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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Leavenworth Conservative

Articles in database from Leavenworth Conservative:    127

...
February 7, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5704)

Volume 1, Number 1. D. W. Wilder, editor. D. R. Anthony, publisher.

The Weekly Conservative - A large number of copies of The Weekly Conservative are sent to persons who are not subscribers. We ask you to examine it, show it to your neighbors and, if you like it, to send us a club of subscribers.

We publish a large amount of matter for a very small price, and believe that our people will gladly avail themselves of the opportunity now offered to get a first-class Kansas newspaper for one dollar a year; ten copies for $9, cash in advance. No other numbers of the paper will be sent unless ordered.

"We have received the first number of a daily paper just started in Leavenworth called The Conservative. It is published by D. R. Anthony, and edited by D. W. Wilder, late of the Free Democrat, St. Joseph, Mo. The first number is filled with a large amount of interesting reading matter....In connection with the daily, the publishers intend issuing a tri-weekly and weekly Conservative. Politically it is Republican, but the publishers promise to make it of such a character as to recommend itself 'to all families as a domestic paper; to all business men as a commercial paper; to the intelligent and refined as a literary paper and to everybody as a general newspaper.'..." - Oskaloosa Independent.

 

...
February 14, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5705)

The Weekly Conservative has already gained an extensive circulation in the state, but we hope to make it a welcome visitor at every fireside...and we offer as an inducement to the getter up of a cub of ten "The Life, Eulogy and Great Orations of Daniel Webster" together with a extra copy of The Conservative....For a club of five on the receipt of the subscription price we will mail the book free. On the receipt of a club of ten, the book will be mailed postage paid to the address of the person sending the club, and the extra copy....

"The Conservative - This is the title of a good-sized, neatly-printed daily which has recently been started in Leavenworth with D. W. Wilder as editor and D. R. Anthony as publisher. The office will be under the management of M. Weightman, G. F. Prescott, H. Buckingham and G. C. Hume. This is a formidable corps to compete with...." - Atchison Union.

"New Paper - We have received the Conservative, a daily paper published in Leavenworth by D. R. Anthony and edited by D. W. Wilder, formerly publisher of the St. Joseph Free Democrat, against whom the grand jury of Buchanan County, Missouri, found a bill of indictment for publishing an incendiary sheet, i. e. Republican...." - Auburn Docket.

 

...
March 21, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5709)

The Conservative now has as least one correspondent in every county in Kansas. For the present, political news will center chiefly at the state capital (where we have already two reporters engaged) and we ask our correspondents to give particular attention to the condition of the crops in their localities....A few facts and figures, a plain statement of corn, wheat, hemp, and grass crops will be read with interest, not only in Kansas but in other states.

 

...
April 4, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5710)

The Wyandot Commercial Gazette has again made its appearance....If the citizens of Wyandot will study their interests, they will give their home paper a liberal support.

The Lecompton Democrat has been suspended for want of support. The material has been sold to a couple of gentlemen who are to start a newspaper it Atchison called the Bulletin, to be published tri-weekly and weekly.

We have received the first number of the Daily State Record, published at Topeka. It has a thrifty appearance and will be published during the session of the Legislature.

The Atchison Union of last week contains the following article: "The paper called the Conservative, published by one Anthony, edited by one Wilder, and owned by one modest, immaculate, virtuous young man, the Hon. Marcus J. Parrott." The Union publishes a lie when it says the Hon. Marcus J. Parrott owns any interest in the Conservative. It, with all of the material, is owned by the undersigned who alone directs the management and is responsible therefore. No one has ever paid us a dime....D. R. Anthony.

 

...
April 18, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5711)

**(Correspondent of the Conservative) Osawatomie -- ...The notorious cutthroat, Quantrall, alias Hart, the fiend that decoyed three men into Missouri to liberate slaves and then helped to murder them, has been skulking about here some time. Last week he was captured by a small party of men led by Captain Snider and lodged in our county jail on a charge of horse-stealing, it being the intention to hold him here until a warrant could be procured from Doniphan County, where he stands indicted for kidnapping; but his pro-slavery friends rushed to his rescue and succeeded in getting him discharged from custody by the probate judge upon a writ of habeas corpus before the warrant from Douglas County could be procured, and he left immediately for the company of more congenial spirits on the other side of the state line.

 

...
May 2, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5712)

The combined circulation of The Conservative is now three thousand, five hundred and forty-one copies. The first number was issued on the 28th day of January and The Conservative is only three months old. We have published more than one hundred columns more reading matter in our daily during that time than any other Kansas daily has furnished to its readers.

 

...
June 6, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5714)

The Fort Scott Democrat has temporarily suspended. Cos why? The editor, foreman, jour and devil have enlisted. Success to the typos!

 

...
June 13, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5715)

Printers in the Army - The senior editor of this paper started a Free State paper here known as the Kansas Tribune in 1854. Looking back to see where our assistants are now, we find them all in the Army. Capt. Swift and Surgeon Litchfied in the famous Stubbs," and Sergeant Garrett of Capt. Walker's company, for a long time formed the entire corps of typographers in the Tribune office in the times when it was anything but a safe business to publish an anti-slavery paper...." - Lawrence Republican.

 

...
June 27, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5716)

**A detachment of the Illinois 16th, now stationed at Chillicothe, Mo., has taken possession of a secession office and printed the first number of the Constitution. John L. Merrick, a volunteer who was for four years a resident of Elwood, Kansas, is the foreman of the office. The Constitution says it is "published by order of Lieut. Col. Wilson by the volunteers of the 16th Regiment now stationed at Camp Wilson, Livingston County, Missouri." The volunteers make a leader out of "Our March" and give a graphic description of "demolishing a disunion printing office at Macon" and cutting down a secession pole....It will be recollected that our pro-slavery friend Gen. Lucien J. Eastin, formerly of thee Leavenworth Herald, is editor of the Chronicle at Chillicothe. Eastin has cut and run if we may believe the following item: "Why is the editor of the Chronicle like Moses? Because in the bushes you can find him."

 

...
July 4, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5717)

**The St. Joe Gazette has changed hands. From the farewell of its traitor editors we are led to believe that the Gazette has long been bankrupt and must soon consent to drop under. The editors say they have been compelled to leave it because U.S. troops are stationed in St. Joe....With the Gazette dead and a Home Guard mustered in, we have hopes that St. Joe may yet be a decent town.

 

...
July 11, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5718)

**The Kansas Soldiers and the Clinton Journal - We received several letters from Camp Washington...but the Clinton Journal demands immediate attention. It is printed on the inside of a blank warranty deed and is "published by U.S. Forces under command of Major Sturgis." F. H. Swift, F. M. Tracy, Wm. H. Bisbee, A. J. Brown, C. M. Fisher, Geo. C. Smith, R. A. Tracy and Jno. A. Henry, Kansas First, printers.

The Union printers have taken a Secesh office and turned it to Union. The Journal is a lively paper. It contains a proclamation from Major Sturgis, addressed to the Union loving citizens of Missouri, and a proclamation from Chas. Lambert, "commander typographical corps." Charley, in behalf of the printers, proclaims that "no more secession papers shall be issued within our jurisdiction in the state of Missouri."...

 

...
August 1, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5719)

The Verdict - Our columns have been occupied for the last six days with the report of a trial entitled "The State vs. D. R. Anthony." Yesterday morning the jury came in with a verdict of acquittal. This did not surprise anyone who knew the facts in the case, or who had heard the evidence. The jury was composed of men of intelligence, men who could look at the facts fairly and impartially, and therefore a verdict of acquittal was rendered as soon as they came in.

The verdict is entitled to the more weight from the fact that the jury was composed of men of all shades of political opinion. The decision of the jury is, so far as we have heard, universally approved by the people.

We therefore ask those newspapers which have heretofore misrepresented this case to now do the tardy justice of recording the innocence of the defendant of the crime charged against him.

 

...
September 12, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5723)

We have received the prospectus of the Smoky Hill and Republican Union, a weekly paper to be published at Junction City, Davis County, Kansas, by G. W. Kingsbury at $2 per year....

 

Vol. 1, No. 202.: G. I. Stebbins, formerly of the ...
September 20, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 3984)

Vol. 1, No. 202.

G. I. Stebbins, formerly of the Atchison Union, called on us. He has assumed the editorship of the Atchison Champion. Our old friend, John A. Martin, is now a lieutenant colonel and will fight as bravely for freedom with his sword as he has ever done with his pen.

 

The man who spells elephant with two "ff's" and bu ...
September 22, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 3986)

The man who spells elephant with two "ff's" and buys paper by the ream says the Conservative is "going down." So it is. From a circulation eight months ago of about 100, it has "gone down" to a combined weekly circulation of 4,924. The people rather like it to take. That's what's the matter.

 

H. D. Hunt, publisher of the Elwood Free Press, ha ...
November 1, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4000)

H. D. Hunt, publisher of the Elwood Free Press, has given up the shooting stick for the shooting iron and joined Jennison's regiment....

Jno. L. Merrick, also a printer and formerly publisher of a paper in Elwood, has left the Illinois 16th and joined the same regiment....

 

List of papers that support Crawford and the whole ...
November 5, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4001)

List of papers that support Crawford and the whole State Union Ticket: Lawrence Republican, Topeka State Record, Elwood Free Press, Atchison Union, Brown County Union, Oskaloosa Independent, Manhattan Express, Smoky Hill Republican, Junction City Frontier, Council Grove Press, Neosho Valley Register, Osawatomie Herald, Shield and Banner, Fort Scott Democrat, Wyandott Post, Leavenworth Conservative. The opposition press does not represent one-fifth of the circulation and influence of the above papers.

 

...
November 7, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5725)

H. D. Hunt, publisher of the Elwood Free Press, has given up the shooting stick for the shooting iron and joined Jennison's regiment....Jno. L. Merrick, also a printer and formerly publisher of a paper in Elwood,, has left the Illinois 16th and joined the same regiment....Elwood has turned out not less than 150 men for the war and Doniphan County not less than 450.

 

*I have sold the Conservative, with stock of paper ...
November 8, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4004)

*I have sold the Conservative, with stock of paper on hand sufficient to last six months, to D.W. Wilder, the editor. The business and editorial relations have been satisfactory and pleasant. My hearty thanks are due a generous public for many favors.... -- D. R. Anthony.

 

Our old friend John L. Merrick, a printer, has bee ...
November 10, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4005)

Our old friend John L. Merrick, a printer, has been chosen first lieutenant of Company I, Jennison's regiment. He is a member of the "Union," true to the other Union, a gay typo and a gallant soldier....

 

The Marysville Platform, published in Marshall cou ...
November 11, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4011)

The Marysville Platform, published in Marshall county, is no more. The bogus papers are very generally going.

 

...
November 14, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5726)

I have sold the Conservative, with stock of paper on hand sufficient to last six months, to D. W. Wilder, the editor. The business and editorial relations have been satisfactory and pleasant. My hearty thanks are due a generous public for many favors. With best wishes for the prosperity of The Conservative, I am respectfully, D. R. Anthony.

 

...
November 21, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5727)

**The Marysville Platform, published in Marshall County, is no more. The bogus papers are very generally going.

 

*The Frontier News, published at Junction City, ha ...
December 4, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4013)

*The Frontier News, published at Junction City, has a long article in which an argument is used in favor of "peace," "compromise," and the "enforcement of the fugitive slave law." It is, we believe, the only paper in the state which licks the hand that smites us, and proposes to make concessions to men who trample upon every principle in the Constitution.

 

We received from Rounds' Chicago Type Foundry a ne ...
December 10, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4015)

We received from Rounds' Chicago Type Foundry a new supply of job type. Our office is the most complete in the state.

 

In Jackson county, Mo., the Daily Conservative has ...
December 25, 1861, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4017)

In Jackson county, Mo., the Daily Conservative has a circulation of over 140 copies. Of these 115 go to Kansas City and 25 to Independence. From one company of Col. A. C. Davis' Excelsior Cavalry we have received 34 subscribers to The Weekly Conservative.

 

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b ...
January 1, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4022)

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to be a correct list of the newspapers now published in this state. The number is not as large by a third as might have been given two years and a half ago.

Independent, Oskaloosa, Jefferson County, John W. Day and J. W. Roberts.

Gazette, Grasshopper Falls, Jefferson County, P. H. Hubbell.

Express, Manhattan, Riley County, James Humphrey.

Frontier News, Junction, Davis County, Geo. E. Dummer.

State Record, Topeka, E. G. Ross.

Tribune, Topeka, Cummings & Shepherd.

News, Emporia, Breckinridge County, Jacob Stotler.

Herald, Osawatomie, Miami County, C. E. Griffith.

Republican, Lawrence, John Speer.

State Journal, Lawrence, Trask & Lowman.

Gazette, Wyandott.

Post (German), Wyandott.

Shield & Banner, Mansfield, Linn County, J. Lyman.

Neosho Valley Register, Burlington Coffey County, S. S. Prouty.

Smoky Hill and Republican Union, Junction, Davis County, G. W. Kingsbury.

Mirror, Olathe, Johnson County, Jno. W. Francis.

Chief, White Cloud, Doniphan County, Sol Miller.

 

The Daily Conservative is sold at the following ne ...
January 7, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4025)

The Daily Conservative is sold at the following news depots: Woolworth & Co., Atchison; Post Office, Leavenworth; G. Wilmarth, Lawrence; Geo. O. Wilmarth, Topeka; Gilliss House, Kansas City; David Manlove, Fort Scott; S. M. Strickler, Junction City; Woolworth & Moffat, Denver, Col. Ter.; J. C. Agnew, Independence, Mo.; Wm. H. Sloan, H. R. Holman, A. Carpenter, Kansas City, Mo.

*The rebel newspaper published at Junction City gets a deserved and pointed blow from Sol Miller's Chief: "Would anybody believe that in this season of ruin, rebellion and blood, when party politics are forgotten, and nothing but the war is talked or thought of; when the causes of the insurrection are fully understood and appreciated; that an editor could be found, even out here in Kansas, who every week sends forth columns of doleful, dismal groans, the burden of which is 'Abolition!' 'Abolitionism!' Yet such an editor there is and his paper is called the Kansas Frontier, hailing from Junction City, Davis County -- in which paper article headings composed of five letters contain seven different varieties of type! It is unnecessary to state that the name of the editor is Dummer. His performances have about as much effect as trying to thaw a frozen nigger by crying 'fire'!"

 

The First Cavalry. This regiment is complete, cons ...
January 11, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4029)

The First Cavalry. This regiment is complete, consisting of ten companies. The officers are: Colonel, Charles R. Jennison; lieutenant colonel, D. R. Anthony....

 

A contest having arisen as to which paper should h ...
January 12, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4030)

A contest having arisen as to which paper should have the advertising of the post office letter list, a number of affidavits have been taken to be used in deciding that question. We give two of them below:

Affidavit of the pressman of the Times....John M. Best, being duly sworn, deposes...that he has worked off and pressed during the four weeks ending Jan. 4th, 1862, of said Daily Times, each day, the average of 28 quires, or 672 copies....

Affidavit of the pressman of the Conservative....Thomas McGiven, being duly sworn, deposes...that he has worked off and pressed during the four weeks ending Jan. 4, 1862, of said Daily Conservative the average number of 33-1/2 quires or 804 copies....

 

We have received the New York Tribune Almanac for ...
January 16, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4031)

We have received the New York Tribune Almanac for 1862. Having preserved them for ten years, we can bear honest testimony to their great accuracy and value....For a shilling you can buy this valuable compendium of statistics and political information.

 

...
January 16, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5728)

We take pleasure in announcing that Matthew Weightman is now a partner in The Conservative. The business will hereafter be conducted under the firm name of D. W. Wilder & Co.

We have received the New York Tribune Almanac for 1862. Having preserved them for ten years, we can bear honest testimony to their great accuracy and value....For a shilling you can buy this valuable compendium of statistics and political information.

Wm. H. Adams announces his withdrawal from the Atchison Union in the last number of that paper. A. P. Cochran will hereafter publish it. Mr. Adams will come to this city and start a Democratic newspaper.

 

We have had the pleasure of making the acquaintanc ...
January 23, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4032)

We have had the pleasure of making the acquaintance of S. W. Driggs, who will be the editor of the new Democratic paper about to be established in this city. Driggs informs us that the paper will be a daily, and he believes that it will be started within a very few weeks. The sooner the better, and we bid it welcome.

 

...
January 23, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5729)

We have had the pleasure of making the acquaintance of S. W. Driggs, who will be the editor of the new Democratic paper about to be established in this city. Driggs informs us that the paper will be a daily, and he believes that it will be started within a very few weeks. The sooner the better, and we bid it welcome.

 

R. J. Hinton, special correspondent of the Chicago ...
January 31, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4037)

R. J. Hinton, special correspondent of the Chicago Tribune and N.Y. Times, arrived here yesterday. The Tribune has shown its usual sagacity and enterprise in securing the services of so popular a writer.

 

Two old Conservative printers, of the Kansas 1st, ...
February 5, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4038)

Two old Conservative printers, of the Kansas 1st, G. O. Smith and Sergeant A. J. Brown, honored our office yesterday with their benign countenances. They have been with their regiment ever since it left here last spring....

 

Unpleasant. To have the gas give out before the pa ...
February 12, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4039)

Unpleasant. To have the gas give out before the paper is half made up, as it did last night. The gas is as uncertain as the telegraph was when the rebels had possession of Missouri.

 

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." ...
February 14, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4041)

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." He is not an orator or, if he is, he conceals his gift. But he is sharp, active and persevering. He makes an excellent chairman of a "Smelling Committee." Fraud, double-dealing and villainy of any kind must be ingeniously concealed, indeed, if it escapes his prying eyes. Sol is chairman of the Printing Committee....The committee presented their report this morning, and it gives us a very refreshing view of the manner in which contracts for printing have been let. The committee very justly observe that there appears to have been "a systematic combination to obtain contracts at exorbitant rates" and that "this species of swindling has been winked at, if not actually encouraged, by officers whose duty it is to guard the state against imposition."...The banking law...was ordered to be printed in one paper in each county. It appears that certain favored papers, in addition to publishing the law in their own columns, struck off extra copies containing the same matter, but with different headings, and thus drew pay for publication in papers which only had an imaginative existence. For instance, the publication was made in the Louisiana Republican, a paper purporting to be printed in Pottawatomie county, but actually printed at a newspaper office in Junction City, which was run at the time by one G. W. Kingsbury, who patriotically received for such bogus publication $290.44. Cummings, of the Topeka Tribune, seems to have been the whilom proprietor of the Wabaunsee Patriot! for publication in which visionary sheet he received the modest sum of $344. There are other instances of the same kind....The report will be printed and you can review it at your leisure....

 

John A. Henry, formerly a printer in this office, ...
February 15, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4042)

John A. Henry, formerly a printer in this office, and for the past eight months a private in...First Kansas Regiment, has been appointed private secretary to General Hunter.

 

The new Democratic daily about to be started in th ...
February 22, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4043)

The new Democratic daily about to be started in this city will bee called the Leavenworth Inquirer and will be published by Adams & Driggs.

There is a paper temporarily printed in Topeka by one of the publishers of the State Journal, or Farm Produce. It is the acknowledged organ of Charles Robinson, and is as dirty, nasty and mean as he is. Some people call it the Life in Boston, some the Venus Miscellany, and some the Swindler's Own. It is circulated "gratuitously" but somebody must pay its slanderous expenses. On the whole we think the best name for it is The Morning Bobstevens.

 

*We have a new paper. Its political position is pe ...
March 1, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4044)

*We have a new paper. Its political position is peculiar and worthy of remark....The paper is called the Inquirer; its publishers are Adams and Driggs, and its editor is Burrell E. Taylor. It is to be published daily, tri-weekly and weekly and calls itself "Democratic." The word "Democrat" is ambiguous. In the mouth of Stephen A. Douglas it meant loyalty, honor, the glory of the Stars and Stripes; in the mouth of John C. Breckinridge it means treason, repudiation, oppression, ignorance, hell. This Inquirer does not echo the words of that gallant loyalist and leader of the people, Stephen A. Douglas....The peculiarity of this Inquirer is that, while it is full of abuse for loyal men and the Administration, it has not a word against traitors and Jeff Davis. It professes to be loyal but all its poisonous darts are aimed at loyal men....

*The Meeting Last Night. Yesterday afternoon a placard called for the meeting of all loyal citizens at the Market, and a large number of people assembled. Capt. J. M. Dickson was appointed president and...stated that the object of the meeting was to consider and take into action a paper called the Inquirer; he believed and the people believed that it was a traitor concern....Maj. W. F. Cloud said he was provost marshal and no mob should disturb any newspaper....D. W. Wilder said he didn't care anything for provost marshals or military law. The citizens of Leavenworth had a right to meet at any time in any way....If the object of this meeting was to mob the Inquirer office he was utterly opposed to it. Let us meet our enemy fairly and squarely and overcome argument by argument, not by violence....The meeting closed by the appointment of a Committee of Five to wait on the proprietors and editor of the Inquirer and request them to "dry up" the concern.

 

*The Inquirer (secesh) and the Times (pro-slavery) ...
March 5, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4046)

*The Inquirer (secesh) and the Times (pro-slavery) are now giving three columns a day to the abuse of each other. The cause of their bitterness and slang is that each desires the county printing....We take no part in the vulgar brawl....We have a circulation three times as large as the combined issue of both these dirt-rollers....

 

G. T. Williaks, agent of the Associated Press, and ...
March 6, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4048)

G. T. Williaks, agent of the Associated Press, and one of the most skillful telegraphic operators in the country, returned from the East last night.

 

We have procured the services of Mr. A. Hamilton, ...
March 13, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4050)

We have procured the services of Mr. A. Hamilton, well known in our city for his superior skill and taste in the execution of job work, and have no hesitancy in saying that we can offer...as good, if not better, work than they can procure East at the same prices....

 

John A. Martin, lieutenant colonel of the Kansas E ...
March 15, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4052)

John A. Martin, lieutenant colonel of the Kansas Eighth, has been appointed provost marshal of this city. The appointment is in every respect an excellent one....

 

S. D. Macdonald of the Topeka Record is now in thi ...
March 16, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4053)

S. D. Macdonald of the Topeka Record is now in this city soliciting advertisements for that excellent paper....

A Republican and Editorial Regiment. We believe every officer in the gallant Kansas Eighth is a Republican. Col. Graham has been for seven years an editor. Lieut. Col. Martin established the Atchison Champion, of which he still remains publisher and editor; Major Schneider established the first Republican paper in Nebraska and afterwards edited the Times in this city. There are also in the regiment two captains who have been Republican editors. We doubt whether there is a more intelligent regiment in the whole service than the Eighth of Kansas.

 

We dislike to refer so frequently to Burrell. But ...
March 19, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4054)

We dislike to refer so frequently to Burrell. But he edits the most disloyal paper printed in any loyal state and, although it is merely printed and does not circulate, we are compelled to put in a protest against its constant violations of all those rights and principles which are dear to the people of Kansas. Burrell's last effusion is an apology for kidnapping and an argument for it. He denounces the supporters of the Kansas Emancipation League as thieves; he charges with crime the men whose only object is to give the unfortunate refugee negro a comfortable home....The Inquirer may prevail in rousing the hellish spirit of the mob; it may succeed in making a black slaughter; but we warn it against arousing those unreasoning passions. The nigger may be killed, and that may not be the end of it.

 

...
March 20, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5730)

We believe every officer in the gallant Kansas Eighth is a Republican. Col. Graham has been for seven years an editor. Lieut. Colonel Martin established the Atchison Champion, of which he still remains publisher and editor. Major Schneider established the first Republican paper in Nebraska and afterwards edited the Times in this city. There are also in the regiment two captains who have been Republican editors. We doubt whether there is a more intelligent regiment in the whole service than the Eighth of Kansas.

 

Henry O. Ford, the special artist for Harper's Wee ...
April 26, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4075)

Henry O. Ford, the special artist for Harper's Weekly, left for Fort Riley yesterday morning to join his company, that of Capt. Trego, 8th Kansas volunteers. He will make a series of sketches of the western country.

 

To Leavenworth. "We, too, have been to Leavenworth ...
April 27, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4077)

To Leavenworth. "We, too, have been to Leavenworth. Big town. Full of institutions. Daily newspapers, telegraph, theatre, moral show, Planter's House, Web Wilder and the Conservative. This latter institution is 'the leading newspaper in Kansas.'...Web does the heavy writing. Col. Martin and Sam Stinson let their splendid genius shine through the local columns. We saw Web. He is beautiful. Had a long talk with him on the Lane issue....We were most handsomely treated by all of the fraternity over there...." -- Lawrence State Journal.

 

The Doniphan County Patriot is the name of a paper ...
May 1, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4078)

The Doniphan County Patriot is the name of a paper just started by E. H. Grant at Troy....Dr. Grant has had much experience in newspapers....

 

Royal Washington press for sale. We shall soon hav ...
May 3, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4081)

Royal Washington press for sale. We shall soon have for sale the press on which our weekly has been printed. It is in good condition, prints a paper as large as 31x48, and does excellent work. Our reason for disposing of it is that we have ordered from New York one of Hoe's cylinder presses.

 

The Fort Scott Bulletin is the name of E. A. Smith ...
May 15, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4086)

The Fort Scott Bulletin is the name of E. A. Smith's new paper. It is handsomely printed and edited with ability. Fort Scott having been selected by Gen. Blunt as a permanent military depot, it will assume a position of more importance than ever before....

 

We learn from Lt. Col. D. R. Anthony that the cour ...
May 17, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4090)

We learn from Lt. Col. D. R. Anthony that the court-martial is over and that out of some fifty charges against him all have failed except one -- the charge of shooting a secesh colonel. The court-martial has adjourned.

J. Stotler of the Emporia News is in town. While here he will visit some of our merchants for advertising patronage. The News is five years old and as well established and conducted as any paper in the state....

 

Lt. Col. D. R. Anthony is acquitted on every charg ...
May 23, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4092)

Lt. Col. D. R. Anthony is acquitted on every charge and specification brought before the late court-martial.

New Papers. E. H. Grant has just started a paper at Troy and E. A. Smith at Fort Scott. D. B. Emmert talks of starting one at Marmaton, Mr. Wagstaff at Paola, and Mr. Peters at Marysville. There is room enough for all.

 

...
May 29, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5732)

E. H. Grant has just started a paper at Troy and E. A. Smith at Fort Scott. D. B. Emmert talks of starting one at Marmaton, Mr. Wagstaff at Paola and Mr. Peters at Marysville. There is room enough for all.

 

D. B. Emmert, now of this city and formerly editor ...
June 1, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4095)

D. B. Emmert, now of this city and formerly editor of the Auburn Docket, is about starting a paper in Marmaton, Bourbon county. Mr. Emmert has had much experience and will publish a first class paper.

 

Our paper is today printed on one of Hoe's cylinde ...
June 3, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4096)

Our paper is today printed on one of Hoe's cylinder presses -- the first one ever brought to this state. The introduction of this press marks an era in the history of Kansas journalism. The circulation of The Conservative had become so extensive that a cylinder press became an absolute necessity. We now have six presses in our office -- three of them power presses -- and our business is such that they are kept almost constantly at work....

 

S. M. Strickler of Junction City is now in town an ...
June 4, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4097)

S. M. Strickler of Junction City is now in town and while here he will visit our merchants in order to secure advertising patronage for the Junction City Union....The Union is an excellent journal, having few superiors in the state....

 

...
June 5, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5733)

Our paper is today printed on one of Hoe's cylinder presses - the first one ever brought to this state (with line drawing). The introduction of this press marks an era in the history of Kansas journalism. The circulation of The Conservative had become so extensive that a cylinder press became an absolute necessity. We now have six presses in our office - three of them power presses - and our business is such that they are kept almost constantly at work. Our printing establishment is larger and better supplied with materials than any other in the Missouri Valley....

 

New Paper. We have received a prospectus of the Ka ...
June 13, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4100)

New Paper. We have received a prospectus of the Kansas City Daily Press, the first number of which will be issued Sunday morning by McReynolds, Upson & Co. The political color of the Press...will be Democratic, the exact hue of which we are not informed, but it proposes to stand by the old Flag, and labor for the perpetuation of the Union. Mr. Upson has been for some time past engaged in this city and as a workman has few superiors....The other members of the firm are all old practical printers....

 

The Osawatomie Herald will be moved to Paola on th ...
June 14, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4101)

The Osawatomie Herald will be moved to Paola on the first of next month. It is now in its fourth year, is an able and staunch Republican paper and deserves liberal patronage.

 

*General Blunt Suppresses the Inquirer. On Sunday ...
June 17, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4103)

*General Blunt Suppresses the Inquirer. On Sunday night Colonel Barstow, provost marshal, by the order of Gen. Blunt, took possession of the office of the Inquirer, a daily paper published here, and put under arrest Burrell B. Taylor, editor, W. H. Adams, P. Ronan and D. D. Taylor, publishers, and W. H. Westbrook, "local." The paper has been published here about three months and has never printed a line either in favor of sustaining the government or putting down the rebellion. More pernicious sentiments than it has given birth to were never published in any paper, at any time....Gen. Blunt has acted with the utmost caution and only after the fullest deliberation. If any censure whatever of his course shall proceed from the lips of loyal men, it will be that he exercised too great forbearance....In the suppression of the Inquirer no blow has been struck at the freedom of the press. Freedom does not mean license....Those who affect to believe that anything can be said and anything can be printed possess a patriotism which is akin to treason, and a morality but a slight remove from vice. The order of Gen. Blunt...says very plainly (and all "sympathizers" cannot be too hasty in heeding it), you cannot talk or print treason in Kansas. And he is justified by the Constitution....Every man who finds fault with the "cleaning" out of that Secession den simply criminates himself. The great mass of our people...,whether Democratic or Republican, breathe freer today and most heartily thank Gen. Blunt for his patriotic act....

...We allude to the battle between the Third Wisconsin Cavalry and Burrell Taylor, the burly rebel who proved his doctrine heterodox by editorial blows and knocks....The office was the first place to yield to the assault. It was quietly entered through two doors, peaceable possession taken and the gas turned on. This brought to light some peculiar correspondence and also revealed various United States muskets. They were well distributed through the printing office, and were all loaded and capped....Two squads of the Third were making a forced march to South Leavenworth. They...succeeded in finding the quarters of Adams and Taylor. Burrell, of course, had a few remarks to make....The other arrest was silently made and the Bohemian Brothers trotted along with soldiers in front of them; soldiers behind them....

 

We have on hand between two and three hundred bund ...
June 19, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4106)

We have on hand between two and three hundred bundles of printing paper. Publishers will bear this in mind when ready to replenish their stock.

The Zeitung, a German paper published in this city, has been recently enlarged....The Zeitung is nearly five years old....L. Soussman is the publisher.

 

...
June 19, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5734)

**It may be thought that our constant denunciation of the Inquirer has been dictated by selfish or personal motives.. To those who take that view we commend the following statements from other papers....

Doniphan County Patriot: "Now we have only one word to say further. Such a paper has no right in a patriotic community. It is a law-defier - a law-breaker. It encourages treason, resistance to the laws and government, and if its doctrines were lived up to would place Kansas among the apostate States. If neither the civil rulers nor the provost marshal will do their duty and suppress that infernal sheet, we expect the people will take the matter in their own hands and that right soon."

Oskaloosa Independent: "When the Inquirer was established, we refrained from expressing what kind of a paper we thought it would be though we knew the proprietors were of the meanest stamp of pro-slavery border ruffians in '56. We have been reading its treasonable pages frequently since it started and we believe its publication is a daily insult to the loyal men of Kansas."

 

McReynolds, Upson & Sinclair have commenced public ...
June 20, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4107)

McReynolds, Upson & Sinclair have commenced publication of the Kansas City Press. It is handsomely printed and a genuine Union paper....

 

*All the Inquirer folks have been released except ...
June 22, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4109)

*All the Inquirer folks have been released except B. B. Taylor....

 

*The new and independent and Union Inquirer is nei ...
June 25, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4112)

*The new and independent and Union Inquirer is neither new, independent nor Union. One would suppose from reading it that there were at least four hundred abolitionists now arrayed in arms against their country, and that it was the duty of Union men to go out and fight them....He who says that the abolitionists are equally guilty with the rebels ought to be shunned as a liar or pitied as a fool....

 

...
June 26, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5736)

All the Inquirer folks have been released except B. B. Taylor. We understand that A. F. Pratt, late of Wisconsin, has made an arrangement with the Inquirer printers to issue an "independent" paper and that the publication is to commence immediately.

 

*Another Inquirer Editor Squelched. An order was r ...
July 12, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4125)

*Another Inquirer Editor Squelched. An order was received by Col. Barstow yesterday evening from Gen. Blunt, directing A. F. Pratt to go beyond the lines of this military department within 24 hours from date. When the Inquirer was suppressed, Pratt made such representations that he was allowed by the department commander to revive the paper and assume control of it. But it seems that, in the meantime, he had been writing to the Wisconsin papers dirty libels on the people of Kansas, on Gen. Blunt and the system of military rule here....

 

The Kansas Herald is now published at Paola by W. ...
July 31, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4137)

The Kansas Herald is now published at Paola by W. F. Kinter, editor and publisher.

 

...
August 14, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5737)

P. B. Plumb of Emporia and E. G. Ross of Topeka arrived here yesterday, were mustered and return to their towns today to each raise a company for the Eleventh Regiment.

 

...
August 21, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5738)

Another Editor Gone - B. F. Kinter of the Paola Herald came up here yesterday and was mustered into the service. He informs us that recruiting is going on rapidly in southern Kansas. The men who are enlisting there now are doing so for the safety of the state, and they justly demand they be not ordered into another Department.

 

E. G. Ross has sold the Topeka Record to McDonald ...
August 26, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4154)

E. G. Ross has sold the Topeka Record to McDonald & Adams. Mr. McDonald is a practical printer and has long been connected with the Record. Judge Adams, formerly of Atchison, is well known...as an able man and a vigorous writer....In taking leave, our friend Ross says: "...We are now in the army, one of Uncle Sam's boys, and shall endeavor, as heretofore, to do our duty and do it well."

*Another Paper Suppressed. P. H. Peters and J. S. Magill of the Constitutional Gazetteer are expected to arrive here today under arrest. Their paper was published at Marysville, Marshall County, and they were arrested by Judge Horton for discouraging enlistments....

 

...
August 28, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5739)

Another paper suppressed - P. H. Peters and J. S. Magill of the Constitutional Gazetteer are expected to arrive here today under arrest. Their paper was published at Marysville, Marshall County, and they were arrested by Judge Horton for discouraging enlistments. The citizens of that county are nearly all going to the war and they didn't want any traitors left in the rear.

 

*Town of Olathe Sacked!...About one o'clock Sunday ...
September 9, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4165)

*Town of Olathe Sacked!...About one o'clock Sunday morning Quantrile, with 230 men, dashed into and took possession of Olathe. From that time until he left, at an early hour in the morning, he and his men were engaged in the work of murder, plunder and devastation. The first places visited were the stores kept by S. F. Hill, J. E. Clark and Frederick Huff. From Mr. Clark's store they stole $900, and enough from the others to make $2,000. Capt. J. E. Hayes (absent in this city) had about 50 recruits stationed at Olathe, all of whom were captured and their arms taken. Skinner and Wiggins, both recruits, were killed for making resistance. Blanchard of Spring Hill was also killed. They took 50 horses and mules, attached them to the best wagons they could find, and loaded them with goods seized from the stores....The printing offices of the Mirror and the Herald were entered and their contents demolished....

 

...
September 9, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5740)

**Town of Olathe Sacked!...About one o'clock Sunday morning Quantrile, with 230 men, dashed into and took possession of Olathe. From that time until he left, at an early hour in the morning, he and his men were engaged in the work of murder, plunder and devastation. The first places visited were the stores kept by S. F. Hill, J. E. Clark and Frederick Huff. From Mr. Clark's store they stole $900, and enough from the others to make $2,000. Capt. J. E. Hayes (absent in this city) had about 50 recruits stationed at Olathe, all of whom were captured and their arms taken. Skinner and Wiggins, both recruits, were killed for making resistance. Blanchard of Spring Hill was also killed. They took 50 horses and mules, attached them to the best wagons they could find, and loaded them with goods seized from the stores....

The printing offices of the Mirror and the Herald were entered and their contents demolished.... (The files of the Kansas State Historical Society include the Olathe Herald from August 9, 1860, to April 11, 1861.)

The records of the county clerk's office were torn in pieces and scattered to the winds. A Union flag suspended from the recruiting office of Capt. Hayes was torn to shreds and trampled in the dust by these mad assassins....

 

During the absence of the editor in the East, Ward ...
September 13, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4171)

During the absence of the editor in the East, Ward Burlingame will have control of the editorial columns of The Conservative.

 

The Atchison Union has changed hands, A. P. Cochra ...
September 17, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4172)

The Atchison Union has changed hands, A. P. Cochran retiring, and is hereafter to be published by Leland, Jackson and Marion. The political complexion of the paper is to be independent....

 

...
September 18, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5741)

T. Dwight Thacher has resumed the publication of the Lawrence Republican....In him all good causes will have a fearless advocate. There was need of such a man at such a time.

The Atchison Union has changed hands, A. P. Cochran retiring, and is hereafter to be published by Leland, Jackson and Marion. The political complexion of the paper hereafter is to be independent....

 

Col. D. R. Anthony has resigned his position as li ...
September 19, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4178)

Col. D. R. Anthony has resigned his position as lieutenant colonel in the 7th Kansas and returned home yesterday morning. Col. A. has seen a great deal of hard service in the Seventh, whose confidence he possessed in high degree, and parts with the regiment with many feelings of regret, but sickened and disgusted with the manner in which the war is carried on in Tennessee.

 

From the Seventh Kansas, Rienzi, Miss., Sept. 12, ...
September 20, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4180)

From the Seventh Kansas, Rienzi, Miss., Sept. 12, 1862....Lieut. Col. Anthony...resigned his commission...on account of the outrageous treatment he has received since Jennison left the regiment. He received notice of the acceptance of his resignation yesterday and left this morning for Leavenworth. The boys got wind of his departure and flocked around the Colonel's tent to say farewell. The boys of the 7th have always appreciated the noble qualities of Anthony as a soldier and a man, and the rank and file of the regiment regard him as the most reliable leader they have ever had. The Colonel said a few parting words to us, expressive of his affection for the regiment and his regret at leaving it, which brought tears to many manly eyes. As he left camp we made the woods ring with three rousing cheers for Anthony, and the band played the "Farewell March." His departure has left a gap in the 7th which will never be filled.... -- Sam.

 

City Printing. We understand that the Printing Com ...
September 28, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4185)

City Printing. We understand that the Printing Committee of the Council have awarded the city printing for the ensuing year to the Times....The committee went to the offices of the Times, Bulletin and Inquirer and received proposals for the printing, which were as follows: The Bulletin agreed to do the advertising for three cents a line and print the blanks at fifty cents a hundred. The Inquirer offered to advertise at two and a half cents a line, and print the blanks for fifty and seventy cents a hundred. The Times bid was five cents a line for advertising and one dollar a hundred for blanks. The committee probably did not consider it worth their while to secure a bid from the Conservative. We care nothing for that; we can live for six months or a year without the city printing. But we do object to see the city swindled out of five hundred or a thousand dollars for the sake of patronizing a particular newspaper....As between the three papers mentioned the Bulletin's bid was probably the lowest. If the Conservative had been consulted it could have done the work ten percent cheaper than either....

 

The Leavenworth Typographical Union, No. 45, will ...
October 4, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4188)

The Leavenworth Typographical Union, No. 45, will meet this evening at the Times office at 7:30.

L. T. Heritage has been elected captain of Company C, 11th regiment, vice P. B. Plumb promoted to the majority....

 

We published a weekly edition of 2,000 copies yest ...
October 9, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4194)

We published a weekly edition of 2,000 copies yesterday. Who can beat it?

 

...The Conservative is printed this morning in an ...
October 11, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4197)

...The Conservative is printed this morning in an enlarged form....Nearly two years ago the first number of the Conservative was issued. It was issued in face of the fact that newspaper enterprises in this city had not been generally successful....How far this design has been accomplished is for our friends to determine....We have spared no effort to make good the promise with which our enterprise was inaugurated, namely, to make the Conservative, politically and generally, the leading paper of the state....

 

*We welcome with pleasure the re-appearance of the ...
October 14, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4199)

*We welcome with pleasure the re-appearance of the Olathe Mirror. Its editor, Mr. Francis, has been actively engaged since the unwelcome visit of Quantrile in making arrangements to resume publication....

 

We have received the first number of the Union Cru ...
October 18, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4204)

We have received the first number of the Union Crusader, a paper just started at Paola, Miami County, for the purpose of the campaign. It is edited by Ben. Simpson, Mr. Wagstaff's law partner, and is of course devoted to the mongrel ticket...

 

The Atchison Union has changed hands, C. M. Leland ...
October 21, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4208)

The Atchison Union has changed hands, C. M. Leland, W. J. Marvin and W. Jackson are now the editors and proprietors. The Union is an independent paper....The form of the paper has been changed to eight pages, similar to the Topeka Record. The proprietors are about to issue a daily.

 

...
October 23, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5742)

We have received the first number of the Union Crusader, a paper just started at Paola, Miami County, for the purpose of the campaign. It is edited by Ben Simpson, Mr. Wagstaff's law partner, and is of course devoted to the mongrel ticket. From the known character of its editor, is will readily be inferred that the Crusader is not profound.

 

We have received the first number of the Atchison ...
October 24, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4215)

We have received the first number of the Atchison Daily Union, published by Leland, Marion and Jackson. C. M. Leland is the editor. It...presents a fair typographical appearance....

 

E. A. Smith, late editor of the Fort Scott Bulleti ...
October 25, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4217)

E. A. Smith, late editor of the Fort Scott Bulletin, has gone into the service and Charles B. Hayward has assumed control of the paper....

 

In the discharge of a duty I owe C. F. D. Vivaldi, ...
October 28, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4222)

In the discharge of a duty I owe C. F. D. Vivaldi, the former editor of the Manhattan Express, I have taken possession of the press at this place. I gave a bond in the district court in an attachment case between...Humphrey and Mr. Vivaldi, in reference to this printing press, and took it into possession....When Mr. Vivaldi left here for Santas, Brazil, he left his press in the hands of Mr. Humphrey, whom he had taken into his house and office and treated as a brother. Mr. Vivaldi owed, at the time he left, about $150 to Mr. Humphrey, but H. had possession of all his printing apparatus, worth more than a thousand dollars. Very soon after Vivaldi left, Humphrey seized on attachment his friend's press.... It has stood in this shape in court until now....This was the primary reason for my action. I have other reasons. One is Humphrey for months has been doing all he can to defeat the material interests of this locality. He has allowed his paper to be used as a means of private slander and he has advocated principles different from those he agreed with Mr. Vivaldi to advocate....I gave a bond and took possession of the press as I had a clear legal right to do....The press for months past has been a curse to western Kansas and I am not aware that my friend Vivaldi was under any special obligations to furnish anyone a press for nothing. -- S. D. Houston.

 

The Kansas City Press has ceased to exist. In its ...
October 30, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4227)

The Kansas City Press has ceased to exist. In its issue of yesterday, it says: "We succumb to the hardness of the times, and the interference that military duties have with our business." There is now no paper in that town.

 

The Evening Conservative. The following is from th ...
November 5, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4231)

The Evening Conservative. The following is from the first number of our evening edition....We begin today to issue the evening telegraphic report and shall do so regularly....The evening edition of the Conservative commences with a circulation of one thousand copies in the city alone....Our terms are: For one square one week $2.00; for one square one month $5.00

 

Fifteen hundred is the circulation of The Daily Co ...
November 6, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4233)

Fifteen hundred is the circulation of The Daily Conservative.

 

An employee in the Conservative office had his han ...
November 20, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4244)

An employee in the Conservative office had his hand nearly severed from the arm yesterday by getting it caught on one of the power presses.

D. R. Anthony has been appointed agent at this place of the Corn Exchange, Fire and Inland Insurance Company of New York.

 

G. A. Colton has become the proprietor of the Paol ...
November 25, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4246)

G. A. Colton has become the proprietor of the Paola Herald.

 

The Atchison Union has "sold out." It is now the S ...
December 2, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4253)

The Atchison Union has "sold out." It is now the Standard, is edited by W. J. Marion, and is in favor of McClellan for President and Sammedary for Vice President.

 

Some half dozen of our exchanges have been diminis ...
December 3, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4254)

Some half dozen of our exchanges have been diminished in size since the breaking out of the Paper Famine, and large numbers of them have raised their prices.

 

...
December 11, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5743)

The Atchison Union has "sold out." It is now the Standard, is edited by W. J. Marion and is in favor of McClellan for President and Sammedary for Vice President.

 

Edward Sachse of the Zeitung office leaves here to ...
December 14, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4259)

Edward Sachse of the Zeitung office leaves here tomorrow to take an interest in the Democrat at St. Charles, Mo.

 

The Paper Famine. A bundle of paper which cost $5 ...
December 16, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4260)

The Paper Famine. A bundle of paper which cost $5 four months ago now sells in this city for $10. The New York Tribune has raised the price of its weekly to two dollars, the St. Louis has done the same. The Weekly Conservative is only one dollar a year. Subscribe before we raise it.

 

The Inquirer, Bulletin and Times each pay five dol ...
December 21, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4266)

The Inquirer, Bulletin and Times each pay five dollars a week for telegraphic dispatches. The Conservative pays ten, or twice as much as any other paper in the state. We intend to publish the latest news, although it costs us $520 a year. We publish a newspaper and spare no effort or expense to give our readers the latest news.

 

...
December 25, 1862, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5744)

Two Editions - The Conservative is the only paper in the Missouri Valley that publishes two daily editions.

 

Out of His Hole. Sam Wood is once more writing for ...
January 11, 1863, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4281)

Out of His Hole. Sam Wood is once more writing for the papers. We are daily expecting a communication from him, and have entrenched ourselves with a dictionary fortification, in readiness for the assault. Sam succeeded better in putting down bushwhackers in Missouri than he did in editing an illiterate newspaper in Kansas.

 

*The traitorous, cowardly, lying, sneaking, bonded ...
January 14, 1863, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4282)

*The traitorous, cowardly, lying, sneaking, bonded organ of the F.F.V.'s in this city, the Inquirer, made a characteristic attack on Gen. Blunt yesterday morning. We sincerely hope the dawn of the day is not far distant when the cowardly carcass of every home traitor will be found dangling, by its lying throat, to its own door post.

 

The Banquet and Ball. The banquet and ball given b ...
January 21, 1863, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4289)

The Banquet and Ball. The banquet and ball given by the printers of Leavenworth on Monday night was one of the finest affairs ever gotten up in Kansas. At an early hour in the evening the carriages began to arrive, and by nine o'clock Stockton's Hall contained a very large and festive throng....About ten o'clock, a motion was unanimously carried that Gen. Halderman preside at the banquet. After the crowd were seated, the General, in a neat speech thanking the guests for the honor,...accepted the chair. It is unnecessary here to delineate the...onslaught upon the best supper ever gotten up in this city. When sufficient time and labor had been expended upon the eating department, wine began to see and be seen. Then came the reading of answers to invitations sent abroad, toasts, speeches, &c....Next was a toast to the memory of Franklin....Benjamin Franklin. The Practical Printer; the Friend of Freedom; the Protector of the Poor; the Advocate of Abolitionism; the Representative of Reason; the Scientific Statesman; eulogized in England; fraternized in France; honored at home; loved by the Learned; prized by Philanthropists; praised by Patriots, and denounced by despots. May his memory remain, as immortal as the "Art" he admired, and the "Union" he assisted to establish. Then came a toast to "A Free Press."...After the conclusion of the banquet (about 12 o'clock) the hall was cleared of the tables, &c, to make room for the dancing. At 12-1/2 o'clock the dancing began, and was continued until nearly daylight....Altogether the entertainment passed off in a manner highly satisfactory to both Printers and patrons....

 

We call the attention of business men to the insur ...
February 4, 1863, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4294)

We call the attention of business men to the insurance card of D. R. Anthony. This agency was established in this city nearly six years ago....Col. Anthony has had a very large experience as an underwriter....

 

*Breaking Up of the Inquirer Office....The only pa ...
February 11, 1863, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4299)

*Breaking Up of the Inquirer Office....The only paper in Kansas that favored peace and submission to the rebels has ceased to exist. It departed this life at half past ten o'clock, yesterday morning, in broad day, and in the presence of a large number of peaceable citizens. It departed out of windows and down stairs. Such of it as would burn was burned; the rest was picked up by boys and sold to dealers in old junk. As we write, three gamins are rolling away the last wheel....We have already recorded the attempt made by the Copperheads on Saturday last to hold a disloyal meeting. That scheme was frustrated. The Inquirer was the organ of that movement, its principles being those of the Chicago Times, Cincinnati Enquirer and New York Express. The special friends of the Copperhead sheet, to the number of about thirty, armed themselves with muskets, revolvers and knives, and stationed themselves as a guard in and around the Inquirer office at an early hour on Monday evening. By midnight they became boisterous, abusive and guilty of such manifestations as usually result from bad whisky and similar patriotism. They affected to believe that every Union man who walked the streets was a "mob," intent upon the destruction of the Inquirer, and they carried their belief into execution. The building opposite the Inquirer office shows 26 bullet holes. The shots were aimed at Col. D. R. Anthony and two or three other Union men who were standing there, and who escaped unhurt now as they have done on many other occasions, almost miraculously. The Union men had made no demonstrations whatever against the office, and Col. Anthony had constantly opposed any such movement. We are told that the leaders of the Inquirer guard were the city marshal and several policemen. It is hardly necessary to say that men who have so grossly abused their office should be instantly removed from power. Men who get drunk and attack peaceable citizens are not fit guardians of law and order. The impression is well nigh universal that the policemen in this city, except officer Schott, are totally unfit persons to be entrusted with such power. John P. Mitchell, the jailer, is another man who was engaged in this shooting upon unoffending men, and into a dwelling house. The temper of our people is not to be mistaken, not be trifled with, and all such officers must be removed. Thus Monday night passed. At least one hundred shots were fired from revolvers and muskets in the hands of this Inquirer guard. They also forcibly entered a dwelling house and several bullets were found in bedrooms. The only person injured was one of the "guard" who was shot in the leg, probably accidentally, for it occurred in the printing office. The result of these midnight outrages was the cleaning out of the office the next day. This was done very quietly, with no violence and no disturbance whatever. Col. C. R. Jennison observed that some of the bullet holes in Mrs. Dexter's house could only have been made by persons shooting from the windows of the Inquirer office. He jocosely said that he "thought that paper had been firing upon Union men about long enough" and, without intimating his purpose or asking for followers, proceeded to walk up the stairs. Capt. Hoyt and a few other persons followed him and Inquirer stock presently began to come down. After the office was emptied the loyal men formed into procession, with Anthony for leader, visited the four loyal newspaper offices and greeted them with hearty cheers. We have no better citizens than those engaged in putting an end to the treasonable organ. If this was a mob it was such a mob as threw the tea into Boston harbor, and the results in our city and state will not be less beneficial than was that historic exercise of "arbitrary power." The Copperhead reign in Kansas has been very brief.

Martial Law Proclaimed. Headquarters District of Kansas, Fort Leavenworth, Feb. 10, 1863. General Orders No. 5. I. In view of the present pressing circumstances, and with the knowledge that the civil authorities are unable and inadequate to keep the peace and administer justice, Martial Law is hereby established in the city of Leavenworth. II. The Commanding Officer, Fort Leavenworth, will immediately detail fifty mounted men under a competent officer to act as a Provost Guard, said office being responsible for the quiet and safety of the city and loyal inhabitants thereof. By order of Brig. Gen. Blunt. Tos. Moonlight, Lieut. Col. and Chief of Staff.

The speeches of Jennison, Anthony and Hoyt, after the coup d'etat yesterday, were very plain expositions of unconditional loyalty.

Burrell was last heard of (on) his way to Weston. Missouri has received large accessions from bleeding Kansas within the last 24 hours.

Gen. Blunt suppressed the Inquirer last summer and put B. B. Taylor, its editor, in the guardhouse. After a time he was released, gave bonds, and the publication of the paper was resumed. Since that time it has been worse than ever.

 

*Vocal. The "insurrectionists," during our recent ...
February 12, 1863, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4302)

*Vocal. The "insurrectionists," during our recent "revolution," sang the John Brown Song whenever they appeared in our streets. To that tune the Copperhead meeting was transformed; by that stirring air the Abolishmenters abolished the Inquirer. On Tuesday night two hundred men in solemn procession rung out the old and rung in the new to "his soul is marching on."...Persons who do not live in Kansas, and who have never examined our legal code, can judge of the temper of the people when they are told that we sing the John Brown Song. That's the reason Copperheads can't live here.

State Record. Judge F. G. Adams has retired from this valuable paper. He is succeeded by F. P. Baker, who with S. D. McDonald will hereafter publish and edit the Record....Judge Adams has done good work and we part from him with feelings of regret.

 

"Buffalo Bull, editor of the ex-Inquirer, left her ...
February 13, 1863, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4303)

"Buffalo Bull, editor of the ex-Inquirer, left here by night, wearing a soldier's coat and a fur cap. He went to Atchison, and is in St. Louis ere this. We are anxiously waiting for his 'statement,' which he said would appear in the Chicago Times. Whoever publishes it will publish a set of rebel lies from a creature who has not one friend in Kansas, and who deserves a felon's fate."

 

*The meeting...was one of the most enthusiastic an ...
February 14, 1863, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4304)

*The meeting...was one of the most enthusiastic and determined ever convened in this city. It breathed loyalty, pluck and war. It was unconditional Union from beginning to end. The organization was as follows: President, D. R. Anthony. Vice Presidents, M. W. Delahay, E. H. Marsh, H. Deckerman, C. N. Palmer, Wm. Larimer, W. H. Ralston. Secretaries, G. H. Hoyt, D. W. Wilder, H. Buckingham. On taking the chair Col. Anthony said: "One week ago tonight Union men were despondent. War Democrats and Republicans were insulted in our streets. When the Inquirer office was destroyed, real estate in Leavenworth went up ten percent. Capitalists would not send money here unless we were first and last for the Union. When officers appointed by Sheriff Repine and Mayor Denman resolve themselves into a mob to assassinate loyal citizens, it is time for Union men to combine."...Three cheers were given for Jennison....He briefly related the historic incidents of the past week, including what Gen. Blunt called the "little incident" of closing out the rebel paper. He (Jennison) said: "They threatened to assassinate Anthony, Hoyt and myself. Now, gentlemen, I have been accustomed through six years to assassination. That night five men followed me home -- one of them was a policeman. I am constitutionally appointed to attend to that creature. The next morning I saw the shots in Mrs. Dexter's house, made by Mitchell and his drunken gang.

I say when the policemen and sheriff's deputies organize themselves into a mob, it is time every good citizen united against them. We didn't clean the thing out as a 'military necessity' but as a city and state necessity. The cleaning out party was not an irresponsible mob -- nine-tenths of them were property holders in this city. I went into the office first, hoping to find the engineer at home. I asked for arms of the first man I took hold of. He said there were none there. But when I began to run that 18-inch butcher knife of mine under his 'veskit' he cried out 'you'll find them in the next room,' and I did find United States muskets in that rebel office. After that 'little incident' the police element began to talk about 'driving out.' McConkey was going to cut every Abolitionist's heart out. Mitchell said there was an organized plan to clean out the Abolitionists. This is the same war that began in '55; we have been fighting it ever since. The Copperheads are organized in this state. Capt. Nelson runs a lodge at Wyandott. He swore a man in the other day and, when it was all done, behold, he was a 'Red Leg' -- one of Hoyt's men! There is another lodge in Atchison, one in Easton, one on the Wakarusa. We must put this thing down. Wherever you hear a man talking treason, shoot him. (Great cheering) Let that be practiced a month and these hounds will go to Missouri when they want to talk treason. I think there are traitors on the police in this city."...

 

*The Inquirer and Times. A few days ago Mr. Eskrid ...
February 18, 1863, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4306)

*The Inquirer and Times. A few days ago Mr. Eskridge of Lyon Co. offered the following resolution in the House: "Resolved, That the thanks of this House be tendered to those who participated in the recent suppression and destruction of that seditious and traitorous sheet, the Leavenworth Inquirer. And to maintain a healthy public sentiment for the cause of the Union, the Leavenworth Times and other papers in our state of questionable character and loyalty should be carefully and zealously watched; when treason through their columns becomes so bold as to be impudent, they may also be unceremoniously suppressed by the people they seek to disturb and injure."

The above is very similar to the following resolution which was unanimously adopted in a convention in this county last October. The Times long since ceased to have the confidence of loyal people in any part of Kansas: "Whereas, The Leavenworth Times has on several occasions, while professing to advocate Republican principles, united with disloyal sheets in support of candidates of the same stripe, under circumstances which leave no doubt that its influence, if any it had, was bought with a price, as Judas, who betrayed his Maker. And whereas, Its course in the present canvass must bring it into contempt with all honorable men, and even with those who, while they love treason, must detest the traitor. Therefore. Resolved, That the Leavenworth Times under its present management is unworthy the confidence and support of any honorable man who regards fidelity as a virtue or hired treason as a crime."

 

*The Doniphan County Patriot, in commenting on the ...
February 19, 1863, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4308)

*The Doniphan County Patriot, in commenting on the destruction of the Inquirer, says: "We have long since expressed our sentiments in regard to the character and course of the Inquirer and suggested the necessary remedy. Had it not been for Col. Cloud and Web Wilder, the office would have met its fate a year ago." It is true that we attended a meeting, called after the first number of the Inquirer was issued, and opposed its destruction by a mob. We have no apology to make for that act. The Inquirer had not uttered a single disloyal word at that time, and we were not then, and are not now, in favor of mobbing a paper because it does not agree with us in politics.

 

The Dimes. The Dimes of yesterday says, "We will g ...
February 20, 1863, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4310)

The Dimes. The Dimes of yesterday says, "We will go further than The Conservative in our devotion to the Federal Union....We will go further and sacrifice more to save the Union." Why don't you go, why have you not gone? What the Dimes may do in the future is impossible for us to say. It promises to be sincerely Union hereafter, to be even as loyal as The Conservative, and we hope no Copperhead will bribe it before it has a chance to carry out its good resolutions. We hope it will support loyal men for office, stand by the government in its hour of peril, cease to advocate only such men and measures as pay for its dubious assistance. Ever since the Inquirer was started the Dimes has labored to have it mobbed -- not on account of any repugnance to its principles, but for the loaves and fishes. The Dimes was more anxious for Democratic patronage than it was for the integrity of the Union. It wanted sheriff's sales and Democratic advertising, and it changed its politics and sold its soul for that cheap mess of pottage. Thus it favored mobs until the Inquirer was disposed of; that accomplished, it decries "lawlessness" and pats the Secesh gently on the back and tells them it always was opposed to "violence."...

*The Departure of Burrell. Correspondence of the Conservative. St. Joseph, Mo., Feb 18, 1863....B. B. Taylor came up from Weston on the cars with us yesterday, and left this morning for the East....Burrell sent a man to the cars at Weston to find out who were aboard from Leavenworth. He feared some of the "Red Legs" were around, as they had run him out of Platte City the day before. He was also afraid he would be reported upon along the road and be annoyed by military arrests in consequence. As he was going away from Kansas, we thought we could bear his presence for a time, so he came aboard. He looked very much dejected and had not a word to say. He would not talk to us Leavenworth men....Some of the boys thought he ought to be trotted through here, but as he was making his way out of Missouri, the military commander thought best to let him slide but said, if he remained over here even one day, they would "harness" him and send him back in the same to Leavenworth, if the people had any use for him down there. I learned that he told an awful tale at Platte City and Weston about the "mob" at Leavenworth. Well, he is gone, and I do not think Leavenworth will be troubled with him again....

 

*Provost Marshal's Office. The above office is now ...
February 21, 1863, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4314)

*Provost Marshal's Office. The above office is now in the room formerly occupied by the Inquirer.

 

We regret to learn that Col. Anthony met with a ve ...
February 24, 1863, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4315)

We regret to learn that Col. Anthony met with a very serious and nearly fatal accident at Topeka on Friday night. He was returning to his hotel, about midnight, and the night being very dark, he stepped off the sidewalk into a deep cellar, breaking his lower jaw and cutting his head in a terrible manner. He was also otherwise bruised....

 

For Mayor, D. R. Anthony. The Republican conventio ...
March 22, 1863, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4321)

For Mayor, D. R. Anthony. The Republican convention gave us a candidate for mayor yesterday that every loyal man will support with confidence and enthusiasm....Col. Anthony is one of our largest property holders and one of our most successful business men. We have few if any citizens of greater public spirit or of keener sagacity. He is called rash, but no officer was more cool and deliberate in the hour of battle. Some believe him to be imprudent, but his own successful career proves the absurdity of all such impressions....We don't think Anthony will ever need a Special Police. He is himself a police force of one hundred men, and can back down and drag out that number of rebels, thieves, or outlaws before breakfast, with a very slight exertion, and with no expense to the city....

 

Leavenworth Dailies. The Lawrence Republican says: ...
March 28, 1863, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4327)

Leavenworth Dailies. The Lawrence Republican says: "As for the Conservative, its bold, dashing, reckless style, and especially its large circulation, is an eyesore to the Times and Bulletin; hence they rejoice greatly to have discovered that the Conservative was wont to do the press work for the Inquirer. In vain does the Conservative reply that it was only a bit of job work, which in no wise implicated them in its sentiments. The Times and Bulletin gravely stick to it, that as inasmuch as the Inquirer was a traitorous sheet, the man that printed it, even though as a job, must also be a traitor. Of course, then, Drake, who sold the Inquirer its printing paper, the hands who worked in its office, and the man who rented the building to it, must all have been traitors. Pshaw! the Times or Bulletin would have done the job for the Inquirer gladly, could they have got it to do. But it makes a good little thing to punch the Conservative on, and they keep at it....On the whole, we hope nobody, outside of Kansas, will think that the Leavenworth editors are half as bad as they represent one another to be. They are really a very clever set of fellows, but competition is sharp -- that's all."

 

Journal of the Kansas State Agricultural Society. ...
April 3, 1863, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4329)

Journal of the Kansas State Agricultural Society. The contract for the publishing of this Journal has been given to the Tribune office, our bid being the lowest sent in....This Journal will be a valuable advertising medium, as every farmer in the state will become a subscriber. Its 'editorial' will be conducted by Judge F. G. Adams, of this place, the secretary of the society, but will owe its existence and continuance to the zealous efforts of Judge Bailey, president of the society...." -- Topeka Tribune.

 

*From Burrell Taylor. A gentleman in this city yes ...
April 5, 1863, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4331)

*From Burrell Taylor. A gentleman in this city yesterday received a letter from the above refugee, dated Vincennes, Indiana, in which the writer heartily endorses the action and policy of the Democratic convention here in adopting a sorehead as their candidate for mayor. The writer closes as follows: "It was the very best dodge they could have adopted to place Leavenworth again under our control, and I wish to God I were with you to aid in the work. If Mr. Atwood is elected, I shall feel that I may again return to L. and recommence the publication of my paper....Sincerely hoping that I may soon be advised of the success of the Democrats, and the reinstating of a mayor friendly to our cause, I remain your friend, B. B. Taylor."

 

*Burial of Copperheads. For the first time in our ...
April 7, 1863, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4332)

*Burial of Copperheads. For the first time in our history we can truthfully say that Leavenworth fully and fairly represents Kansas....Leavenworth is for the Union, for the Army, for Universal Freedom. We nominated our most radical, most Abolition, most gallant and true man, and he is elected by the largest majority ever given in this city....All men knew Anthony. They knew him for a man of nerve, of enterprise and of earnestness....The Times opposed our ticket. The Bulletin opposed it for three days and after that (who says it was bought?) gave it a weak support. But Anthony had the support of the "Leading Paper" and all true men....There will be no more disorder in Leavenworth....

 

*The Result. The following is the result of the el ...
April 8, 1863, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4333)

*The Result. The following is the result of the election yesterday: For mayor, Daniel R. Anthony 1222, Samuel F. Atwood 546. For marshal, John Schott 1272, George Kiernan 495....

 

S. S. Prouty of the Neosho Valley Register favored ...
April 11, 1863, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 4336)

S. S. Prouty of the Neosho Valley Register favored us with a call yesterday. He has been in the service nearly a year as a quartermaster in the Indian Brigade.

 

...
November 5, 1863, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5748)

**The editor of the St. Joe Tribune, D. K. Abeel, was arrested on Friday afternoon and taken to St. Louis, by order of the provost marshal, Col. Broadhead. He was placed in charge of a squad of soldiers.

The Tribune is the radical organ and the probability is that the editor was arrested under Order 96, though he was not informed of either of the specifications against him.

The arrest will probably result, as did that of Elder Bratton, of his unconditional release. The liberty of the press is too sacred to be interfered with unless the life of the nation should be endangered by its exercise. Certainly the administration, which withdrew the interdict on the Chicago Times, will not suffer another of its generals to imprison at will loyal editors whose only crime is that they differ as to the policy to be pursued on the question of slavery.

We are aware that intemperate language is freely bandied by the radicals - unjust criticisms as freely vented....The radical cause in Missouri will triumph because it is right. We urge its supporters to bear that in mind, and let no outrages of their foes now in power there goad them into acts of resistance to the Federal authority.

 

...
November 18, 1863, Leavenworth Conservative (ID 5751)

State Printing - John Speer was awarded the printing of the laws, journals and public documents. McDonald & Co. of the Record were the successful parties for furnishing the current printing of the Legislature. The Bulletin was awarded the executive printing. Dodsworth has the binding. There was considerable competition and the contracts were let at a low figure.

The Smoky Hill and Republican Union, published at Junction City, Davis County, has just commenced its third volume. W. K. Bartlett and S. M. Strickler are the proprietors and Wm. S. Blakely and George W. Martin are the editors and proprietors. Judged by typographical appearance, racy ability and genuine earnestness, there is not a better paper in Kansas....