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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

National Democrat

Articles in database from National Democrat:    46

A Printer's Drink. According to the Princeton Kent ...
August 6, 1857, National Democrat (ID 3286)

A Printer's Drink. According to the Princeton Kentuckian, the following is a receipt for a Printer's drink: Take one pint of good whisky, stir in well one spoonful of whisky, then add another pint of whisky, beat carefully with a spoon and keep pouring in whisky. Fill a large bowl with water and make the servant put it out of your reach. Take a small tumbler, pour in two spoonsful of water, pour out the water and fill up with whisky and add to the above. Flavor with whisky to your taste.

 

The Wyandott Citizen. This is the title of a Democ ...
October 1, 1857, National Democrat (ID 3302)

The Wyandott Citizen. This is the title of a Democratic paper just started at Wyandott, Leavenworth County, K.T. Its editor and proprietor is Ephraim Abbatt. He is a racy writer and will battle with ability and determined energy for the cause of Democracy and the Union.

 

The Wyandott Citizen. This is the title of a Democ ...
October 1, 1857, National Democrat (ID 3304)

The Wyandott Citizen. This is the title of a Democratic paper just started at Wyandott, Leavenworth County. Its editor and proprietor is Ephraim Abbatt. He is a racy writer and will battle with ability and determined energy for the cause of Democracy and the Union.

 

The editor (S. W. Driggs) is now absent from his p ...
October 29, 1857, National Democrat (ID 3318)

The editor (S. W. Driggs) is now absent from his post on a trip east, with the intention of bringing his family out to Kansas. He will probably be absent for four weeks.

 

The Kansas Chief at White Cloud complains that the ...
November 12, 1857, National Democrat (ID 3323)

The Kansas Chief at White Cloud complains that the Democrat is not regularly received there. It is not our fault, as we venture to say that no newspaper in this Territory is mailed with more punctuality than ours. The blame, we know, rests with the Postmaster.

We have seen the prospectus of a newspaper, the Palmetto Kansan, to be published at Marysville, in the extreme western part of this territory. J. E. Clardy is the proprietor.

 

The Daily (St. Louis) Republican copies our Fort B ...
May 20, 1858, National Democrat (ID 3409)

The Daily (St. Louis) Republican copies our Fort Bridger correspondent's letters and give the Lecompton Union credit for the same. This is certainly rich, inasmuch as the Union has been dead for a year and the press and type taken to Palmetto in Marshall County, on which the Palmetto Kansan is published.

 

The Daily Western Journal of Commerce. We have rec ...
June 17, 1858, National Democrat (ID 3418)

The Daily Western Journal of Commerce. We have received No. 1 of this daily published at Kansas City by VanHorn and Abeel. It is gotten up in the neatest style of the art, and in fact is the best looking daily in the whole West.

 

This number closes the first volume of the Nationa ...
July 22, 1858, National Democrat (ID 3432)

This number closes the first volume of the National Democrat. We commenced our paper under very disadvantageous circumstances. The chief difficulty we have had to encounter was the entire absence of any organization of the Democratic party in the Territory. In addition to which we found the settlers aroused to a state of high excitement, many of whom were induced to believe that the wrongs and outrages which had been perpetrated were chargeable to the Democracy. We felt it to be a duty we owed to our principles and our party to expose the real authors of the troubles in Kansas. We have made the acquaintance of a large portion of our settlers; we have found the most of them to be fully imbued with the principles of Democracy; they have given us a much more generous support than we had expected, and we have the pleasure to assure them that our paper is firmly established....We propose making the Democrat the best paper in the West, and in order that we may be enabled to do so, we ask our friends to raise clubs of subscribers in the vicinity of every Post Office and in every settlement through the entire Territory....

 

The New Issue. Since the question has been settled ...
October 7, 1858, National Democrat (ID 3463)

The New Issue. Since the question has been settled that Kansas will be a Free State, there is no longer any possibility of the enemies of the Democratic party being able to again disturb the peace of the Territory under the old issue; therefore we have raised a new one of Kansas a free Territory. To accomplish which would require a repudiation of the Constitution of the United States, and the repeal of the Nebraska and Kansas bill. Of course, they do not hope or expect to make Kansas Territory free, but they do intend if they can accomplish it to again involve Kansas in a civil war. Let the traitors beware, there are at this time too many settlers in Kansas who understand their nefarious plot to enable the conspirators to play out their hand successfully. In the meantime, the people accept the new issue and will meet it.

 

We learn that some of the brawling disciples of ne ...
October 14, 1858, National Democrat (ID 3465)

We learn that some of the brawling disciples of negro equality in Lawrence have recently been indicted for an attempt at kidnapping. We regard negro stealing and kidnapping as crimes of the first magnitude....To say that the negroes are slaves would not justify any person in attempting to arrest them without due process of law. We may be told that certain persons in Lawrence harbor runaway slaves, and so conceal them as to render it impossible for their owners to recover them by lawful means. Yet all this is no excuse for any unlawful proceedings; two wrongs never yet made a right....Public opinion is daily gaining strength as to the absolute necessity of prohibiting free-niggerism as well as slavery in Kansas. A "Black Law" will effectually rid us of all annoyance on the part of the negro....

 

"Slavery is a peculiar crime, like polygamy or ars ...
February 24, 1859, National Democrat (ID 3526)

"Slavery is a peculiar crime, like polygamy or arson, and therefore calls for peculiar penalties." -- Lawrence Republican, Feb. 10th.

We have heretofore shown by the most incontestable proof that the New Testament strictly prohibits polygamy, which was tolerated under the Old Dispensation, and we have also shown that the New Testament does not prohibit slavery, but sanctions it by the most careful and stringent legislation. We have called on the editors of the above fanatical sheet to controvert our proof, and they have signally failed to do so....If we believed that the negro was a white man, with a black skin, we would not only be in favor of abolishing slavery everywhere, but we would labor night and day to put him on an equality with white men....We advise the fanatical individual who amuses the public with such trash to marry some colored wench, and when he has taken his own medicine, let him give the public the benefit of his experiences. What does thee say, friend Timothy?

 

It is rumored that the Leavenworth Herald and Jour ...
April 28, 1859, National Democrat (ID 3552)

It is rumored that the Leavenworth Herald and Journal are to be united under the name of the Leavenworth Democratic Union, which is to be published daily and weekly by George A. Crawford. We are pleased to learn that a union of these two excellent democratic papers is to take place....We made the acquaintance of this gentleman in 1857, and we know him to be an honest man and a stern and unyielding Democrat. Mr. Crawford has been residing at Fort Scott since 1857....

 

Horace Greeley arrived in Kansas and immediately s ...
June 2, 1859, National Democrat (ID 3564)

Horace Greeley arrived in Kansas and immediately set out for Osawatomie. This visit of Greeley's to Kansas is one of those impudent attempts to dictate to a free people we have ever known. An effort has been made on the part of his disciples to convey the idea that he had been invited to come here; this is not true. He feared the people of Kansas were getting tired of being used to make capital for Black Republican politicians, and he came solely to dictate to and keep them in the traces. Horace, during the sitting of the Convention at Osawatomie, opened an outside meeting and began a remarkable harangue, avowing his peculiar doctrines of negro equality, congressional sovereignty, &c; but the convention having a just fear of the Kansas Democracy before their eyes deemed it most prudent for the present to sacrifice their principles to policy, and admitted the irresistible power of the Democracy by attempting to conceal their negro-equality doctrines, on all of which they have felt themselves compelled to keep quiet for the present....

 

Atchison Union. The above is the title of a new De ...
June 9, 1859, National Democrat (ID 3568)

Atchison Union. The above is the title of a new Democratic paper just commenced in Atchison....G. O. Chase appears as editor and publisher. In his salutatory,...he says: "...While it will advocate the largest liberty of action consistent with the rights of the citizen and good order of society, it will oppose mulatto and negro suffrage. As our free institutions were reared by white men, for the benefit of the white race, political or social equality between the races would be as degrading to the elective franchise as it would be subversive of social order. Whether Congress does or does not possess the power to create or prohibit slavery in the Territories is no longer a practical question in Kansas -- as, in the language of the Tecumseh Resolution, "the slavery question is practically settled in favor of a Free State beyond the possibility of controversy."...

The Kansas Ledger of Leavenworth, which has been sailing under a neutral flag,...has gone over to the Black Republican camp and we are glad of it....

 

In reply to the charge that our paper is owned and ...
June 16, 1859, National Democrat (ID 3572)

In reply to the charge that our paper is owned and controlled by any other person or persons than ourself, we deny. We are the sole owner and alone control its columns, and shall never use them to bandy epithets....

 

It affords us more than ordinary pleasure to allud ...
August 4, 1859, National Democrat (ID 3593)

It affords us more than ordinary pleasure to allude to the arrival in our city not long since of Ben H. Keyser, the sterling Democratic editor of the Junction Sentinel, who has, for a considerable period, been a most formidable opponent of the aggressions of Abolitionism.

 

With this number closes the second year of our pap ...
August 18, 1859, National Democrat (ID 3600)

With this number closes the second year of our paper....We have steadily steered our frail bark with the single star of Democracy as our only guide, carefully avoiding the Scylla of Fanatical Abolitionism and the Charybdis of Southern Nullification on the other....

 

We have, from time to time, noticed in the Aboliti ...
August 25, 1859, National Democrat (ID 3602)

We have, from time to time, noticed in the Abolition papers complaints against Post Masters throughout the Territory. The complaints are in regard to carelessness, the non-delivery of papers, letters being opened, &c. We have long known that men who are bitterly hostile to the Administration and the Democratic party have been permitted to obtain the post offices throughout the Territory. This ought no longer to be permitted....We have had many complaints from our subscribers that their papers do not reach them, and in one case a subscriber called at the office kept by a Black Republican, who told him there was nothing for him in the office. Our subscriber walked behind the counter and found his paper hid away....Let this trick of the enemy be stopped.

 

We have received the first number of the Olathe He ...
September 22, 1859, National Democrat (ID 3616)

We have received the first number of the Olathe Herald, a new Democratic paper published at Olathe, Johnson County, by Deveney & Giffin.

Sam A. Medary, having located at Junction City, Riley County, has become the editor and proprietor of the late Junction Sentinel, press and fixtures, and has issued the first number of his paper, which he names the Kansas Statesman.

 

We have received the first number of the Americus ...
October 6, 1859, National Democrat (ID 3623)

We have received the first number of the Americus Sentinel, published at the beautiful and thriving town of Americus, Breckenridge County, by T. C. Hill....Politically the Sentinel is independent, and will be devoted to the interests of Kansas. In his introductory to the public, the editor, R. M. Ruggles, expresses his intention to earnestly advocate "the making of Kansas a free state for white men, believing that such a course will most advance the prosperity of the state."...

 

This week we place on our exchange list the Neosho ...
October 20, 1859, National Democrat (ID 3634)

This week we place on our exchange list the Neosho Valley Register, published at Burlington, Coffey County, and the State Record, published at Topeka, both Republic sheets and, of course, devoted to the Wyandott swindle and Marcus J. Parrott. They are well gotten up and present a good typographical appearance, which is about all that can be said in their favor....

 

To eastern papers of the Black Republican stamp, t ...
November 10, 1859, National Democrat (ID 3647)

To eastern papers of the Black Republican stamp, that do not like to risk an open defense of the Harper's Ferry murders and robberies -- treason and revolution, try to justify their cause by stating that Old Brown was instigated in his deeds of blood from the fact of his having a son killed in the Kansas forays. This falsehood they have spread far and wide....Here where the scenes occurred, this statement is known to be false -- every word false. Geo. W. Brown, the editor of the Lawrence Herald of Freedom, who has been an eyewitness to most of the Kansas troubles, and suffered some at that, puts this falsehood, got up for Old Brown's benefit, but which he repudiates, to rest forever, in reply to the Atchison Champion....Read and learn the truth.

 

Hereafter our patrons will find us in our new offi ...
December 1, 1859, National Democrat (ID 3658)

Hereafter our patrons will find us in our new office, Rowena Hall building, entrance on Woodson Avenue.

 

Our readers will recollect that some weeks since w ...
December 29, 1859, National Democrat (ID 3672)

Our readers will recollect that some weeks since we published from the Lawrence Herald of Freedom an account of the brutal murders by Old John Brown and his crew on the Pottawatomie. Those who are trying to make a martyr of Old Brown felt that these publications were damaging their hero and saint, and therefore flatly contradicted them. No one who knew Geo. W. Brown, the editor of the Herald of Freedom, believed for a moment that he would state a falsehood about matters of which he was more or less, himself, the victim. We mean the troubles in Kansas of former years. He could have no object in stating a falsehood, but he had a great purpose in having the truth told fairly before the public....At a very extraordinary meeting, held at Lawrence a few days ago, by the friends of Brown, they did not deny but justified this act. So that ends the matter so far as the truth or falsehood of the story goes....

 

We are happy to state to our patrons that we have ...
January 5, 1860, National Democrat (ID 3677)

We are happy to state to our patrons that we have made arrangements with A. P. Walker to conduct the editorial department of the Kansas National Democrat during the session of the Legislature now convened at this place.... -- S. W. Driggs.

 

This week we issue only a half sheet, for the reas ...
January 12, 1860, National Democrat (ID 3682)

This week we issue only a half sheet, for the reason that our paper did not arrive in time. We are obliged to omit several editorial articles of importance for want of room; yet there will be found nearly our usual quota of reading matter.

 

The Leavenworth Times,...in giving a list of the p ...
March 22, 1860, National Democrat (ID 3716)

The Leavenworth Times,...in giving a list of the papers in Kansas, speaking of our paper says: "S. W. Driggs & A. P. Walker, editors." This is an error; during the sitting of the Legislature at this place, Mr. Walker became temporarily associate editor; when the Legislature removed, the connection ceased.

 

This morning C. C. Clawson, who has so long and ab ...
May 10, 1860, National Democrat (ID 3730)

This morning C. C. Clawson, who has so long and ably conducted the local column of the Democrat, in company with his wife and brother-in-law, leaves for the "Land of Gold."...In him we lose a good printer, a warm friend and genial companion. Already do we miss him -- no more do we hear the hearty laugh that used to come from his "alley," nor the steady click, click of the type at his "frame," as they went rattling into the "stick." Once more, Clawson, we all wish you a pleasant trip across the plains, and an abundant harvest of gold after you reach the mountains.

 

The Emporia News comes to us this week enlarged an ...
May 24, 1860, National Democrat (ID 3735)

The Emporia News comes to us this week enlarged and in a new dress from head to foot. Mr. Stotler has associated with himself Mr. Randall and again assumed charge of the News....We stuck type with Jake last winter and know him to be a thorough printer and an able writer, but we are sorry to see that he has been so misguided as to waste his fine talent in giving aid to and supporting so hopeless a cause as that of Republicanism.

S. O. Thatcher has retired from the editorial chair of the Lawrence Republican. In his valedictory, he says he has but little to regret with regard to his past editorial course. What a conscience he must have.

 

The Irrepressible Conflict. The Republicans at Chi ...
June 7, 1860, National Democrat (ID 3738)

The Irrepressible Conflict. The Republicans at Chicago nominated a candidate of the ultra stamp. He boldly avows the odious principles enunciated by Senator Seward in his celebrated Rochester speech. In his speech delivered in the state convention held in Springfield, Ill., in June 1858, Mr. Lincoln uttered the following sentiments:

"In my opinion, the slavery agitation will not cease until a crisis shall have been reached and passed. A house divided against itself cannot stand. I believe this government cannot endure permanently half slave and half free. I do not expect the Union to be dissolved; I do not expect the house to fall, but I do expect it will cease to be divided. It will become all one thing or all the other -- Either the opponents of slavery will arrest the further spread of it -- place it where the public mind shall rest in the belief that it is in the course of ultimate extinction; or its advocates will push it forward till it shall become alike lawful in all the states as well as new -- North as well as South."

These are the principles of the John Brown and Redpath school. Those who are prepared to break down the barriers of society and let loose the entire slave population of the South will vote of course for this ranting mono-maniac; but prudent and law abiding people of all parties, who are satisfied with society as it is -- and government as it is, will spurn the candidate whose claim to the Presidency is based upon such an issue. -- Atchison Union.

 

We have received the first number of the Auburn Do ...
June 21, 1860, National Democrat (ID 3744)

We have received the first number of the Auburn Docket, edited and published by D. B. Emmert, at Auburn, Shawnee County. It presents a very neat appearance and speaks well for its publisher. It has hoisted the Republican nominee to its masthead and promises to labor zealously in the "Rail Splitter's" cause.

 

Last Wednesday morning, Charles Foster, A. William ...
June 28, 1860, National Democrat (ID 3748)

Last Wednesday morning, Charles Foster, A. Williams and George Dummer (the latter late local editor of the Kansas Statesman), all fellow typos, who have been working with us for some time past, "threw up their cases" and left for the mountains, thinking no doubt that they could make more panning gold dirt than they could sticking type -- we hope they may. We miss the boys very much, for they were a jolly crew.

 

Leavenworth Herald. Mr. Gill, the former able edit ...
July 26, 1860, National Democrat (ID 3766)

Leavenworth Herald. Mr. Gill, the former able editor of this journal, has retired from the management of said paper, and the same is now under the editorial management of Wm. P. Fain & Ward Burlingame, gentlemen of merit and ability.

 

The population of Lecompton is about 500 at the pr ...
August 9, 1860, National Democrat (ID 3778)

The population of Lecompton is about 500 at the present time. Like many other towns in Kansas, this place has furnished a large delegation to the gold mines at Pike's Peak during the past year.

 

The Largest Printing Press in the World. At the pr ...
August 16, 1860, National Democrat (ID 3784)

The Largest Printing Press in the World. At the printing house of the Appletons, in New York, is a press made expressly for Webster's Spelling Book, which prints both sides at once. As this is the only press of its kind in existence, so Webster's "Speller" is the only book requiring a press so rapid and on which a single book is being printed without interruption from January to December. The sale of Webster's "Speller" amounts to more than one million per annum, and more have been sold than there are people in the United States.

 

With this number...we commence a new volume of the ...
August 30, 1860, National Democrat (ID 3789)

With this number...we commence a new volume of the National Democrat. We are now entering upon the fourth year of publication. We have made improvements in our journal as fast as the circumstances...would admit, and desire to increase our circulation somewhat, although we have no reason to be dissatisfied with our patronage....

 

...It will be seen that the printers of Lecompton ...
September 13, 1860, National Democrat (ID 3796)

...It will be seen that the printers of Lecompton will give a complimentary ball to the citizens of this place on Tuesday evening next, 18th inst. They wish it to be known that tickets to the ball are free. Mr. Wilson of the American will prepare a supper for the occasion, tickets $1.50....Music by the Lawrence Band....

 

Doniphan County Dispatch. This journal published a ...
November 1, 1860, National Democrat (ID 3817)

Doniphan County Dispatch. This journal published at Troy...is well got up, and edited with ability by J. W. Biggers. Is now in the first volume about two months old.

The Leavenworth Dispatch will be issued daily until the close of the election returns.

 

With this number, the undersigned undertakes the e ...
November 15, 1860, National Democrat (ID 3823)

With this number, the undersigned undertakes the editorial duties in connection with this journal....We hope to discuss all questions of public interest in candor, and with moderation....Every man in this country has the right to think independent of every other man's thoughts,...to speak and write his thoughts without fear or favor, if so be he does not encroach upon others rights in the same respect.... -- Wm. P. Montgomery.

 

Wood! Wood! Wood! Those of our subscribers proposi ...
December 20, 1860, National Democrat (ID 3836)

Wood! Wood! Wood! Those of our subscribers proposing to pay their subscription for the Democrat in wood will please bring it on at their earliest convenience, as the concern and the proprietor's family are out of fuel. We...must have wood or money to buy it at once.

 

The Leavenworth Herald. The above-named admirable ...
January 24, 1861, National Democrat (ID 3855)

The Leavenworth Herald. The above-named admirable journal has just come under the editorial management of Chas. W. Helm.

Newspaper sketches. We find in The Printer for December a very humorous article under the above caption. We have divided it into four parts, and propose to give our readers one part each week....

The "Devil" is an institution by and of himself. He inks the type, or turns the crank, or "lays on the sheets." If it were not for him, the paper would not "come out." He sweeps out the office. He builds the fires -- an appropriate work for a fiend -- and swears because someone has "hooked the kindlings!" He does the "chores at the house." He "quiets the baby." Yet his most important duty is to keep watch on the street corner so as to be able to inform the editor when the sheriff is after him! With all this, the "Devil" shoulders all the bad or smutty jokes of the editor. When the mighty man of the pen is ashamed of an expression, and still desires to utter it, he says, "our Devil says thus and so," and the poor devil has to stand it! Nevertheless, the "Devil" is an important personage in society. He attends lectures. He frequents concerts, shows, and the opera; but -- I say it more in sorrow than in anger -- he seldom attends church. He presents himself at the ticket office of the "show," with his "linen" reversed by way of a change (for he seldom possesses more than a single shirt) as a "member of the Press," and so presses his claims that he is admitted without the accustomed quarter. Indeed, he gives the ticket agent no quarter until he is admitted without the quarter. But our young friend is not alone. He is too much of a gallant for that. His "woman" is with him and he and his "woman" pass in and enjoy the entertainment, which, whatever it may be, is taken down in doses alternated with peanuts and tobacco. For the Devil chews as well as smokes, and spits profusely on carpets when he gets within reach of them. I never heard of a Printer's Devil who had "risen in life," but I do the class the justice to say that, to my knowledge, none of them have fallen very low. Some of these "Devils" have descended to be mayors of cities. Some of them have even let themselves down into Congressmen. But I never knew one to degrade himself so low as to become a President of the United States. So much for the "Devil." I know the "animal." I've been there myself.

 

Newspaper Sketches No. 2. The "Jour Printer": Allo ...
January 31, 1861, National Democrat (ID 3860)

Newspaper Sketches No. 2. The "Jour Printer"

Allow me to introduce the "Jour Printer." Of jacks-at-all-trades he is the chief. He never finds an emergency to which he is not equal. He is in every desirable place, at all times. He is always "at the fire" -- sometimes bootless and hatless and shirtless; still he is there! He is in California, at Pike's Peak, or in Utah, and has a practical belief in a plurality of wives! He rejects the current proverb that there can be too much of a good thing -- in this respect. He is engaged alike in John Brown insurrections and Southern secession movements. Of course, he has joined the Sons of Malta -- long ago. He is one of the pioneers. His admission was irregular. Very much to the sorrow and discomfiture of the order, he swindled the goat out of his accustomed perquisite in the butting line -- seizing the animal by the tail and "reversing the engine!" And after he had seen the elephant, or rather the goat, he published his experience in the newspaper, illustrated with cuts. It was very plain that he could swim; at least, he "got along swimmingly." The "Jour Printer" travels. He is not infrequently compelled to travel by the force of circumstances. His little brass rule is an open-sesame alike to steamboats and rail cars. He occupies the choicest seats and puts his muddy boots, or shoes, upon the velvet cushions. He is always "strapped," more or less -- generally more. Still, he declares the "world owes him a living," as surely as he owes his washerwoman an indefinite sum which she will never get. He is never out of spirits -- animal spirits, I mean -- for he is sometimes crazy for want of the variety 'clept "ardent." In some cases, his idea of Paradise is a huge barrel of Old Bourbon, pierced for a large-sized straw, with his mouth at the muzzle. I repeat, he travels. At one point in his peregrinations, he works at his "profession" -- it would be sacrilege to call it "trade;" at another, he is a quack doctor with an adequate supply of bread pills and molasses syrup; at another, he assumes ministerial robes, occupies the sacred desk, drawls out in lugubrious tones the paragraphs of a purloined sermon, and addresses the "throne of grace" in a style peculiarly his own!

 

Kansas a State! No one can fail to notice that the ...
February 7, 1861, National Democrat (ID 3865)

Kansas a State! No one can fail to notice that the admission of Kansas as a state is producing much interest among the people of the country. Our brethren of the Republican school -- including editors of Kansas journals -- are all at the height of glorification. "We did it!" "We conquered." "Glory to us! to us!" is sent through the host in an excellent manner. We like to see our friends happy, if the snow is deep. Our Free State Democratic friends, too, claim a share in the universal rejoicing, and are glad with a right good will. We say cheer up! right good cheer! Kansas is a state!! But we of the leading Pro-Slavery party journals -- as the enthusiastic little Atchison Champion calls us in a late issue -- are left in the background entirely. Lecompton has failed! The Territorial Government has failed -- and we, too, join in the chorus! We are glad Kansas is a state, and we want to see this young progeny of the Union wash her face, comb her hair and put on clean clothes, so that we won't be ashamed of our little state when she goes to meeting with her large, intelligent and well-dressed sisters.

Newspaper Sketches No. 3. "Ye Local."

Next comes "Ye Local." He is an indispensable adjunct to every well-conducted newspaper. Everybody knows him. If my rural friend comes to town, he "sees him." He is standing on the street corner. He meets him on the pavement, possibly with a bill for collection! "Ye Local" is ubiquitous. If a Dutchman drink forty glasses of lager at a sitting "ye local" sees it done, and helps do it. If a plug-muss occurs at midnight, he is certain to be present and, ten to one, he has a black eye for the next week. If a man has the bad luck to be murdered, the "local" is the principal witness; and if there is an elopement in high life, you may be sure he is at the bottom of it for the sake of getting a good item. He attends the first and last ball of the season. He never goes home till morning, and then he takes the girls with him. He is the chronicler of the occasion, and of every other occasion. He renders extraordinary service to those who get into his good graces -- how they get there is nobody's business. He makes an "able and entertaining" lecture out of an irregular grouping of stale, flat, and unprofitable ideas; a "graceful danseuse" out of a large-limbed damsel who would disgrace a "Pete Williams hoe-down;" and a "melodious, bird-voiced songstress" out of a croaking, braying, old "campaigner." He puts the bad English of the public speaker into proper shape, and secures for him fame and renown which he would never enjoy through his own merits. We will drop the curtain on "ye local."

 

Newspaper Sketches No. 4. "The Country Newspaper." ...
February 14, 1861, National Democrat (ID 3868)

Newspaper Sketches No. 4. "The Country Newspaper."

Let us glance at the "Country Newspaper." It is located at some "crossroads" or "four corners." The office is surrounded by a "tavern," a "store," a "church" edifice and a schoolhouse. The editor, the "squire," the postmaster and the schoolmaster are the only men of function in the town. The newspaper is seven by nine in size -- very much larger that in pretension! Its conductor -- assisted by the 'Devil" to whom I have referred -- "steals" his own "editorials," cabbages his "original" items, puts them in type, works them off on the old wooden press (the "Devil" blacking the types as his great exemplar blacks the characters of men), distributes his papers to his subscribers, and frequently has to pay their subscriptions out of his own pockets. Besides this, he frequently serves as a mayor, or magistrate; practices law in a style that seldom "makes perfect;" preaches occasionally, exhorts frequently, and sometimes elopes with another man's wife! The "circulation" of the country newspaper is always "one thousand" -- never more nor less. Counting five persons to the family of each subscriber, and ten neighbors who regularly borrow each paper, the editor glories "in types" over his "fifteen thousand readers!" The country editor has but one formidable rival -- and this rival is the town gossip. If she obtain possession of an "item" there is no occasion for the editor's publishing it. His "fifteen thousand readers" are all posted before the day of publication comes around. She is the best person in the world to keep a secret, if one is not particular how it is kept. If she finds herself incompetent to keep one, she imitates the sagacious son of Erin, who, having confided to him a very important matter, found himself unable to smother it within his bosom, and "bejabers he gave it to one who could kape it." And the recipient of the secret likewise confided it to another, and he to another, until it took the entire community to keep it, and they kept it moving! And your town gossip is as prolific as Canada thistle or -- Queen Victoria! This sort of competition annoys the country editor exceedingly; and if, on some occasion of extraordinary provocation, he murders the town gossip, we hope he will escape the polite and considerate offices of the hangman!

 

The Kansas State Journal. We have just received th ...
February 21, 1861, National Democrat (ID 3872)

The Kansas State Journal. We have just received the first number of this journal, published at Lawrence by Trask & Lowman. It presents a neat typographical appearance, and the editorial department is conducted in a better manner than most of its Republican contemporaries. The editors ventilate their spleen against the present administration, and their prejudice in behalf of what is called "Freedom in Kansas." It claims to be of the conservative Republican school, and we hope it will come nearer the mark than did the Leavenworth Conservative. It will give attention to the interest of the agriculturist, and also the interest of the new state. They have our best wishes for prosperity in a pecuniary point. We differ in political sentiments but not necessarily so in other matters.

 

We notice the following announcement in the Juncti ...
March 7, 1861, National Democrat (ID 3880)

We notice the following announcement in the Junction City Statesman of March 2nd. We are sorry to know that so many of our brethren have yielded to the pressure of the times: "The Statesman has passed into other hands, but will appear for a week or two in its present form. As soon as a supply of paper and other material can be received, the Smoky Hill Republican will make its appearance. The Statesman is past redemption -- nothing can save it. 'Unwept, unhonored and unsung,' it is about to pass to 'that bourne from whence no traveler returns.' Peace to its ashes."

The Council Grove Press. Amid the changes going on, it is gratifying to see improvements, even in these dark days for Kansas. The above mentioned journal come to us greatly improved, and we believe the present editor, A. J. Baker, will make that sheet an honor to Council Grove.

The Topeka Tribune. The Tribune has changed hands and is now under the editorial management of John P. Greer. We are sorry the Tribune has gone over to the enemy, yet we are glad it has fallen into so good hands....We suggest to the Democratic fraternity that, if any more changes are to take place, they had better look up a few Democratic editors.