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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Lawrence Republican

Articles in database from Lawrence Republican:    115

T. Dwight Thacher, Norman Allen, editors.: Introdu ...
May 28, 1857, Lawrence Republican (ID 3247)

T. Dwight Thacher, Norman Allen, editors.

Introductory. In assuming the editorial charge of the Republican...our political creed may be briefly summed up in these words: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. That to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed; that when any form of government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute a new government, laying its foundation on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness."...This will be an out and out Free State paper. We shall labor with all honesty and energy to make Kansas a free state, not only in name but also in fact....We hope to see arise a state rich in the intelligence and moral worth of its citizens, strong in the omnipotence of right, and lasting in the immutability of eternal principles. For this end we shall labor....No majority has the right to make the minority slaves....That the people of Kansas are opposed to slavery, no intelligent man can doubt. That slavery has been forced upon them in utter contempt of their wishes is equally certain....Relying therefore upon the justness of the principles we shall advocate and the generous support of friends in Kansas and elsewhere holding these principles in common with ourselves, we hopefully and cheerfully enter upon our work.

 

The Republican has now reached its third number an ...
June 11, 1857, Lawrence Republican (ID 3252)

The Republican has now reached its third number and although we have put forth little or no effort to bring it into notice, our Territorial subscriptions have far exceeded our expectations. We issue now two thousand copies; yet we shall be able to supply back numbers to but few that shall hereafter subscribe....

Boy wanted. Steady employment will be given to a good active boy at the Republican office.

Another new paper. The Kansas News is a new Free State paper published at Emporia, the first number of which has just reached us. P. B. Plumb is the proprietor and principal editor....R. J. Hinton is its corresponding editor.

 

*Most happy are we to receive the first number of ...
June 18, 1857, Lawrence Republican (ID 3258)

*Most happy are we to receive the first number of the resuscitated Kansas Free State, published by R. G. Elliot in Delaware, Kansas, at $2 per annum. Mr. Elliot was so unfortunate as to have his paper destroyed by the border ruffians about a year ago, but not so fortunate as to have his name trumpeted all over the country as a "martyr," and make a nice little speculation out of his "loss." He announces to his former subscribers who failed to receive their papers for the full time of their subscription that by sending on the orders their papers will be forwarded....

We should have noticed last week the appearance of the Kansas Leader, published in Centropolis, Kansas, by Austin & Beardsley at $2 per annum. It claims to be a Free State paper, though it advocates voting at the bogus election.

 

Ottumwa Journal. The undersigned proposes to publi ...
July 9, 1857, Lawrence Republican (ID 3269)

Ottumwa Journal. The undersigned proposes to publish a weekly newspaper, the first number of which is to be issued about the 1st of August next in the village of Ottumwa, Coffey County, Kansas, and called the Ottumwa Journal....The Journal will be a thorough Free State Paper.... -- Jonathan Lyman.

 

Notices of the press....: "The Republican, publish ...
July 30, 1857, Lawrence Republican (ID 3281)

Notices of the press....

"The Republican, published at Lawrence, Kansas Territory, has reached us and promises to be the most efficient and fearless of all the Free State papers. It is conducted with nerve, tact and ability. The names at the editorial head are T. Dwight Thacher and Norman Allen. We are glad that it has started as the Herald of Freedom has evidently been tampered with by the same influence that has swerved the New York Times, and is now playing into the hands of the usurpers and sowing the seeds of division and discord in the Free State ranks. It is very opportune that the Republican has been established at the moment the other sheet began to play false to the cause of freedom." -- Chicago Tribune.

"We have received the first number of the Lawrence Republican....It presents a fine appearance, and is edited with ability. It boldly espouses the cause of the Free State party...." -- Chemung County Republican, Horseheads, N.Y.

"The Lawrence Republican. No paper comes to this office which we value more highly than this. It is the largest paper published in the Territory, and in our opinion is the most ably edited. It takes a firm and decided stand in the cause of freedom, and is none of your wishy-washy, milk-and-water 'conservatives.'..." -- Freemen's Champion, Prairie City, Kansas.

"Lawrence Republican. This is the title of a new paper recently established in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, by T. Dwight Thacher and Norman Allen, the first number of which reached us yesterday....As many of our readers may wish to take a paper from that Territory, we suggest that they subscribe for this one." -- Chester Herald, Illinois.

"The Lawrence Republican. No. 1, Vol. 1, of this paper is on our table. It is a neatly printed and ably edited eight column paper....The introductory commences by stating the political creed of the Republican, to do which the first paragraph of the Declaration of Independence is quoted....Shame on the American editor who cannot do the same!..." -- Aurora Beacon, Illinois.

 

Thanks. Our sincere thanks are due to our friends ...
August 4, 1857, Lawrence Republican (ID 3284)

Thanks. Our sincere thanks are due to our friends in the southern part of Kansas for their kind and successful endeavors in increasing the circulation of the Republican. We have added several hundreds to our list during the last few weeks....Clubs of ten and over $1.50 a copy, and an extra copy to the getter up, when desired.

 

"Out-Heroding Herod." The National Democrat, a pap ...
August 13, 1857, Lawrence Republican (ID 3289)

"Out-Heroding Herod." The National Democrat, a paper just started at Lecompton, and generally understood to be Gov. Walker's Lecompton organ, bids fair to totally eclipse all the other Pro-Slavery journals in Kansas. The Union seems to have succumbed at once, and beside this new organ such papers as the Leavenworth Journal, the Herald, the Doniphan Constitutionalist are perfectly tame. Of course, it pitches into the Free State men pell-mell, shovel and tongs, head over heels. All the old fabrications about Emigrant Aid Societies, Abolitionists, &c, are trumped up and heralded forth with an ample supply of capitals, interrogation and exclamation points -- all as if they were original....

 

Our associate, T. D. Thacher, started for New York ...
August 27, 1857, Lawrence Republican (ID 3293)

Our associate, T. D. Thacher, started for New York on the 18th. He will be necessarily absent for a few weeks, but will return to his post as soon as his private business affairs will permit.

We have received during the past week liberal clubs of subscribers from Neosho City, Prairie City, the Delaware Reserve, Manhattan and Cresco....There are still other neighborhoods where the people would gladly join a club for the Republican if someone would move in the matter.

 

Home Again. After a few weeks absence, we are agai ...
October 1, 1857, Lawrence Republican (ID 3303)

Home Again. After a few weeks absence, we are again at our post. We have found everywhere at the East a very great interest manifested in regard to the affairs of Kansas. The impending struggle is attracting the solicitude of the whole country; the friends of Free Kansas, though not unaware of the immense disadvantages under which we are forced to enter this contest, still almost universally approve our resolve to take part in the election. They express their convictions that in no event can our political condition be rendered any worse than it now is, and it may be made better. Thinking and candid men of all parties, so far as we have observed, regard the present condition of Kansas affairs as a disgrace to the American people....

The Wyandott Citizen is the title of a new paper just started at Wyandott. It is a respectable appearing paper, and evinces considerable tact and energy in its management. It is devoted to the interests of the so-called Democratic party, and labors quite earnestly to make its readers believe that the question of slavery has nothing at all to do with Kansas politics. E. Abbot is the editor and proprietor....

 

Leavenworth Times. This able and sterling journal ...
November 5, 1857, Lawrence Republican (ID 3320)

Leavenworth Times. This able and sterling journal has changed hands. Mr. Crozier having disposed of his interest in it to our much-esteemed and talented friend, Champion Vaughn, under whose exclusive control and management the Times will hereafter be conducted. We are sorry to part with Mr. Crozier from the editorial fraternity, but are glad that he leaves the Times in such good hands. Mr. Vaughn has had much of the editorial charge of the paper for some time....

 

A Modest Editor. The editor of the White Cloud Kan ...
November 19, 1857, Lawrence Republican (ID 3330)

A Modest Editor. The editor of the White Cloud Kansas Chief, a paper published at White Cloud, a little town of some 300 inhabitants up in Doniphan County, communicates to the public the highly interesting and important information that "a majority of the papers in the Territory are published, not for Kansas, but to tickle the taste of Northern or Southern people, and therein receive the patronage of these sections," but that he, the editor of the Chief, publishes a paper not "to please the North or South, but to tell the truth, as near as possible, about Kansas." Modest merit is often unappreciated, and we accordingly give the above the benefit of our circulation.

 

With the present number, we enter upon the last ha ...
November 26, 1857, Lawrence Republican (ID 3332)

With the present number, we enter upon the last half of our first volume....During the past six months, it has acquired a circulation in the Territory never before equaled by any Kansas paper in the same length of time....The expense of the undertaking has also exceeded by far our previous estimate -- so we find ourself about even on that score....No week since it started have we issued an edition of less than fifteen hundred copies, and for several weeks past we have found it necessary to issue an edition of twenty-four hundred copies....We appeal to those who approve of its past course and present position to put forth a little exercise in its behalf. Especially is each of its present subscribers requested to act as agent in obtaining and forwarding subscriptions for the Republican....Times are hard...and it is necessary for each and all of us to practice economy, but we assure you it will be the poorest kind of economy...to dispense with such a paper as the Lawrence Republican....We have reliable information that the editor of a "contemporary" sheet in town, which has decreased in circulation during the last six months about twice as much as the Republican has increased in the same length of time -- he and his few especial friends have endeavored to give the impression that the Republican was going to suspend before long....The Republican has not suspended, that we are aware of -- neither will it suspend. Our stock is laid in for the winter, and our force engaged for several months to come; and if Lawrence stands, the Republican will be issued regularly as hitherto....We...offer the following rates: One copy one year $2.00; five copies one year $9.00; ten copies one year $15.00; one copy six months $1.00; five copies six months $5.00; ten copies six months $8.00; and one extra copy to getting of club....

 

The Leavenworth Journal has changed hands, Henders ...
December 3, 1857, Lawrence Republican (ID 3337)

The Leavenworth Journal has changed hands, Henderson having sold out and, it is said, left the Territory. Geo. W. Purkins assumes the editorial charge. The paper under its new auspices takes strong and earnest grounds against the Lecompton Constitution and will oppose its acceptance by Congress. The supporters of the bogus Constitution are fast being reduced merely to the villains who made; and many of them, deeming "discretion the better part of valor," are fleeing from the Territory. The rest had better follow suit. They are not wanted here.

The Tecumseh Note Book also, which the Charleston Mercury lately declared to be the "only sound Pro-Slavery paper in Kansas," has also gone to that bourne from whence few pro-slavery newspapers ever return....

 

A New Paper. We have received the first two number ...
December 24, 1857, Lawrence Republican (ID 3352)

A New Paper. We have received the first two numbers of the Southern Kansas Herald, a new paper just started at Osawatomie. It starts off well -- is a Free State paper, of course....Terms $2 per annum. Address C. E. Griffith, Osawatomie.

 

The Crusader of Freedom, edited and published by J ...
January 7, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3358)

The Crusader of Freedom, edited and published by James Redpath at Doniphan, is before us. It is a racy, witty, sarcastic, saucy paper -- readable all over, full of pluck and fight, delightfully fanatical as times go -- that is, ardently believing and advocating equal rights for all men....Its very boldness and audacity will set men to thinking, and its fire will help to thaw out the icy conservatism of northern Kansas....

 

We were unable to issue a paper last week as we we ...
January 28, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3366)

We were unable to issue a paper last week as we were engaged in doing the Legislative printing, and found it impossible to obtain compositors sufficient to get it out. This work cuts in largely upon the stock of paper we had laid in for a winter's supply, and we have sent teams to Jefferson City -- a distance of about 150 miles -- for an additional supply. Should our paper not reach our patrons regularly, during the session of the Legislature, which will last about three weeks yet, we must beg their indulgence with the assurance that we will try to make up for all deficiencies after the session is over.

We have received several numbers of the Leavenworth Daily Ledger. It is a conservative little journal, "independent of all political parties," but ready to fall into rank when the old Whig fossil shall again become flesh and blood. We could wish that the first permanent daily established in Kansas were more alive to great, present issues, and not musing amid the mummies of the past; but it's a free country and men have a right to be what they please, Free State, Pro-Slavery, Whig, or what-not.

 

*The Legislative Assembly...passed an act...provid ...
February 4, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3368)

*The Legislative Assembly...passed an act...providing for the taking of a census of Oxford, Shawnee, Kickapoo, and several other populous precincts in the Territory. The census of Oxford has been completed. It contains just 42 legal voters, all told! And of these 42, 14 are Free State men. This precinct returned, last October, 628 votes; December 21 at the vote for the Constitution, it gave 1,266 votes; at the state election of January 4th, it gave 738 votes. Such is a specimen of the manner in which National Democracy has attempted to rule the people of Kansas.

We notice that the Herald of Freedom, Kansas Leader, National Democrat, and other Democratic papers in the Territory are characterizing the Free State party as "Garrisonian Abolitionists." This is a mild and stale epithet which the Border Ruffians wore out long ago, and which the Free State party can well afford to bear. The freemen of Kansas have heard the mad dog cry of Abolitionist! Abolitionist! until it has ceased to have any terrors whatever. So go ahead, sweet friends. Your invective is complimentary rather than otherwise.

 

The only paper in the Territory that has favored t ...
February 18, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3370)

The only paper in the Territory that has favored the Lecompton Constitution has received the appointment to publish the laws, treaties, &c, of the United States.

 

New Daily Paper in Leavenworth. We have received a ...
February 25, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3375)

New Daily Paper in Leavenworth. We have received a copy of the Daily Times, published at Leavenworth. It is published by Champion Vaughn, the accomplished editor and publisher of the Leavenworth Weekly Times.

The Freemen's Champion, published by S. S. Prouty of Prairie City, again comes to us regularly after a temporary suspension of a few weeks.

The Western Metropolis is the name of a Free State paper that is to be started in Wyandot in April next.

 

The Squatter Sovereign, originally a border ruffia ...
March 11, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3384)

The Squatter Sovereign, originally a border ruffian sheet of the most savory sort, and next a Free State paper of the milk and water stamp, has at last come out "right side up" under the inspiring title of Freedom's Champion, and promises to do efficient labor in the cause of the Republican party. Jno. Martin is its present editor and publisher.

 

Since the proposal has been made by our Administra ...
March 18, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3388)

Since the proposal has been made by our Administration neighbor, that people should submit to the Lecompton Constitution, and make it the source of all the future governments of Kansas, we have taken the pains to observe some of our Territorial exchanges....We take the following article from the White Cloud Chief, a paper which is characterized by a good deal of steady conservatism, and not at all inclined to go fast. It don't sound much like submission.

*"Condition of the Territory. We believe that affairs in this Territory were never in more unsettled condition than at present, even in the days of its most violent wars. The only difference is, another party is now in the ascendant, and appear to be taking revenge for a long series of foul wrongs. The ring-leaders of the Pro-Slavery usurpers, and the murderers of Free State men, women and children, the destroyers of their homes, and the plunderers of their property in former days, are nearly all refugees from the Territory. Calhoun, Henderson, McLean and their coadjutors in the Lecompton swindle are ensconced behind the throne of King Buchanan; Laughlin, Boyd and others have been driven from Doniphan; Whitfield, who was sent as delegate to Congress by the votes of armed Missouri invaders, has either sought safety among his constituents beyond the river, or is guarded by United States soldiers. The usurpers are everywhere flying; and those who have the temerity to remain are being rapidly put out of the way.

The avenger cometh, they know not at what hour, nor in what place. This strife and bloodshed are sincerely to be regretted, and every good citizen cannot but hope that these scenes may soon be ended. But it is more than injured human nature can bear to see the usurpers of their rights and murderers of their friends before them, and not burn for vengeance. And we have yet to hear of the first peaceable or guiltless Pro-Slavery man being molested. President Buchanan talks about the acceptance of the Lecompton Constitution restoring peace in Kansas. He had better come and see the signs of the times and judge for himself, instead of acting upon the judgment of such tools as John Calhoun, Jack Henderson, and Henry Clay Pate. In like manner did the British Parliament, three thousand miles away, talk of restoring peace in the American Colonies by adding renewed insult and injury while turning a deaf ear to the petitions of the people. The only way to restore peace here is for Congress to reject the Lecompton swindle. It is plain to the most superficial observer that that instrument can never be enforced in Kansas; and the persons who attempt it will do it at their peril. The United States troops have heretofore compelled the people of Kansas to submit to tyranny, but they cannot do so another year. These are stern facts. We do not tell them because we desire such things to be, or to excite the people to the perpetration of the deeds spoken of. The people are already determined, and the truth is too plain to be concealed."

*Speaking under the impression that the Territorial Legislature had passed an act making it felony and punishable with death for any person to attempt to set the Lecompton Constitution in operation, the same paper says: "We have but little doubt that any one who attempts the job will suffer the penalty, but it is by no means probable that time will be taken to contact him of his crime, by due process of law."

*...The Sumner Gazette...says: "If the Lecompton Constitution is forced upon us, the people will openly put down the government that is attempted to be put in motion under it; no matter whether Free State of Pro-Slavery. No man can ever exercise the functions of office under it in this territory; if the Pro-Slavery men attempt it, they will be imprisoned; if the Free State men attempt it, they will be hung."

 

As we go to press, we learn that the Lecompton Bil ...
May 6, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3401)

As we go to press, we learn that the Lecompton Bill...has passed both branches of Congress, in the house by nine majority. Lecompton is therefore passed -- provided the people of Kansas vote to accept a proffered Land Grab -- otherwise we remain in a Territorial condition until we have 93,000 inhabitants. Of course, we will remain a Territory.

We will send our paper to subscribers one year for six bushels of potatoes, or five bushels of good corn, delivered in this town. We are still receiving Valley Bank money on subscriptions, when we can't get that which is current.

 

The Doniphan Free Press is the title of a small sh ...
May 20, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3410)

The Doniphan Free Press is the title of a small sheet, the first number of which bears date May 8, 1858. It is published by Lenhart & Welch, and edited by R. St. Clair Graham. It hoists the Free State ticket under the Leavenworth Constitution....We presume it is to take the place of the Crusader of Freedom in the affections of the Doniphanites.

Our associate, T. Dwight Thacher, left for the East...to accompany to their final resting place the remains of his wife, recently deceased. He will not, therefore, for the present be engaged in his accustomed duties as editor of the paper....

Our job office is nearly new, and we are making additions to it as circumstances may seem to require. We are regularly turning out large quantities of job work, embracing books, pamphlets, circulars, cards, posters, certificates of stock, law blanks, and every other variety of plain and fancy work....

 

*The present number completes the first volume of ...
May 27, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3413)

*The present number completes the first volume of the Republican, and closes the record of an eventful year in the history of Kansas. In that record, Free State men find much over which to exult....One year ago saw the Pro-Slavery Democracy rampant in the exercise of its political power. With its iron heel upon the necks of the people, and aided and sustained by the strong arm of the Federal Government, reasonable fears were entertained that its power would be long perpetuated. That power has been broken down, and today that usurping pro-slavery organization is remembered as belonging to the past. We look forward to but one more triumph, when our victory shall be complete....

 

We have found upon our exchange table during the p ...
June 17, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3419)

We have found upon our exchange table during the past week three new Kansas newspapers....

The Grasshopper is the title of an interesting little sheet issued at Grasshopper Falls on the 5th, of which J. A. Cody is editor....It is a radical Free State paper and uncompromisingly opposed to the acceptance of the Lecompton Constitution....

The Kansas Weekly Press is the title of a paper published at Elwood, K.T., by Whitney & Tompkins, and is the successor to the Elwood Advertiser. The editor says: "We intend our paper to be an organ for the dissemination and support of the great principle that a free people should be kept free,...that Kansas, with a Free State majority, should be a Free State....

The Minneola Statesman, the first number of which is dated June 9th, is published where its name indicates by G. A. Bassett & Co. It takes the place of the Centropolis Leader, now defunct. It opposes the English bill and says that Franklin County will poll 400 votes against it....

 

We have procured a large quantity of type and mate ...
July 8, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3427)

We have procured a large quantity of type and material especially for legal advertising, and for advertisements generally where it is desirable to get a large quantity of matter in a small space. In this way we shall be able not only to decrease the expense to the advertiser, but largely increase the quantity of reading matter in our paper....

We are pleased to acknowledge the receipt of another large club of subscribers from Sugar Mound. Will not our correspondent in that place give us a description of the town and country round about?...We invite similar correspondence from all parts of Kansas....

 

That sterling old farmer's paper, the American Agr ...
July 15, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3429)

That sterling old farmer's paper, the American Agriculturist, comes to this month, if possible, more replete than ever before with matter useful to the cultivator, whether of farm or garden....Mr. Judd, the talented editor and proprietor, has recently commenced the publication of a German edition....There are several millions of German population in the country....

 

Newspaper Consolidation. The first number of the w ...
July 29, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3435)

Newspaper Consolidation. The first number of the weekly Chicago Press and Tribune was issued on the 10th inst. The proprietors of the two papers have taken this step of consolidation, believing that it will favorably affect their private interests as well as the interests of the public upon the principle that "in union there is strength."...We regard this as a very sensible move....The chief reason why there are so few good papers in the west is because of the super abundance of them, as compared with the capacity or will of the people to sustain them. Every young hopeful of a town desires an organ, and begins by making a show of inducements to some individual to commence its publication. The bait is accepted and material encouragement is for a while, to an extent much more limited indeed than was proposed, extended; but this generally subsides in a few months, and the poor publisher, after spending what little means he may have had at the commencement -- economizing in every way possible, and throwing in his own time, is obliged to suspend. This is but the melancholy history of one half of the newspapers that have been started in Kansas, and yet we hardly know of a town with three dozen houses in it that does not offer a "fine chance for a newspaper publisher." The expense of publishing the Republican the past year has been about $6,000, exclusive of our own constant services, and though we have received a larger list of subscribers than any other paper in Kansas, we have many times found it next to impossible to meet the current expenses of the office....From our estimate above, those who want an organ can judge whether they can keep up a paper, provided they can find a person self-sacrificing enough to embark in the enterprise of its publication....What we say...is in reply to several letters with regard to establishing newspapers, and we wish it to apply only to such places as are not able to give good support to a good paper. No paper in Kansas...can make a respectable living at the present cost of publication and price of subscription with less than two thousand subscribers, and there is not more than three papers in the Territory that can today boast of half that number....We believe from a survey of the whole ground that there are more papers now in Kansas than will be sustained the present year, and that establishing new ones will work disastrously to three-fourths of those who embark on it. We rather need a consolidation of some that now exist, and particularly of their support, than an increase of papers.

 

A Few Parting Words. With the present number cease ...
August 12, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3441)

A Few Parting Words. With the present number ceases my editorial connection with, and also my partnership of, the Republican. I make this announcement with feelings of deep regret....Some 18 or more months ago, a very general and pressing need was felt of a journal in this city that should be true to these principles, the operation of which have eventuated in the now gloriously triumphant Free State party....More in desire to supply that necessity than in the hope or expectation of any pecuniary advantage, I established the Republican. In the editorial department, I called to my assistance the services of Mr. Thacher, on whom for the greater part of the first year devolved the principal burthen of the editorial labors. During the remaining time of its publication, the very arduous and unremitting duties of editor and publisher have devolved chiefly upon me, and it is with feelings of relief that I yield up the labors and responsibilities of the position to other and abler hands....Of the future position and worth of the Republican, the public have a sufficient guaranty in the fact that its former senior editor is one of the new editorial corps. It is with feelings of peculiar satisfaction...that, in resigning its proprietorship and editorial duties, I am able to leave them all in the hands of this gentleman and his able and worthy associate.... -- Norman Allen.

Prospectus. From the above announcement, the public will learn that the Lawrence Republican has changed hands. To Mr. Allen, as its original founder, all honor is due for his successful efforts in establishing the paper. The enterprise, at the time he engaged in it, was one of doubtful success. He leaves the paper established upon a sound and healthy basis....From the first issue of the Republican down to the present, with the exception of the past three months, the editorial conduct of the paper has devolved almost wholly upon T. Dwight Thacher. He will continue to devote his entire energies to it for the future. Under the new arrangement, he has associated with him Solon O. Thacher, formerly of New York, but more recently of Chicago. Mr. Thacher is and has been an ardent Republican, was a member of the New York Legislature elected in the memorable campaign of 1856, and has always been a most firm and devoted friend of the cause of Freedom in Kansas....The Republican will continue to be in the future, as it has been in the past, a firm, decided, and uncompromising foe to human slavery....To the interests of industry, education, temperance, freedom and religion shall the columns of the Republican be devoted. Free men, free speech, free schools, free labor, a free press, and a free pulpit -- these are our watchwords. Freemen of Kansas! Our reliance is upon you.... -- T. D. Thacher & Co.

 

Norman Allen, former proprietor of this journal, i ...
August 19, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3445)

Norman Allen, former proprietor of this journal, is about establishing himself in the insurance business....

 

The third number of the Junction Sentinel, a new p ...
September 9, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3451)

The third number of the Junction Sentinel, a new paper just started at Junction City, Riley County, lies before us. It is pro-slavery or Democratic in politics. Aside from that, it is a commendable sheet.

Our old friend, W. W. Ross, formerly of the Topeka Tribune, made us a call. Mr. Ross has dropped the editorial quill and retired to the less exciting and harassing vocation of a farmer. He is living...south of Topeka on a claim.

 

Consistent. Brown bolts the Free-State party becau ...
September 30, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3460)

Consistent. Brown bolts the Free-State party because of its platform, yet he sustains Branscomb, Morrow and Woodward, of the regular nominees, who every one stand on that platform and fully endorse it!...Brown is awful on Republicans, and yet nominates Mr. Berkau, who openly avows himself a Republican and says he don't see how any honest man can be anything else!...Brown pretends not to be a Democrat, yet bolts the regular Free-State nominees and puts up Bruner of Lecompton, who is an out-and-out Democrat. We suppose this is Brown's method of showing how "independent" he is!

 

We wish to get an active, intelligent boy as an ap ...
October 7, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3464)

We wish to get an active, intelligent boy as an apprentice to learn the art of printing. We will give such an one a good situation.

Ten cords of good wood wanted at this office on subscriptions.

We have heretofore failed to notice the reappearance of the Topeka Tribune. The Messrs. Ross are succeeded by Farnsworth & Cummings. The Rosses made the Tribune a fearless and faithful exponent of the Free State principles....

 

We have received the first number of the Palermo L ...
October 28, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3475)

We have received the first number of the Palermo Leader...and rather like it. It is Free State in politics, but with good, substantial anti-slavery sentiment at the bottom, we should judge. C. S. Perham & F. W. Emery are its editors and proprietors.

 

We are happy to meet in town our friend P. B. Plum ...
November 11, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3483)

We are happy to meet in town our friend P. B. Plumb, editor of the Emporia News. The News is almost the only paper in southern Kansas which is published with any degree of regularity -- most of the papers started in that portion of the Territory for the last year and a half having succumbed to the hard times. Mr. Plumb will call upon the business men during his stay in town for the purpose of obtaining advertisements....

 

*We much prefer to live peaceably with out neighbo ...
November 18, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3486)

*We much prefer to live peaceably with out neighbors; and it is, therefore, with profound regret that we must ask the forbearance of our readers while we pay attention briefly to the uncalled for and ungentlemanly attempts of G. W. Brown to interfere with our private business affairs. We of course allude to his repeated attacks upon us in regard to the wages which we pay the workmen in our office, charging us with doing "injustice" to them, and heaping upon us opprobrious epithets therefore. We would simply say that what we pay our hands, how we pay them, or when we pay them are all matters purely of our own private business, with which Mr. G. W. Brown has no more right to meddle than he has with the wages which Mr. Ford or Mr. Bullene pay their clerks, or with the business of any other citizen....We will just here take occasion to warn Mr. G. W. Brown that unless he ceases interfering with our private business affairs, we may be called upon to retaliate upon him in such a manner as shall not fail to raise a blush upon his shameless and brazen brow. Our public course he may attack and misrepresent, as he habitually does, to his heart's content, but our business or other private affairs he must not meddle with. But, since our private affairs have been thus dragged into public notice, we will here take occasion to say that between ourselves and our employees the most pleasant and cordial relations exist. They are as good a set of printers as can be found in our part of Kansas, as our large and increasing patronage abundantly testifies....One of our hands once worked for Brown and quit his office because his conscientious scruples against taking part in the "necessary" immoralities in connection with his shop. Another of them worked in Brown's office once, but he left because Brown attempted to murder a young friend of his, only failing because his (Brown's) pistol missed fire. Brown, or any other meddler, is welcome to get them away from us, if he can....It is simply ridiculous for a paper like Brown's, on its last legs, and as notorious among printers for Ratting as its editor is among editors for lying, to set itself up as a sort of typographical dictator....

 

T. Dwight Thacher will deliver a Temperance addres ...
November 25, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3489)

T. Dwight Thacher will deliver a Temperance address in Lecompton on next Wednesday evening.

 

We must ask the indulgence of our readers for the ...
December 9, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3492)

We must ask the indulgence of our readers for the amount of space occupied by our advertising patrons. The large number of new subscribers we are constantly receiving, as well as the general circulation of our paper throughout the Territory, have made it the best medium for advertising in Kansas. As a consequence, our advertising columns have rapidly filled up, until now we find it almost impossible to prevent them from trenching on the space which we intend to devote to reading matter. We have tried to avoid the difficulty...by reducing the size of type used....But with the present prospects for an unparalleled immigration to Kansas in the spring, and the consequent general increase of business,...we plainly see that, although we now publish the largest paper in the Territory, we shall be under the necessity of still further increasing its size....Without a large advertising patronage, no paper of the size and character of this could be sustained at all. The actual cost of furnishing a single copy of this paper for one year cannot be covered by the subscription price charged for it....

 

*We received a pleasant call...from our old friend ...
December 16, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3497)

*We received a pleasant call...from our old friend, Col. M. W. Delahay. He has been spending the fall in Illinois, connected with the Alton Courier, and has been doing a yeoman's service in the good cause of Freedom in that state. Mr. Delahay has now returned to Kansas for permanent settlement, and has established a loan office in Leavenworth.

 

Kansas Messenger. This new claimant for public pat ...
December 23, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3500)

Kansas Messenger. This new claimant for public patronage and sympathy came to our table Saturday last. It is published at Baldwin City, Douglas County. Its editors are Professor B. R. Cunningham, Rev. W. R. Davis, L. B. Dennis and H. H. Moore. It is an "educational and religious paper designed to promote the interests of the people."...

 

To each new yearly subscriber, or old one renewing ...
December 30, 1858, Lawrence Republican (ID 3504)

To each new yearly subscriber, or old one renewing for the Republican, whether singly or in clubs, we will give a copy of Mr. Parson's Book on the Gold Mines. ....We have also made arrangements with the publishers of the Atlantic Monthly whereby we are enabled to furnish the Republican and the Atlantic both for $4 per year....

 

Last week we printed an unprecedentedly large edit ...
January 6, 1859, Lawrence Republican (ID 3508)

Last week we printed an unprecedentedly large edition of the Republican, but they all disappeared before Friday night. Wilmarth says he could have sold 200 more, and we know we could have sold half that number more at the office....The fact is, we must enlarge the Republican very soon. The press on our advertising columns is immense, while the demand for its cheering "gold news" can hardly be met.

 

*Letter from old John Brown -- Trading Post, Kansa ...
January 13, 1859, Lawrence Republican (ID 3509)

*Letter from old John Brown -- Trading Post, Kansas

Gents: You will greatly oblige a humble friend by allowing the use of your columns while I briefly state two parallels, in my poor way. Not one year ago, eleven quiet citizens of this neighborhood, viz.: Wm. Robertson, Wm. Colpetzer, Amos Hall, Austin Hall, John Campbell, Asa Snyder, Thos. Stilwell, Wm. Hairgrove, Asa Hairgrove, Patrick Ross, and B. L. Reed, were gathered up from their work and their homes by an armed force under one Hamilton, and without trial or opportunity to speak in their own defense, were formed into a line, and all but one shot -- five killed and five wounded. One fell unharmed, pretending to be dead. All were left for dead. The only crime charged against them was that of being Free State men. Now, I inquire, what action has ever, since the occurrence of May last, been taken by either the President of the United States, the Governor of Missouri, the Governor of Kansas, or any of their tools, or by any pro-slavery or Administration man, to ferret out and punish the perpetrators of this crime? Now for the other parallel. On Sunday, the 19th of December, a negro man named Jim came over to the Osage settlement from Missouri, and stated that he, together with his wife, two children and another negro man were to be sold within a day or two, and begged for help to get away. On Monday (the following) night, two small companies were made up to go to Missouri and forcibly liberate the five slaves, together with other slaves. One of those companies I assumed to direct. We proceeded to the place, surrounded the buildings, liberated the slaves, and also took certain property supposed to belong to the estate. We however learned, before leaving, that a portion of the articles we had taken belonged to a man living on the plantation as a tenant, and who was supposed to have no interest in the estate. We promptly returned to him all we had taken. We then went on another plantation, where we freed five more slaves, took some property, and two white men. We moved all slowly away into the Territory for some distance, and then sent the white men back, telling them to follow us as soon as they chose to do so. The other company freed one female slave, took some property, and, as I am informed, killed one white man (the master) who fought against the liberation. Now for a comparison. Eleven persons are forcibly restored to their natural and inalienable rights, with but one man killed, and all "hell is stirred from beneath." It is currently reported that the Governor of Missouri has made a requisition upon the Governor of Kansas for the delivery of all such as were concerned in the last named "dreadful outrage." The Marshal of Kansas is said to be collecting a posse of Missouri (not Kansas) men at West Point, in Missouri, a little town about ten miles distant, to "enforce the laws." All pro-slavery, conservative Free State and doughface men, and Administration tools, are filled with holy horror. Consider the two cases, and the action of the Administration party. Respectfully yours, John Brown.

 

During the past week, we received over fifty subsc ...
January 27, 1859, Lawrence Republican (ID 3517)

During the past week, we received over fifty subscribers to the Weekly Republican. Our Daily Republican is doing a flourishing business....

Our friends at Mound City, Linn County, will accept our thanks for a fine club of yearly subscribers....Our friends in southern Kansas generally may rest assured that no effort of ours shall be wanting to secure justice, peace and freedom in all parts of the Territory.

We are happy to acknowledge the reception of a fine club of subscribers from Nottingham, Marshall County....

Our thanks are due to S. O. Himoc of Mapleton, Bourbon County, for a club of 11 subscribers from that place....

 

From Leavenworth: ...Wm. W. Bloss, the enterprisin ...
February 17, 1859, Lawrence Republican (ID 3523)

From Leavenworth: ...Wm. W. Bloss, the enterprising and efficient local editor of the Times, was shot and severely though not fatally wounded on Saturday night....While sitting writing at his desk in the Times office, he heard the door open behind him, but did not look up. A moment after, he heard the report of a pistol and felt himself wounded in the left shoulder and arm, the ball entering at the shoulder blade, glancing and lodging in the upper portion of the arm. He turned instantly and, rising, endeavored to draw his own pistol, but while so doing received two other balls, one in the right hand and the other in the right arm. He fired his own pistol once or twice, but was so dizzy and faint from loss of blood that his aim was destroyed. His assailant was seized by two of the compositors in the office, but they, seeing Mr. Bloss fall, released their prisoner to aid their comrade, and he escaped. He was subsequently arrested, waived an examination, and gave bonds for his appearance. His name is Wm. D. White, and is a compositor in the Journal office. The cause of the attack has not been made public. Mr. Bloss is doing well, though the wounds are severe, and hopes ere long to be out again.

 

Printing Press for the Mines. The El Paso Town Com ...
March 10, 1859, Lawrence Republican (ID 3532)

Printing Press for the Mines. The El Paso Town Company have just made arrangements with S. S. Prouty of the Freemen's Champion, Prairie City, to take his press and fixtures to El Paso and start a paper there....The company, in securing Mr. Prouty, engage an active, wide-awake man....We predict for Prouty great success in the land of gold. El Paso will have the first paper in the gold region....

 

Johnson County Standard. This is the name of a new ...
March 24, 1859, Lawrence Republican (ID 3536)

Johnson County Standard. This is the name of a newspaper just started at Olathe, Johnson County. It is published by Barker and Eddy. It claims to be independent in politics, yet avows a belief in Jefferson and Jackson....We are sorry to see that the Standard drops in the wake of the Border Star, Wyandot Argus, and such small fry, in condemning Medary's Amnesty Act. The course of the Democracy on this subject is inexplicable. Old Buck pardoned the Mormon rebels after spending millions of money in trying to conquer them. Why shouldn't Medary pardon good Democrats such as Russell, Jones and others for robbing and plundering and attacking Free State men on the Osage? We really don't see into the motive these Democrats have for denouncing the governor. Is it because he is disposed to treat Free State men as fairly as Democrats?...

 

Linn County Herald. This is the name of a newspape ...
April 14, 1859, Lawrence Republican (ID 3546)

Linn County Herald. This is the name of a newspaper just started at Mound City in Linn County. It is published and edited by Jonathan Lyman. It is an out-and-out anti-slavery paper and sustains Medary's Amnesty Act as being on the whole a wise and humane act....

Judge Dow, mayor of Topeka, has become one of the editors of the Topeka Tribune....In its new typographical dress, also, the Tribune indicates a growing and thriving condition....From Judge Dow's salutatory, we extract the following:..."The undersigned has only to say that it is his purpose to make the Tribune, so far as he is able consistently with the duties of his profession, readable and instructive, but at any rate Republican.... -- L. Dow."

 

From the Emporia News: "We enjoy a feast of fat th ...
May 12, 1859, Lawrence Republican (ID 3554)

From the Emporia News: "We enjoy a feast of fat things in looking over the columns of our Territorial exchanges....First,...from the extreme northeast corner of Kansas comes the White Cloud Chief, in complete war dress...and brandishing the Republican battle axe in splendid style....The Chief is well and ably seconded in Doniphan County by the Palermo Leader, an accomplished and valiant brave....Then comes from the City of Atchison...that sterling sheet, so well and truly named Freedom's Champion, edited, printed and published by our young friend, John A. Martin, and a truer son of the 'Old Keystone' never wielded pen or shooting stick....Who could have hoped three years ago, when the Squatter Sovereign under the control of that infamous Ruffian, Bob Kelley, was inciting its readers to mob and murder every Free State man,...that the very same types would so soon be used to proclaim the truth and the whole truth of the Republican creed in that same city, which still bears the name of the head devil in the war waged against Free Kansas?...But what have we here? Why simply the handsomest, best printed and best edited daily west of the Mississippi River, the Leavenworth Daily Times, full of hope, vim, pluck and principle; full of fight when the exigencies of the times demand it; full of fun at all times; full of hope for the good time coming. Ample success to its brave, unflinching editor, Champion Vaughan....We have reached the Kansas river, and here's where Commodore T. D. Thacher hangs out his broad pennant, the Lawrence Republican. No braver or stauncher craft ever rode the boisterous seas of political strife....S. O. Thacher keeps a bright lookout ahead for the financial rocks and shoals upon which so many a Kansas paper has foundered....Belonging to the Kaw squadron are the Topeka Tribune, and the Commercial Gazette, Wyandot. The Tribune, now edited by Lorenzo Dow, mayor of Topeka, is one of the old guard....The Gazette, we are sorry to say, hangs fire somewhat for the present....The Osawatomie Herald, published on the old battle ground, is all right, of course....The Linn County Herald is a new ally in the good cause, published at Mound City, among the Jay-Hawks, and edited by Jonathan Lyman, formerly of the Ottumwa Journal. It is doing good work in southeastern Kansas, and we trust the Republicans of that region will give it a liberal support. Brothers of the Republican press gang, we are with you heart and soul. We are small and weak, but we are enlisted for the war through evil report as well as good....

 

The Leavenworth Ledger has hoisted the Republican ...
June 2, 1859, Lawrence Republican (ID 3563)

The Leavenworth Ledger has hoisted the Republican flag and is doing efficient labor for the good cause. McLane is eccentric, but witty and effective.

The Leavenworth Herald has made its appearance as a daily....We advise our Democratic friends to subscribe for the Herald, as it is one of the oldest and most consistent papers of that stripe in the Territory.

 

We are in receipt of the Kansas Daily State Regist ...
September 1, 1859, Lawrence Republican (ID 3604)

We are in receipt of the Kansas Daily State Register, a new paper just started in Leavenworth, Jeff Dugger editor and proprietor. The Register is ably edited, Republican in politics....

 

From Kansas Statesman: "We woke up this morning an ...
November 11, 1859, Lawrence Republican (ID 3648)

From Kansas Statesman: "We woke up this morning and found ourselves covered with a sheet of snow. Pleasant, very. On coming downstairs, we found the cases half full of snow and the galleys buried in the same white covering. Went to work to get matters right again, and to try and warm up the office, but up to the present writing, 12 M., we have utterly failed; notwithstanding, we have employed six Irishmen and three Dutchmen to cut the wood and keep up the fire. We set a line an hour, warming included. Have serious thoughts of calling in a little redeye to our assistance. Oh, for a lodge in some warmer climate."

 

A Retired Editor. The Leavenworth Herald...contain ...
December 15, 1859, Lawrence Republican (ID 3667)

A Retired Editor. The Leavenworth Herald...contains L. J. Eastin's farewell to that paper and the city. The General has always been a staunch Democrat, and has made his paper the leading organ of the Democracy in the Territory for the last five years. He now leaves, his destination being...the new gold fields of Kansas.... -- Kansas City Journal of Commerce.

How does the above gibe with the persistent assertion of our Democratic friends that their party has not been organized in the Territory for only a year or so? We have always charged Eastin and his comrades as being the only Democracy there was in Kansas, and that the party was as much organized in the bloody days of '55 as now; that the old Law and Order party was the Democratic party, and nothing else. Here we have Van Horn, a Democratic appointee, confirming all we have said. His testimony is conclusive.

 

T. D. Thacher & Co. Editors and proprietors, T. D. ...
January 5, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3675)

T. D. Thacher & Co. Editors and proprietors, T. D. Thacher, S. O. Thacher.

 

*The Slanderer of John Brown. The wife of George W ...
January 10, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3680)

*The Slanderer of John Brown. The wife of George W. Brown, editor of the late Herald of Freedom, has filed her petition in the District Court of this county for a divorce, charging the said Brown with adultery on several occasions, once in his office and once in his own house, and with inhuman treatment such as to render her condition intolerable....This George W. Brown is the creature whose slanders against the noble old John Brown were so industriously circulated by the pro-slavery press at the East. He is also the creature who, during his editorial career, maligned nearly every prominent Free State man in Kansas....

 

Annual meeting of the Historical and Scientific So ...
January 26, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3688)

Annual meeting of the Historical and Scientific Society of Kansas. The Society met at their rooms in Lawrence January 19, 1860. Lawrence D. Bailey, president, in the chair....At the solicitation of the Society, the following papers are regularly contributed by their publishers: Southern Kansas Herald, Osawatomie; Fort Scott Democrat, Fort Scott; Elwood Free Press, Elwood; Linn County Herald, Mound City; Emporia News, Emporia; State Record, Topeka; Topeka Tribune, Topeka; Olathe Herald, Olathe; Lawrence Republican, Lawrence; Kansas Statesman, Junction City; Leavenworth Herald, Leavenworth; Daily State Register, Leavenworth; Atchison Union, Atchison; Western Argus, Wyandot....Standing Committees for 1860....Local history, C. Robinson, Lawrence; H. J. Adams, Leavenworth; L. D. Bailey, Emporia....Biographical history, J. C. Vaughan, Leavenworth; J. H. Lane, Lawrence; A. Wattles, Moneka. History of events, Edward Hoogland, Tecumseh; T. D. Thacher, Lawrence; S. C. Smith, Lawrence....Commerce, John A. Martin, Atchison; J. M. Winchell, Superior City; J. L. McDowell, Leavenworth....

 

*Gov. Medary has given his interpretation of what ...
February 23, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3701)

*Gov. Medary has given his interpretation of what constitutes Free-Statism and Squatter Sovereignty by vetoing the bill prohibiting slavery in Kansas. The bill was purposely so drawn that he could find no fault with it except for the sole reason that it prohibited slavery. He was forced to face the naked issue of Freedom or Slavery. He has done so, and has stepped in and attempted to thwart the popular will in favor of freedom by his veto in favor of slavery....

 

We...have acknowledged the receipt of the Leavenwo ...
March 8, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3709)

We...have acknowledged the receipt of the Leavenworth Weekly Dispatch,...just started by the same association of young men who have hitherto, and are still, publishing the Daily Dispatch. The weekly is published at the very low price of $1 a year under the editorial management, chiefly, of Josiah T. Hinton....In politics, it claims to be independent of parties, but advocates the claims and doctrines of Mr. Douglas....We also hope that ere long they may attain to that position of free independence where they will not agree with Mr. (Senator Stephen) Douglas in not caring whether slavery is voted up or down, but will infinitely prefer that Freedom...shall be always and everywhere "voted up."...

 

F. M. Tracy, formerly of the Elwood Press, has bec ...
April 12, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3724)

F. M. Tracy, formerly of the Elwood Press, has become editor of the St. Joseph Free Democrat.

The Americus Sentinel has changed hands, and will hereafter be published as a Republican paper by S. L. Kenyon & Co.

 

The Kansas City Metropolitan is henceforth to have ...
April 26, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3727)

The Kansas City Metropolitan is henceforth to have a new firm at the head, and be issued under the name of the Kansas City Enquirer. Bates & Sypherd retire and Mr. Hodgson takes the editorial chair....Mr. Hodgson has a good reputation as a writer....

The Lecompton Democrat opposes the Homestead Bill. This bill would give thousands of poor laboring families homes. It would add tens of thousands to the population and wealth of Kansas. But the Democrat opposes it. Were it a bill to steal Cuba and give niggers to the niggeries, the Democrat would shout itself hoarse in its favor....The Democrat is true to the crib whence it eats fodder.

 

The connection of my name with the Republican with ...
May 17, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3733)

The connection of my name with the Republican with this issue ceases. Other and more pressing duties have necessitated this separation....The relations existing between the publishers of the Republican during the past two years have been entirely friendly,...and it is with much regret that those relations are severed.... S. O. Thacher.

...The publication of the Republican will be continued by T. D. Thacher and S. M. Thacher, under the firm name of T. D. Thacher & Co. The entire editorial conduct of the paper will be maintained by T. Dwight Thacher....

 

*Jottings on the Road to Pike's Peak....Marysville ...
June 14, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3741)

*Jottings on the Road to Pike's Peak....Marysville...was founded by "Governor" Frank Marshall of Border Ruffian notoriety, and so called in honor of his wife, who bears the name of Mary. It is admirably located but wears the unmistakable indications of a pro-slavery town. For shooting and stabbing affairs, whisky drinking and horse racing, Marysville can bear away the palm from all other towns in Kansas.... ? A. D. Richardson.

 

*Kansas and Missouri. The people of Kansas ought c ...
June 21, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3743)

*Kansas and Missouri. The people of Kansas ought certainly to entertain the most kindly feelings for those of the State of Missouri. When we were young and weak and poor, they endeavored to exterminate us. They were rich and powerful and they used their strength and wealth to rob and ruin their feeble neighbor. But still Kansas lived. Though the traces of unnatural violence might be found on almost every rod of her soil, though each village and hamlet had its tale of rapine and wrong, though the cry of the widow and orphan was heard all over the land, still her sturdy settlers, through want and woe, stuck to the soil. They would not leave. Kansas has survived those early attempts of a sister state to accomplish her ruin.

The bitterness of the old contest has passed away. The ties of common and congenial interests are beginning to weave a veil over the past. Kansas asks for admission into the Union. Her demand is just and reasonable. But behold! the Senator from Missouri, her old enemy, rises and pours out the full vials of wrath and long-concealed hatred upon the devoted head of her people. He traduces and maligns the living, and heaps obloquy upon the good names of the dead. No lie is too mean or low for the honorable Senator to coin and circulate concerning the very people whom four years ago he and his constituents were attempting to exterminate. Senator Green may glory in such shame as this, if he chooses. The people of Missouri may glory in it too, and rejoice in the power they possess to injure the people of Kansas.

But we caution them against supposing that the people of Kansas do not notice these things, and treasure them up in enduring remembrances. We would prefer to cultivate friendly and harmonious relations with our neighbors, but it is not in human nature to be insensible to a long-continued series of insults and injuries. It is hard work to be friends of those who continually treat you as enemies. Missouri makes her choice. Let her hereafter ask no favors of Kansas. (T. Dwight Thacher)

 

The Auburn Docket is the title of a Republican pap ...
June 28, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3747)

The Auburn Docket is the title of a Republican paper just started at Auburn, Shawnee County, by D. B. Emmert. It is a neat looking sheet.

 

The Territorial Democratic Papers on the Nominatio ...
July 5, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3754)

The Territorial Democratic Papers on the Nominations. The Lecompton Democrat hoists the Breckenridge and Lane flag, and pitches into the "free soilers," as it calls the Douglas faction, without mercy. The Leavenworth Herald supports Douglas with apparent enthusiasm, but the spicy little Dispatch is in its glory, and encourages its slow-paced neighbor of the Herald, telling it that the two papers together will make a tandem Douglas team, with the Dispatch about a "length ahead." The Wyandot Argus gives the result of the smashup, but hoists neither ticket; the Atchison Union, do.

 

We find upon our table No. 1 of the Weston Mail, a ...
July 12, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3758)

We find upon our table No. 1 of the Weston Mail, a paper just started at Weston, Mo.

 

Wm. H. Gill has retired from the editorial chair o ...
July 26, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3763)

Wm. H. Gill has retired from the editorial chair of the Leavenworth Herald. Mr. Gill is a polished and forcible writer and has placed the Herald at the head of the Democratic press of the Territory. We regret to learn that his retirement is caused, in part, by ill health.

The Leavenworth Dispatch, which has been the leading Douglas organ in the Territory, has hauled down the Douglas flag and run up that of Breckenridge. Josiah A. Green has now become its editor and wages uncompromising war upon the "free soil" heresies of the Douglasites.

**Freedom of the Press in Missouri.

The Lexington (Mo.) Advertiser...had the temerity to hoist the names of Lincoln and Hamlin as candidates for President and Vice President. Of course, this was distasteful to the oligarchs, so they determined to stop the publication of the paper. What followed is thus stated by the Expositor:

"This,...in a community so decidedly pro-slavery as ours, caused much excitement. Some of our citizens held a consultation, the result of which was that, in less than an hour after the appearance of the obnoxious sheet, Mr. Harbaugh was waited on at his office by a committee of citizens, who demanded that the publication of the paper should be immediately discontinued. It was further intimated that, if the press and type were not boxed up and ready for shipment by sunset, they would be thrown into the river.

"The committee explained to Mr. H. That these prompt measures had been resolved upon by the people because they were unwilling to have in their midst a paper advocating the candidates of the Black Republican party ? a party, the principles of which, are antagonistic to our institutions and the peace of the community.

"The committee then retired but, in the meantime, quite a large crowd had collected in front of the Advertiser office. Although much excitement prevailed, no attempt at violence was made. Mr. Harbaugh once, at the request of persons, mounted a stand to explain his reasons for advocating Lincoln and Hamlin but, for some cause, concluded not to speak and got down again.

"Mr. Harbaugh left on the Hamilton stage at 3 o'clock, bound, we believe, for St. Louis."

We shall look with some interest to see whether the Douglas papers of Missouri rebuke this great outrage. If not, they may expect in due time to receive like treatment themselves, for they are already stigmatized as Free Soilers and Abolitionists.

Meanwhile, let us say to these haughty oligarchs, who thus assume to muzzle a free press, that the period of their rule is fast passing away. The days of slavery in Missouri are numbered. It has got to die. The little squad of slave owners who now rule that state are bound to be ousted, and the people will then resume the exercise of self-government. Every such high-handed outrage as this at Lexington but hastens on the day of deliverance. A system that cannot tolerate a free press ought to die, and it shall die. (T. Dwight Thacher)

 

Wm. H. Gill has retired from the editorial chair o ...
July 26, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3765)

Wm. H. Gill has retired from the editorial chair of the Leavenworth Herald. Mr. Gill is a polished and forcible writer and has placed the Herald at the head of the Democratic press in the Territory. We regret to learn that his retirement is caused, in part, by ill health.

 

The Paola Chief has suspended publication for a ti ...
August 2, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3771)

The Paola Chief has suspended publication for a time. The publisher says the receipts of the paper have not been sufficient to pay the hands in the office....

 

We much regret to learn from the last number of th ...
August 9, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3776)

We much regret to learn from the last number of the Linn County Herald that Jonathan Lyman has ceased the publication of that paper, and that it will probably be discontinued. Mr. Lyman has made the Herald a good local paper....He intimates that differences of sentiment between himself and many of his supporters in regard to local affairs have caused him to take this step....

G. O. Chase, who established the Atchison Union over 14 months ago, and has since...been its sole editor and proprietor, has retired,...and is succeeded by Wm. H. Adams and C. M. Stebbins....

Sam Medary has sold all his "right, title, interest," &c., in the Junction City Statesman to W. W. Herbert and Wm. Cuddy....Sam has built up a very creditable newspaper....The new concern is Breckenridge and Lane out and out.

The Grasshopper Falls Gazette has changed hands. Frank Barclay has sold to P. H. Hubbell of Leavenworth, who will be the publisher. A. W. Spalding will continue to be editor.

 

The Free State Republican is the name of a new pap ...
August 30, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3790)

The Free State Republican is the name of a new paper just started at Kansas City. It is a bold and outspoken paper, and may be expected to do effective service for the Republican cause in Missouri.

 

The Editorial Brotherhood was well represented yes ...
September 17, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3802)

The Editorial Brotherhood was well represented yesterday. Bartlett and Schneider of the Leavenworth Times, Ross Brothers of the State Record at Topeka, Emmert of the Auburn Docket, Doane of the Free State Republican (Kansas City), Giffen of the Olathe Herald, Driggs of the Lecompton Democrat, Vivaldi of the Manhattan Express were all in attendance....

 

Yesterday was a gala day in Lawrence. Though the n ...
September 27, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3803)

Yesterday was a gala day in Lawrence. Though the notice was limited, yet thousands from Douglas and the adjoining counties poured into the town to pay homage and respect to the greatest living statesman. Gov. Seward, in company with Judge Conway and A. C. Wilder, reached here Monday evening, as it were incog. The next morning, in company with Mr. Wilder, the Governor made a visit to Topeka, spending the night there. Yesterday, he was met two miles west of town by a cavalcade of horsemen numbering some hundreds....Early in the morning, teams, carriages and horsemen began to fill the streets. Large delegations...had arrived the previous evening....

Editors in Town. The editorial brotherhood was well represented yesterday. Bartlett and Schneider of the Leavenworth Times; Ross Brothers of the State Record, Topeka; Emmert of the Auburn Docket; Doane of the Free State Republican, Kansas City; Giffen of the Olathe Herald; Driggs of the Lecompton Democrat; Vivaldi of the Manhattan Express were all in attendance. We trust that every paper in Kansas, at least the Republican papers, will give Gov. Seward's speech in full....

 

The Leavenworth Dispatch announces the suspension ...
October 4, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3806)

The Leavenworth Dispatch announces the suspension of its daily issue. An unwillingness to sink $50 or $60 a week is the cause assigned.

E. F. Schneider has assumed the editorship of the Leavenworth Times. He has been connected with the paper for some time and has shown himself to be an interesting and able writer. The Times, under the proprietorship of Jno. Kemp Bartlett, one of the best business men in the Territory, and managed editorially by friend Schneider, will easily maintain itself as the best paper in Leavenworth.

 

**The election of Lincoln was celebrated with grea ...
November 15, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3822)

**The election of Lincoln was celebrated with great enthusiasm in this city on Thursday evening last. A Wide-Awake Club was formed and with torches marched through the streets, making a fine appearance. The Old Sacramento was brought out and thundered forth the glad tidings of the great Republican triumph. The Commercial, Miller's Block, the Eldridge House and other buildings were brilliantly illuminated. Bonfires were kindled in the streets and the public joy manifested in every way possible. The rejoicings were kept up until a late hour.

 

The Printer. When we take into consideration the f ...
November 22, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3827)

The Printer. When we take into consideration the fact that morning newspaper compositors are utterly robbed of all the healthful hours of sleep, we do not wonder that they average a life of but about 30 years. We know that Nature's laws cannot be violated with impunity. We know that sleep obtained only in the after part of the night or early in the morning is fitful and unsatisfactory, unhinging and unbalancing our physiological and phrenological equilibrium ? creating in most organizations an insatiable hankering after stimulants, and engendering a love of excitement and dissipation. Need we wonder that there are dissipated printers?...We find many who conquer or, to a great extent, suppress the craving of injurious dissipation by roaming from place to place, or by frequently attending theatrical and operatic entertainments. Few, indeed, with all the necessities of a family staring them in the face, can possibly endure anything like constant night labor. There is an ever-welling disposition to procrastinate the tedium of type-sticking by gaslight....A man who is engaged on a morning newspaper should never work more than three days successively nor more than five days per week....Aside from the unnatural time of labor, they labor too many hours and, generally speaking, in a very unwholesome atmosphere....Almost as wholly isolated from the truly living, moving, breathing world as are the colliers of Europe, they sweat and toil, toil and fret, ever longing, ever sighing for some lucky stroke of fortune to emancipate them. Their organ of hope is largely developed, or many would utterly despair, for of every 20 who get into the printing business, not more than one ever gets out alive. ? Old Typo.

 

Defunct. Sam. Wood's paper has "gone up." Its late ...
December 13, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3835)

Defunct. Sam. Wood's paper has "gone up." Its late issues have been completely filled with Sam's personal quarrels and its decease will be no great loss to anybody.

C. E. Griffith has resumed his position as publisher and editor of the Southern Kansas Herald, published at Osawatomie.

 

We are glad to acknowledge the receipt of clubs (o ...
December 20, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3837)

We are glad to acknowledge the receipt of clubs (of subscribers) from Iola, Allen County; from Bloomington in this county, and numerous other subscribers from various sources. Notwithstanding the hardness of the times, our receipts from subscribers alone for the last six weeks are considerably in advance of the corresponding weeks of last year....

 

Valedictory. My connection with the Lawrence Repub ...
December 27, 1860, Lawrence Republican (ID 3839)

Valedictory. My connection with the Lawrence Republican ceases after this number. The paper and office have been sold to John Speer and Nicholas Smith....Mr. Speer is one of the oldest settlers of Kansas and published the first paper ever started in this city. His position as an original Free State man, and as an anti-slavery Republican, is too well understood to need any comment from me. With Mr. Smith I am but slightly acquainted. I know him, however, to be of good Kentucky blood, and believe he will do himself credit and the party service in his new situation....It is not without some feeling of regret that I sever the bond which, for nearly four years, has existed between myself and the readers of this paper....I am less regretful in relinquishing my position since the great end which brought me to Kansas has been virtually accomplished. Kansas is today not only Free State but emphatically and reliable Republican.... ? T. Dwight Thacher.

 

*Salutatory. In accordance with an announcement ma ...
January 3, 1861, Lawrence Republican (ID 3841)

*Salutatory. In accordance with an announcement made in the last number of this paper, the persons whose names appear at the head of this column (John Speer and Nicholas Smith) assume the entire control of this journal. The junior editor, who has hitherto resided in Leavenworth, has not yet arrived, and in his absence the entire editorial labors have devolved upon the senior. The former, however, is known as a true-hearted, earnest and zealous Republican....To the incoming Administration of the Federal Government we expect to extend a true and earnest support. With a fixed faith in the firmness, the wisdom and the patriotism of Abraham Lincoln, we look to his Administration with no small degree of anxiety for a restoration of that order and respect for the laws so essential to the true interests of the country....It shall be our aim to make the Republican a true exponent of the principles of the party whose name it bears, eschewing all cliques and combinations, doing justice to all of its representative men and injustice to none....

 

A union of editors, like a union of elements, form ...
January 10, 1861, Lawrence Republican (ID 3845)

A union of editors, like a union of elements, forms a new compound. It is my duty then, before losing all identity, to address the people of Kansas in an individual capacity....I am a Kentuckian. Ever proud of my nativity, I am particularly so just now, when the three most interesting characters of the hour are of Kentucky blood -- one pleading the cause of Union and Liberty in our national Senate; another wrestling the helm of State from a pale and trembling hand and steering boldly where none of his associates dared advance; the other, forsaken by the Administration,...bears aloft the Stars and the Stripes, ready to perish in defense of his flag. In like manner, I am ready to acknowledge and respect all the rights of my native South, guaranteed to her by the Constitution and the laws, but her encroachments and illegal pretensions I am equally ready to meet with all the powers of the Federal Government. At no period in our history has the duties of the political editor been so responsible as now....Today the fundamental principles of our Government are controverted....Ours shall be a war with disunionists. They alone shall feel the temper of our steel. As traitors we offer them no favors but the halter -- as returning prodigals, brotherly love.... ? Verres Nicholas Smith.

 

**Glorious Intelligence! Kansas in the Union! We h ...
January 31, 1861, Lawrence Republican (ID 3858)

**Glorious Intelligence! Kansas in the Union! We have received the glorious news that Kansas is admitted into the Union. The Kansas bill passed the House with Fitch's amendment in regard to the judiciary yesterday. The following dispatch was sent to the Leavenworth Conservative:

Washington, Jan. 28, 1861. A. C. Wilder ? The state bill, with Fitch's judicial amendment, has passed the House. ? Marcus J. Parrott.

Somebody gave us a copy of the Conservative and, without waiting to inquire to whom we were indebted, we hurried to the office and placed it in the hands of our printers. It was sent here by the proprietors of that paper, by express, some five hours in advance of the mail.

We hear the jubilant news vocally heralded in the streets, and the sounds of the "spirit-stirring drum" admonish us that the "immortal Stubbs" are glorifying the event. All hail! We are citizens of the United States once more, partners in "Hail Columbia," "Yankee Doodle," the stars and stripes, the Declaration of Independence, and the Fourth of July!

Tuesday Night's Jubilee. Yesterday, when the news arrived of the admission of Kansas, our whole town was elated. Men ran from place to place, proclaiming the glad tidings. Cheering and music and all manner of exultation was heard everywhere through our streets. A deputation was immediately sent to Capt. Bickerton's for that celebrated old piece, the Sacramento, and it was brought to town after dark and 34 guns fired at about 12 o'clock, and renewed at sunrise this morning. The long hoped for event, the final triumph of Freedom, was achieved, and never in the history of Kansas was such exultation known amongst our people.

There is an interesting reminiscence connected with this gun. It is a Mexican brass piece, a six-pounder, which was taken by the American army at the battle of Sacramento in Mexico, and held in possession of a Missouri regiment until the troubles of 1856 in Kansas, when it was brought here by the Border Ruffians to batter down Lawrence, and was afterwards captured by the Free State boys at the battle of Franklin. Previous to that battle, the Pro-Slavery men had taken the Free State howitzer from Lawrence and our people were without any artillery whatever. It was known that this brass piece was at Franklin, with other arms, and the Free State men here determined to take them ? and they did, having one man killed and four wounded. Mr. Gunther, of this place, and who participated in the joyous proceedings of last evening, being one of those severely wounded. This piece has remained as a trophy in the hands of the Free State men ever since.

*...It was used at the battle of Fort Sanders, Capt. Bickerton going against Brown's express orders and taking type out of his office to make the assault. The balls were cast in sand, the first foundry work ever done in Lawrence. The Fort Sanders men fled at the advance of the cavalry and the canon, of course, was of little use. The next morning, the Free State men attacked Fort Titus and made the type metal do better service than they ever did with their own owner. Titus and his men were taken prisoners, one man being killed on each side, and Titus badly wounded. Afterwards, when the Free State men had compelled the surrender of the Pro-Slavery forces at Hickory Point, they were surprised and surrounded by U.S. troops and 101 men captured and imprisoned at Lecompton, and the gun taken under the orders of Gov. Geary. Titus loaded it and leveled it at the Free State prisoners, threatening to murder them in case he was attacked by outside Free State men. After the prisoners had obtained their liberty...the gun was very quietly taken from Lecompton one night by some of our artillery boys and buried....

 

*Col. M. W. Delahay was in our city last Monday on ...
February 28, 1861, Lawrence Republican (ID 3877)

*Col. M. W. Delahay was in our city last Monday on his way into the southern portion of the State. He had just returned from a visit to Springfield, Ill., and was in good health and buoyant in spirits in regard to the success of the incoming administration....Col. Delahay has done eminent service in the Republican cause, not only upon the stump in the Western states in the two last Presidential campaigns, but also in the heroic advocacy of the Free State cause in the times when few men on our borders had the courage to speak at all. His valuable press, the Territorial Register, was thrown into the river by a mob in 1855 because its liberty-loving utterances could be stopped in no other way. To such a man, the final triumph of a good cause must be gratifying indeed.

 

Our friends Ross, of the (Topeka) State Record, ha ...
March 28, 1861, Lawrence Republican (ID 3891)

Our friends Ross, of the (Topeka) State Record, have commenced the publication of a daily, to be continued during the session of the Legislature....

Influence of Newspapers. "Small is the sum that is required to patronize a newspaper, and amply rewarded is the patron, I care not how humble and unpretending the gazette which he takes. It is next to impossible to fill a sheet with printed matter without putting into it something that is worth the subscription price. Every parent, whose son is away from home at school, should supply him with a newspaper. I well remember what a marked difference there was between those of my schoolmates who had not access to newspapers. Other things being equal, the first were always superior to the last in debate, composition and general intelligence." ? Daniel Webster.

 

I have sold my interest in the Lawrence Republican ...
April 25, 1861, Lawrence Republican (ID 3902)

I have sold my interest in the Lawrence Republican to H. H. Moore....V. N. Smith.

Early on Monday morning of this week, an arrangement was consummated with Speer & Smith by which the latter...retires from the chair editorial of the Lawrence Republican and the undersigned assumes a share in the management of its columns. The Republican will remain as heretofore, an independent sheet....H. H. Moore.

...Mr. Smith retires from the Republican and Mr. Moore takes his place. The partnership was mutually dissolved, Mr. Smith desiring to betake himself to other occupations, and leaving with the good wishes of all concerned. Our new associate, Mr. Moore, is well known to the people of Lawrence....He is a true and firm Republican, an energetic business man and a good writer....The Republican will hereafter be issued under the firm of Speer & Moore....

 

The Grasshopper Gazette still lives. J. H. Burnett ...
May 16, 1861, Lawrence Republican (ID 3914)

The Grasshopper Gazette still lives. J. H. Burnett, the new editor, will make it a very readable paper.

Our printer has handed us a copy of the Congregational Record, a small quarterly published at the Republican job office and edited by Rev. R. Cordley. It is the only religious journal published at present in Kansas....

The Valley Farmer. The May number of this excellent agricultural journal is received....Published as cheap as this work is at only $1 a year, we can't see why it should not be patronized by every farmer in the West....

We have received the first number of the Olathe Mirror, edited by John Francis. It is Republican in politics and, of course, true to the Union.

The American Agriculturist for the farm, garden and household, published by Orange Judd, 41 Park Row, New York City, is a thorough going, reliable and practical journal....Terms $1 per annum in advance.

 

Printers in the Army. The senior editor of this pa ...
June 6, 1861, Lawrence Republican (ID 3932)

Printers in the Army. The senior editor of this paper started a Free State paper here known as the Kansas Tribune in 1854. Looking back to see where our assistants are now, we find them all in the army. Captain Swift and Sergeant Litchfield in the famous "Stubbs," and Sergeant Garrett of Captain Walker's company for a long time formed the entire corps of typographers in the old Tribune office, in the times when it was anything but a safe business to publish an anti-slavery paper -- armed then and ready to defend it, as they are to defend the honor of their country now....

 

We have received two numbers of a paper published ...
July 4, 1861, Lawrence Republican (ID 3950)

We have received two numbers of a paper published at Atchison called The Weekly Bulletin, published by Driggs, Ferris and Moore. The mechanical work is well executed but the animus of the sheet is traitorous in the extreme. No patriot, without loathing and disgust, can read its pages. We mistake the character of the people of Kansas if they support such an enterprise.

 

The Clinton Journal. We acknowledge the receipt of ...
July 11, 1861, Lawrence Republican (ID 3955)

The Clinton Journal. We acknowledge the receipt of this new and thorough going Union sheet, published by our Kansas boys during their stay in Clinton, Mo. Among the printers we recognize the names of Swift and Busbie, old typos of this office.

 

Off for the War. The undersigned, having been chos ...
August 1, 1861, Lawrence Republican (ID 3957)

Off for the War. The undersigned, having been chosen chaplain of the Third Regiment by the almost unanimous voice of officers and privates, has accepted the position and taken the oath of office. I have consequently sold my interest in the Lawrence Republican to my former partner, Mr. Speer, and my business connection with the office ceases with this date....During my continuance in the army as corresponding editor, shall endeavor to keep its readers and patrons thoroughly posted in regard to all that transpires on our part of the theater of the war. ? H. H. Moore.

Mr. Moore, in the foregoing brief valedictory, announces his retirement from the Republican. The paper will hereafter be conducted by the undersigned....Mr. Moore...will keep us fully posted in the events of the war in this most important field of contest.... ? John Speer.

 

The Leavenworth Conservative puts the interrogator ...
August 8, 1861, Lawrence Republican (ID 3961)

The Leavenworth Conservative puts the interrogatory to us: "By the way, friend Speer, after the article you gave us at the time of the affray on Delaware street, and when only one side of the case had been heard, would it not be fair now to state that Mr. Anthony has been acquitted?"

We think it would. The article alluded to was written by our late partner, and expressed his honest opinion about the affray, not on the evidence in the case, but as his moral opposition to all such proceedings. Entertaining a high opinion of Mr. Anthony, we deplore the transaction on his account, but thought best to say nothing on the subject prior to the trial. We have scanned the testimony very hurriedly, and are glad to be able to say that some of the witnesses testify very differently from the testimony before the coroner's inquest. The jury was composed of some of the very best men of Leavenworth -- of both political parties -- and their sworn verdict ought to have more weight with the public than the crude reports which found their way to the public ear immediately after the unfortunate affray, but nothing could be farther from our heart's desire than to do injustice to either the deceased or the surviving party....Our omission to notice Mr. Anthony's acquittal last week was entirely accidental. We are rejoiced that he was able to satisfy a jury of his innocence.

 

State Printing. The Senate Journal has just been f ...
August 15, 1861, Lawrence Republican (ID 3967)

State Printing. The Senate Journal has just been finished at this office, and the Laws are about completed at the Journal office. The stoppage of the Missouri river has retarded the work somewhat....

 

C. F. de Vivaldi, who goes to Santos, Brazil, as U ...
September 12, 1861, Lawrence Republican (ID 3977)

C. F. de Vivaldi, who goes to Santos, Brazil, as U.S. Consul, has retired from the Western Kansas Express. James Humphrey, who has for the past few months been the assistant editor, will have the future management of the paper.

 

*Peculation and Jay-Hawking: A system has sprung u ...
October 3, 1861, Lawrence Republican (ID 3987)

*Peculation and Jay-Hawking

A system has sprung up in Kansas known as Jay-Hawking. We are not conversant with its origin, and the representations in regard to its extent are so contradictory that we have been puzzled to know whether it was really an offense of great enormity.

Col. Jennison, when commanding a small body of Free State men, was represented as a Jay-Hawker, and we believe the same offense was also charged to Col. Montgomery. In the acceptation of their enemies ? the pro-slavery men ? it was simply stealing, while they always claimed that they only took the property of robbers and plunderers who had despoiled and driven off the Free State men.

Other plunderers, however, sprung up who made no such distinctions, and we have no doubt a large amount of thieving has been carried on under pretense of subserving the public good; and it is high time the system was crushed out. Now that the government has assumed the redress of evils, there is no necessity, and can be no justification, in individuals taking it upon themselves. That it is necessary to confiscate property is undeniable, but every dollar's worth taken should be scrupulously handed over to the government.

...We are glad to feel that there is a public virtue in Kansas which sets its face against these evils. Gen. Lane has issued orders for the prompt punishment of all such outrages, and in public speeches has denounced the man who appropriated property as a thief, and declared his determination to visit upon all such men under his command the severest punishment.

Lieut. Col. Blunt...followed up and captured a band of Jay-Hawkers, taking from them several horses, and threatened them with death for the second offense.... (John Speer)

 

*The Union sentiment continues to work disastrousl ...
October 10, 1861, Lawrence Republican (ID 3991)

*The Union sentiment continues to work disastrously on the secession journals and editors of the North, and in the loyal sections of the border slave states. Our list now exhibits the following results:

Papers suspended by the authorities, 17.

Destroyed by mobs, 10.

Died naturally, 6.

Denied the mails, 5.

Changed to Union, 7.

Editors in prison, 6.

Wood and Produce. We make it a rule to have pay in advance on subscription, from which we have only varied in a few instances to accommodate friends. In some of these, they have agreed to pay in wood in a few days; the others agreed to pay in produce when crops were gathered. Money is difficult to get, and we do not ask it where we can make anything else a substitute. We need wood exceedingly....Anything that a family can eat would also be very acceptable....

 

*A messenger has just arrived from Gardner with th ...
October 24, 1861, Lawrence Republican (ID 3999)

*A messenger has just arrived from Gardner with the intelligence that about 100 rebels sacked Gardner, taking about $10,000 worth of goods....

 

Sheriff Clem of Bates County, Mo., went into Linn ...
November 7, 1861, Lawrence Republican (ID 4003)

Sheriff Clem of Bates County, Mo., went into Linn County on Wednesday last at the head of 200 Missouri traitors. They have roamed through Linn County, committing depredations wherever they went. All the settlers on Mine Creek were driven off and 320 head of cattle taken. Three Union men...were killed. The utmost consternation has been created by this invasion. It is part of the plan which began with the pillage and burning of Humboldt. But General Lane is now near Fort Scott and the reign of the rebels will be brief." ? Conservative.

 

Fried Speer: I hope you will allow me room...to gi ...
November 21, 1861, Lawrence Republican (ID 4007)

Fried Speer: I hope you will allow me room...to give your readers a brief account of the most remarkable exodus of slaves to a land of freedom that has occurred since the time of Moses....

Gen. Lane's War Policy. He believes most religiously that slavery is the cause of the war -- that conquering armies have not so terrible an effect upon secessionism and treason as opening the way for the escape of slaves...that in the institution of slavery we are to look for the vulnerable heel of the South....

How Are the Slaves Obtained? Most of them come of their own accord into camp. For instance, George, a boy of about 12 years, was sent into the woods with a fine mule that neither might fall into the hands of the army. The boy had learned from conversation...among his master's family that many slaves were escaping into the army, and that they were protected. After a ride of about 15 miles, he came into camp....Our colored teamsters and servants act as...missionaries among their brethren, and induce a great many to come into camp. It cannot be denied that some of our officers and soldiers take great delight in this work....

But Few Slaves Redeemed. Masters, whether loyalists or secessionists, are permitted to come freely into camp and reclaim the fugitives if they can....Not one in a hundred can be persuaded to return.

The Exodus....When the army arrived at Lamar, some 40 miles southeast of Fort Scott, it was found that it was seriously cumbered with refugees from slavery; and especially so if any fighting was to be done. The following order was issued by Gen. Lane: "Lamar, Nov. 12, 1861. Chaplains Moore, Fisher, and Fish; you are hereby directed to take charge of the train of Refugees and escort them to Fort Scott....You will superintend the entire business of seeing them located, and their property secured to their possession before leaving them. J. H. Lane, Commanding Army Western Border." Our train was ready to move about 4 o'clock of the day the above order was received. The fugitives numbered 218, many of whom were children, and they had a large amount of household furniture. The column...was about a mile in length. No escort of soldiers was allowed, and we had before us a slow march of about 30 miles in the enemy's country. Col. Nugent sent along with us a load of old muskets and, though we had not a cartridge, every man was made to carry a gun through the town, which gave our command quite a fighting appearance....The evening of our departure, we made a march of 17 miles....The refugees were generally cheerful, though a few maintained a silent and serious aspect....About 11 o'clock we made a halt on the Dry Wood, about six miles from the Kansas line, fed our train from a cornfield belonging to a traitor who fought against Gen. Siegel at Carthage, killed one of his cattle for beef, and spent the night till nearly daylight in cooking and preparing for our march....

The Kansas Line. After a short march, we were able to point out...the distant hills and bluffs of Kansas. This created much enthusiasm in the ranks, and when informed that we were over the line -- that we were in Kansas -- the cheers and shouts which extended along the whole line beggar description....They...gave three hearty cheers for Gen. Lane, the Liberator. Our journey to Fort Scott was...without accident or difficulty. We camped a little south of the town....

Giving Names....Early in the morning, persons came into camp, desirous to relieve us of a portion of our command. One wanted a little girl to dress and bring up like her own; one wanted a boy; another a family to occupy a vacant house, &c. In parting with any of our charge, we took their name, age, the name of their old master, and a written pledge from the Guardians that they should be treated kindly and honestly. But as few negroes have any name except "Jack," "Bill," "Tom," &c., we had to supply the deficiency. I asked a little fellow his name and he answered in a low, glum voice, "Abe." "Abraham, I suppose." "Yase," he replied. "Your other name?" "Hain't got any." "Well, sir, you shall have a name. In the future, your name shall be Abraham Lincoln."...

The Negroes and Lawrence. Nearly every one of them was anxious to come to Lawrence, or to its immediate vicinity, but this we discouraged at every step. It was difficult to get any of them to leave the train....We had no difficulty in finding homes and employment for them all among our farmers.... ? Yours, &c., H. H. Moore.

 

*Col. Delahay, our able and efficient surveyor gen ...
December 5, 1861, Lawrence Republican (ID 4014)

*Col. Delahay, our able and efficient surveyor general, has issued a circular in which he recommends to Congress the passage of a Bounty Land bill, giving our Union soldiers lands for their services....

 

With this number ends 1861 as well as the first ye ...
December 26, 1861, Lawrence Republican (ID 4018)

With this number ends 1861 as well as the first year of the Lawrence Republican under the control of the present editor. It has not been a profitable business, but we flatter ourselves that we have met the approbation of our patrons....During a year of unexampled want, produced by the drouth, we have increased the subscription list of our popular predecessor, in but few instances varying from the ready pay system. But,...the past year has so curtailed business generally as to reduce our income from advertising....

 

Gen. Lane was to leave Washington last Monday, 20t ...
January 23, 1862, Lawrence Republican (ID 4033)

Gen. Lane was to leave Washington last Monday, 20th, for Chicago. He had an interview with the President and Secretary Stanton and Gen. McClellan, who heartily united in giving him authority to conduct the campaign on his own principles. Lane's staff will be that of a major general, comprising 17 officers....Champion Vaughn will be first aid-de-camp with the rank of colonel.

 

Congregational Record. This is...a paper devoted t ...
March 27, 1862, Lawrence Republican (ID 4059)

Congregational Record. This is...a paper devoted to the interests mainly of the Congregational denomination,...but it also gives appropriate and impartial notices of other churches and is a very well conducted periodical. It has been published for three years as a quarterly, but is now a monthly of 16 pages, pamphlet form, published at Lawrence at one dollar per annum in advance. Rev. Mr. Cordley, its editor, is a spicy writer who never fails to interest his readers.

 

George C. Smith, a printer from Northampton, Mass. ...
April 10, 1862, Lawrence Republican (ID 4064)

George C. Smith, a printer from Northampton, Mass., died at the military hospital....He had been several years in Kansas, for a time employed in the Leavenworth Times office, but at the time of his enlistment was a compositor in the Conservative office. He had formerly been an editor in Massachusetts....He was a member of Captain Stockton's company, First Kansas, and was through the battle of Springfield and all the other engagements of that gallant regiment....He was buried in the Lawrence cemetery.

 

Death of a Soldier and Editor. George C. Smith, a ...
April 10, 1862, Lawrence Republican (ID 4070)

Death of a Soldier and Editor. George C. Smith, a printer from Northampton, Mass., died at the military hospital in this city....He had been several years in Kansas -- for a time employed in the Leavenworth Times office, but at the time of his enlistment was a compositor in the Conservative office. He had formerly been an editor in Massachusetts....He was a member of Captain Stockton's Company, First Kansas, and was through the battle of Springfield and all the other engagements of that gallant regiment. He was buried in the Lawrence Cemetery...by his company with military honors.

 

*The Big Blue Union, J. P. Cone, editor, published ...
May 8, 1862, Lawrence Republican (ID 4083)

*The Big Blue Union, J. P. Cone, editor, published on the ruins of the secesh Palmetto Platform, is a true Republican journal and deserves success. We hope to see all the remnant of pro-slavery papers substituted by such sheets.

 

*The Inquirer. The Leavenworth Inquirer has made i ...
June 26, 1862, Lawrence Republican (ID 4116)

*The Inquirer. The Leavenworth Inquirer has made its appearance again; but under the direction of a man whom we believe to be a true loyalist. A. F. Pratt, of the Wisconsin Third Cavalry, is named as the person who has the helm. Mr. P. was formerly editor of a Democratic paper in Waukasha, Wis., and is known in that State as an able and racy writer. He celebrated himself several years ago in writing spicy and characteristic letters from the state capital to a Milwaukee paper during the session of the legislature....Buffalo B. Taylor is still in durance, his co-workers having been released. He has a card in the Inquirer, in which he says: "When I shall be released, I am not informed. There are no charges against me. The only cause assigned by Gen. Blunt for the arrest is the manner in which I conducted the Inquirer." Poor Buffalo! he is loath to admit that he was daily striving to cause dissention in a Union-loving community -- that he was violating the laws of his country by issuing matter tending to "give aid and comfort" to the enemy. The language of the Inquirer was too obvious to believe otherwise than that it was a sympathizer with the South. Everyone who read that paper says his confinement is just, and commends Gen. Blunt for his action in the premises.

 

Proof Reading. The superiority of English publicat ...
July 24, 1862, Lawrence Republican (ID 4133)

Proof Reading. The superiority of English publications has arisen from three concurring circumstances: Perfect typography, good paper, and composition so correct that a literal error is very rare indeed. The readers in a first-class English printing office are educated men. Oliver Goldsmith occupied such a position for a time. The reader on the London Times receives an editorial salary, but has to forfeit one guinea for every typographical error, even a turned letter, in each day's impression; if he has marked the error on the proof, the compositor who neglects to correct it pays the forfeit.

 

*Salutatory. The undersigned has again become the ...
September 11, 1862, Lawrence Republican (ID 4167)

*Salutatory. The undersigned has again become the editor and proprietor of this paper. He intends to publish it as an Independent Journal, devoted to the interests of Human Freedom. It will support men and parties only so far as they conduce to the furtherance of those interests....He will be thankful for the favorable remembrance of his old friends and patrons. -- T. Dwight Thacher.

*Kansas Invaded! Olathe Sacked! A newspaper Destroyed! Quantrell at Work! The town of Olathe, Johnson County, was visited and plundered on last Saturday night by the secessionists from Missouri under the lead of Quantrell. From Mr. Francis, of the Olathe Mirror, we learn that the attack was made at about 11 o'clock at night. Quantrell had about two hundred well mounted and armed men. He surrounded the town, placed pickets every few rods, with orders to shoot down any person who should attempt to escape, and then assembled the citizens on the Public Square....Quantrell took all the soldiers there were in the town, all the arms and munitions of the whole company, plundered every store, destroyed the type of the Mirror office, and after pressing all the horses and wagons he could find in the vicinity, marched off for Missouri. Two men were killed and one mortally wounded of the citizens or soldiers. Quantrell lost none....Had there been a well organized and drilled company of 50 men in Olathe, with a proper guard out, the town could never have been taken by any guerrilla force....Let our other towns take warning. The success of this raid will encourage similar ones on a bolder scale.

Mr. Speer, who retires from The Republican,...will carry with him the best wishes of his numerous friends. We understand that he will devote himself entirely to the duties of...Collector for the State....

 

We have added to our printing establishment a comp ...
September 18, 1862, Lawrence Republican (ID 4173)

We have added to our printing establishment a complete and well-ordered book bindery, and are prepared to accommodate our patrons with anything in that line....Blank books of any desired pattern or quality furnished to order. Also county, notarial and other seals. Aaron Katzenstein has transferred his entire stock and business into our hands....

*Maj. W. Y. Roberts and a large number of the commissioned officers of the Kansas First Regiment, now stationed at Trenton, Tenn., have petitioned Gen. Blunt to procure the return of the regiment to Kansas, alleging the threatening appearance of affairs as the reason for their desire to return.....

*Home Defense. At a public meeting in this city...to consult concerning the defense of the city, a large number of our citizens were in attendance....Roy and Divinney of Olathe were present and gave detailed and interesting accounts of the sacking of that place and the murder of some of its citizens by Quantrell and his band. A general discussion was then had as to the best means to be taken for the defense of our own city, and of the border towns and counties generally....It was deemed of great importance that our entire population, capable of bearing arms, should be immediately organized and drilled, and put upon a war footing....A committee was accordingly appointed to confer with Gov. Robinson, in company with the delegation from Johnson County, and report to him a resolution of the meeting, recommending the immediate organization of the entire militia of Douglas, Johnson, Miami and Franklin counties, and that they be armed and drilled. A resolution was also passed calling upon our city authorities to immediately place the artillery now in the city in a condition for active service, and also urging upon them to take measures for the organization of a company of infantry, one of artillery, and one of cavalry for the defense of the city, and the placing of proper guards to prevent a surprise. The committee visited the governor the next morning and...he determined to order the immediate organization and drill of the entire militia force in the counties above named, and also Wyandotte County....

 

During the sitting of the State Convention, we had ...
October 2, 1862, Lawrence Republican (ID 4186)

During the sitting of the State Convention, we had the pleasure of meeting a number of our editorial brethren: J. K. Bartlett, Leavenworth Times; T. D. Thacher, Lawrence Republican; R. B. Taylor, Wyandot Gazette; Sol Miller, White Cloud Chief; H. E. Lowman, Lawrence Journal; James Humphrey, Manhattan Express; Jake Stotler, Emporia News; D. B. Emmert, Monitor; E. H. Grant, Troy Patriot; J. Francis, Olathe Mirror; P. H. Hubbell, Grasshopper Falls Gazette.... -- Topeka Tribune.

Lieut. Col. Anthony has resigned his position and returned to Leavenworth. He is a brave and true man who has not been ashamed of his principles anywhere. He was driven from the service by the pro-slavery work required of our soldiers in Buell's department. A different era has dawned in such matters since the 22nd of September, and our soldiers will have no more dirty work of returning fugitives forced upon them.

Resignation of Col. Anthony. A letter writer in the Conservative thus speaks of the resignation of Lieut. Col. Anthony: "Lieut. Col. Anthony, you are doubtless aware, resigned his commission some time ago, on account of the outrageous treatment he has received since Jennison left the regiment. He received notice of the acceptance of his resignation on yesterday, and left this morning for Leavenworth. The boys got wind of his departure and flocked around the Colonel's tent to say farewell. The boys of the 7th have always appreciated the noble qualities of Anthony as a soldier and a man; and the rank and file regard him as the most reliable leader they have ever had. The Colonel said a few parting words to us, expressive of his affection for the regiment and his regret for leaving it, which brought tears to many manly eyes. As he left camp, we made the woods ring with three rousing cheers for Anthony and the band played the 'Farewell March.' His departure has left a gap in the 7th which will never be filled. There is not a man whom we would follow with such cheerful confidence into the 'imminent deadly breach.' We all feel that whatever discipline and effectiveness we have attained, we owe more to Col. Anthony than any other man, and that he alone deserved the colonelcy which was vacated by Jennison."

*"Quantrell's scouts are reported to have been seen within six miles of Fort Scott on Thursday night. If Quantrell intends to come this way, we hope he will give us due notice, that we may have time to get our 'form' out of the way. Judging from his operations at Olathe, he has an unpleasant way of knocking such things into pi." ? Bourbon County Monitor.

 

Over 70 new subscribers since our last issue. Merc ...
October 9, 1862, Lawrence Republican (ID 4195)

Over 70 new subscribers since our last issue. Merchants who wish to reach southern Kansas will please see the above. Every new subscriber, during this month, paying two dollars will receive the Republican for a year and the American Agriculturist for 14 months.

Lieut. A. J. Brown, formerly a printer in this office, and now a lieutenant in Capt. Stockton's Company, Kansas First, was shot through the body in an attempt to capture a gang of guerrillas in Tennessee a few days since. His wound, though serious, will not probably prove mortal.

 

*We are glad to find the Olathe Mirror once more a ...
October 16, 1862, Lawrence Republican (ID 4202)

*We are glad to find the Olathe Mirror once more among our exchanges. It is printed at Wyandot, edited at Quindaro, and published at Olathe. If Quantrell stops it again, he will have to make a wide circuit.

 

The Republican Party has nominated the editor of t ...
October 23, 1862, Lawrence Republican (ID 4212)

The Republican Party has nominated the editor of this paper for Representative in the Legislature from this district. We have nothing to say in regard to the matter except that our opponent, George Ford, is a neighbor and a friend, and an estimable and worthy gentleman.

*Kansas Again Invaded -- Town Sacked and Burned. Shawneetown, in Johnson County, a few miles from the Missouri line, was visited a few evenings since by Quantrell's guerrillas, and sacked, and in good part burned. Some 13 houses were burned and all the stores robbed except Capt. Keeler's. Several persons in and near the town were murdered....Kansas has 13 regiments in the field, and it is cruel that enough cannot be spared to defend our own homes. Every little town in Missouri is guarded, but our whole border from the Kansas river to Fort Scott is left unprotected.

35th Representative District. Proceedings of the Nominating Convention....Mr. Thacher was introduced and addressed the meeting....He had consented to accept the nomination, not because he had any ambition for a seat in the Legislature, but because it had been thought by many of our citizens that, if elected, he might be able to do something in protecting and promoting the local interests of the city. He considered these local interests of great importance....

We find among our exchanges a new paper, hailing from Paola, entitled the Union Crusader, and edited by B. F. Simpson. It supports the Union ticket with spirit.

*Gen. Delahay, surveyor general of Kansas and Nebraska, was in town....Gen. Delahay has just made an interesting report of the business of his office during the past year....

 

We sincerely regret the defeat of T. Dwight Thache ...
December 13, 1862, Lawrence Republican (ID 4258)

We sincerely regret the defeat of T. Dwight Thacher in Douglas Co.. We suppose he was defeated because he was a 'Lane man,' although he was responsible for none of the charges made against that party.

 

The State Record learns that the Manhattan Indepen ...
July 16, 1868, Lawrence Republican (ID 854)

The State Record learns that the Manhattan Independent and Radical have been purchased by L. R. Elliott, formerly connected with the Atchison Free Press...and that hereafter but one paper will be published there.