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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Leavenworth Daily Times

Articles in database from Leavenworth Daily Times:    143

Published every morning, Monday excepted, by J. Ke ...
June 24, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4110)

Published every morning, Monday excepted, by J. Kemp Bartlett, office corner of Delaware and Third Sts.

The Inquirer will be out again this morning, somewhat changed in political complexion, which will not suit its recent secesh supporters, and we think it doubtful if Missouri will send any more clubs. It is to be conducted by Mr. Pratt, a gentleman connected with the 3d Wisconsin, who will make it what it never has been -- a Union paper.

 

Geo. A. Baxter, late editor of the St. Joseph West ...
June 25, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4111)

Geo. A. Baxter, late editor of the St. Joseph West, was killed at the battle of Front Royal. He was a captain in Ashby's rebel cavalry.

 

*But one verdict has been rendered by the press of ...
June 27, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4117)

*But one verdict has been rendered by the press of the state in regard to the suppression of the Inquirer. As all were agreed as touching its treason, so all think its suppression a measure of necessity and justice. The Emporia News says: "The Leavenworth Inquirer was squelched by Provost Marshal General Barstow, on Sunday evening, the 15th, by order of General Blunt, and its editors and publishers placed in the guard house. It was an infamous rebel sheet, always puffing and eulogizing rebel leaders and their cause, defaming and belying the Administration and the cause of free government. In our humble opinion this step was not taken too soon...."

 

*Marysville has become the birth place of another ...
July 3, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4121)

*Marysville has become the birth place of another newspaper -- the Constitutional Gazetteer -- which makes perhaps something less than a hundred which have been established there since Marshall drove the stakes for a city. Magill & Peters are editors and proprietors, and promise to keep the Gazetteer on the "Democratic" track. Rather indefinite, considering the promises of the Inquirer.

 

*Editorial Banishment. The Inquirer has been parti ...
July 12, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4126)

*Editorial Banishment. The Inquirer has been particularly unfortunate editorially. Scarcely had editor No. 1 been released from the guard house on his oath and duly approved bond of loyalty, when an order issues from headquarters requesting the absence of Pratt, editor No. 2, from Kansas. The terms of the order were doubtless imperative, as we learn that the aforesaid took immediate steps to comply with them and left town this morning. As we understand it, the cause of this order was the wholesale denunciation of the government and the military authorities indulged in by Pratt through the medium of correspondence with eastern papers. It is a complicated case and it is not at all likely we shall very soon be aware of all the particular causes producing the result chronicled above....

*Ordered Off. Gen. Blunt yesterday ordered A. F. Pratt, the present editor of the Inquirer, to leave the state. Pratt came to the city as a sort of a partner in the sutler shop of the 3d Wisconsin Cavalry. He left that place after a difficulty with the sutler, and by his importunity with Gen. Blunt succeeded in obtaining the privilege of taking hold of the Inquirer when it was suppressed, and he has since run that concern. He has, it is understood, varied his employment by writing home libelous articles on Kansas affairs which have been published in the Wisconsin papers. This order is a just rebuke to an officious intermeddler, who had no connection with the regiment, but obtained a little credit by claiming to be attached to it, and has caused it more trouble than all the jayhawkers. His low jokes, indecent sneers and ill-disguised sympathy with the rebel cause have well earned this penalty. The regiment feels the order quite as much a relief as, under any circumstances, it can prove to the people of the city and state. The original order sent him off in 24 hours. On his representation that his clothes were still with the washer woman and his board bill unpaid, the time was extended two days further for him to fix up his private affairs.

 

*Burrell Writes an Editorial. A long editorial in ...
July 13, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4128)

*Burrell Writes an Editorial. A long editorial in Burrell's most felicitous style was prepared for the Inquirer of yesterday morning; but Maj. Calkins, "happening" to look over the proofs, the editor was delicately informed that he could use his own discretion as to publishing it, only that if he did so the paper would be suppressed. Of course the article did not appear.

 

D. B. Emmert, late of this office, sends us the fi ...
July 18, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4130)

D. B. Emmert, late of this office, sends us the first of his monitions in the shape of a vary fair appearing journal, published at Marmaton, Bourbon county, under the comparatively new title of The Monitor. Mr. Emmert is a ready and forcible writer, as well as a practical printer, and the Monitor will make a creditable addition to the newspaperdom of Kansas.

 

The New Paper Boy. We are so little in the habit o ...
July 24, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4135)

The New Paper Boy. We are so little in the habit of being surprised at the sight of a newspaper boy that we are liable to forget the interest he represents. He may not be above four feet in height; he may not particularly shine in his clothes; his name may be Jack, and he may be in the habit of whistling, or when his papers are delivered he may play leapfrog with his friends over his and our friend the post at the corner of the street; but what an important personage he is. Let us leave the view we have taken of him and follow him tomorrow morning down the street as he delivers his papers. At No. 1 lives a member of the House of Commons who finds a relish in the breakfast which stands before him in the perusal of the speech he delivered the night before. At No. 4 live the young ladies who are anxiously waiting to read the advertisement of their sister's marriage, as they want to see how it looks in print. At No. 40, where furnished apartments are let, lodges the last edition of the operatic stage, nervously waiting to see whether the critics have made or marred her future reputation. Then, in the next street and over the way, are gentlemen who, having a grievance, have written to the papers and look in the correspondence for their letters; or gentlemen who have gone to law to settle their grievances and who search down the column of intelligence for a report of the trial; or, again, gentlemen who don't know exactly what to think -- who, in fact, do not want to think, who go to the editor to form their opinions; father and mother, and the exile who only sees his country through the medium of the newspaper; buyers and sellers are all waiting tomorrow for the news vendor's boy.

 

*John Speer of the Lawrence Republican has been ap ...
August 7, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4140)

*John Speer of the Lawrence Republican has been appointed collector for Kansas under the new tax law....

 

Weston is blessed with another newspaper, about th ...
August 9, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4141)

Weston is blessed with another newspaper, about the tenth that has been born there only to die. It is a fair sized sheet, of excellent typographical appearance, and issued under the auspices of A. F. Cox, who says in his inaugural: "...We are for the maintenance of the Union -- The Whole Union -- and for its maintenance at whatever cost it may require. We are for the preservation of the Constitution, for the enforcement of the laws, and for the perpetuation of the institutions of our government. As the prominent object with us is the preservation of the Union, the establishment of peace, and the restoration of fraternal feeling, we regard the introduction of all issues which tend to divert from this great object as wrong -- criminal." With a majority of Platte county people such a platform will be disagreeable; but we wish the Sentinel every success in its missionary labors.

 

John Swinton. One of the best fellows it has ever ...
August 13, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4142)

John Swinton. One of the best fellows it has ever been our fortune to enjoy an intimacy with -- in '57 foreman of the Lawrence Republican office, is now one of the editors of the N.Y. Times at a salary of $2,000 per annum. He is an original and vigorous thinker and wields a facile pen.

 

We learn from the July number of The Printer that ...
August 15, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4144)

We learn from the July number of The Printer that Capt. Madigan, 9th Mass., ex-vice president of the National Typographical Union, was killed during the battles before Richmond. Our introduction to Capt. Madigan was in the spring of 1860 at Nashville, whither he was sent as a delegate from the Boston Union, and then how little did we dream that he would meet death at the hands of those warm-hearted, impetuous Southerners among whom we so briefly and pleasantly sojourned....

 

To the War. Printers are proverbially patriotic an ...
August 16, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4145)

To the War. Printers are proverbially patriotic and we venture the opinion that in each regiment now in the field will be found some of the craft. The last call, however, has done the business, taking into the ranks editors, proprietors and compositors. The Richmond (Ky.) Messenger announces its suspension....The editor says he lays aside the pen and takes up the sword, which he will endeavor to wield to some purpose on the side of the Union....The Greenfield (Ohio) Republican announces by circular its suspension, as all the employees of the office have enlisted for the war....The offices of this city have furnished perhaps 25 men for the war, and we presume there are yet others who will go if necessary.

 

"Newspaper People Not Exempt. In the rebel conscri ...
August 17, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4147)

"Newspaper People Not Exempt. In the rebel conscription act the editors, proprietors and printers of Southern newspapers are expressly exempted from the operation of the draft; not so, however, with the recently enacted state and federal militia acts. In these there is no exemption for persons connected with newspapers, although professors, school teachers, students, and all connected with other educational institutions are not called upon to serve in the armies. Secretary Stanton has of his own motion and without any warrant of law exempted the telegraph operators from the effects of the draft; it may be that he also intends issuing a similar order respecting the press. It would be a graceful recognition on his part of the services of the fourth estate in exposing his military blunders and saving the country from their effects." -- World.

 

For lack of variety and amount of reading matter t ...
August 19, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4148)

For lack of variety and amount of reading matter this morning our apology will be found in Provost Order No. 2. Everyone connected with the Times office is a member of some military organization.

 

*The office of the Marysville Gazette, we learn, w ...
August 21, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4149)

*The office of the Marysville Gazette, we learn, was on Sunday last completely demolished by a party of soldiers stationed there. It is reported that offence was taken at an article denunciatory of Gen. Lane. The type, cases, etc., were scattered promiscuously through the streets.

 

J. K. Bartlett, proprietor of the Times, now East, ...
September 2, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4160)

J. K. Bartlett, proprietor of the Times, now East, has made large purchases of job materials for this office. It was shipped from New York last week. We shall, therefore, soon be prepared to do job work with all the new styles of type.

 

New Paper. Our enterprising friends, Buckingham, H ...
September 3, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4161)

New Paper. Our enterprising friends, Buckingham, Hamilton and Prescott, forming the Bulletin Printing Company, propose starting about the 10th of September an evening journal under the title of the Bulletin. We understand it is to be politically Republican and thoroughly Union. These gentlemen are of known ability and experience and, being all typos, will of course get up a good paper....

Editing a Country Newspaper. Pomeroy's Lacross Democrat speaks feelingly of the newspaper business. We hope Brick is not detailing his own personal experience when he says: "About the meanest, smallest, worst, lowest, most pusillanimous and thoroughly contemptible business a man was ever in, or can engage in, or is liable to be drawn into, or is unfortunate enough to have anything to do with is editing a country paper! A business that sounds so elevating and important, yet contains more bitterness, petty caucusing, driveling, miserable principles, and yields not benefit to the editor, either in pocket or position. A business that hazards credit, love of truth, veracity, good opinion, good position, yet is claimant upon everything that is of wire pulling, underhanded, go-around-ward -- sacrificing office meanness, and office rascality for support, and get cheated out of it at that!"

 

*The Inquirer is "still harping on my daughter." I ...
September 4, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4162)

*The Inquirer is "still harping on my daughter." It has now a wholesome horror of a mob when the "ingredients of the poisoned chalice" brewed in '55-6 may be commended to its own lips. Pray, did ever the highly moral, courteous and gentlemanly attaches of that sheet quote the common law in those days? Did they see anything felonious in the destruction of the Register? Anything criminal in the tarring and feathering and murder of Phillips? Or in the destruction of the Luminary, or the Free State, or the Herald of Freedom? Was it criminal in Fugitt to kill Hopps and carry his scalp through the streets of Leavenworth on a pole? Was the murder of Buffam nothing? Did Hoyt die justly? Was Butler only fitly punished when he went down the river from Atchison? Was the demolition of the Eldridge hotel only an act of loyal "breaking into?" The people of Leavenworth and of Kansas know who indorsed and applauded these things. They have not forgotten them, nor forgiven them; and if at times the recollection of these atrocities is brought before the vision of the guilty, like the ghosts before Macbeth, we fancy they must enjoy the prospect. Satan rebukes sin; pimps and panderers preach morality, and Burrell Taylor writes an essay on the enormity of mobs.

 

We shall receive, in a few days, a large assortmen ...
September 6, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4163)

We shall receive, in a few days, a large assortment of new job material from the best foundries in New York, and shall from time to time make such other additions as our extensive job business demands. It is the intention of the proprietor to make improvements in the office, both of job and newspaper type, bringing it fully up to the standard of a first class printing establishment. The business of the Times during the past year has been unexampled for prosperity, and upon receipt of our new material we shall be prepared to execute all descriptions of work in a style equal to that of any Eastern city.

 

*The Platte Conservator and the Topeka Tribune ret ...
September 12, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4169)

*The Platte Conservator and the Topeka Tribune retail the infamous lies of the Inquirer. The editor of the one paper has been appointed to office by Robinson, while those of the other are both graduates from Hughes' division of the rebel army, as disloyal now as they ever were, and as deserving of a military prison or the halter. The trenches would be too light a punishment.

 

*The Olathe Mirror. The Topeka Tribune publishes s ...
September 18, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4175)

*The Olathe Mirror. The Topeka Tribune publishes some extracts from a private letter written by Francis of the Olathe Mirror in relation to his recent losses and future prospects. He is a candidate for nomination to the office of superintendent of public instruction, for which he is well fitted.... "Lawrence, Sept. 8, 1862. Friends Cummings & Shepherd: On Saturday evening last our town was entered by Quantrell with about 200 of his brigand cut throats, and completely sacked. We were taken by surprise and any sort of resistance by the few remaining citizens of the place was impossible and fruitless. He made a harangue in which he disclaimed any intention of molesting quiet and peaceable citizens....But the cowardly wretch, under cover of these assurances, disregarded even the amenities of civilized robbery in plundering our people and demanding the personal jewelry and trinkets of men and women. He broke open and utterly destroyed my office, smashing cases and scattering the type promiscuously over the floor and yard. My ruin financially is complete. The labor of years and my future hopes -- gone. My office was the product of five years sweating and struggling with vicissitude and adversity, and sick at heart I almost shudder as the future looms before me...."

 

The Evening Bulletin made its appearance last even ...
September 19, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4177)

The Evening Bulletin made its appearance last evening. In typographical appearance it is unsurpassed -- decidedly the best looking paper in the upper country. The proprietors are practical printers and understand how to do it. In politics it is radical Republican, believing in abolishing everything but the Union for the safety of the Union. We are willing to divide, and say success to the new concern. The Bulletin will be a live concern.

 

City Printing. We are happy to announce, notwithst ...
September 27, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4182)

City Printing. We are happy to announce, notwithstanding the fact that Mayor Denman packed the Council Committee on Printing, so that in his judgment the city printing for the ensuing term would beyond all doubt be given to the Inquirer, we have signally triumphed over him and his followers in the council, and have secured the city printing until the 15th day of April, 1863. "The best laid schemes of mice and men aft gang agley."

 

Consistency. There are a few mendicant penny-liner ...
October 7, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4192)

Consistency. There are a few mendicant penny-liners in this city whose chief occupation consists in abusing the proprietor of the Times. They have no ideas of editorial courtesy, and none of the instincts of high-toned public journalists. Whenever the Times sees fit to advocate any course of political action, these fellows set to howling bargain and sale and the like trash. If those who make such charges are as free from the charge as we are, their morals are unimpeachable in that respect. But if these gentlemen insist upon such miserable falsehoods, we propose to ask them a few questions. Will the Conservative tell us how much it received for supporting Lattin (a radical Democrat) for mayor, and thereby defeating Dr. Houston, a Republican? The Conservative professes to be radical Republican, and yet it supported a radical Democrat for mayor. There must have been some pay for that somersault. Oh, most serenely consistent Conservative, how does it happen that a Democrat now edits thy paper? The public is perhaps not generally informed that the Inquirer, which the Conservative formerly called upon the authorities to suppress, is printed and issued from the Conservative office. It is but just, however, to say that the howlings of the Conservative ceased at the time this arrangement was effected. Oh, most spotless sheet, was it pay that made the change?

 

The Conservative undertakes to give a list of Kans ...
October 12, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4198)

The Conservative undertakes to give a list of Kansas papers that are supporting the two tickets. It puts down the Topeka Tribune, White Cloud Chief, Neosho Valley Register, Oskaloosa Independent, Wyandotte Gazette and Grasshopper Falls Gazette as supporting the straight Republican ticket. The simple facts are that the Topeka Tribune, Neosho Valley Register, Wyandotte Gazette and Grasshopper Falls Gazette are as yet non-committal. The White Cloud Chief has nothing to say in favor of the ticket, and the Oskaloosa Independent is a neutral paper. It is a well known fact that the Lawrence Republican is indirectly doing all it can against the ticket. So much for the fairness of the Conservative's statement in that respect.

 

Corruption. A part of Gen. Lane's staff is now det ...
October 15, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4200)

Corruption. A part of Gen. Lane's staff is now detailed to edit the Conservative. The government pays these gentlemen at the rate of about two hundred dollars per month for defending the nation in this hour of peril. The aforesaid gentlemen don't defend the nation, not a bit of it -- never have where there is any danger. Never will. But they defend Jim Lane's political rascality, and Jim Lane pays them out of the government money. What do the people say about paying taxes for such purposes?

 

*Quantrell in Kansas! Shawneetown Burned! A report ...
October 19, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4207)

*Quantrell in Kansas! Shawneetown Burned! A report reached us last evening that Quantrell, with a portion of his band, visited Shawneetown on Friday, burning 13 houses and killing two men. After robbing the citizens of such articles as seemed desirable he made an about face and left for his old haunts in Jackson county.

 

*The Kansas City Press has been "squelched." It di ...
October 21, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4209)

*The Kansas City Press has been "squelched." It died of too much Jeff Davis, but was resuscitated on a promise to do better. The provost marshal is "sentiment inspector" for it.

 

The Conservative, after resorting to all kinds of ...
October 22, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4210)

The Conservative, after resorting to all kinds of lying and corruption, after descending to the lowest depths of rascality and obscenity, after exhausting the vocabulary of billingsgate and mendacity, at last -- like an abandoned bawd who, through physical wreck can no longer ply her profession -- has become disgusted with its own infamy and now seeks to play the role of injured innocent. It says: "The readers of the Conservative will bear witness that thus far in this canvass we have refrained from the discussion of personal character." Sublime audacity! Epitome of lies!...Mr. Wilder is the proprietor of the Conservative. He has opened the door of tribulation himself, and we propose to let his sins flow unobstructed through, for the public scorn and execration. "Let the galled jade wince, our withers are unwrung."

 

*The Inquirer has found a "mare's nest" in our den ...
October 23, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4213)

*The Inquirer has found a "mare's nest" in our denunciations of the mob spirit as exhibited towards Mr. Parrott at Junction City, and accuses us of having invoked the same spirit on an occasion heretofore. We deny the charge in toto. However much we might have thought the Inquirer unworthy of confidence in a loyal community, we never wished to consign them to the tender mercies of a mob, and emphatically condemn the action of the meeting looking to that end.

" 'The Leading Paper.' The Conservative is consistent in one thing in this canvass. It adheres with unenviable pertinacity to the system of lying, humbug and cheating which was inaugurated by the bogus Jim Lane Convention at Topeka. It seems to understand perfectly well that a grand swindle can only be advocated and upheld by persistent falsehood. That paper has indeed become a 'leading paper' in one respect -- it has become a leading liar...." -- Manhattan Express.

 

We have received the first number of the Atchison ...
October 26, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4221)

We have received the first number of the Atchison Daily Union, a fair appearing sheet but given in some degree to gas. It proposes to "take telegraph news one day in advance of Leavenworth or St. Joseph dailies, and two days ahead of St. Louis and Chicago papers."...The Union runs Wilder and Mathias politically.

 

Owing to the death of the infant son of the propri ...
October 28, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4223)

Owing to the death of the infant son of the proprietor, the Times office will be closed until 1 o'clock today.

 

C. B. Haywood has purchased the Fort Scott Bulleti ...
October 31, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4228)

C. B. Haywood has purchased the Fort Scott Bulletin and makes his bow as editor. We do not like his ticket in this campaign, but have no doubt he will come round all right next time. We extend our hand and wish you success.

 

It may now be stated that the Republican state tic ...
November 7, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4235)

It may now be stated that the Republican state ticket is, in the main, elected. Such a result may not have been the one desired by us but it contains nothing from which either we or the people need take alarm. It has been truly stated by a contemporary: "The one man power" is dead in Kansas. Although this end, the one to which our efforts have been directed, in our judgment, would have been better accomplished by the election of Union candidates, yet we are completely satisfied that those who have triumphed will take heed of the future and so recognize the power that has spoken in this election that no apprehension need be felt....With the election of Mr. Carney, our preferred candidate from the outset, the people have cause to congratulate themselves greatly....As to Mr. Wilder, his future course has been sufficiently foreshadowed by his organ. That has spoken in terms not to be mistaken. But the people may now see, when the smoke of the campaign has lifted, with what honesty Mr. Wilder and his friends opposed the Union movement, into which they are now so eager to fling themselves with indecent haste. They have at last had the wisdom to discern the signs of the times.

*The Olathe Mirror, published at Wyandotte, has been suspended. It was a campaign sheet in the interest of the "patriot and statesman" Jim Lane.

 

Willis Emery, and old Leavenworth typo, returned y ...
November 12, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4239)

Willis Emery, and old Leavenworth typo, returned yesterday. He has been absent on a "tramp" about two years.

 

A Washington correspondent of the Republican says ...
November 16, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4242)

A Washington correspondent of the Republican says that G. W. McLane, the young general and whilom proprietor of Young America, and the Ledger, of this city, has been appointed assistant quartermaster in the regular army with the rank of captain.

 

Rebel Newspapers. A rebel paper published in Louis ...
November 30, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4252)

Rebel Newspapers. A rebel paper published in Louisiana is printed on the inside of ordinary wallpaper. The Houston Telegraph and the Galveston News have come down to small brown paper, such as grocers use. Many of the Mississippi papers are lingering in the last stages of contraction. They appear in all sorts of fantastic shapes and colors, exhibiting alarming symptoms of the fatal newspaper epidemic in the rebel land.

 

We are now paying a united tax of three percent on ...
December 12, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4257)

We are now paying a united tax of three percent on all the advertisements inserted in this paper. This tax has to be paid by all newspapers which have a circulation of over two thousand copies. In the state of Kansas one newspaper alone pays it -- The Times. The law settles the question of circulation, and business men will bear this fact in mind when selecting a paper to advertise in.

 

The Newspaper Crisis. The newspapers on our exchan ...
December 16, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4261)

The Newspaper Crisis. The newspapers on our exchange list are undergoing a thorough transformation. A large number have almost passed beyond recognition in their effort to retrieve expenditures, on account of the high cost of printing materials and the burden of taxation. Quite a number -- such as the Albany Argus, Albany Evening Journal, Baltimore American, Boston Courier, Philadelphia Inquirer, Rochester Union and Advertiser -- have curtailed their dimensions. Others resort to a cheaper kind of paper. One from New Jersey, for example, came to us yesterday composed of brown wrapping paper. But the more common expedient is to advance the subscription price, or terms of advertising, or both. This movement of increasing the price is general over the whole country. Very few city papers are now sold for less than three cents a copy. These changes will continue and it will not be strange if eventually many of the small country papers become extinct....

 

Artemas Ward as an Editor. In the autumn of 18--, ...
December 20, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4265)

Artemas Ward as an Editor. In the autumn of 18--, my friend, the editor of the Baldinsville Bugle, was obleeged to leave his profeshional dooties & go and dig his taters & he axed me to edit for him dooring his absence. Accordingly I ground up his Sheers and commenced. It didn't take me a great while to slash out koppy enuff from the xchanges for 1 isso of and I thawt I'd ride up to the next town on a Jaunt, to rest my Branes, which had been severely rockt by my mental effort. (This is sorter ironical.) So I went over to the Raile Rode office and asked the Sooperintendent for a pars.

"You a editor," he added, evijently on the pint of snickering.

"Yes, Sir," sez I, "don't I look poor enuff?"

"Just about," sod he, " but our road can't pars you."

"Can't hey?"

"No Sir -- it can't."

"Becauz," sez I, looking him full in the face with an Eagle eye, "it goes so darn slow it can't pars anybody!"

Methinks I had him thar. It's the slowest Rale Rode in the West. With a mortified air he told me to get out of his office. I pitied him and went.

 

Justly apprehensive of the safety of the Times bui ...
December 28, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4269)

Justly apprehensive of the safety of the Times building and the adjoining property, the mayor yesterday made application to Gov. Carney for permission to place in his powder house a large quantity of state ammunition which has been for more than a year stored in the story above the Times counting room. Permission was immediately granted, and the dangerous packages were removed to a more secure place.

 

Printers Take Notice. A good Washington Press, wit ...
December 30, 1862, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4270)

Printers Take Notice. A good Washington Press, with types, cases, racks, galleys and all the necessary apparatus for a complete country news and job office will be sold very low for cash, or exchanged for real estate in city or country, at a reasonable rate. Apply to or address F. M. McDonald, Times office, Leavenworth City.

 

At no time since The Crusader was established has ...
July 3, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4361)

At no time since The Crusader was established has it been in a more flourishing condition than at the present. During the past month we have added over one hundred new names to our subscription list. We have now probably the largest circulation in southern Kansas. -- Paola Crusader. We are glad to notice this prosperity of the Crusader. It is one of the most interesting and best conducted papers in the state.

 

D. B. Emmert of the Fort Scott Bulletin passed thr ...
July 9, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4363)

D. B. Emmert of the Fort Scott Bulletin passed through our city this week on his way home from the East to procure new material for his paper. D. B. is a splendid fellow, is sound, is a vigorous writer, and knows how to run the machine.

 

The Lawrence Republican is now published by S. M. ...
July 12, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4366)

The Lawrence Republican is now published by S. M. Thacher, a brother of the former proprietor.

 

A new paper to be called the Manhattan Independent ...
July 15, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4367)

A new paper to be called the Manhattan Independent is to appear this week. Mr. Pillsbury is to try the experiment this time.

 

*John Speer has been appointed receiver of commuta ...
July 18, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4370)

*John Speer has been appointed receiver of commutation money (the $300 to be paid for exemption from draft) for the state of Kansas.

 

The editors of the Conservative and Bulletin have ...
July 21, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4371)

The editors of the Conservative and Bulletin have been engaged in the dignified work of betting on paper and through the columns of their respective dailies as to how many men were enlisted in the 14th cavalry regiment. We suggest that if the belligerent knights of the quill desire to show their patriotism in a becoming manner, instead of making asses of themselves, that they go and enlist....Save your money gents and go into the regiment. -- Oskaloosa Independent.

 

Believing that the exigencies of the times demand ...
July 22, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4372)

Believing that the exigencies of the times demand it, and believing moreover that it will pay, we shall on Friday next commence the publication of an evening or 3 o'clock edition of The Times. It will contain the morning telegraph reports, local news up to the hour of going to press, with a variety of original and selected matter. The Evening Times will be furnished to subscribers, by carrier, at the low rice of 15 cents per week. Our morning edition will be continued as heretofore.

 

Opinions of the press:: "The Daily Times Enlarged. ...
July 24, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4374)

Opinions of the press:

"The Daily Times Enlarged. The Leavenworth Daily Times came to us last Monday enlarged to an eight column paper. It was always a well printed sheet. The Times is now the largest daily this side of St. Louis. It merits an increase to its already liberal patronage and we hope it will receive it." -- Lawrence Republican.

"The Leavenworth Times comes to us enlarged and improved. It is an excellent reading paper, and is the oldest and largest in the city. The liberal support given three such dailies by the people of Leavenworth surpasses any town in the West." -- Junction City Union.

"The Leavenworth Times comes to us very much enlarged and greatly improved in appearance. It is now the largest daily west of St. Louis. The Times, in its first enlarged issue, gives some interesting reminiscences of the daily papers which have flourished there and died out. They number seven and were the Herald, Journal, Young America, Ledger, Dispatch, State Register, and Inquirer." -- Atchison Champion.

"The Leavenworth Times comes to us greatly enlarged, printed on new type, and every way improved....Its publisher, J. K. Bartlett, has been the business manager of the paper, we believe, from its first issue. It has had various editors, but has usually been conducted with ability. The editorial management is now under the control of David H. Bailey, a forcible and spirited writer...." -- Kansas City Journal.

 

No. 1 of the Manhattan Independent is before us. I ...
July 30, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4378)

No. 1 of the Manhattan Independent is before us. It is the same size as the old Express and resembles that paper in appearance. Mr. Pillsbury seems well qualified to run the editorial machine and gets up a really readable sheet. It is of the extreme radical school of politics.

 

Among the big things around the thriving, bustling ...
August 9, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4383)

Among the big things around the thriving, bustling, busy burg, Fort Scott, the biggest decidedly is the Union Monitor, a combination newspaper published by Emmert & Hayward. The first number we have just received and must congratulate the firm upon their success in producing a paper so creditable to the city and themselves. Emmert edits the Monitor in his usual ponderous style.

 

The Sautrelle Jeffersonian has been purchased by S ...
August 19, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4393)

The Sautrelle Jeffersonian has been purchased by S. H. Dodge from Troy, Doniphan county. Mr. Crosby retires after a very short experience in journalism.

 

Saturday morning *Raid on Lawrence by Quantrell! ...
August 22, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4395)

Saturday morning *Raid on Lawrence by Quantrell! The City Burned! 100 to 160 Persons Shot!...Assessor J. F. Legate reached the city about noon today from Lawrence with intelligence that Quantrell and about 350 men...made their appearance in Lawrence this morning about six o'clock, attacking first the negro camps, during which several of the negroes were killed.

They announced to the citizens that they were Quantrell's men and had "come to see them according to promise." At about 8 o'clock they commenced firing the town, and when Legate left half an hour afterwards most of the city was on fire.

The following dispatches show that the guerrillas left Missouri last night, passing through Gardner about 12 o'clock. A cannonading was heard after Mr. Legate left, and it is supposed the troops from the border were in their rear. A battalion of cavalry left here immediately on the receipt of the intelligence....

Latest. We learn, just as we go to press, that a messenger has just arrived at the Fort with a dispatch from Lawrence, stating that about 70 persons had been killed and about 100 wounded. We also learn that Quantrell had about 800 men, and that immediately on their arrival in the town they commenced a systematic blowing open of all the safes with a view to get money. The whole town is reported to be burned, except about 30 houses....

The Dead of Lawrence. The latest reports from Lawrence, received here about midnight, are that the dead of Lawrence number between 100 and 150....Latest advices state that 150 are killed and a number wounded unknown. A great many bodies have been burned in the building(s). The demons shot every man that they could see or find. In one place, they drove 12 men into one house and then shot them. The inhabitants fled into the ravines and into the bushes, and the fiends stood on the banks and fired into them, killing and wounding them by the scores.

Lawrence is a place of about three thousand inhabitants. Nearly the entire town is in ruins. The Eldridge House, a magnificent structure that cost $50,000, is a shapeless mass of ruins....

Later from Lawrence. Mr. Montague arrived from Lawrence about 4 o'clock yesterday after medical assistance and medicines. He reports that from 50 to 70 of the citizens of Lawrence have been killed by the guerrillas. Among the victims he names J. C. Trask of the State Journal....

Relief for Lawrence. Now is the time for our citizens to display their liberality. The losses and suffering in Lawrence must be great. Let immediate steps be taken towards raising a munificent fund to relieve their necessities....

Drs. Logan, Sinks, McCormick, Barbour and two or three other physicians left yesterday afternoon, in great haste, for Lawrence...to attend the wounded of that place.

Organization of the Militia. Gov. Carney has ordered the immediate re-organization of the 1st Regiment State Militia in this city, and has commissioned S. A. Drake, colonel....

From passengers on the Fort Scott stage, we learn that Quantrill passed through Johnson county on Thursday night within two miles of Spring Hill. They robbed several farmers of their horses and proceeded to Gardner. They reached the latter place about 10 o'clock at night and, after robbing the citizens of all their money and taking several fine horses, they left for Lawrence. Quantrill said he was going to "burn the damned abolition town and scoop out the negro thieves." Quantrill's men numbered between 300 and 400, and were all well mounted and armed....

The Burning of Lawrence! The news which we publish today from Lawrence is of the most painful and exciting character. Kansas has been invaded and many of her best citizens murdered by rebel outlaws from Missouri. Justice cries aloud for vengeance and expiation. The destruction of Lawrence must be avenged. We will inscribe on our banners "Lex Talionis." Lawrence was one of the fairest, most beautiful and flourishing towns in the state. Her destruction touches every Kansan's heart with the most poignant sorrow, and fills him with feelings of bitter and dire revenge....

War Meeting Last Night. A Policy of Extermination Demanded....Pursuant to call, an immense concourse of people assembled in front of the Mansion House last evening to listen to the remarks of prominent men upon the events of yesterday in Lawrence. A deep seated feeling has taken possession of the public mind that these guerrilla raids have gone far enough, and that Quantrell's gang shall no longer set at defiance the people and authorities of Kansas. Mayor Anthony, Col. Jennison, Captain McCahon, Mark Parrott and Colonel Vaughan were the speakers....Our home dangers were strongly dwelt upon by all, and the seeming inefficiency of the military authorities, which have allowed the border to be overrun for years, earnestly and not flatteringly spoken of....

Our old friend and typo, Tom L. Johnson, left...yesterday for Springfield, Mo. War is to be his element now and his posish is battalion adj't 1st Ark. Cavalry.

 

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. ...
August 23, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4398)

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!....A large number of gentlemen came over from Lawrence early this morning, from whom we collate the following details of the terrible massacre at Lawrence.

The inhabitants of the principal street, Massachusetts, were aroused about half past four o'clock in the morning by horsemen riding furiously through the town. Quantrill entered the place about a quarter before five o'clock in person, and immediately posted his pickets out around the town in every direction. At sunrise, the work of plunder and murder commenced. Bands roved around through the streets and suburbs at will, robbing and shooting down every man they met, with the demonic abandon of cannibals....In the confused manner in which statements came in, it is impossible as yet to give a connected account of the whole affair....When the bushwhackers rode into the town, they did so yelling at the top of their voices, and saying that they intended to kill all without exception. Mayor Collamore, to avoid being killed, went down into his well and was suffocated. Gen. Lane escaped into a cornfield near his house and thus saved himself. He was one of the first men back into the town after Quantrill left and immediately organized a force and started in pursuit. At 4 o'clock last evening a messenger had arrived in Lawrence from Lane, stating that he had overtaken Quantrill at Brooklyn City and that a fight would immediately take place....Major Plumb arrived in sight of Lawrence just as Quantrill was leaving. He immediately turned his forces about with a view to intercept and capture the bushwhackers on the Santa Fe road. The banks were all robbed of large sums....Four Germans lying on a platform in front of a building were shot early in the morning while asleep. About 25 negroes were killed....Through the interposition and negotiations of R. S. Stevens and others, between 50 and 60 persons who were in the Eldridge House were saved. They were marched out under an escort and protected during the terrible scenes that were transpiring....Gov. Robinson's house was saved by a squad of the 12th Kansas regiment who were on the north bank of the river and who fired upon them whenever they approached the house. We have the following names as among the killed at Lawrence...son of John Speer....

We learn from Mr. Squires, express agent of the Fort Scott Stage Line, who arrived last evening, that the troops that went from Aubrey and Kansas City under Capt. Coleman and Major Plumb met Quantrill's band at Brooklyn City and, in connection with Lane's forces, they kept up a running fight all day on Friday, Quantrill retreating in the direction of Ottawa, Jones and Stanton, striking from there towards Paola. Troops and citizens from Paola met them one mile and a half from the town about half past nine o'clock at night of the same day. A considerable skirmish took place. Quantrill is reported to have lost during the day's fighting 24 killed and one prisoner....

 

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. ...
August 23, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4399)

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!...It is hardly possible as yet to procure a succinct and consecutive account of the diabolical proceedings of the Quantrill gang on Friday morning. However, through the kindness of R. S. Stevens, we are enabled to furnish a few additional particulars....We give a few of the terrible scenes as we recollect them:

Murder of Trask, Thorp and Griswold. Shortly after their arrival in the city, a detachment crossed the ravine to the west side and, surrounding the houses, called the citizens out and shot them. A party went to the residence of Dr. Griswold and, with demonic yells, said, "the d--d s--s of b-----s must come out of there." Mr. Trask and, we believe, Mr. Thorp were boarding with Dr. Griswold and all three of the gentlemen went out of the house by the front door, when they were immediately taken prisoners. Their names were asked and, as the answers were given, each in turn was deliberately shot down. Mr. Trask was recently married and his young wife stood by, a witness of her husband's assassination....

One of the first persons out was Col. Deitzler. "The sight that met us when coming out, I cannot describe. I have read of outrages committed in the so-called dark ages and, horrible as they appeared to me, they sink into insignificance in comparison with what I was then compelled to witness. Well-known citizens were lying in front of the spot where their stores or residences had been completely roasted. The bodies were crisped and nearly black. We thought at first that they were all negroes, till we recognized some of them. In handling the dead bodies, pieces of roasted flesh would remain in our hands. Soon our strength failed us in this horrible and sickening work. Many could not help crying like children. Women and little children were all over town hunting for their husbands and fathers, and sad indeed was the scene when they did finally find them among the corpses laid out for recognition....

Plunder was carried off on pack horses, and each private of the rebel gang must have been greatly elated by his share of the pure money, as all the safes in the city were cut open or blown up by filling the key holes with powder. In some instances, the keys were demanded and a refusal in every case was a death warrant....The amount carried away by the gang will probably exceed $75,000. Eighteen soldiers, out of 22, belonging to the 14th regiment were killed, with a number of the Second colored. The ladies exhibited in many instances the greatest degree of calmness and courage....The search was particularly directed for Gov. Carney and Gen. Lane, the rebels having heard that both were in the city. Lane's lucky star and a neighboring cornfield saved him, and the Governor was in Leavenworth....

Killed. Gen. G. W. Collamore Mayor, and son;...Josiah C. Trask, proprietor State Journal;...John Speer Jr., and brother missing....

 

*Fighting at Stanton! A gentleman who arrived from ...
August 24, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4400)

*Fighting at Stanton! A gentleman who arrived from Stanton yesterday saw the fighting from that place on Friday. The people from all parts of the country were rallying en masse in pursuit of the guerrillas.

The latest report is that Lieut. Col. Lazelear of the 1st Mo. State Militia had attacked a portion of Quantrill's gang on the border and killed seven.

Kansas City, Aug. 24, special dispatch to the Times: Twenty-seven guerrillas have been killed as far as heard from. They divided on the head of Grand river, some going south, pursued by Capt. Coleman, and some northeast, pursued by Major Plumb and Major Thacher, and other parties breaking up and taking to the brush....

First Information at Kansas City....At 12 o'clock on Thursday night two couriers dashed into the town with information that Quantrill had crossed the border at 6 o'clock with a large force, estimated at 900, for Lawrence. The alarm was instantly sounded and in 15 minutes every available man was in the saddle with Major Plumb at the head. The whole force left at half past 12 o'clock on a full gallop....

A Bushwhacker Executed. We learn by passengers who came in last night on the Fort Scott coach that one of Quantrill's guerrillas was captured a mile and a half from Spring Hill by Wm. McDowell, a boy 17 years old and a private in the 12th regiment, and taken to Olathe, where he was shot yesterday at noon by order of Capt. Ashby, 12th Kansas. Before his execution, he made a full confession and gave the names of 50 or 60 of the gang, some of whom have heretofore been recognized as Union men on the border in Missouri.

 

*Major Plumb. A certain clique in this city have b ...
August 26, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4401)

*Major Plumb. A certain clique in this city have been very busy for the past few days in making charges against Maj. Plumb. They allege that he displayed cowardice and refused to fight Quantrill when an opportunity was in his grasp. They aim to fix this belief with the community, by prejudicial reports claimed to have been received from the forces in the field, while in point of fact these reports are manufactured here for political ends. We have watched Major Plumb's course with great scrutiny, since the raid began, and have taken pains to converse with many reliable citizens, and one or two officers, who have been engaged with him in the pursuit, and from all these sources we draw unvarying evidence both as to the sagacity and bravery of Plumb during the whole of this trying ordeal. But, if stronger evidence is needed than the above statements, we have it in the fact that at a meeting in Lawrence night before last, and which Gen. Lane addressed, he having just returned from the pursuit, it was stated by Lane that Major Plumb behaved throughout the pursuit as a gallant, brave and judicious soldier. All who saw him pass through the fiery baptism of Prairie Grove know him to be as brave a man as ever trod a battlefield, and his maligners, while sneaking at home, are seeking to traduce, by poisonous innuendoes, and for miserable political ends, a brave soldier who is at this moment undergoing the hardships, the vicissitudes, the dangers of the war....

 

*We are pleased to learn that Hovey Lowman will re ...
August 27, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4403)

*We are pleased to learn that Hovey Lowman will re-establish the State Journal at once. The Journal occupied the front rank among the leading papers of the state. It was edited with signal ability and was, all in all, a paper that for its high tone, character and elevated sentiments cannot be spared from the list of public journals. The Journal has grown to be a power in the state.

 

*The loss of property (at Lawrence) will reach nea ...
August 28, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4406)

*The loss of property (at Lawrence) will reach near a million dollars. Killed:...John Speer, Jr., of Tribune office;...Asbury Parker, late of State Journal office, recruit of 14th Kansas;...S. H. Tritch, State Journal book bindery;...Chas. Palmer, Tribune office; Josiah C. Trask, State Journal;...

Hovey Lowman of the State Journal is in the city.

The St. Joseph Herald has commenced an evening edition.

The Weekly Times will be issued tomorrow and will contain the...full particulars of the Lawrence massacre.

 

*Destruction of Weston Sentinel. On Thursday night ...
August 29, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4408)

*Destruction of Weston Sentinel. On Thursday night a squad of soldiers from the 3d Provisional Missouri Regiment, stationed at Weston, Mo., attacked the office of the Weston Sentinel and entirely destroyed it. They entered the office between 9 and 10 o'clock at night, broke all the windows, pitched all the type into the street, destroyed the cases and played havoc generally. The office is now completely non est. The loss will reach about $1,000. The press...was not destroyed. The cause of the demolition is said to be a series of articles denouncing Col. Herran, commandant of the regiment, and the efforts of Cox, the editor of the paper, to procure his removal from the command, which efforts have finally succeeded and Col. Pike supercedes him....

McCallister, foreman of the State Journal, is in the city on his way east with Mr. Lowman for the purpose of purchasing a new outfit for the paper.

 

*State Journal To Be Re-established. We publish he ...
August 30, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4410)

*State Journal To Be Re-established. We publish herewith an interesting correspondence between Hovey Lowman of the State Journal and General Deitzler and others....

Lawrence, Aug. 24, '63. Hovey E. Lowman, editor Kansas State Journal -- Dear sir: The border fiends have been here and our beautiful city is in ruins. Amidst the ashes are what remains of the Republican, the Tribune, and the State Journal offices....Among these martyrs to liberty and civilization was your partner, the lamented Trask. The places of these cannot be filled, but Lawrence must again be rebuilt. One of the most potent instrumentalities to that end is a vigorous and well conducted newspaper. The eminent success of the Journal has taught us to confide in your editorial and business capacity.....The ground is classic. There the Journal was published by you, on the fragments of two other presses, established under the encouragement of the builders of free institutions. They were destroyed by the same malign spirit that let loose the demons who have now filled our streets with ruin. We therefore ask you to revive the Journal, and pledge to you our best endeavors to secure to it the prosperity it enjoyed before it was destroyed. (Signed by Geo. W. Deitzler, C. Robinson, and 36 others.)

Lawrence, Aug. 24, 1863. George W. Deitzler and others. Gentlemen: Your letter of today inviting me to reinstate the Kansas State Journal, and pledging to me your hearty cooperation in the enterprise, is before me. I hasten to reply, I will with the encouragement of your valued friendship re-establish the Journal as complete in all its appointments as it was before Capt. Quantrill and company visited our unhappy city....I am Your Serv't, H. E. Lowman.

In this connection, we are permitted to publish the following admirable telegram from Mayor Cummings of Topeka to Wells, agent of the Cincinnati Type Foundry, and L. Johnson & Co., type founders, Philadelphia: "The State Journal, Lawrence Republican, and Lawrence Tribune were destroyed on last Friday morning by slavery; will not freedom build them up again? Can you not raise enough money in Cincinnati to furnish three offices with new material?"

 

*An Instance of the Lawrence Massacre. S. A. Young ...
September 1, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4411)

*An Instance of the Lawrence Massacre. S. A. Young, a printer formerly connected with this office, passed through some thrilling adventures in the Lawrence tragedy. He was engaged in the Tribune office at the time of the massacre. He relates his story thus: The ruffians entered the house of Mr. Sargeant, where Young and several other men were boarding; the house was immediately set on fire, and all persons in it ordered out. Mr. Sargeant, a man named Palmer, and Young came out and were permitted, after giving up their money, to carry furniture out of the house; the ruffians then went away; soon, however, another gang appeared and ordered the men up to the fence and immediately began firing. Mr. Palmer was killed and Mr. Sargeant was shot twice through the head while his wife was clinging around him, killing him instantly. They then fired upon Mr. Young three times, missing him each shot, but he, playing a handsome ruse, fell as if killed. While thus lying in close proximity to the burning building, Mr. Young's clothes caught fire and burned his back almost into a crisp; but with Spartan heroism, knowing that his life depended on keeping quiet, he remained motionless, enduring the most excruciating agony from the fire. During this time the fiends fired into the lifeless remains of Sargeant and Palmer and were just on the point of firing into the prostrate form of Young, when a lady interfered, telling them that he was dead, and thus saved him. Finally they retired and Young dragged himself into some high weeds and lay there until they left the town. His sufferings are yet very severe, but he will recover.

A new and first class weekly newspaper is to be started at Burlingame by Mr. Murdock....Mr. Murdock is a thoroughgoing business man.

*We have received last week's Lawrence Tribune. The proprietor, John Speer, appears determined that his paper shall not miss a single issue, notwithstanding his great loss of property and the sad bereavements in his family. Mr. Speer lost two...sons by Quantrill's infernal gang.

 

We have numerous agents for the Times. They are al ...
September 5, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4417)

We have numerous agents for the Times. They are all effective men, and increase our circulation greatly; but none of these are half so efficient as Mayor Anthony. He is our best friend -- our best advertising medium. If our lists run down, forthwith Anthony imprisons us, or gets up a meeting to denounce us, and forthwith, as a natural sequence, our subscriptions run up amazingly. We are really under great obligations to Anthony for this. He does us great service. We will not be ungrateful. We respectfully request His Honor to hold a meeting once a week to denounce the Times. We will pay him for it. It pays us, and we can afford to remunerate him.

 

*Just as we go to press, we have the following tel ...
September 7, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4418)

*Just as we go to press, we have the following telegram from the provost marshal: Kansas City, Sept. 7, 1863. Capt. L. D. Joy -- If Mayor Anthony was not arrested by your orders, release him. A detective or soldier acting under your orders or mine in Leavenworth county may resist an attempt to arrest him, made while in the discharge of his duties, and for the discharge of his duties; but he should not arrest a civil magistrate without special orders from you or me. Thos. Ewing, Jr., Brig. Gen.

The city was thrown into great excitement yesterday afternoon by the arrest of Mayor Anthony. The facts attending and leading to the arrest, as near as we can learn, were these:

The detectives and the Mayor have been at violent issue for several days. Among other things alleged against Mr. Anthony is the arrest and imprisonment of one Andrews, a person in the employ of the government. The statement is that Andrews had been sent here from the Army of the Potomac for spy purposes among the bushwhackers. He had been provided with counterfeit money and various means by which to gain credit with the guerrillas, to ascertain their movements and report to the military authorities. Just as he was on the eve of starting on his expedition, he was arrested by the Mayor and is now confined in jail. Those are the facts as given to us by those who claim to know. A man named Yocum, from Platte County, who has a son in the 14th Kansas, now organizing, came over on Saturday to recover a horse which had been stolen from him. Mr. Yocum is vouched for as being one of the best Union men in the state of Missouri. While here looking for his horse, he found it, and was proceeding to the provost marshal's office to prove it, when the Mayor arrested him and put him in jail, assisting a man to run away with his horse. This is the statement that we have from the government officers. We know nothing further as to the facts. Another ground stated is that Mayor Anthony arrested I. G. Lossee, a government detective, yesterday for horse stealing, and bound him over without evidence, and, because Mr. Lossee offered to give bail, fined him $20 and costs for contempt of court. These and many other charges which we learn have been laid against the Mayor, and which we are told will be forthcoming in a day or two, led to his arrest yesterday by a troop of soldiers. He was immediately taken to Kansas City to have an investigation before General Ewing. His arrest, we are informed, was without the knowledge of General Ewing....Arbitrary arrests are always to be avoided. Although Mayor Anthony has committed many gross outrages upon the rights of citizens, yet upon principle we cannot endorse the manner in which he was arrested, unless we hear of a stronger statement of facts than have yet come to our knowledge.

*The Platte County Sentinel at Weston has been re-established....Its destruction was a piece of pure vandalism. Those engaged in it were actuated by no principle -- personal malice to the proprietor was the sole cause. They should be ashamed of themselves. The Sentinel is of the most unquestioned loyalty. Its destruction was a disgrace to all concerned.

 

*Mayor Anthony had a large reception at the Mansio ...
September 9, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4419)

*Mayor Anthony had a large reception at the Mansion House last night. He made a speech relating to the incidents of his arrest and detention at Kansas City. He was intensely bitter upon Gen. Ewing. He called him a liar, a puppy, a cur, a dog, and a coward. The whole speech was full of gall....Nelson McCracken and Judge Hemingray addressed the meeting, stating that the dignity of the city had been maintained and that martial law was revoked.

 

Mr. Soussman of the Zeitung will commence issuing ...
September 18, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4424)

Mr. Soussman of the Zeitung will commence issuing a daily edition of his paper first of next week....A good German daily ought to be well sustained in this city. We wish Mr. Soussman success in his new enterprise.

 

*Our Case. David H. Bailey vs. D. H. Anthony, civi ...
September 21, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4427)

*Our Case. David H. Bailey vs. D. H. Anthony, civil action. This was an action for false imprisonment. The facts, as disclosed in the testimony, are as follows:

On the morning of May 12th, 1863, the defendant, the mayor of Leavenworth, met a policeman, Gaston, upon the sidewalk and directed him to bring the plaintiff before him for a disturbance of the peace. The policeman went to the house of the plaintiff, wearing his badge of office, and found the plaintiff sitting with his family. Seeing that his family was alarmed by the presence of an officer, the plaintiff took him out onto a porch, when the officer informed him that he had come to take him before the mayor, stating what for. On the promise of the plaintiff that he would be there in a few minutes, the officer left. In about 20 minutes the defendant went to the mayor's office, meeting the officer on the way, who returned with him and accompanied him to the office. Immediately upon entering the office the mayor called the case of "The City of Leavenworth against David H. Bailey." The plaintiff enquired in what manner and the answer was by his criticism of Gen. Hooker in the Times, of which the plaintiff was one of the editors....On request, the Mayor refused to continue the case but, with great reluctance, granted the plaintiff an hour to procure counsel. At the end of the hour he appeared again with counsel. His counsel asked a continuance of one day, assuring him their only object was to make the necessary preparations to try what they considered a very extraordinary case. The application was refused. They asked for the warrant. They were told none had been issued. They asked for the charge proferred against him; they were told none had been made, it was in the newspaper. They asked that it might be put in writing for future use, the request being denied. The Mayor then proceeded to try the case, and the proof showed that the plaintiff was one of the two editors of the paper, but did not show that he wrote the articles or know of their existence till the paper was issued. The defendant said he would take official notice of the fact that the defendant was the responsible editor of the paper. He then announced his judgment, that the defendant be fined $20 and costs, and stand committed till they be paid. His manner was denunciatory, his manner malignant. He said that criticisms on military commanders should cease, and that he would make an example of the defendant and that he would not be deterred from his course by the technicalities and quirks of lawyers.

The Mayor then issued his warrant of commitment -- the then defendant refusing to pay the fine, by virtue of which he was held in custody some three hours, more than one hour of which was in the city jail, a loathsome prison where the lowest grade of criminals are confined. He was then discharged from custody by habeas corpus. The proof further showed that the next day, in a communication on the subject, the defendant, speaking of the arrest, said probably, or perhaps, there was no law for it, but that made no difference. This was all the evidence.

The judge charged the jury that, if there was no complaint made against the then defendant, and no warrant issued, unless he voluntarily surrendered himself to the Mayor, for the purpose of giving him jurisdiction, he did not obtain jurisdiction of the person, and was a trespasser, for which he was liable to respond in damages....

The following is the argument of H. Griswold for the plaintiff, who had the principal charge of the case for the plaintiff. It is much more condensed than it was in its delivery. But it is a fair outline of the argument, containing...the more important points and positions....

Gentlemen of the Jury: ...The action is for false imprisonment, the imprisonment consisting in arresting the plaintiff for a pretended offense and, after going through the mockery of a trial, imprisoning him in a loathsome jail for the alleged crime of disturbing the peace. The remedy is damages, the amount depending upon the circumstances of the case....In this case there was no prosecutor. No one in all this city had discovered that the peace had been disturbed. Everything was calm and tranquil until the defendant, the Mayor of the city, sent one of the city police to bring the defendant before him....The defendant claims immunity for his acts on the ground of his official inviolability. He places his defense on this monstrous proposition that he can be prosecutor, policeman, witness, judge, and that no tribunal can review his acts, and no individual can obtain redress for whatever injury he may receive at his hands....In view of this claim, so abhorrent to all our notions of right and justice, so opposed to the spirit of the age and country in which we live, so as to war with the teachings of our natural, unperverted instincts, I think you will agree with me, before we are through with this case, that it was not commenced a moment too soon....The plaintiff, a peaceable, loyal citizen, guilty of no offense against the laws or public morals, or even public sentiment, has been arrested, fined and imprisoned. These wrongs have been inflicted upon him by the defendant.

The original offense was a great outrage; the defense is atrocious....If this defense prevails, it places every man at his mercy; and if he may with impunity thus grind his heel into the neck of his victims, every magistrate in the state has the power to do the same thing....I desire it to be understood emphatically that I am not seeking to obtain damages for one whose claim is based upon a mere technicality. I also wish it understood that I do not seek to punish the defendant for a mere error of judgment, but because I believe him to have been guilty of a gross, intentional outrage upon the plaintiff. And I wish it especially to be understood that I am not prosecuting the case for a disloyal man who has been convicted by this defendant of publishing a disloyal sentiment in his paper....I hate a Copperhead....I say to you that I believe I have read every number of the Times of which the plaintiff is editor, since I came to this city, and I have never seen a disloyal sentiment in it. It differs from some papers, as it has a right to differ, as to the qualifications and merits of certain men, and as to some matters of policy, but so far as I have ever seen it has urged the most vigorous prosecution of the war, by all the power of the government, till the rebellion is subdued and its cause destroyed....

I claim that the defendant, in the farce enacted before him, called a trial, never obtained jurisdiction of the person of the plaintiff, and that, therefore, whatever he did was as illegal as if done by one of this jury. He failed to obtain jurisdiction for two reasons -- first because no warrant was issued against him, nor was he arrested on view, in the commission of any offense, and second because no complaint or information was filed against him, both of which provisions are provided for the security of the citizen by the constitution of this state....That you may properly estimate the offense of which the defendant is guilty, you should look at the relation of the parties to each other, and their position in society. The defendant is the chief officer of this city, a part of whose functions consist in the administering of justice....The plaintiff is editor of a leading paper in the metropolis of the state with a circulation extending through it. His influence, as editor, depends upon his reputation. The value of his position as editor which is his property is measured by this influence....Hence to assail the plaintiff's reputation inflicts upon him a double injury. It injures him as all are injured by assailing their character, and it strikes his tangible interests as it does to assail professional reputation or to steal property. The defendant then, by this act of which we complain, violated the plaintiff's rights of property, of reputation, and of personal security. In doing this he violated rights God-given and protected by the Constitution....

In France, too, we have seen the same struggle, and I refer to the struggle there for a purpose. After the restoration of the Bourbons the press for a time enjoyed comparative freedom. But Charles X, finding its free utterances annoying, sought to muzzle it, and as a consequence he was hurled from his throne. Louis Phillippe succeeded him, and if anyone could have been a match for this growing power it would have been he. He was of illustrious descent and could trace his lineage back to Charlemagne and William the Conqueror. Yet he was a man of the people, commenced life a democrat, espoused the principles of the revolution, fought in its armies, and afterwards acquired an enlarged experience of men and things by travel and association with all classes of people. But after a prosperous reign of 18 years, when he raised an issue with the press and sought to stifle it, he too was dethroned....

(To be continued)

 

*Hiram Griswold's Speech Concluded.: Under Louis N ...
September 23, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4428)

*Hiram Griswold's Speech Concluded.

Under Louis Napoleon the same contest is going on, and this is the way the people do up the business there. During the past year an editor named Pelatin was imprisoned several months, under the order of the Emperor, for saying in his paper there was more liberty in Austria than in France. At the last election there for members of Parliament, this man was elected by a large majority....Now look on that picture and then on this....This defendant, charged by his position and his oath with the duty of protecting its citizens in the enjoyment of all their constitutional rights, arrested and sent to a loathsome prison a loyal, peaceable citizen for the crime -- Oh God! what mockery -- for the crime of saying in mild and respectful language what the government has at length admitted, that the general who with the best army on this planet had suffered a disastrous repulse with a loss of 30,000 men in killed, wounded and missing, was not the proper man longer to lead the army of freedom in its contest with the maddened hosts of slavery....

There has always been in this country one subject that could not bear the sunlight of truth. Hence slavery has ever been the bitter prosecuting foe of a free press and free speech. It has attacked this principle under the form of law and in violation of all law. It has ransacked, plundered and burnt the public mails. It has robbed and murdered editors and orators. It has guttered and destroyed printing offices. It has violently dispersed peaceful assemblages of citizens. Of these things I have a lively recollection -- doubtless some of you have. If you were early settlers of Kansas you certainly have.

It will do no harm to see what in the early history of this state was claimed and done by the pro-slavery party in this region. It will show that tyrants and oppressors at all times travel the same road....Among the various laws passed by the bogus legislature of this state, I find and will read one section. "If any free person, by speaking or by writing, shall assert or maintain that persons have not the right to hold slaves in this Territory, or print, publish, write, circulate or cause to be introduced into this Territory written, published in this Territory, any book, paper, magazine, pamphlet or circular containing any denial of the right to hold slaves in this Territory, such person shall be deemed guilty of felony and punished by imprisonment at hard labor for a term not less than two years." It was the embodiment of such a principle in the form of law, identical in spirit with the action of the defendant, that shocked the moral sense of the civilized world. Well do I remember the outburst of indignation with which such enactments of your bogus legislature were received, and how from every stump in the North anathemas were hurled upon the heads of their authors....By my investments then made, I obtained a small interest in this state. I came out here to look after it, and I find it assailed by the defendant. He exhibits more of the tyrant than the Border Ruffians did. They published their laws....The defendant keeps his laws in his own bosom.

*...Well, the Border Ruffians having passed their laws, an obsequious grand jury reported two printing presses and the Eldridge House at Lawrence as nuisances. Thereupon, a mob, headed by Sheriff Jones, threw the presses into the river and burned the hotel, and while the flames illuminated the sky till it seemed to blush for the crimes committed beneath it, Jones sat upon his horse, rubbing his hands, and declared that he had sworn the Free State men should bow before those laws, and by God he had made them do it. Why that outburst of malignant joy, as from the open jaws of hell? Because a free press had been silenced.

...Who would have thought that, so soon after these events happened here, amid the mementos of your trials and sacrifices, and the monuments of your triumphs, a free press, because of the free utterances of a free man through its columns would be stricken down by the hand of its boastful champion?...He swore to support the Constitution, and he therefore swore than, under his administration, the liberty of the press should be inviolate. But in his hot haste to prosecute the plaintiff and his press he trampled upon two other constitutional safeguards he was equally sworn to support, which are that no man shall be arrested without warrant, or without being informed whereof he is accused....It is the duty of the press to expose imbecility and disloyalty. During the war the press has been a most efficient agency in weeding the army of drones and traitors....It turns out, now, that the criticism upon Hooker, for which the plaintiff was imprisoned, was correct. He was incompetent....

Probably the question has occurred to you, before this, what right had the defendant to interfere in this matter, even if the plaintiff had offended against some military law. The question is a pertinent one. That is what I complain of, an arbitrary arrest made by the defendant without any color of right to make it....I only ask you to appropriate to the case the feeling which was extended to the defendant, recently, when he was the subject of illegal arrest. Though it was made by a detective, in retaliation for the defendant's recent wanton, illegal and oppressive conduct in arresting him, the whole city gave expression to its condemnation of the act. Its citizens felt that a wrong was done to them in the person of the Mayor....I make no objection to military arrests, made from military or political necessity. I am perfectly willing the President should be the judge of this necessity. But there is safety in a military court for, before that tribunal, there are written specifications and the evidence is recorded and its findings are submitted to a higher power for revision....Mayor Anthony ruled that a just criticism upon the commander of the Army of the Potomac was a disturbance of the peace in the City of Leavenworth.

It is for this conduct we seek to recover damages. We claim that the defendant was actuated by malicious motives. We claim we have made a case against him from which the law infers malice, and that the case also discloses malice in fact....Beyond all compensation to the plaintiff, beyond all punishment of the defendant, you should guard the interests and look to the future of this state. Its history is yet to be written. You will write one page of it today. Let it be one of which you nor your children will be ashamed....You are asked to secure for the people of this state, for all coming time, the right of personal liberty and free speech -- those great, God-given, immortal rights, which none but those who hate both God and man would assail....

*AT THE CLOSE of this argument, the jury retired for a few moments and returned with a verdict for the plaintiff, fining Anthony $50 and costs of the suit. Thus Mayor Anthony has been condemned by a jury of his countrymen. They have, by their verdict, pronounced his acts as illegal, oppressive, malicious and corrupt. The triumph of law and justice over this man's corruption and petty tyranny is complete.

 

Presses & type for sale. I have for sale one Washi ...
September 25, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4432)

Presses & type for sale. I have for sale one Washington Hand Press, one Ruggles' Card Press, 1,000 pounds Bourgeois, 500 pounds Nonpareil, 75 pounds Nonpareil sorts and figures, new, 40 fonts advertising type, 50 fonts job type, lots of border and brass rule, two fonts labor-saving rule, lots of job and newspaper cuts, chases, &c. This is a rare chance to anyone wishing to start a country paper, and will be sold low to make room for new material. Specimens furnished. Will be sold separately or together. Terms: two-thirds of purchase money cash; balance credit of one year at ten percent. J. Kemp Bartlett, proprietor Daily and Weekly Times.

 

*"Freedom of the Press Vindicated in Leavenworth. ...
September 26, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4435)

*"Freedom of the Press Vindicated in Leavenworth. It will be remembered...by most of our readers that Mayor Anthony last spring fined D. H. Bailey, editor of the Leavenworth Times, $20 for an alleged breach of the peace in publishing a very mild criticism upon the military abilities of Gen. Hooker immediately subsequent to the battle of Chancellorsville. Bailey refused to pay the fine, and Anthony sent him to jail. Bailey was released, after a few hours incarceration, on a writ of habeas corpus. He immediately brought suit against Anthony for false imprisonment, which suit has just been tried in Leavenworth. The jury found Anthony guilty and fined him $50 and costs of suit.

"The result has shown that there is still virtue enough left in Leavenworth to properly estimate and punish so gross an outrage upon the liberty of the press. In this connection we must confess to our astonishment that the Bulletin can have the assurance to say that 'Bailey disturbed the peace by censuring a commanding officer in the field, by which he violated a city ordinance.' And still further, the Bulletin says that 'Bailey claims that the liberty of the press was violated in the arrest and imprisonment. We do not see it. It was simply an imprisonment for a violation of a city ordinance. Such cases occur every day.' Now either the Bulletin must mean to say that in 'censuring a commanding officer in the field' Bailey 'violated a city ordinance' -- in which case Leavenworth must be deeply disgraced by any such foolish ordinance -- or else it must mean to say that in 'censuring a commanding officer in the field' Bailey 'disturbed the peace,' a statement so ineffably absurd as not to need contradiction. The dilemma is not a peculiarly pleasant one for an editor of the legal persuasion, and especially one who has borne judicial honors; but there it is, and there is no getting away from it. As, in fact, there is no such ordinance in the city of Leavenworth, the Bulletin is reduced to the self-stultifying assertion that 'in censuring a commanding officer in the field,' Mr. Bailey 'disturbed the peace.'

"Away with such nonsense. It is unworthy the most pitiful pettifogger in the country. The truth is, Mayor Anthony's course in that mater was utterly indefensible. It was an act of pure tyranny, and we are gratified that a jury of his countrymen has handled it as it deserved." -- Kansas City Journal.

 

T. Dwight Thacher has established a bookbindery in ...
September 29, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4436)

T. Dwight Thacher has established a bookbindery in connection with the Journal of Commerce newspaper published at Kansas City, Mo.

We have just received the first number of the Weekly Osage Chronicle published by Marshall Murdock at Burlingame. It is a handsomely gotten up paper, is filled with excellent reading matter, and is sound on the great issues of the day.

 

*"Anthony Mulcted. It will be remembered that D. R ...
October 2, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4440)

*"Anthony Mulcted. It will be remembered that D. R. Anthony, mayor of Leavenworth, caused D. H. Bailey, editor of the Times, to be arrested and brought before him on a charge of disturbing the peace. An article criticizing Maj. Gen. Hooker, then in command of the Army of the Potomac, being designated as such disturbance. Bailey was fined $20 and costs, and upon his refusal to pay the same was lodged in jail....Bailey at once commenced a suit against Anthony for false imprisonment, which was tried at the present term of the District Court of Leavenworth county. Anthony was mulcted in the sum of $50 and costs of suit. We are glad that the freedom of the press has been vindicated, and that Anthony's vindictive and arbitrary course as a judicial officer has been rebuked, even by a Leavenworth jury. The Mayor is a good sort of man in his way, but when he uses the power of his position to trample upon laws, and the liberty of the citizen and the press, it is high time the curb was applied....Gen. Hooker has long been blooming in retirement, and Wendell Phillips, Anthony's great exemplar, openly charges the defeat of our army at Chancellorsville to the drunkenness of the commanding general. We suggest that Anthony cause the arrest of Phillips, and that he issue a writ of quo warranto, compelling the administration to show cause why Hooker is left out in the cold." -- Topeka Tribune.

 

We have made arrangements with W. H. Bisbee, late ...
October 4, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4442)

We have made arrangements with W. H. Bisbee, late associate editor of the Times, by which he will act as our special reporter during the fair.

 

*Editorial Convention. In accordance with previous ...
October 8, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4446)

*Editorial Convention. In accordance with previous notice a portion of the editors of Kansas met at the office of the Conservative. An organization was effected by the election of D. H. Bailey of the Times as president and F. P. Baker of the State Record as secretary. On motion, a committee of H. E. Lowman of the State Journal, Jacob Stotler of the Emporia News and F. P. Baker of the State Record were appointed to draft resolutions relative to the course to be used by the press in regard to legal printing, and they were directed to report at an adjourned meeting at the Conservative office at 7-1/2 o'clock Oct. 8th. On motion, a committee of E. H. Grant of the Troy Patriot, S. M. Strickler of the Junction City Union and E. C. Manning of the Big Blue Union was appointed to report a permanent organization of the editorial association of Kansas. All editors in the city are invited to be in attendance. D. H. Bailey, chairman; F. P. Baker, Sec'y. The following gentlemen were at the meeting last night: H. E. Lowman, State Journal; Jacob Stotler, Emporia News; E. C. Manning, Big Blue Union; S. M. Strickler, Junction City Union; J. P. Cone, Nemaha Courier; F. P. Baker, State Record; R. H. Crosley, Jeffersonian; E. H. Grant, Troy Patriot; D. W. Wilder, Conservative, and D. H. Bailey, Times.

 

A special telegraph...conveys the information that ...
October 11, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4448)

A special telegraph...conveys the information that D. W. Wilder has been appointed surveyor general of Kansas and Nebraska vice (in place of) M. W. Delahay, appointed judge of the U.S. District Court. The appointment, of course, was made through the influence of Lane and Wilder, and Web is no doubt grateful to both for the interest taken in his prosperity. Lane pretends to reward his friends and we take it that Web is considered one of them from this last promotion....

 

Editorial Convention. The final action of the edit ...
October 14, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4450)

Editorial Convention. The final action of the editorial convention, assembled in this city on the 7th and 8th, has unavoidably been crowded out of our columns until today....Second day's proceedings. The convention of editors met October 8th at the Conservative office, pursuant to adjournment. Same officers as the night before. Mr. Lowman from the committee appointed at the first meeting, reported the following preamble and resolutions: Whereas it is generally conceded that the press is a power in the state, while it should always be so directed as to advance the right and conserve good principles, it should also be so united in itself as to make that power promotive of its own vital interests. A newspaper publisher has rights. The public have no interest in denying him any of them. Among those rights is that of a just hire for his labor. If the public do deny him that, then he has a right to employ any proper means to encourage the conviction on the part of the public that that right must be respected. It is said that "in union there is strength." Your committee subscribe to that doctrine. They believe, also, that it is one that the printers of this state should at once adopt. To effect that end, and to make the doctrine at once operative, they most respectfully submit the following resolution: Resolved, that we, the editors and publishers of the newspapers in the state, unite in rejecting all such advertising as is regulated by statute, whenever the rates are fixed below the regular price charged for that class of advertising. On motion, the report was accepted and the committee discharged. After some discussion, the report was unanimously adopted. Mr. Strickler from the committee of permanent organization made the following report: The editors and proprietors of Kansas newspapers, for mutual benefit and convenience, herewith organize a State Editorial Association. The officers shall consist of a president, vice president, secretary and treasurer, who shall hold their offices for one year or until their successors shall be elected. They shall constitute an executive committee to fill their own vacancies during the year, and shall transact such other business as the interests of the association render imperative. The duties of the officers and the government of the association shall be regulated by parliamentary usage. The annual meetings shall be held in connection with the state fair, and all editors and proprietors of newspapers in the state are ex officio members. Special meetings can be held after one month's public notice in three newspapers. Six publishers of different journals shall be sufficient to form a quorum for the transaction of business. E. H. Grant, Ch'n of Com. on Org'z. The report of the committee was accepted and the committee discharged. On motion, the report was unanimously adopted. *The following gentlemen were then elected officers of the association: John Speer of the Lawrence Tribune, president; H. E. Lowman of the State Journal, vice president; D. H. Bailey of the Leavenworth Times, secretary; D. W. Wilder of the Leavenworth Conservative, treasurer. The following members of the press were present at the second day's proceedings: John J. Ingalls and Frank A. Root of the Atchison Champion; John Speer, Lawrence Tribune; E. C. Manning, Big Blue Union; J. Kemp Bartlett and D. H. Bailey of the Leavenworth Times; H. E. Lowman of the Lawrence Journal; S. M. Strickler, Junction City Union; J. Stotler, Emporia News; M. Weightman and D. W. Wilder of the Leavenworth Conservative; J. P. Cone, Nemaha Courier; R. H. Crosby, Jeffersonian; E. H. Grant, Troy Patriot.

 

Valedictory. I have this day disposed of my entire ...
October 21, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4453)

Valedictory. I have this day disposed of my entire interest in the Leavenworth Times to a company of responsible citizens of Kansas. Hereafter, the paper will be conducted and controlled precisely as the New York Tribune and Chicago Tribune are managed. The name and style of the concern will be The Times Printing Company. After a connection with the Times of six years, during which period I have witnessed and ministered to its growth from an obscure adventure of the smallest dimensions to its present size of a 32 column daily, and until it has reached the secure footing of a permanent institution and a power in the state; after so long a connection with the paper I part with its proprietorship with a feeling of reluctance, not unmingled, however, with pride that I leave it the largest, one of the most influential and prosperous papers in Kansas, or in the great Missouri Valley. During my proprietorship of the Times, I have sought to make it an independent paper, upholding that which is right and opposing that which is wrong.... -- *J. Kemp Bartlett.

Salutatory....In the early day this journal stood in the forefront, battling for freedom. Changes occurred, and in those changes it did not fully sustain its first and higher position. We have no fault to find, no censure to cast upon the former proprietor of the Times. It was the pinching financial distress of Kansas that caused him, seemingly, to waver. The paper felt the shock. That shock, however, was temporary; for though not reaching up to the higher standard, it leaned earnestly to the side of freedom....The Times now is under a new organization, solid in capital and true in principle. It will strike steadily and boldly for measures and the men that shall extend and give vitality to freedom....The Times, as a matter of course, will be an independent journal. It will be the organ of no man, of no clique. The misfortune of Kansas is that it has been ruled by a few ambitious men and by cliques....Corruption of the worst kind has followed and will follow. This evil here and now has touched, if it has not tainted, some of the best young blood of our state. We will war against this evil to the bitter end....We announce, with these views, the following platform of principles: First, universal freedom. Second, the support of the national administration because it sustains this principle. Third, the claims of party above the claims of any man; principles before men. We are Kansans and will stand by Kansas interests....Our fame on the battle field is won. Wherever the Kansan has fought, he has fought with dauntless valor. The Times will strive to make the civic as lofty as our warrior renown.

 

L. Willis Emery, one of the best job printers in t ...
October 22, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4457)

L. Willis Emery, one of the best job printers in the West, returned yesterday from a long tramp on the plains.

 

Leavenworth Times. This paper has changed hands. I ...
October 25, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4460)

Leavenworth Times. This paper has changed hands. It is now owned by The Times Company, who have bought the establishment of Mr. Bartlett. C. Vaughn, we understand, is now the editor in chief.... -- Oskaloosa Independent. We appreciate the friendly notice..., but it is mistaken as to the editor. C. Vaughn is in no way connected with the paper. He is out of the state, engaged in the military service. *The editorial management of the Times is unchanged. It is still under the direction of D. H. Bailey.

The Daily Kansas Zeitung has removed its establishment to the southwest corner of Fourth and Shawnee streets. This paper is now ably conducted....

Stotler of the Emporia News has been elected adjutant of a militia regiment.

A Timely Hit. Editors of weekly papers have time to think. Not hurried as those of us conducting dailies, they have an opportunity -- time -- to digest what they have to say....The White Cloud Chief has a position peculiarly its own. It is in one sense independent, nevertheless social affiliations affect it, and when it rises above these afflictions -- in other words, when it speaks for itself -- it is generally correct in its conclusions and judicious in its hits. As an illustration we may refer to its leader of Oct. 15th headed "Spreading It On."...We quote a part of that article: "For the downright, doubly-distilled quintessence of overdone laudation, commend us to Web Wilder. He fairly crawls into a man, revels there as a maggot in a dead sheep, then crawls out and wonders if the whole world does not admire the exploit. He beslavers, besmears, beslimes a man with praise three inches thick over the whole surface, then scrapes it off and spreads on a fresh coat. If he were in the habit of drinking, we would be inclined to think that on such occasions he had been taking more than he could conveniently carry. After reading these articles, we feel like puking." We dislike this reference to individuals by name, and consequently have never indulged in it....Still, as we are quoting from the White Cloud Chief, we must let it have...its say in its own way....It adds that his judgment is so warped that even those who admire his vim, and like his "get up," cannot follow him. Thereupon the Chief adds: "We remember the worshipping article on Lane...in which he clearly established the fact, to his own satisfaction, that Jesus Christ might envy Lane, or that he might resign and Lane could perform his duties better. But the Conservative caps the climax, in an article almost a column in length (upon Blunt) just about one-half of which consists of such expressions as 'gloomy despondency,' 'dread suspense,' 'intelligence which may desolate happy homes and the loving life of true hearts,' 'throb of pleasure,' 'kingly courage,' 'great and manly valor,' heights of heroism,' ' bow before greatness,' 'the heart leaps,' 'the blood pounds in the veins,' 'the pulses throb with quickening fervor,' 'Blunt's coolness, courage and audacity,' 'wraps him around as with imperial purple,' &c." A word here. There is a tone of exaggeration in the press which is neither consistent with good taste nor good sense....The White Cloud Chief does not admire this extravagance of the Conservative and pithily, as well as pathetically, adds: "For God's sake, Web, don't! If we couldn't obtain little favors and earn our bread and butter, without crawling in the dust and licking a man's feet, we'd starve and go naked."

 

The Printers' Union of this city, at the regular m ...
November 4, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4464)

The Printers' Union of this city, at the regular meeting last Monday evening, adopted the following advanced scale of prices for work: Foremen's wages, $18 per week. Composition on morning papers, 40 cents, evening papers, 38 cents, per 1,0000 ems. Compositors and job hands, working by the week, not less than $16. For hand-press work, 45 cents per token.

The printing for the state, for the year 1864, was let at Topeka last Monday as follows: Executive printing, Bulletin office. Bill printing, State Record office. Journals, laws and public documents, Lawrence Tribune. Binding, S. Dodsworth.

Governor Carney has commissioned, as second lieutenant of Company E, Fifteenth regiment, W. H. Bisbee, recently associate editor of this paper....As a writer for the press he has few superiors in the state, as his letters last winter from the capital would testify....

 

Our readers will excuse the editor of the Times to ...
November 5, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4465)

Our readers will excuse the editor of the Times today for lack of editorial matter. Amid the general joy for victories won in behalf of freedom in the land, a heavy calamity has befallen his home. He mourns the loss of his first-born.

 

In the Paola District, Miami county, our old edito ...
November 7, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4467)

In the Paola District, Miami county, our old editorial and typographical friend, Tom H. Ellis of the Crusader, has been elected to the Legislature on the anti-Lane issue, squarely....

Since the jovial Tom Ellis has been elected to the Legislature, he has transferred the material and good will of the Crusader office to Mr. Scott, a former partner in the publishing business. Scott will revive the paper about the 18th of the present month....

 

S. N. Wood announces that he will suspend the publ ...
November 8, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4468)

S. N. Wood announces that he will suspend the publication of the Press until January next. The reason assigned is that the printing office must be fixed up. Hope the Press will soon re-appear. It is altogether the spiciest paper in Kansas.

 

W. W. Roberts, editor of the Oskaloosa Independent ...
November 13, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4471)

W. W. Roberts, editor of the Oskaloosa Independent, is in the city. Also J. W. Day of the same paper. Mr. Day has been appointed assistant paymaster in the navy and has accepted the position.

 

We are indebted to the Leavenworth Typographical U ...
November 19, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4474)

We are indebted to the Leavenworth Typographical Union for a copy of their constitution and by-laws;...it's one of the neatest jobs which has appeared recently, reflecting great credit upon the artist and the office. It was printed at the Bulletin, and bound at the office of the Journal of Commerce, Kansas City.

 

We regret to learn that Mr. Soussman, proprietor o ...
November 26, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4481)

We regret to learn that Mr. Soussman, proprietor of the Zeitung, is lying very ill, with but little prospect of recovery.

 

We have received the first number of the Weston Ti ...
November 29, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4484)

We have received the first number of the Weston Times, edited by L. W. McSchooler. The editor announces himself as no partisan, but "devoted to his country." He will be neutral in nothing, but independent on all subjects.

 

The Union Crusader of Paola, after a suspension of ...
December 1, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4485)

The Union Crusader of Paola, after a suspension of two months, has been revived. Ellis & Scott are the editors and proprietors.

 

Mr. Soussman, proprietor of the Kansas Zeitung, we ...
December 2, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4486)

Mr. Soussman, proprietor of the Kansas Zeitung, we are happy to learn, is recovering from a severe illness.

 

D. H. Bailey. The editor of the Times left for the ...
December 5, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4489)

D. H. Bailey. The editor of the Times left for the East yesterday. For a year he has been at his post night and day, working faithfully and hard. He will take a fortnight's rest. Meantime, our readers will pardon "shortcomings." Now that our friend is away, we may say a truthful word of him. We know the stock out of which he is bred. His good old father, one of the best citizens of Cincinnati, was born in the old school of Virginia anti-slavery. Nor did he falter in defending its principles in Ohio, when to do so required patient pluck....David H. Bailey, his son, was educated in this school and, like his father, has been, and will be, true to its great principles. Besides this, we predict for our young editor a bright future. Patient; mild yet firm; earnest yet tolerant; a close observer and a careful student; he will rank among the best writers and thinkers of the West.

 

Daily Paper. We learn that a daily paper will be i ...
December 11, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4493)

Daily Paper. We learn that a daily paper will be issued from the office of the Topeka Tribune during the coming session of the Legislature. The papers which have heretofore been published for the benefit of the Legislature, at high rates, have scarcely been worth the cost....The Tribune force, both mechanical and editorial, is to be largely increased....

 

State Journal, Lawrence. This paper comes with bri ...
December 16, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4495)

State Journal, Lawrence. This paper comes with bright looks and with a brighter spirit. Its words ring with the right sound; its thoughts breathe forth high purposes. The editor of the paper is one of our best citizens, and the best of our writers, and we trust he will receive a hearty support. "We trust our friends have not grown weary waiting and watching for us as we come to them this week. We shall strive hard to make up for the wasted time in future good conduct, promptness and enterprise...."

 

John Speer, editor of the Lawrence Tribune, offers ...
December 19, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4497)

John Speer, editor of the Lawrence Tribune, offers $100 reward for the discovery of his son Robert. He has not been heard from since the Lawrence raid. He was last seen on the night before the raid, and was dressed in mixed plaid pants, linen coat, fine French calf boots, and an India hat.

 

We have received the first number of the Home Circ ...
December 29, 1863, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4505)

We have received the first number of the Home Circle, a paper published at Baldwin City, devoted to literature, education, politics, &c. From the first number we judge that the interests of the Baker University and general education will be a prominent feature in its columns. The editorial management is under the control of W. F. Woodworth.

 

The first number of the Kansas Educational Journal ...
January 21, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4515)

The first number of the Kansas Educational Journal has been issued. The Journal will be published monthly by the Teachers Association of the state.

 

The first number of the Kansas Home Circle is out. ...
January 23, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4516)

The first number of the Kansas Home Circle is out. The Home Circle is published at Baldwin City and has for its object the advancement of the interests of the University and Deaf-Mute Institute in that town. It contains the mute alphabet and is published at $2 per year.

 

Valedictory. I retire from the Times today as its ...
January 26, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4518)

Valedictory. I retire from the Times today as its editor. I cannot do this, however, without thanking friends and patrons for their uniform kindness and the steadiness of their support....Since the change in the proprietorship of the Times I have had the valuable help of Col. J. C. Vaughn, and during my absence in the East he has had editorial control of the paper. I leave it under his able direction. -- D. H. Bailey.

 

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr ...
January 28, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4519)

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawrence Tribune lost two sons by Quantrill's massacre at Lawrence. One was found and buried. No trace has been discovered of the other, and the father calls again upon any person who may have information in regard to the missing boy to communicate with him at Lawrence...."The public well know that one of the sons of the editor of this paper was killed in the Lawrence massacre. Him we buried. He rests with the martyred dead on the mount above Lawrence. It was a terrible stroke to his parents to part with that dear boy. But a sadder affliction was the loss of our second son, Robert Speer, whose body has never been found. We have heard numberless rumors, and have spared no pains to follow them up, in hopes that the child might be found. The last we saw of him, we put our arm affectionately on his shoulder and asked him to see that our papers were well mailed, while we went to a railroad meeting. David Purington, a neighbor's son, once our apprentice, a faithful, good boy, assisted him. Finishing their work, they went to the Republican printing office, were David usually slept, to keep each other company. They were heard to come in, by a gentleman and his wife occupying an adjoining room. The same gentleman broke the door between the two apartments...to alarm the boys when the murderers came, and found their bed empty. A colored boy, who thinks he knew them well, saw them in the cellar. A neighbor says he saw Robert pursue the rebels -- another says he saw David after they left. Reports reach us that they were prisoners and shot -- others that Robert was hung by the murderers. As the two boys were known to be very anxious to join the army, some think they may have pursued Quantrill and, when our volunteer forces were turned back at the Missouri line, with boyish ambition and heroism they might have joined the forces of General Ewing. Others think they might have left to join the army the night before Quantrill came, and be still alive. Every place where they might possibly be dead, every well and cistern, has been searched in vain. Robert was dressed in mixed plaid pants, linen coat, fine French boots, and an India hat. To his mother his clothing would be easily recognized. She dreams of him in a handsome blue soldier's dress, and hopes, even against hope, that he may live. Money is nothing compared with the lives of those dear children. All that we have would we freely give for the mere identity of his remains, if dead. But we have offered $100 as a sufficient remuneration to pay any person for taking pains to hunt up facts in regard to any body that might be found, or to give any information of him, if living. Freely, gladly would we give it. We would respectfully ask editors to copy this notice, that nothing may be left undone; and any person having information, to communicate it."

 

Our neighbor of the Manhattan Independent is getti ...
February 10, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4523)

Our neighbor of the Manhattan Independent is getting exceedingly obliging. We have no particular objection to his ruining himself, but we enter our protest against his pulling the business down with him. He has all along been doing transient advertising for just half what it is worth, and now asks that stray notices, and such like, be sent him and he will insert them free! Some folks may think it none of our business how he charges, but we think it is when people dispute our bills, referring us to Manhattan. We want no hawking or jewing in the craft. Among all honorable printers it is woe to the man who works for less than the established scale. Come, neighbor, put your prices up to a living rate; you'll bust if you don't. -- Junction City Union. The above will apply to papers we know of....A printer who does work at less than established rates...is nothing more than a rat, disguise it how you will.

 

*Adams, formerly of the Inquirer, has purchased a ...
February 11, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4524)

*Adams, formerly of the Inquirer, has purchased a farm near Macon, Mo., and intends to become an honest tiller of the soil. When he assisted in destroying the Free State Register in 1855, he little thought that a day would come when he would be summarily kicked out of the printing business....

 

Our office was burned yesterday, and we were unabl ...
February 20, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4526)

Our office was burned yesterday, and we were unable, in consequence, to attend to the paper. That was done by our young friend, Willis Emery. Today we resume our duties and may be found in the office adjoining the Times counting room.

 

We lost all our own letters and the letters of cor ...
February 23, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4527)

We lost all our own letters and the letters of correspondents, together with whatever prepared matter we had, editorials, selections, &c., in the fire of Friday morning.

 

The Eighth. The veterans are coming and will be he ...
February 24, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4528)

The Eighth. The veterans are coming and will be here soon. The following telegraph has just been received: St. Louis, Mo., Feb. 23, 1864. Hon. D. R. Anthony, Leavenworth: The Eighth Kansas veterans, Col. Martin commanding, escorted Major General Rosecrans and staff to Alton yesterday. They were received at Alton by the Tenth Kansas and returned to St. Louis Today. Their march has been a perfect ovation, and all parties have contributed in honoring the heroic regiment....The regiment numbers about 250 strong, and are covered all over with the honors of war....

 

The Topeka Tribune seems to be acquainted with Man ...
March 3, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4531)

The Topeka Tribune seems to be acquainted with Manning of the Big Blue Union, as the following will show: "Mr. Manning of the Big Blue Union arrived here last night. We shall esteem it a special favor if Carney will inform us when he buys him up." -- Conservative. "Mr. Manning is one of Capt. McCahon's detectives and receives about $100 per month for doing nothing. He publishes a little sheet up in Marshall county called the Big Blue Union, which is running for Lane, and of course, as in duty bound, howls on the fraud. Talk about Carney's buying him up. He has no use for such. Manning has sold himself already and the above advertisement will not secure him a higher bid. If the Conservative thinks they have got him cheap, they can crow over their bargain without fear of competition." -- Topeka Tribune.

 

The Neosho Valley Register comes to us under new a ...
March 13, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4534)

The Neosho Valley Register comes to us under new auspices. Mr. Bent retires, being succeeded by Mr. Payne.

 

The People Triumphant! McDowell's Majority 985!... ...
April 5, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4544)

The People Triumphant! McDowell's Majority 985!...We worked hard all day yesterday and the brave boys of the office worked harder than we. We have only time, therefore, to announce the glorious result. Nine hundred and eighty-five majority for McDowell! Anthony caused the only difficulty and that, for a while, had a threatening look. Without cause, when there was no trouble, he ordered the ballot box of the Fourth Ward to be seized and taken. The people rallied. Ere the would-be tyrant could get away, he was seized and brought back, and yielded! Then he ordered the polls to be closed! Afterwards, he issued a proclamation declaring them closed and, for a time, they were closed. Then he sought to raise a mob, but failed. During this period, Anthony's life was threatened, and was saved by McDowell and Col. Jennison on three occasions. Borne down by the swelling tide of public opinion, baffled at every point, dishonored in person and hooted at by the people, he retired, overwhelmingly routed!...Here are the returns:...For mayor, James L. McDowell, 1534; D. R. Anthony 549....

 

Anthony, yesterday, made another raid upon office, ...
April 6, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4545)

Anthony, yesterday, made another raid upon office, another effort to retain it! He called the council together, as he had a right to do, in a special meeting at 11 a.m. and, when the members had assembled, coolly told them that he intended it to be secret, and that the object of it was to enable him to hold onto office until he had re-established order. After the members had organized, Anthony spoke to them -- rashly, violently! It was a desperate effort, the last throe of a desperate man....A. M. Clark, however,...told him emphatically that he had claimed what he had no right to get, and demanded of the council what it had no authority to grant. "You are powerless, sir," said he. "You are no longer mayor." A secret meeting of the council to continue him in office! Of whom is he afraid?...It was bad enough to order the election closed; to take, with ruffian hand, the ballot box, as if he were master or monarch! It was bad enough, failing in this tyrannous action, to attempt to raise a mob and let it loose with its wild and wayward passion upon the city. But attempt to convert the council into a cabal -- to convene it in secret session to perpetuate power through its agency is monstrous -- the very climax of Anthony's despotic desperation! But the council met at its regular time...and proceeded at once to business. The votes were counted, McDowell declared to be elected mayor and sworn in; Anthony reading a protest of which no notice was taken. Subdued, conquered, dishonored, disgraced, he retired!...

 

In its issue of Tuesday morning, the Conservative ...
April 7, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4546)

In its issue of Tuesday morning, the Conservative charged that men had been imported from Fort Scott to support the McDowell ticket. It judged our side by its own. Last year, to our certain knowledge, citizens of Fort Scott took an active part in securing the election of Ballot-Box Anthony. This year the thing was not attempted because it would fail. It is true that there were several gentlemen, residents and business men of Fort Scott, in our city on Monday last. But that they took an active part in our municipal election is a lie manufactured out of whole cloth....

The Conservative persists in saying that men were driven from the polls on Monday and refused the elective franchise, because they wanted to vote for Anthony. It lies, and it knows it, when saying so. Every legal voter was protected in his right to vote for whom he pleased on that day....

In his speech on Monday last, D. R. Anthony was particularly loud in his denunciations of Red Clark. If any man had just cause to injure Anthony, it was Red. Instead of doing so, he defended Anthony from men determined to take his life, and absolutely knocked down his personal friends who attempted to rush up the Market House stairs in pursuit of the ex-mayor. To Mr. Clark and Col. Jennison, Anthony owes his life....

 

Leavenworth City Election. This election was the m ...
April 12, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4548)

Leavenworth City Election. This election was the most exciting of any election that has ever taken place in Kansas....We did not feel it our duty to interfere with the election by any suggestions....We must, however, rejoice at the election of Mr. McDowell....It is difficult to imagine the intense feeling -- we may say passion -- that was pent up and found effervescence at this election. The language of the press and of the people of Leavenworth shows that they felt as if they were subjects instead of citizens, and that they were determined, come what would, to release themselves from their bondage and terror....Mr. McDowell is an intimate friend of Governor Carney, is the publisher of the Daily Times, which is a leading supporter of the governor, consequently there will be no difficulty in understanding the political complexion of the election. -- Lawrence State Journal.

 

W. W. Bloss, formerly connected with the press of ...
April 14, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4549)

W. W. Bloss, formerly connected with the press of this city and more recently with the Rochester Democrat, has become one of the editors of the Conservative. Mr. B. is a ready and forcible writer, and we are confident will give the Conservative a more respectable tone than has characterized that sheet during the past few weeks.

 

Willis Emery has been unanimously chosen as delega ...
April 16, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4551)

Willis Emery has been unanimously chosen as delegate to the National Union by the Printer's Union of this city. The National Union meets in Louisville on the first Monday in May.

 

The contest for mayor in Leavenworth is over and M ...
April 20, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4552)

The contest for mayor in Leavenworth is over and Mayor McDowell has entered upon his official duties. The people of that city have suffered from the tyranny of a man who ruled without system, who perverted and misconstrued law to suit his own caprices and gratify his own passions. Anthony's last acts -- his attempt to remove the ballot box and his closing the polls by proclamation -- are unparalleled in the history of elections among freemen. But the people were firm and the tyrant was rebuked, defeated and overthrown. The city is fortunate in having elected McDowell as their chief magistrate. He is a man who will conduct affairs with firmness, moderation and even-handed justice.... -- Border Sentinel.

 

Col. Jno. T. Snoddy, editor of the Border Sentinel ...
April 23, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4555)

Col. Jno. T. Snoddy, editor of the Border Sentinel, died at Mound City on Thursday evening after a short illness. Col. Snoddy was a member of the last Territorial Legislature....

 

Unlike the editorial corps of the Conservative, we ...
April 26, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4557)

Unlike the editorial corps of the Conservative, we have not formed ourselves into a mutual admiring society, but...we think no apology necessary for publishing the following from the Oskaloosa Independent: "We had a call from Col. J. C. Vaughn, editor of the Times, on Tuesday....Col. Vaughn is one of the ablest men of the state, thorough anti-slavery, having given his own slaves their freedom in the days of his early manhood, and devoted a lifetime to the cause of human liberty. He wields a vigorous pen and is, withal, a candid journalist. He is doing a good work against corruption."

 

Capt. E. G. Ross has been promoted to a majority i ...
April 30, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4561)

Capt. E. G. Ross has been promoted to a majority in the 11th regiment of cavalry. Major Ross is a printer and, of course, deserving.

Warren Mitchell of the Baldwin City Observer and Miss Maggie Friend of this city were married in Lawrence on Thursday.

 

We have received the first number of the Fort Scot ...
May 22, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4573)

We have received the first number of the Fort Scott Daily Monitor, published by D. B. Emmert.

 

A Necessary Step. The proprietors of the Times, in ...
June 9, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4579)

A Necessary Step. The proprietors of the Times, in common with all business men similarly circumstanced, in view of the high prices of labor, paper and material, have...come to the conclusion that a rise in the price of their paper becomes inevitable...daily, one copy one year, $8; tri-weekly, one copy one year, $4; weekly, one copy one year, $2....

 

Sam Wood has sold the Council Grove Press to Rev. ...
July 14, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4598)

Sam Wood has sold the Council Grove Press to Rev. J. E. Bryan, who will hereafter make the Press a literary and miscellaneous paper.

 

Col. R. T. Van Horn, the founder of the Kansas Cit ...
July 26, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4605)

Col. R. T. Van Horn, the founder of the Kansas City Journal, edits that paper in the absence of Mr. Thacher.

 

Pete Ronan, an old typo of this city, well known a ...
July 27, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4606)

Pete Ronan, an old typo of this city, well known and highly appreciated by the community and the craft, arrived here yesterday direct from Bannock. He has been absent from here about 18 months, during all that time delving in mother earth after filthy lucre. He has nuggets enough to make plugs, who have stuck by the stick and rule, to pi a handful for luck....We extend our congratulations to the gay old tramp....

C. B. Hayward's connection with the Fort Scott Monitor ceased on the 22d. Emmert now controls the entire machine....

 

Speaking of the death of the editor of the Neosho ...
July 29, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4608)

Speaking of the death of the editor of the Neosho Valley Register, Wm. Payne, that paper says: "Mr. Payne was a devout Christian, and ardent friend of the Union, and an anti-slavery man of long standing. He was pre-eminently an honest man...."

 

R. G. Oakly, and old Rochester typo, recently of t ...
August 4, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4615)

R. G. Oakly, and old Rochester typo, recently of this office, and lately of Fort Smith, arrived in the city last evening. He looks fat, hearty and sassy....

 

S. H. Dodge, editor of the Jeffersonian, retired f ...
August 7, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4616)

S. H. Dodge, editor of the Jeffersonian, retired from the editorial chair of that paper on the 1st. Hereafter, it will be conducted by an association....

 

C. B. Hayward, late of the Fort Scott Monitor, but ...
August 11, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4619)

C. B. Hayward, late of the Fort Scott Monitor, but now intent on becoming a tanner a la Gen. Grant, is in the city. Charley is an old typo....

 

W. B. Schirach of St. Louis has assumed charge of ...
August 13, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4620)

W. B. Schirach of St. Louis has assumed charge of the Kansas Zeitung, published in this city....

 

The White Cloud Chief, in noticing the speech of t ...
August 18, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4621)

The White Cloud Chief, in noticing the speech of the grim chieftain at that place,...copies and comments upon his speech in detail. Here are some specimens: "Ten newspapers have lately been started in Kansas upon money stolen from the Indian Department, to uphold the Senatorial fraud and beslime Jim Lane." -- Lane's speech. Since the agitation of the Senatorial question, just six new papers have been started in Kansas, three of which support the "Senatorial fraud" and three oppose the "fraud" and support Jim Lane. He ought to know where the money was stolen from to start them....

We have received the prospectus of the Union Sentinel, a new paper about being established in Hiawatha, Brown county, by H. P. Stebbins.

 

Oscar J. Leonard, a printer recently employed in t ...
August 20, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4624)

Oscar J. Leonard, a printer recently employed in the St. Joe Herald, was murdered by the Indians in their attack on the emigrant trains a few days ago.

 

The first number of the Union Sentinel, published ...
September 2, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4629)

The first number of the Union Sentinel, published and edited by H. P. Stebbins at Hiawatha, Brown county, has been received. It has a neat appearance typographically....

 

Conservative. D. W. Wilder retires from the Conser ...
September 8, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4631)

Conservative. D. W. Wilder retires from the Conservative. His valedictory is short but pithy. We hope the conclusion to it -- that slavery is dead -- may prove true. We think the big battle is yet to be fought over it. Mr. Bloss has taken charge. He has talent, if he will only curb his partisan tendencies, silence the harsh voice of the partisan and its littleness, he would do better. The truth is, the editors of Leavenworth might accomplish much for themselves, for the state, if, while they are tart, they should be courteous; if while decided, they should be manly; if while they are sincere, they should be (if we may coin a word) unvituperative, personally. For Mr. Weightman we have a word to say. He is a worker. He has gone up and kept up by steady, patient labor. A good man, he has earned what he has, and what he is, by work. We honor such success....We wish the retiring editor all happiness and long success....

The Paola Crusader, revived, remodeled and rejuvenated, appears again this week after a sleep of some months.

At a meeting of the Leavenworth Typographical Union last Monday evening, the price of composition was raised to 60 cents per thousand ems, and advance of 10 cents over the old scale.

 

The paper famine....The high price of paper in thi ...
September 10, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4633)

The paper famine....The high price of paper in this country is seriously affecting a large and leading interest, that of the publishers of newspapers and books, and is likely to diminish their circulation, for there is nothing more certain than that excessive high prices reduce competition. To meet this contingency, which is not merely the effect of a disordered currency, but a scarcity of the material for manufacture, owing, in a great extent, to the diminution of the supply of cotton, the greatest efforts have been made to procure a substitute for this material. Hundreds of various kinds of vegetable fibers have been tried and, though most of them have confidently been pronounced successes, we see nowhere any extensive manufactories adopting any one of them on a large scale. Now and then we hear of a newspaper being printed on what was once wood fiber, or some such unexpected material, or on straw....In the meantime, we are not alone in our dilemma. An extraordinary state of things exists also in England of the same character, and to an alarming extent. A paper famine is also threatening to overtake that country....

 

The first number of the Kansas Patriot, published ...
September 11, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4635)

The first number of the Kansas Patriot, published at Burlington, Coffey county, is before us. It is a neat, well printed, six column paper and, from its appearance, its editor and proprietor, S. S. Prouty, has the ability and energy to make its presence felt in southern Kansas.

 

Retirement. I leave the editorial chair of the Tim ...
September 20, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4639)

Retirement. I leave the editorial chair of the Times today, and William W. Bloss will fill it. I shall address the people in fulfillment of the appointments made for me by the Central Committee....J. C. Vaughan.

Salutatory. It is with extreme reluctance that the writer intrudes anything personal of himself upon public attention; but the change which is today announced in the editorial department of the Times renders a word of explanation unavoidable. As editor of the Conservative, we have heretofore advocated the claims of what we honestly conceived to be the regular Republican organization in the state of Kansas. Whether justly entitled to that designation, or not, is no longer the point at issue. That question has been superseded by one of far greater importance to the political and material interests of Kansas. The leaders of the Lane organization, obeying the impertinent behests of the "one man power," adopted a course of action in their recent nominating convention, through which the rights, the interests and the preferences of the people were flippantly repudiated and ignored. The convention committed an outrage upon popular rights, they insulted the intelligence of their constituents, they forfeited the confidence of the party, and absolved from further allegiance every man who esteemed principle above party, and whose thirst for official patronage and distinction did not blind him to the grossest political tyranny and fraud ever originated or enforced a the dictation of a party leader....The position which we assume today is primarily one of political independence. While we are of the intensely Union Republican faith, and shall fully and earnestly cooperate with the organization which has placed in nomination the ticket at the head of these columns (Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson), we propose to view all men and all parties from the people's viewpoint. We have no concern for past issues....

Another Newspaper Change. The Bulletin of last evening announces that the establishment has been sold to D. R. Anthony. It is generally understood that Mr. A. will conduct the paper editorially; that it will advocate the election of Lane's candidates for the state offices, Lane's candidate for Congress, and Anthony's candidate for Senator, viz. D. R. Anthony himself. This is the unkindest slap of all. Lane shakes the bush and Anthony catches the bird.

Our veteran predecessor, Col. Vaughn, has been named in the list of speakers who are to canvass the state in behalf of the Union ticket. Col. Vaughan is an earnest and effective speaker, well known to the people, and fully conversant with the important issues of the campaign. He will do yeoman service for the cause.

 

Lane's Political Machinery....There are 32 newspap ...
September 21, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4640)

Lane's Political Machinery....There are 32 newspapers in Kansas....Just 18 of these newspapers are established upon a legitimate basis and derive their support from the people. They are the papers that oppose Lane. Not a man who is identified with their editorial or business transactions holds any federal or state appointment. They repudiate Lane's Convention Fraud and advocate the People's candidates and the People's cause. We have made a careful classification of these Kansas newspapers, with the following result:

Republican Union journals opposed to the Convention Fraud: Leavenworth Times, Lawrence Journal, Leavenworth Zeitung, Topeka Tribune, Atchison Champion, Olathe Mirror, Wyandotte Gazette, Paola Crusader, Mound City Sentinel, Hampden Expositor, Baldwin City Observer, Oskaloosa Independent, Neosho Valley Register, White Cloud Chief, Council Grove Press, Troy Investigator, Marysville Enterprise, Hiawatha Sentinel.

The Stipendiary press of Kansas in favor of the Convention Fraud: The remaining 14, for the most part, endorse the Convention Fraud. Some of them are the personal property of Lane, others his stipendaries. We make the classification that the public may understand the true animus of their support of Lane....The Conservative. This paper recently changed hands and D. W. Wilder has retired. Mr. Weightman -- no tool and no friend of Lane's -- is the ostensible proprietor, but common report affirms that Capt. M. H. Insley is the "king behind the throne" and regulates the policy of the paper. The report has not been denied. Insley is chief quartermaster in the Department of Kansas, and upon general principles is of course in favor of all frauds. Lane's last concoction was, however, a bitter pill for him. He gagged awfully on the candidate for governor, and utterly refused to swallow Clarke....The Bulletin has been sold to D. R. Anthony, who has the post office. He is for Anthony first and for Lane second. He formed the combination which nominated Sidney Clarke over A. C. Wilder, and will labor for the success of the Fraud ticket in the hope of effecting his ulterior object. The remainder of the opposition press are sprinkled over the country, and are generally small fry organs, enjoying a limited circulation and less influence. They are as follows: Lawrence Tribune, John Speer, internal revenue collector; Fort Scott Monitor, Emmert & Insley, chief QM; Paola Herald, Colton, Indian agent; Burlington Patriot, Prouty, assistant QM; Topeka Record, Baker, commissioner of enrollment for Southern District; Emporia News, Hunt, U.S. detective, just detected. This paper was recently owned by J. Stotler, who declared at Topeka that he would not support the Convention Fraud and immediately went home and sold out. Osage Chronicle, by a deputy provost marshal;...Junction City Union, by Gen. Strickler, deputy provost marshal;...Big Blue Union, Manning, deputy provost marshal and the especial friend of Brumbaugh, the only original secessionist on the bogus ticket; Nemaha Courier by Cone & Bro., commission in army and $500 in cash per Sid Clarke; Grasshopper Falls Gazette, owned by Lane, U.S. Senate; Atchison Free Press, owned by Lane and run by Adams, a very clever gentleman who is living on "great expectations." Total 14....With the defeat of that ticket, at least one-half of the papers named will give up the ghost, and their managers will be ready to swear that they were opposed to Lane from the beginning.

The Bulletin. As before announced, this paper has been purchased by Col. D. R. Anthony, who made his editorial bow last evening and announced his intention to continue the publication as his legitimate business. The Bulletin will support the Lane ticket "and a good and true man for the U.S. Senate." The proprietor has had some former experience as a newspaper publisher (the Conservative) and his qualifications as a business man are an ample guarantee that the material interests of the concern will not be overlooked or neglected.

 

Newspaper Changes. From the Kansas City Journal.: ...
September 23, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4644)

Newspaper Changes. From the Kansas City Journal.

A complete revolution has been effected in the newspaper press at Leavenworth. W. W. Bloss has left the Conservative editorial chair and takes that of the Times, Col. Vaughan retiring and taking the stump for the Union Republican ticket. The Bulletin Printing Company have sold that paper to D. R. Anthony, who becomes sole manager. Mr. Wilder had retired from the Conservative before these latter changes took place. Of these changes we may say a word. The retirement of Col. Vaughan is a real loss to the newspaper profession in this part of the west. The Times under his charge has been conducted with great ability, and with a courtesy and candor, amid exciting and exasperating circumstances, which have made it truly a model for general imitation. His successor, Mr. Bloss, is a young man in years, but old as a newspaper writer, and still more a veteran in the cause of freedom. He comes of slavery-hating stock and does full justice to his name. The Bulletin Company have made that establishment a success. Col. Anthony,...though a man of great energy, will have his "hands full" to keep it up the present position....

 

R. H. Boughton, lately of the Bulletin, has taken ...
September 24, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4647)

R. H. Boughton, lately of the Bulletin, has taken the local department of the Conservative. He is a practical printer by profession....H. Clay Wright, a young man of decided literary ability and of classical tastes, is to be the assistant editor of the Bulletin....

 

Another Accession. The newspaper convulsion has no ...
September 30, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4654)

Another Accession. The newspaper convulsion has not yet fully subsided. The Conservative and the Fort Scott Monitor repudiate Clarke. The Emporia News and the Junction City Union have changed owners without changing creed, but the Manhattan Independent, the most influential paper in that section,...repudiates the Lane fraud and runs up the People's ticket....

 

Mr. Mount, publisher of the Baldwin City Observer, ...
October 1, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4656)

Mr. Mount, publisher of the Baldwin City Observer, is in the city and will call upon our merchants for advertisements for his paper. Mr. M. was formerly connected with the deaf and dumb school at Baldwin, and is himself a mute. He will communicate his desires to our merchants by "hand" or on paper, and we hope the business men of Leavenworth will extend to him their favors.

 

We are in receipt of the proceedings of the Nation ...
October 19, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4660)

We are in receipt of the proceedings of the National Typographical Union for the years 1862-63-64....It makes a neat volume of 100 pages containing matter of general importance to the craft throughout the United States.

 

Council Grove Press. We notice that this paper has ...
October 20, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4662)

Council Grove Press. We notice that this paper has gone over, soul and body, to the Lane faction. It was but a short time ago that the Rev. J. E. Bryan, its editor, was down here with letters of introduction from Sam Wood, asking patronage. Sam wrote that he was anti-Lane....Byran stated the same thing here, but fails to come to time....

 

Our compositors being at the front, doing battle f ...
October 25, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4663)

Our compositors being at the front, doing battle for their country, accounts for the small amount of reading matter in this number of the Times.

 

We were personally a witness to the battle on Sund ...
October 26, 1864, Leavenworth Daily Times (ID 4664)

We were personally a witness to the battle on Sunday last near Westport, and returned to Kansas City at 5 o'clock p.m. for the purpose of dispatching the intelligence to our readers. Having prepared a dispatch, the operator...said that if we would permit him to use the same for the Associated Press, he would make no charge for telegraphing it to The Times. We readily consented, not, however, with the remotest suspicion that any other paper would first receive the report which we had specially prepared for our own. To our surprise, the dispatch was not delivered at all to The Times, but was kept for the Bulletin on Monday afternoon!...

Our printers have not yet returned in force, and our supply of reading matter is consequently limited.