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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Manhattan Nationalist

Articles in database from Manhattan Nationalist:    10

With this issue, The Nationalist enters upon its t ...
December 26, 1879, Manhattan Nationalist (ID 1916)

With this issue, The Nationalist enters upon its tenth volume....We have endured the drouth, grasshoppers and panic without swerving to the right or left of the path of duty and, although we have not grown rich, we have managed to live. During the hard times that followed the panic of 1873, we have been lenient with those indebted to us....

 

The editor of this paper...resigned his position o ...
January 16, 1880, Manhattan Nationalist (ID 1928)

The editor of this paper...resigned his position on the Executive Committee of the State Temperance Union....

The first number of the Clay County Dispatch, under the management of Wirt W. Walton & Co., gave Clay Center a big boom....

Sam Wood has sold the National Era to H. W. McCune, who has changed its name to The Journal, and its politics from Greenback to Republican. We believe that the Era was the last survivor of all the papers in the state started as especial organs of Greenback sentiment. The Junction City Tribune, and a few other local papers, still advocate the old ideas, but they are supported mainly on local grounds. In his valedictory, Mr. Wood says that his advertising patronage came principally from those opposed to his financial views, and further, "I had not less than 1,500 subscribers who have read the paper over a year and failed to pay for the same."...

 

Ex-Senator Ross and others have purchased the Leav ...
February 13, 1880, Manhattan Nationalist (ID 1946)

Ex-Senator Ross and others have purchased the Leavenworth Press and will convert it into a Democratic paper....

J. K. Hudson has been elected secretary of the State Board of Agriculture to succeed Alfred Gray. He is a man of ability and great energy...but, if he undertakes to edit the Capital and run the Board of Agriculture, he will probably fail in both....

 

On Friday last, we attended the first annual meeti ...
April 16, 1880, Manhattan Nationalist (ID 1965)

On Friday last, we attended the first annual meeting of the Golden Belt Editorial Association, held in Junction City. About 25 editors were present....During the afternoon, we were taken in carriages to "Grand View" on the south of the Kansas....Twenty miles of river valley and innumerable hills are to be seen, while Junction lies at its foot, and to the westward Fort Riley and Ogden are plainly visible.

From Grand View we went to the fort, listened to an excellent concert by the military band stationed there, and paid our respects to General Pennypacker....Before leaving the reservation, the monument to Major Ogden, said to be the geographical center of the United States, was visited....After supper, the party went to Centennial Hall and enjoyed the second presentation of "Sevenoaks."...The evening's entertainment wound up with supper at the residence of Mayor Rizer.

Geo. Martin seemed as much at home as though he had never been state printer, and the veteran Prouty might almost have been supposed to be on his native heath. John Davis was necessarily in Washington, but his boys did the honors of his establishment well....

 

...There are four newspapers in Manhattan: The Nat ...
September 23, 1880, Manhattan Nationalist (ID 2014)

...There are four newspapers in Manhattan: The Nationalist edited by Albert Griffin...is a live temperance paper, has a strong local interest, and its editor has distinguished himself both as a writer and a lecturer in the cause of temperance. The Enterprise is edited by A. L. Runyon. The Industrialist, edited by Prof. E. M. Shelton, is an agricultural journal published in connection with the agricultural college. The Telephone, edited by Rev. R. D. Parker, is a Congregationalist monthly....

 

The Manhattan National is the name of a neat seven ...
February 17, 1881, Manhattan Nationalist (ID 2062)

The Manhattan National is the name of a neat seven-column folio placed on our table by Dr. Patee, whose name as editor and proprietor heads its columns. We are informed by the doctor that it is printed in Chicago; and we presume that it is intended as the organ of the Greenbackers in this vicinity. The name of the new bantling is so similar to that of this paper that we fear it will lead to some confusion....

 

The Golden Belt Editorial Association met at Salin ...
April 28, 1881, Manhattan Nationalist (ID 2083)

The Golden Belt Editorial Association met at Salina, last Friday....Interesting papers were read by John Davis on phonetic and spelling reform, and V. P. Wilson on the relation of newspapers to railroads and other monopolies. The following officers were elected for the ensuing year: President, Albert Griffin, Manhattan; vice-president, J. H. Downing, Hays City; secretary, W. A. Gebhardt, Ellsworth; treasurer, J. C. Hill, Solomon City. The September meeting will be held at Hays City, and the next annual meeting at Wamego.

 

The Nationalist booming -- We this week present ou ...
May 12, 1881, Manhattan Nationalist (ID 2091)

The Nationalist booming -- We this week present our readers with a seven column quarto. We know of but two papers in the state -- the Clay Center Dispatch and the Holton Recorder -- that equal it in size....Besides adding one column to each page, the columns are lengthened two inches, which altogether is equivalent to an addition of about 14 of our former columns, or 20 columns of a five-column quarto....Still another improvement...is that our sheets are cut at the top and pasted in the back, so that the paper will open like the leaves of a book....

 

The dollar edition -- Hereafter we shall print a " ...
May 19, 1881, Manhattan Nationalist (ID 2093)

The dollar edition -- Hereafter we shall print a "Dollar Edition" of The Nationalist. It will consist of the four outside pages of the "regular edition," and will, of course, contain all of the editorial matter, local news and home advertisements. The price will be $1 a year in advance, and five cents extra for each five weeks in arrears. It will be sent to those residing at a distance only when paid in advance....

 

The Junction City Union appeared last week in a ne ...
November 17, 1881, Manhattan Nationalist (ID 2138)

The Junction City Union appeared last week in a new dress with Geo. W. Martin at the helm. Typographically it is a beauty, and editorially, in newsiness, freshness and ability, it certainly has no superior in the state. If it has a defect in style, it is the apparently studied effort to be constantly startling -- a sort of journalistic Talmageism.