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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Lawrence Journal

Articles in database from Lawrence Journal:    69

The Lecompton Democrat has succumbed to the hard t ...
April 4, 1861, Lawrence Journal (ID 3895)

The Lecompton Democrat has succumbed to the hard times. It is to be removed to Atchison, and a new paper, to be styled the Bulletin, is to be issued from that place. Ely and Charlie are both good boys, but cannot make a Democratic paper go well, we fear. Success to you in all but politics. That's fair. We are really sorry to lose the Democrat as, so far as we have known it, it has always treated political opponents with courtesy and good nature.

 

New Papers. We have received No. 1 of the Shield a ...
April 25, 1861, Lawrence Journal (ID 3903)

New Papers. We have received No. 1 of the Shield and Banner, published at Mansfield, Linn Co., by B. P. Ayres and R. B. Mitchell. Mr. Mitchell is a leader of his party in this state, and is a gentleman of cultivation and ability. We have no acquaintance with Mr. Ayres....The paper presents a fine appearance, and no doubt will do able and efficient service in the cause of Douglas Democracy....We have received the first numbers of the Kansas Frontier, a Democratic paper recently started at Junction City....Short and Geery, editors and proprietors....Mr. Geery was formerly connected with the Statesman at that place, also a Democratic paper....Adams & Stebbins have commenced the publication of a daily paper in Atchison. It is called the Daily Union. It is small, but very smart....

 

When the proprietors of The Kansas State Journal a ...
May 2, 1861, Lawrence Journal (ID 3906)

When the proprietors of The Kansas State Journal assumed the responsibilities of its conduct and publication, they did it with a determined purpose of making it an instrumentality in the advancement of the people by the dissemination of useful general knowledge and information, as well as an exponent of the public virtue and of the better taste in controversial contest, which prevails in enlightened society....They have steadily forborne to notice the weekly attacks of the Lawrence Republican, or to repel its malicious misrepresentations and innuendoes. The time has come, however, when they feel that...they should brand these misrepresentations and the miscreant who invents and publishes them, as they deserve....The charge that G. W. Brown has aught to do or say in the conduct of this paper, that he writes for it, or that he has a dime's worth of interest in it pecuniarily, are false, base, and malicious, and he who weekly repeats them in the Republican is a liar of the vilest stripe....

 

Small Pica or Long Primer? We don't care much whic ...
May 9, 1861, Lawrence Journal (ID 3911)

Small Pica or Long Primer? We don't care much which, and never have! But let us give the plain facts, without undue comment, as we know our readers are not willing to be bored with false, funny or lengthy articles on the subject. There is a great difference in the size of small pica and long primer, notwithstanding villainous newspaper deceit. The main part of all U.S. journals and documents, up to this date, have been printed with small pica. The same is true of at least three-fourths of the States and Territories. Our journals and documents, up to this date, have been printed with the same. Two kinds of type in State work are nuisances, and we only hope that some half made printer may live to know it. The difference in expense, we are prepared to prove, is not $25 in $10,000; but, in any case, the State should "get the best." It is true many offices have long primer -- just barely enough to print one side of their paper! How are they to print books? The State Journal office has 1,500 pounds of very good small pica, and not one ounce of long primer plain type. Any member of last year's Legislature can testify to its good quality. It was purchased with money earned by the hard labor of one who intends to be an honest man and do a thriving business, and the purchase was made eight weeks ago, in the belief that the State printing would be done as most other States do it. The type was bought of Sam. A. Medary. The Lawrence Republican office has an excellent font of small pica and a very poor font of long primer, which they use in printing their newspaper. The State Record (Topeka) office has a good font of new small pica, on which they are now doing the State printing. They have not, we believe, one letter of plain long primer in their office....The above named offices having small pica and only one of them long primer, why send thousands of dollars out of the State, and violate such precedents as we present above. We are satisfied that one or two of the active members of the Senate were shamefully and wrongfully prejudiced against the State Journal, allowing such prejudice to bias their official action, and thereby retarding the business of the Legislature. We hope to be able to correct such feelings in the future....

The Union Banner is the name of a daily paper just started in Atchison by John A. Martin....The Atchison secessionists need such a raking down as Martin's caustic pen is now giving them.

 

Many friends inquire of us the reason of the non-a ...
May 23, 1861, Lawrence Journal (ID 3919)

Many friends inquire of us the reason of the non-appearance of our flag the day of the celebration. We hasten to answer. We had no flag. Ours is in the process of manufacture. The one which has at various times been seen floating from our office belongs to G. W. Brown. He left the city some two weeks since, and his flag is -- we are quite unable to say where. We hope gentlemen don't mean to question our patriotism.

 

To Our Newspaper Friends. We cannot possibly suppl ...
May 30, 1861, Lawrence Journal (ID 3925)

To Our Newspaper Friends. We cannot possibly supply ourselves with a sufficient quantity of paper to be able to furnish a large amount of it to those who do not keep a supply on hand. We have been sadly inconvenienced by calls for paper which we could hardly feel like refusing. We feel compelled to state...that we purchase paper for our own use, and do not wish to keep a paper warehouse for the supply of others....

 

The contract for printing the Laws and Journals of ...
June 13, 1861, Lawrence Journal (ID 3934)

The contract for printing the Laws and Journals of the last Legislature was assigned to the State Journal and Republican offices of this city. The work will be immediately commenced....In view of the above facts, we say to friend Speer, "G. W. Brown is not connected with the Journal office so much as he was. Is he?" That's all!

We have received No. 1 of the Colorado Republican and Rocky Mountain Herald From Denver City, Colorado Territory....Its editors are Tho's Gibson and O. McCreary....

 

The Leavenworth Tragedy. The recent affray in Leav ...
June 20, 1861, Lawrence Journal (ID 3939)

The Leavenworth Tragedy. The recent affray in Leavenworth, in which D. R. Anthony and R. C. Satterlee were the actors, whatever else may be said about it, is an unhappy commentary upon the condition of society in this section of our country. We do not propose to express any opinion whatever upon the character of the act done. This will be done by the proper legal tribunal, removed, we hope, completely from all prejudice for or against the party who is held to answer before it. But we do affirm that condition of public morals is bad that tolerates the common use of deadly weapons in the arbitratement of private disputes or differences. The South has long boasted of its chivalry and its keen sense of honor, and has specially asserted its superiority over the cold-blooded North in the aptness of her sons in getting satisfaction for personal insults and the puncture of personal honor at the point of the bowie, or at twenty paces with loaded revolvers. This custom of the more southern portion of the country cannot but be regarded as a relic of barbarism, instead of an evidence of chivalry....

A new paper, the Brown County Union, has just reached our table. Though "hard times" is the cry now, the proprietor shows enough grit to carry him through....

 

We have received the first number of the Bulletin, ...
June 27, 1861, Lawrence Journal (ID 3944)

We have received the first number of the Bulletin, published at Atchison. We know the publishers, all of them. We know them to be in the wrong politically, and their paper is bound to die an easy death, though we wish the boys better luck personally.

 

Our Home Guard. Lawrence has at last waked up! Two ...
August 25, 1861, Lawrence Journal (ID 3972)

Our Home Guard. Lawrence has at last waked up! Two good companies have been organized in this city for home protection. Every business man has taken hold of it. Large meetings were held for the organization, and drilling has commenced....

Farm Produce. We are ready to relieve our Farmers in any way possible. About five hundred of them owe us for the Journal. We will receive any kind of Farm Produce in payment of subscriptions, at more than wholesale market rates until further notice. A little cash would be preferred, however. Bring in your wheat, corn, oats, potatoes, chickens, eggs, butter, wood, etc.

 

The Shield and Banner, published in Mansfield, Lin ...
September 12, 1861, Lawrence Journal (ID 3978)

The Shield and Banner, published in Mansfield, Linn County, is revived under the auspices of Mr. Lyman, who formerly printed it. We have heard the gentleman highly spoken of.

 

The first number of our friend Kingsbury's paper, ...
September 19, 1861, Lawrence Journal (ID 3981)

The first number of our friend Kingsbury's paper, The Smoky Hill and Republican Union, has been laid upon our table....It is the neatest and most readable sheet that ever came from that quarter...It has the true Union ring to its contents, and we hope that it will soon clear its vicinity of a number of traitors....

 

*Attention is invited to the law card of G. W. Bro ...
October 17, 1861, Lawrence Journal (ID 3996)

*Attention is invited to the law card of G. W. Brown, who has located himself and family and opened a law office at Paola, Miami (formerly Lykins) county. Mr. Brown was admitted to the practice of law in Pennsylvania, where it is said very rigid rules are in force relative to the examination and admission of new members to the bar. Having a large law library, with his extensive reading, considerable experience in the past, and well known energy of character, we doubt not he will build up a handsome law practice.

 

The Leavenworth Conservative, with its usual meann ...
October 31, 1861, Lawrence Journal (ID 4008)

The Leavenworth Conservative, with its usual meanness, continues to garble from Gov. Robinson's reply to Lane, and yet has never dared to present it in full to its readers. You are cowards!

Lane and the Conservative, it is said, are still fighting Robinson. The poor Governor has to bear it. If he replies, he is cursed; if he don't reply, it must be true.

"The Council Grove Press has come to life again. It is supposed that Topeka has breathed into its nostrils the breath of life, as it advocates the claim of that village for the State Capital, even with as much eloquence and earnestness as it did those of Lawrence the week before it died last summer. Time or something else has wrought a change in Baker's opinion -- especially something else." Emporia News.

That's so! We know all about it. He came to our town; got drunk; told us what Topeka had offered him, and wanted us to "go better." We told him we were not in that kind of business just now, and that we did not consider his paper worth any such price, if we were. That's all!

 

Speer says the Republican has a bona fide circulat ...
November 7, 1861, Lawrence Journal (ID 4009)

Speer says the Republican has a bona fide circulation three times as large as that of the Journal. Our paper has existed for eight months. We commenced by offering it to farmers on liberal terms. They have taken advantage of them, and are now paying up. Mr. Speer don't like it. Who cares? We are satisfied the Journal was respected full as much as the Republican in the contest just closed!...

We cannot afford one word of praise to the Leavenworth Conservative for the course it has pursued in regard to every question involved in the political canvass just closed. It has misrepresented and slandered our Governor; it has been the supporter of one of the worst forms of rascality -- Jay-hawking; it has abused every paper or person which did not agree with it; and, worst of all, it has lent its support to Topeka on the "Capital question." This sheet has been respected by a large class of our citizens, but we are glad to see that it is now almost unnoticed in the hands of the newsboy in our city....

 

The Topeka Record has suspended for two weeks. Fri ...
November 14, 1861, Lawrence Journal (ID 4010)

The Topeka Record has suspended for two weeks. Friend Ross, you have allowed your paper to be used for the circulation of infamous slanders upon the character of our Governor. The object, of course, was to make Topeka the Capital. Now that is accomplished, perhaps you would do better in the end if you would take hold of the business again yourself! Fair play!

We commend the Leavenworth Daily Times to those of our readers who may want a good daily, as one which is always supplied with fresh news and sound editorials. It is opposed to Jay-Hawking.

 

We have received the two first numbers of the Leav ...
March 5, 1862, Lawrence Journal (ID 4045)

We have received the two first numbers of the Leavenworth Daily Inquirer, published by Adams & Driggs, and edited by Burrell B. Taylor. In politics it is democratic.

 

It will be gratifying to the numerous friends of D ...
June 26, 1862, Lawrence Journal (ID 4115)

It will be gratifying to the numerous friends of Dr. Bush, who once presided over the editorial columns of the Herald of Freedom, to learn that he has been added to the editorial staff of the Dayton Daily Journal. This is one of the most substantial papers in Ohio....Dr. Bush possesses writing talent of no ordinary character. He has also a clear head, and better than all, his intellectual energies are devoted to the promulgation and defense of the principles of truth and right....

D. B. Emmert, formerly editor of the Auburn Docket, is about to commence the publication of a paper at Marmaton, Bourbon County, to be called the Monitor. Magill & Peters have issued the prospectus of the Constitutional Gazette, which they propose to publish at Marysville.

 

S. S. Prouty, editor of the Burlington Register, h ...
August 7, 1862, Lawrence Journal (ID 4139)

S. S. Prouty, editor of the Burlington Register, has been appointed by the President lieutenant and quartermaster of the First Indian Regiment.

 

Sometime since,...we referred to an article...in t ...
August 14, 1862, Lawrence Journal (ID 4143)

Sometime since,...we referred to an article...in the Champion, charging Gov. Robinson with having made incompetent appointments for the military service, &c. Col. Martin notices the article in the following manner. We quote from a private letter received from a friend: "The views expressed in the Champion are not my views or sentiments, but entirely and radically in opposition to them. More: I consider the article in question as malicious, false and infamous, and having received the Champion a day or two ago, containing this article, I had so written Mr. Stebbins, and told him that although he alone was responsible for the editorials in the Champion during my absence, yet I would not permit the publication of articles so widely in opposition to my feelings, and they must be stopped or I would find another editor to conduct the Champion."

 

*Last Sunday evening, a week ago, the office of th ...
August 28, 1862, Lawrence Journal (ID 4155)

*Last Sunday evening, a week ago, the office of the Marysville Gazetteer was...entered by a party of soldiers stationed at that place, and completely demolished. The type, cases and imposing stones were scattered promiscuously through the streets. The cause of this is said to be that an article appeared in the paper denunciatory of Jim Lane. We also learn from a Leavenworth paper that the editors, J. S. Magill and P. H. Peters, have been arrested on a charge of discouraging enlistments, and sent to Fort Leavenworth.

 

*The guerrillas under Quantrel have taken and plun ...
September 11, 1862, Lawrence Journal (ID 4168)

*The guerrillas under Quantrel have taken and plundered Olathe. Our militia are without arms, ammunition and subsistence, and the legislature did not appropriate a dime to provide anything for the public defense, so anxious were they to obey Gen. Lane, by impeaching Gov. Robinson, so as to destroy his influence at Washington. Therefore we are powerless and can do nothing effectual for defense.

A messenger arrived in this city last Sunday with the intelligence that a band of guerrillas under the notorious Quantrell had made a dash into Olathe Saturday night....The party who made this raid numbered about 150. There was a company of new recruits stationed at Olathe who had just received their arms, clothing and equipments, all of which was captured by the guerrillas. They likewise carried off some 40 or 50 horses and several wagons loaded with stores and articles which they had taken from citizens. The printing offices of the Mirror and Herald were entered and entirely demolished. The soldiers stationed there, about 50 in number, were captured and taken off....Three of the soldiers resisted and were shot....

 

The Republican has changed hands. Mr. Speer has re ...
September 18, 1862, Lawrence Journal (ID 4174)

The Republican has changed hands. Mr. Speer has retired and T. Dwight Thacher has again taken charge of the paper....

The Atchison Union has changed hands, A. P. Cochran having disposed of the establishment to C. M. Leland, Wm. Jackson and Wm. J. Marion.

 

We noticed several representatives of the press in ...
October 2, 1862, Lawrence Journal (ID 4187)

We noticed several representatives of the press in town Monday attending the sitting of the convention. Among them, Bisbee of the Times, Buckingham of the Evening Bulletin, Burlingame of the Conservative,...Cummings of the Topeka Tribune, McDonald of the Record, Humphreys of the Manhattan Express and possibly others....

 

The following papers have already come out for the ...
October 9, 1862, Lawrence Journal (ID 4193)

The following papers have already come out for the Union movement: Atchison Champion, Leavenworth Times, Manhattan Express, Topeka Tribune, Kansas State Journal. Among those papers which have complimented the Union cause and yet failed to put the names at the head of their columns, we may mention the Lawrence Republican, Leavenworth Bulletin, Leavenworth Inquirer, Wyandotte Gazette....

 

*We Want Arms. One great hindrance to the proper o ...
October 16, 1862, Lawrence Journal (ID 4201)

*We Want Arms. One great hindrance to the proper organization of the militia...is the fact that, so far, it has seemed utterly impossible to receive a sufficient supply of arms for the companies organized. There are 10,000 good fighting men, perhaps, who could be called upon in case of border raids; but with the exception of a few hundred muskets, all such men must go into the field with their home weapons -- shotguns, rifles, &c....

 

*Shawnee Sacked and Burned by Quantrel and his Ban ...
October 23, 1862, Lawrence Journal (ID 4214)

*Shawnee Sacked and Burned by Quantrel and his Band! Six Men Killed! Last Friday night, the above named notorious character...made a descent upon Shawnee in Johnson County....The facts...are these: In Shawnee they killed two men, Baker and Stiles, without cause; destroyed three stores after taking what goods they wanted; burned about a dozen houses; ransacked private dwellings; and took all the horses they could find. The property of several sympathizers, as they stated it, was spared. A few miles below Shawnee, they overtook three teams bound for Paola; killed two of the drivers (Crossley and Clarkson) and burned the wagons and goods....Two or three miles from Shawnee, they killed a citizen named Bertrand. It is also reported that, before the attack on Shawnee,...one Jacob Warfield was killed by the gang on the road from Wyandott to Olathe. If this kind of business is to be kept up, it is...time that no inhabitable place be left standing on the Missouri border, and that our military men make some use of the soldiers which line our borders.

The Union Crusader. A neat little paper comes to us from the "home of Wagstaff." Of course, as its name and location indicates, it is Union all over....We know Ben. Simpson, its accomplished editor; he is a good worker....

T. D. Thacher of the Lawrence Republican succeeded in obtaining the nomination for Representative from this district from the Lane Republicans last Saturday evening. Geo. Ford, merchant, is his Union opponent.

 

Wood! Wood! We want a few cords of good wood. Subs ...
October 30, 1862, Lawrence Journal (ID 4226)

Wood! Wood! We want a few cords of good wood. Subscribers may pay us in wood at what they consider a fair price.

Corn! Potatoes! Hay! Anything! We will take anything in the shape of farm produce on subscriptions, advertising, &c. We want the farmers of Kansas to continue to read our paper.

 

*Quantrell. There have been fugitive reports for s ...
November 6, 1862, Lawrence Journal (ID 4234)

*Quantrell. There have been fugitive reports for some weeks that Quantrell, the notorious predatory chieftain of the border rebels, was making serious preparation to give Lawrence a call. Our citizens have given all due heed to these rumors. There are many of the identical Sharps rifles among us, owned by the identical persons who then used them, which gave a character to the Free State side of the early war of the Border Ruffians....We have, also, 13 companies of militia under the command of Col. Frank Swift, the hero of Wilson's Creek....Though Lane, under the pretense of patriotism and of doing great favor to the people of Kansas, has stripped the border counties of their defenders and sent them to distant battlefields, thus taking away that barrier to the incursions of the desperadoes in Missouri, yet we are strong here....Now, it is not necessary for us to exhort our fellow citizens to the exercise of a constant vigilance. We are sure that they are as watchful as we could desire them to be....

**The Quantrell Hunt. Captain Hoyt, with a detachment of independent scouts, arrived in this city this morning. The captain says that his company have been in the saddle for two weeks with Col. Burris' force, hunting Quantrell and his men. He reports Quantrell's band dispersed and driven south. Several of his men were captured by Captain Hoyt, from one of whom important facts were learned concerning Quantrell and his gang. The names of his associates and friends were learned. Parties in Leavenworth, Kansas City and this place are said to be implicated. Captain Hoyt says that Quantrell will soon be back at his old haunts. He also says there is no doubt Quantrell contemplated a raid upon Lawrence. A good many contrabands improved the opportunity of Captain Hoyt's escort to leave Missouri for a land of freedom.

**Defense of the Border. It is useless to talk of defending the border with infantry. In an open prairie country like ours, infantry are no match at all for mounted men. Guerrilla bands can range the entire border with impunity unless they are opposed by cavalry. Now, there are sufficient cavalry among our Kansas troops who are needed for no other service half so urgently as for the defense of the border. A single regiment would be ample for the purpose. Is it not possible that a single regiment of cavalry can be spared from the Kansas forces to guard the homes of our own soldiers? We would call the attention of Gen. Curtis to this matter, hoping that he will not disappoint the earnest wishes of the people of this state. Kansas has furnished soldiers for this war with unparalleled liberality, and she has a right to demand that her own border shall not be left to be ravaged by the banditti of Missouri.

 

The absence of the editor (Hovey E. Lowman) part o ...
December 18, 1862, Lawrence Journal (ID 4264)

The absence of the editor (Hovey E. Lowman) part of the time, and illness the balance of the week, is the excuse for there being no editorial in this issue.

The recent advance in the price of white paper and the rise in the price of all kinds of printing material renders it necessary for us to calculate more closely in order to meet the actual increase of our expenditures. We will...for present continue the subscription price of the Journal at $2, strictly in advance....

 

Printing paper has doubled in price during the pas ...
January 1, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4272)

Printing paper has doubled in price during the past three months. It looks to us as if a few of our subscribers, who still owe us on "Farmer's Terms," would do well to pay up soon....Hay, corn, oats, vegetables, meat, anything -- but pay an honest debt somehow.

 

A fine assortment of new job type, together with s ...
January 8, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4280)

A fine assortment of new job type, together with steam press, enables us to do all kinds of printing in a satisfactory manner, as regards style, time and price. A good job office superintended by a journeyman of 12 years experience (five years in this office) is sufficient evidence that a Kansas man can be suited....

 

Charlie Faris, one of the best boys we ever employ ...
January 15, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4283)

Charlie Faris, one of the best boys we ever employed in the Journal office, has...taken charge of the Local Department of the Leavenworth Inquirer. He has made a vast improvement in that paper....

 

...We learn of the death of Charles Stotler from w ...
January 22, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4290)

...We learn of the death of Charles Stotler from wounds received in the battle of Prairie Grove. He was employed, for several months during the past year, in the Journal office....He was intelligent, kind and generous hearted, and a good workman, and the manner of his death attests that he did his duty as a soldier. Incompetence in the army, it is believed, was the cause of his death. And yet the press, public men and public bodies are doing all they can to make men great military officers who may yet throw away thousands of such valuable lives. Charlie rests in a patriot's grave, and his name is now honorably mentioned with those of Pratt, Jones, Shaw, Litchfield, and the other gallant dead.

 

Come in and see our steam press, the only one in t ...
January 29, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4292)

Come in and see our steam press, the only one in the state, running every day. The State Journal still lives, and we think it will not die at present! So send in your clubs: ten subscribers for $15. The best farmers' paper in the state.

 

The Journal is two years old today. If measured by ...
February 12, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4301)

The Journal is two years old today. If measured by the coming and going moons solely, that period is short even for a newspaper to live. If measured by the march of events, then it is longer than the life of the nation since the signing of the Treaty of Peace between it and Great Britain at Paris in 1782....

The Journal has lived two years; and only a few weeks from its initial page, there is the first record of bloodshed in this terrific struggle still progressing; so that, in future years, it may count its age from the opening of the "Great American Rebellion."...

*Press Destroyed in Leavenworth. We copy the following account of the recent events in Leavenworth from the Daily Times of Tuesday, the 10th....The feverish state of public sentiment in this community, for the last two weeks, consequent upon the treasonable articles which have been published in the Inquirer during a long period past, culminated yesterday in the total destruction of that paper. The original cause of the hostile feeling against the Inquirer was the palpable and unmistakable sympathy which it has constant, and in the most offensive manner, exhibited for traitors who are in arms against the government. The immediate cause of its destruction may be briefly recapitulated as follows: Night before last, its editor had assembled 30 or 40 armed men in and around his office. These men made themselves conspicuous in and about the establishment -- flourishing their arms and putting on an air of defiance to all opposition. This state of affairs got noised over the city, and between ten and eleven o'clock at night, five or six men assembled on the opposite side of the street -- sang "Old John Brown," and fired several shots in the air. At this juncture, Col. Anthony, who had been visiting some friends in South Leavenworth, arrived at his boarding house, which is directly in front of the Inquirer office, and began efforts to pacify the "John Brown" boys; after considerable persuasion, he induced them to go home -- he then retired to his room.

Between one and two o'clock of the morning, hearing a commotion, as he thought, in the street, he went out on the pavement, when a policeman, as our best information says, cried out: "there is Col. Anthony, shoot the d--n scoundrel;" immediately a half dozen shots were fired, penetrating the frame building and windows all around Col. Anthony, but without injury to him; he returned the shots with his revolver, and was again fired at 15 or 20 times, the balls penetrating the boarding house of Mrs. Dexter, and entering the rooms where women and children were in bed. Three Minnie balls passed over the bed where the County Clerk, John E. Blaine, and his lady were sleeping. Strange to say, neither Colonel Anthony nor anyone in the boarding house was injured. At this point, the troubles for the night ceased. Early yesterday morning, the news of these occurrences spread with great rapidity over the city, and by nine o'clock a large and excited crowd had collected in front of the Inquirer office, demanding that the rebel sheet be destroyed. Col. Jennison arrived at this moment, and mounting a box said: "yesterday this establishment was a printing office, and I proposed to protect it -- this morning, it is a rebel fort, and I propose to gut it!" With this, the crowd rushed in and in less than half an hour the whole establishment was a complete wreck. Presses were broken into a thousand pieces; type scattered in every direction, and everything combustible was thrown on huge bonfires and entirely burned up. And thus, for the present, ends this exciting affair.

 

*Hard Luck. The principal part of the Inquirer typ ...
February 19, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4307)

*Hard Luck. The principal part of the Inquirer type, recently destroyed in Leavenworth, has had hard luck in its short career. It was first pitched into the Missouri at Kansas City because it was supposed to be on its way to print a Free Soil paper in Kansas. Then fished up and taken to Tecumseh (five miles from Topeka) where, after printing a few numbers of a local paper, the hands not being able to get their pay, made a grand heap of "pi," which was purchased by S. W. Driggs of Lecompton, who used it in printing the Democrat for a long time. When that paper failed, it was taken to Atchison, where it was used for several months in printing the Bulletin, which failed in due course of time. The material was then taken to Leavenworth to be used on the Inquirer, where it ended its unhappy course, as related last week.

 

*The Paola Herald says that G. W. Brown, formerly ...
March 26, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4323)

*The Paola Herald says that G. W. Brown, formerly publisher of the Herald of Freedom in this city, is the most successful lawyer in that county. He has about one-half the cases before the court there.

 

If one were to understand everything the Leavenwor ...
April 2, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4328)

If one were to understand everything the Leavenworth dailies say about each other as literally and scrupulously veracious, he would be obliged to think very uncomplimentary thoughts of their conductors and editors. The Conservative and Bulletin, for a long time, persisted in calling the Times the "Dimes," which all will admit is a very terrible name to apply to a newspaper. The truth is, however, that the Times is the oldest paper in the city, is well managed, gets a full share of the handbill and card printing to do, and is liberally subscribed for and paid for by both democrats and republicans. That excites the jealousy of the other two younger papers....The Conservative is conducted with great ability and shrewdness. Its editor exhibits unusual tact in coining and getting before the public, taking recommendations of its capacity to do all kinds of fancy job work. He is none the less conspicuous in the skill he exhibits in writing periodic prospectuses for the paper....He was unfortunate (or fortunate) enough once...to write a column in commendation of the "free and easy" system, practiced in Kansas, of getting a living called "Jayhawking." He called it "one of our things." The Times and Bulletin...have continued ever since to call it the "Jayhawker," and "One of our Things."...It has a great circulation and is deservedly popular, way beyond the limits of Kansas....The Bulletin is the youngest born of the Leavenworth journals. It is a brisk, go-ahead, ambitious, up-in-the-morning-early-last-to-bed-at-night and almost "racy and reckless" sheet....For that reason, the Conservative invents and applies to it the very fishy patronymic of "Mullet-head."...The Times don't like the Bulletin either. It also exhibits much, what would be believed to be bad blood by strangers, toward that paper. It says of the Bulletin, "That the rod of the son of Amram was not more potent over the lice of Egypt than is the money of some men over the crawling vermin that infest the modern 'body politic'."...It is a savage thrust at the Bulletin, and persons at a distance undoubtedly think that it has been bought up by some of the candidates for city offices....The facility with which it changes its standpoint irritates the Times....But really these papers are all very excellent dailies, and are all conducted with very marked ability and success. The fact is, the editors are all intelligent, cultivated, patriotic gentlemen and good fellows....

...D. R. Anthony has received the nomination for mayor of Leavenworth. Since that time, several gentlemen have called upon S. F. Atwood to run as an independent. The Democrats have nominated all but the mayor. The Conservative and Bulletin support Anthony, and the Times is for Atwood.

 

On Monday last, D. R. Anthony was elected mayor of ...
April 9, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4335)

On Monday last, D. R. Anthony was elected mayor of Leavenworth by an astonishing majority of 744 votes. The result is made the more remarkable by the fact that Mr. A. is an out and out Abolitionist, and is proud to proclaim it to both friend and enemy....

 

D. Web. Wilder, the "leading" man of the state pre ...
April 16, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4339)

D. Web. Wilder, the "leading" man of the state press, spent a few hours in our city Monday. He expressed himself pleased with the institutions of the hub of Kansas, and the political course of the Journal....

Maj. P. B. Plumb of the 11th Kansas has been in town a day or two....We hope to see him with eagles upon his shoulders within a few days....

Hume & Prescott of the Bulletin office, Leavenworth, have been encouraged by the business men of that city to reproduce a Directory of Leavenworth....Their first effort was an honor to them and their city, the finest specimen of printing too that we have seen in Kansas....It is to be gratuitously circulated throughout the state.

T. D. Thacher of the Republican, this city, has bought out the Kansas City Journal of Commerce and will continue the publication of a daily at that place.

 

We made the acquaintance of F. P. Baker of the Top ...
April 23, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4341)

We made the acquaintance of F. P. Baker of the Topeka Record in our sanctum on Monday....He is a new man in the newspaper business but there is room for a few more in Kansas, though we cannot swear that their enterprises will all pay.

 

*The Boldest Raid Yet! All we stated in our last w ...
May 14, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4346)

*The Boldest Raid Yet! All we stated in our last week's paper about guerrillas has proved marvelously true. The guerrillas who passed through the southern part of this county last week and the week before in small bands returned last Friday night from their westward trip and made a clean sweep as they came. They were led by Dick Yager and numbered from 25 to 40 men. At 8 o'clock in Marion township, they shot, without provocation, Mr. Hubbard, late county surveyor....Passing on, they overtook the Santa Fe coach at Black Jack, took its horses and robbed its passengers. Mr. Johnson of Colorado lost $1,600....A party from Santa Fe, camped near Willow Springs, lost $1,000 in money and some clothes. At Black Jack, while a few held the horses, the party operated rather profitably. From Stonebraker's store, they took $600 in goods....They set fire to Brockway's store twice. In their course, they sacked the town of Gardner in Johnson county, carrying off all the horses, mules and a great amount of other property....The Council Grove Press says they were near that place but made no attack or damaged the town. Marshal McDowell reached there with 60 men Sunday and pushed on in pursuit....At Diamond Springs, 15 miles west of the Grove, a man...was shot and bled to death, and his wife was wounded in the arm....The news of the approach was brought in here about one o'clock Sunday morning. But few persons were made aware of the raid....Early in the morning, a large party was formed in the hope of catching stragglers, but the hunt proved unsuccessful....Briefly, a band of guerrillas have penetrated into our state 150 miles in broad daylight, giving us and our military protectors full warning; for we are assured that Gen. Blunt, Col. Lynde and Maj. Ransom all had early intelligence that small and suspicious armed parties had gone West....

 

*On Saturday night last, Shawnee in Johnson county ...
June 4, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4352)

*On Saturday night last, Shawnee in Johnson county was sacked and burned by an armed force of bushwhackers. The number is supposed to be at least 40. Four men were killed and six wounded. The people of Shawnee were unarmed and when the town was attacked had retired for the night. They were awakened by the shouts and yells of the incarnate band to witness their houses in flames, and their neighbors butchered. But little resistance was made to the hellish work. It was reported that Cy Gordon and Dick Yeager, the notorious leaders of the bushwhackers, were in Leavenworth county on Sunday evening. The citizens of Lanesfield, Johnson county, had a skirmish with the bushwhackers about the same time and whipped them out. Shawnee was visited about a year since by Quantrell and his band. Several were then killed and wounded, and some houses burned....It is too evident that the whole state, as well as our border counties, is bound to depend upon its own resources. The troops are being taken, not only from our own state, but from Missouri. The governor and his military assistants must see to it now that all able bodied men are organized and ready to meet invaders....Prepare for the worst.

 

The Republican has again changed hands. T. D. Thac ...
July 16, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4368)

The Republican has again changed hands. T. D. Thacher announced...that he had sold the paper to his brother, Safford M. Thacher....We have no personal acquaintance with Mr. Thacher, "our neighbor over the way." He, however, came from the southern tier of counties of New York, and that of itself is a good recommendation....

 

*G. W. Brown, formerly proprietor of the Herald of ...
July 23, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4373)

*G. W. Brown, formerly proprietor of the Herald of Freedom in this city, delivered an oration at Paola on the 4th of July. It is published in full in the Paola Crusader. Few addresses on that day were better timed or more meritorious.

Our Office Complete. We take pleasure in informing our contemporaries and friends that the Journal office has at last received the finishing touch. We have just bought the new Book Bindery of A. Katzenstein, Leavenworth, the most complete of any ever brought to Kansas....The Kansas State Journal has now the only complete printing office, as well as the only steam press.

 

*Last Friday evening the mayor of this city receiv ...
August 6, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4380)

*Last Friday evening the mayor of this city received information that unusual activity was being manifested by the bushwhackers on the border, and their numbers and the rumors led his informant to the belief that an interior raid was intended. Though we, as all Kansas men, are always ready, still when we hear from the enemy in advance we propose to go quietly into the business of Morganizing him. We will only take Quantrell a little quicker than our Ohio friends "did it" for their man. Mr. Quantrell is not invited to do bloody and infamous deeds upon unarmed men in any part of this state; but we venture to say that his chances for escaping punishment after trying on Lawrence just once are indeed slim -- perhaps more so than in any other town in the state. Lawrence has ready for any emergency over 500 fighting men, every one of whom would like to see Quantrell. A guard has been kept for miles in every direction about the city for months past. Give us 15 minutes notice of an approach and cannon and howitzers will be shotted, and muskets to the above order to back them....All we ask for protection of the second city in Kansas is one full company of mounted men for scouting duty. With them we can defend the place. Without them it is indeed a burden for our mechanics and business men. A company permanently posted here would, in our opinion, be as effectual in preventing and resisting interior raids as if posted at Kansas City.

We last week purchased of G. W. Brown of Paola the building which we have the past three years occupied as the Journal office. It was known for a long time as the Herald of Freedom building....

 

As. Parker, one of the best printer boys we ever s ...
August 13, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4386)

As. Parker, one of the best printer boys we ever saw stick type (and we have seen some), has been gobbled up by Rankin and Beam of the 14th Kansas. He has "gone to be a soldier."...When they get through with him, we want him to come back.

 

*To Our Patrons. This is a juvenile Kansas State J ...
October 1, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4439)

*To Our Patrons. This is a juvenile Kansas State Journal. Next week we promise it shall look better. We are now working it on a small job hand press. The type and material are the same that were used in the publication of the Mansfield Shield and Banner. They belong to Gen. Mitchell. We are indebted to him for their use until our power press and material, purchased in the East, arrives....We have purchased the same kind of presses, and the same complete outfit of printing material. We shall be in just as good shape to do all kinds of work in our line. In the meantime, let us hope that we have many friends throughout the state and that they will, every one of them, send forward his or her $2. We will say to those who had paid for the Journal, and whose term of subscription had not yet expired when the border demons came, that we will gladly send them the paper the full time if they will only send in their names and let us know how many papers we owe them. Address H. E. Lowman, Kansas State Journal, Lawrence.

...Now we live in a cellar, and have gathered what you see of us from the South, the North, and the West. We expect to grow. We expect to grow very fast. If our brave soldiers watch well the ways into our city, and the good people continue to sleep with their Spencer and Wesson rifles and Colt revolvers, we shall grow out of our present modest shell into a more spacious one....Our readers have read what the papers say about Lawrence. They call it an Idea. So are we an Idea. Lawrence expands into brick and mortar walls. We develop into power presses and printing material. On the charred and blood-reddened site of Lawrence, Freedom incarnated already looms above the horizon....While we await the parts that are to make us whole again, won't our friends all over send in their names? Are there not 2,500 men and women in Kansas who are willing to contribute $2 apiece toward helping us grow, when we promise them that we will give them an equivalent in news, literature, and useful information of all kinds, or else refund their $2?

When Quantrell completed his work of destruction on the morning of August 21st, every business house had been sacked, and all that were occupied, except five, were burned -- books, accounts, notes, goods of all kinds were destroyed; nearly all our business men were ruined, and they were compelled to commence life anew....

 

*Two Weeks Old. Since last week we have increased ...
October 8, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4443)

*Two Weeks Old. Since last week we have increased our size just half. That is, we have added the other moiety to ourself, which makes us a complete little Journal. We are now as large as we can grow under present cherishings. Our restraints are an iron bed and steel bands....Other arrangements are being perfected which will enable us to complete our destiny....In meantime we shall make a point of improving our quality and looks....The warm welcome we met from all in our humble visit last week teaches us that our efforts to exist and grow will be encouraged....So we shall go forward buoyant and hopeful.

 

*Our militia are now all armed. So are the militia ...
October 15, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4451)

*Our militia are now all armed. So are the militia in Johnson, Miami and Linn counties. In each of these counties, the militia are completely organized, and we learn have patrols on every thoroughfare to watch for the enemy. The whole community is aroused and every citizen is on the alert. Gen. Ewing is scouring the whole border, driving out all the bushwhackers. With the organization that we have here, and the complete organization of the adjoining counties which now exists, there is no reason for fear and alarm. It is impossible that a force should now approach us without our being forewarned. The success of Quantrell when he attacked us, the knowledge that the people have of the way it was done and how easily it could haven been prevented, conspire to make us secure now....Many of our people seem diseased with fear. Considering what they have suffered, it is natural. To allay that fear, to create a feeling of security among all, and so labor and do as to make it effectual is the duty of all.

 

*We are four weeks old today. Ambitious to be a la ...
October 22, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4455)

*We are four weeks old today. Ambitious to be a large, good-looking newspaper, with a sound reputation, our eagerness to grow is natural....We have many good friends. The evidences that they are numerous in the state and out of the state are constantly multiplying....The printing appliances which are necessary to enable us to enlarge still linger along the railways....We are impatiently watching....

 

*There is no particular merit in printing a paper ...
October 29, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4461)

*There is no particular merit in printing a paper in the cellar of a dwelling house....The Journal has been issued five weeks regularly, since the raid, and it has been written up and printed in Lawrence. The privilege of publishing a Lawrence paper in Leavenworth was kindly offered us by Mr. Bartlett, recently of the Times, the next week after the raid. We thanked him. We have no knack of humbugging. So we sent for a complete country press and set it up in Mr. McAllaster's cellar five weeks ago....

 

*Our press and type have arrived from Chicago. We ...
November 12, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4469)

*Our press and type have arrived from Chicago. We intend next week, if possible, to publish a State Journal as large as that published before the raid. As soon as we get our steam press in operation we shall publish a daily paper. The telegraph is here, the bridge is nearly completed and the railroad promises to be here by the first of January....Whatever we can do to contribute to our growth, to advertise the place, to inspire courage, confidence and public spirit, we shall and will do. We are nearly all impoverished and we must help one another....The telegraph will enable us to give the news far ahead of other dailies....Send in your advertisements. Send in your subscriptions. Price for the daily $6 per annum; weekly $2.

 

The state printing was let Monday, Nov. 2, to the ...
November 19, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4476)

The state printing was let Monday, Nov. 2, to the lowest bidder in accordance with law. The printing under proposition No. 1, which includes bills and resolutions ordered by the two houses, was let to S. D. Macdonald & Co. of the State Record at 27 cents per quire for the paper, 50 cents per token for presswork, and 40 cents per one thousand ems for composition. The journals and public documents were awarded to John Speer of the Lawrence Tribune at 37 cents for paper, 37 cents for presswork, and 47.5 for composition. The laws were also let to John Speer at 43 cents for paper, 37 cents for presswork, and 44.5 cents for composition. The executive printing was let to...the Leavenworth Bulletin at 25 cents for paper, 7 cents per quire for presswork, and 40 cents for composition. Folding and stitching to Mrs. N. B. Bronson of Topeka. Binding to S. Dodsworth of Leavenworth. There was a great deal of competition and the contracts were all let at very low figures. -- Record.

*We took a ride about the town during the week to notice the improvements that are being made. We found that within the city limits 137 buildings had been commenced, completed or rebuilt since the raid. Some of the improvements were small, temporary structures, but they were demanded as temporary homes, or shops for laborers and mechanics....There are many substantial brick and stone dwelling houses that have been rebuilt, and that are now building; dwellings that would be an ornament to most any city....

 

*We were unable to get our press up soon enough to ...
November 26, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4480)

*We were unable to get our press up soon enough to get out a large Journal this week. Mechanics are so scarce that it is difficult to secure one for an odd job.

 

*We recommence the publication of the Weekly Journ ...
December 10, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4490)

*We recommence the publication of the Weekly Journal this week in its original size....We connect the Journal now with the broken link in its career and shall follow the chain forward to its own proper destiny. There will be no change in the politics or tone of the Journal....

Let our good friends take notice. We are rejoicing this week in the completed inches of our matured growth. In this we have mainly fulfilled the promise we made when we first spoke from the ashes of our narrow habitation in the cellar. Our friends responded to our earnestly expressed desire to grow. To their kindly encouragement and cherishings we are indebted for the progress made....That 11 weeks have passed, instead of three, from the time we first went forth on a quarter sheet until now,...is entirely due to the fact that our friend in Chicago sent 8,000 pounds of iron from the region of the North instead of a press "in good running order" from Rockford, Ill....

*J. C. Trask. The subject of this notice fell in the general slaughter which signalized the coming of Quantrell and his band of merciless guerrillas to this city on the morning of the 21st of August last. He was boarding with Dr. Griswold, whose residence is in the west part of the city. The writer of this lived just across the street, and though not an eyewitness of the atrocious murders committed there, was yet so near that almost everything that passed was distinctly heard and vividly comprehended by him. He will never forget...the demoniac yells and the horrible cursings of the five devils who assailed that house. Four men dwelt there: Griswold, Thorp, Trask and Baker. The two latter had been recently married. The two former had young families. The men were all unarmed and offered no resistance to the guerrillas. Nevertheless, they were dragged from the embrace of their terror stricken and imploring wives, forth to pre-doomed slaughter. Mr. Trask was associated with the writer in the publication of this paper from its commencement in February 1861 to the time of his death. None, therefore, knew him better. He was a practical printer and master of his business. He was intelligent, industrious, energetic and enterprising and in all the relations of life was a most exemplary man. Life was just opening to him, and he looked forward to the coming struggles for standing ground among men with high hope....He was not a writer and mode no pretensions that way. But his great enterprise, and surprising energy and working power, gave him a leading place among his fellow citizens, even in such a go-ahead and wide-awake community as this. He was a valuable citizen and a trusty and most generous friend....He was born in Fitchburg, Mass., and was about 26 years old. Though his grave is made and monument erected in the distant home of his friends, memory of him and his many noble qualities will not perish here.

 

The Neosho Valley Register has changed hands and i ...
December 24, 1863, Lawrence Journal (ID 4502)

The Neosho Valley Register has changed hands and is now edited by H. N. Bent. Mr. B. was formerly a citizen of Lawrence and was a soldier in the Free State cause in the Border Ruffian struggles....

 

S. M. Thacher has become assistant editor of the K ...
January 7, 1864, Lawrence Journal (ID 4510)

S. M. Thacher has become assistant editor of the Kansas City Journal of Commerce. He was editor of the Republican of this city at the time of the raid, and with T. D. Thacher will be able to make the Journal one of the ablest and best papers of the West.

 

The Daily Record at Topeka has suspended, its prop ...
January 21, 1864, Lawrence Journal (ID 4513)

The Daily Record at Topeka has suspended, its proprietors say temporarily. Whether it would have done so had the Legislature decided to support it, as has been its custom for the past few years, is a question.

Mr. Shepherd has retired from the Topeka Tribune and Andrew Stark has assumed his place....The Tribune will not lose in influence or interest under the management of Mr. Stark.

 

The printers of Lawrence have organized themselves ...
February 11, 1864, Lawrence Journal (ID 4525)

The printers of Lawrence have organized themselves into a Printers' Union. They are after the proprietors of newspapers and printing establishments with a demand for better pay. We hope they may succeed, and we also hope the former may succeed in running their machines under the new order of things. The following are the officers of the Union: W. W. Rankin, president; E. P. Harris, vice president; L. P. Cunningham, secretary; O. W. McAllaster, financial secretary and treasurer.

 

*G. W. Brown has been elected mayor of Paola.: We ...
March 17, 1864, Lawrence Journal (ID 4535)

*G. W. Brown has been elected mayor of Paola.

We have received No. 1 of the Baldwin City Observer...in this county. Wm. Mitchell is its editor.

 

We have received a copy of the Border Sentinel, a ...
April 14, 1864, Lawrence Journal (ID 4550)

We have received a copy of the Border Sentinel, a paper published in Mound City, Linn County, by John T. & Jas. D. Snoddy.

 

A contemporary says: "In the national House of Rep ...
February 2, 1865, Lawrence Journal (ID 488)

A contemporary says: "In the national House of Representatives...a joint resolution to reduce the important duty on printing paper to 3 percent ad valorem was passed by a decided majority. The movement is likely to result in something practical. Prices in New York and Boston have already fallen 5 or 6 cents a pound. And a new process of making paper from corn husks, just discovered, is about to be tested with a fair prospect of success." This is as it should be. The monopoly now enjoyed by paper manufacturers is of no benefit to the government while it enriches the monopolist and impoverishes the publisher....

 

Gov. Carney has been elected mayor of Leavenworth, ...
April 6, 1865, Lawrence Journal (ID 498)

Gov. Carney has been elected mayor of Leavenworth, over Dr. R. Anthony, by a majority of about 100 votes. Last year the contest was one of great bitterness. Mr. McDowell, who was the successful candidate at that time, was compelled to vacate the position. The municipal affairs of that city, in consequence, were not conducted in a manner to make or continue friends. Mr. Anthony, who was formerly mayor, and during whose administration a great deal was done for the welfare of the city, was made popular by contrast. He was nominated and it was thought that it would be exceedingly difficult to beat him.

 

We have received the Plaindealer, a new paper just ...
April 13, 1865, Lawrence Journal (ID 499)

We have received the Plaindealer, a new paper just started at Garnett, Anderson County, by J. E. Olney.

We have been in receipt...of the Commercial Advertiser, a new daily paper just started at Kansas City by A. J. Read. it is of good size, well edited....

 

Col. Martin has been appointed by the governor a b ...
May 11, 1865, Lawrence Journal (ID 505)

Col. Martin has been appointed by the governor a brigadier general of the Kansas State Militia, and assigned to the command of the 1st District.

T. D. Thacher of the Journal of Commerce was here....It is reported that he has disposed of his interest in the Journal.

The Topeka Tribune has changed hands. Andrew Stark retiring, and C. K. Holliday assuming control.

 

The Daily, Tri-Weekly and Weekly Journal. Publishe ...
September 14, 1865, Lawrence Journal (ID 544)

The Daily, Tri-Weekly and Weekly Journal. Published by Christian, Reynolds & Co. Office No. 24 Massachusetts Street. Terms, one copy one year, weekly $2, tri-weekly $4, daily $8.

 

From Western Kansas. Hays City: ...The office of t ...
March 5, 1868, Lawrence Journal (ID 827)

From Western Kansas. Hays City: ...The office of the Advance, that spicy little sheet, filled with wit, humor and "buffalo chips," was burned out several weeks ago and the whole concern was totally destroyed. The energetic proprietors, Clark & Bisbee, have secured a new office, new press and material, and are determined to continue to "advance" the interest of their beautiful town....

The Herald of Kansas. The Leavenworth Times says: "The Lawrence Journal has been enlarged, and the reading matter is set up in new type. It presents a very creditable appearance. For enterprise, the Journal is second to none in Kansas. Its politics are horrible. It is a pity to see so brilliant and jovial a young man as our friend Reynolds really throwing himself away. Reform, Milton, ere it is too late. In everything but politics we wish the Journal success." Our friend of the Times evidently has some things a little "mixed." Those "horrible politics" we can't hardly see. We have not a great many of them of any sort, "horrible" or otherwise. As to the statement about enterprise and things the "Duke" is eminently sound. We are constantly adding to the job and other departments of our paper, determined it shall be second to no other in the state as a Kansas paper that the Herald of Kansas (the State Journal) shall lead all others. Within a few days we have purchased and shipped and are now running a beautiful cylinder press that cost in Cincinnati $1,500. We have also recently added largely to our type and other material....