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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Osage Chronicle

Articles in database from Osage Chronicle:    41

Vol. 1, No. 5. By M. Marshall Murdock, editor and ...
October 24, 1863, Osage Chronicle (ID 4458)

Vol. 1, No. 5. By M. Marshall Murdock, editor and proprietor. Office, Santa Fe Avenue.

 

"M. M. Murdock, formerly in this office, has start ...
November 7, 1863, Osage Chronicle (ID 4466)

"M. M. Murdock, formerly in this office, has started the Osage Chronicle at Burlingame. He will make a good paper...." -- Lawrence Tribune.

"Mr. Murdock, late of the Emporia News typographical corps, commenced the publication of a new paper, the Osage Chronicle, at Burlingame, Osage County. He will make a go of it sure." -- State Journal.

"The Osage Chronicle is the title of a new paper just started at Burlingame. It is neatly printed, edited with ability, and is right on all of the great issues -- is Republican in politics, stands by the administration, and says: 'We paddle our own canoe, regardless of counter-currents.' M. Marshall Murdock, editor and proprietor." -- Oskaloosa Independent.

 

Thanks. If we have any friends who contemplate pay ...
November 14, 1863, Osage Chronicle (ID 4472)

Thanks. If we have any friends who contemplate paying us a visit, we give them a cordial invitation to do so forthwith as we have more to eat now than we are likely to have again in the next year to come....Who wouldn't be an editor among such a generous people?...The first on the bill is some very fine cabbage and beets presented by Mrs. Goebel. May Mrs. G. live a hundred years....2nd, a fine roast of fresh pork by Mrs. J. M. Chambers....3rd, wild ducks and prairie chickens bagged by the Burlingame Nimrod who does not want his name to appear in the Chronicle (it's the deputy P.M.)...4th, apples by Mr. Ryus, a bushel of the finest picked from a wagon load....5th, a bushel of English sweet turnips by A. T. Dutton....6th, for dessert, shell-bark hickory nuts furnished by the individual who killed the ducks. P.S. Since writing the above, C. D. Bush, the great cheese man of Osage, came toting into our sanctum a chunk of premium cheese half as big as all out of doors.

 

Lieut. Howard Schuyler, our principal devil, press ...
November 21, 1863, Osage Chronicle (ID 4478)

Lieut. Howard Schuyler, our principal devil, pressman and foreman, when last seen was with that notorious Topeka mail route man, A. Leonard....Had it not been that Lieut. had worked so long and faithful with us when we were hard up, we should have been tempted to halt him. Good luck go with him....

Lieut. T. B. Murdock, the editor's brother, has just returned from Fort Halleck, Idaho Territory, in the Rocky Mountains, where the company has been stationed to protect the Overland Mail Route. His appearance would indicate that mountain life and fighting Indians agreed with him. He is on a visit to his parents residing in Emporia.

 

We sent to Leavenworth several weeks ago for a win ...
November 28, 1863, Osage Chronicle (ID 4483)

We sent to Leavenworth several weeks ago for a winter's supply of paper. There is none in the city. If it should fail to come within four or five days there will be no Chronicle.

We are in receipt of a new paper entitled The Nemaha Courier, published at Seneca, John P. Cone, editor and proprietor....His paper is radical to the core and of the right stripe.

 

An intelligent, industrious boy, about 15 or 16 ye ...
December 2, 1863, Osage Chronicle (ID 4487)

An intelligent, industrious boy, about 15 or 16 years old, is wanted at this office immediately to learn the art of printing. None need apply who are not willing to stay three years. Terms: The same that printer's apprentices are taken upon throughout the United States. A farmer's son preferred.

 

...
December 12, 1863, Osage Chronicle (ID 5752)

The Lawrence Daily Tribune says: "Surprising as it may seem, no less then 137 houses have been constructed and are now under way in our city since the Quantrel massacre, ascertained by actual count. For a time our city spirit seemed deadened, and many feared a stampede, but now courage has revived and our city looms up with surprising activity. Our business houses are fast replenishing and soon Lawrence will present more than her original dimensions and assert her destiny as one of the largest cities west of the Mississippi...."

We have neglected to notice the fact that they have a daily paper in Lawrence. It is a well printed sheet and contains full telegraphic reports. Of course, there can be no doubt of its success with John Speer as its editor and E. P. Harris, one of the best printers in the West, as its foreman.

 

The Southern Kansas Herald is again on its legs an ...
December 19, 1863, Osage Chronicle (ID 4498)

The Southern Kansas Herald is again on its legs and comes to us well filled with new ads and "looking gay as a peach." G. A. Colton, the editor, informs its readers that he has purchased new type and the Herald is shortly to appear in an entire new dress. Paola is a live town but we hear it said that, if a few of its whisky shops were traded off for churches, the place would pass a little more current among the respectable.

 

...
December 19, 1863, Osage Chronicle (ID 5754)

The Southern Kansas Herald is again on its legs and comes to us well filled with new ads and "looking gay as a peach." G. A. Colton, the editor, informs its readers that he has purchased new type and the Herald is shortly to appear in an entire new dress. Paola is a live town but we hear it said that, if a few of its whisky shops were traded off for churches, the place would pass a little more current among the respectable.

The Lost Boys - Mr. Speer, editor of the Tribune, has as yet been unable to discover any trace of his son, who has been missing since that terrible morning. Robert was noble, high-minded and very pleasing in his manners, a perfect Adonis in personal appearance; in fact, one who we loved as a younger brother. He was page in the Territorial Legislature....John Speer, Jr., the oldest son, and the one who was so brutally murdered, was the possessor of an original mind...; one whose worth and force of character was only known to those of his most intimate friends, so great was his diffidence and so unassuming his manners....The editor of this paper occupied his bed with him the night previous to the raid. In the morning we stood together at a back window and witnessed some of the indiscriminate and inhuman murder of our fellow citizens....After a shot or two had been sent close to our heads, I said to him that a printing office was no place for us, that we must seek some other place of refuge. We went down the back stairs together. I told him there was a well close by into which we could go. He hurriedly said something about "home" and the noble boy started....He fell at the hands of a demon within a short distance of where we parted....

 

"The Osage Chronicle is informed that F. G. Hunt o ...
January 2, 1864, Osage Chronicle (ID 4507)

"The Osage Chronicle is informed that F. G. Hunt of Emporia intends starting a new paper at that point, to be called the Vanguard." -- Topeka Tribune.

"Yes, and rumor says that the paper is intended for circulation principally in the Kaw Nation. More than 300 have already subscribed. The efforts of Mr. Hunt to ameliorate the condition of this unfortunate people are truly praiseworthy, and will receive a hearty 'grunt' from every intelligent Kaw." -- Emporia News.

 

...
January 9, 1864, Osage Chronicle (ID 5755)

**A rebel force under command of Quantreile and others is reported to have crossed the Arkansas, destined as is supposed for the Kansas border. Capt. Spillman with some Indian troops met them at Barren Fork in the Cherokee Country, fought them for four hours, routed them and killed 70. From all points along the border we learn that there is not a bushwhacker now to be seen. The stringent measures adopted by the commander of the district have effectually and thoroughly swept these murderous miscreants from the counties adjoining us.

 

...
May 14, 1864, Osage Chronicle (ID 5760)

The Daily Atchison Free Press, published at Atchison by F. G. Adams, recently of the State Record, is at hand. The Free Pres is a lively little daily.

 

...
July 9, 1864, Osage Chronicle (ID 5762)

Newspaper Prices. The St. Joe papers have advanced their prices to higher figures than those of Leavenworth. The papers all over the country have been compelled to increase their rates of advertising as well as subscription in consequence of the enormous advance in the cost of all printing materials and typesetting.

 

The Council Grove Editor. Gen. S. N. Wood has sold ...
July 16, 1864, Osage Chronicle (ID 4601)

The Council Grove Editor. Gen. S. N. Wood has sold the Press. Sad thing! Sad thing! Has Sam's responsibilities became too many and great? Does the champion who has heretofore combated the whole state, that led and wrapped around his finger ends a whole legislature, that made a plaything of a mighty financial governor, succumb? Has the column association pressed too hard on tender truths? Or has our plucky little General determined to go hand in hand into retirement with the U.S. Senator who has resigned a seat in the Council of the Nation that he might enjoy rest and quietude? We are in truth sorry to lose Wood as an editor from this portion of Kansas. Our neighboring town, through the exertions and untiring energy of the editor of the Press, has from a mere Kaw trading post become a lively business point and a town of considerable notoriety and, we presume, that the business men will feel the loss of their puffer.

 

The Lawrence Weekly Tribune is the finest appearin ...
July 30, 1864, Osage Chronicle (ID 4613)

The Lawrence Weekly Tribune is the finest appearing, most readable...and cheapest weekly newspaper printed in the state. It arrives here on Friday mornings containing all the telegraph of the dailies up to that date....It contains nearly 30 columns of reading matter.

 

Jacob Stotler has sold the Emporia News establishm ...
September 17, 1864, Osage Chronicle (ID 4637)

Jacob Stotler has sold the Emporia News establishment. The News has been edited by Stotler for six pears with great success....

 

After a silence for a time, the Chronicle again co ...
July 22, 1865, Osage Chronicle (ID 525)

After a silence for a time, the Chronicle again comes to its readers. Since our last issue, peace...has been vouchsafed to our people....The beloved hero of our success, the American Emancipator, Abraham Lincoln, is no more....Our paper will abate none of its original radical democracy. "Our Nation is free and to freemen we speak" is our motto....

 

...
July 22, 1865, Osage Chronicle (ID 5764)

After a silence for a time, the Chronicle again comes to its readers. Since our last issue, peace, a tranquil, triumphant and heaven-approved peace - without a bondsman - has been vouchsafed to our people....All, all very satisfactory, with but one dark cloud to mar the glorious results. The beloved hero of our success, the American Emancipator, Abraham Lincoln, is no more....Our paper will abate none of its original radical democracy. "Out nation is free and to freemen we speak" is our motto....

 

...
July 29, 1865, Osage Chronicle (ID 5765)

Osage Chronicle. This paper has been revived by its former editor and proprietor, M. M. Murdock. It is cleanly printed, well edited, and bears evidence of prosperity.... - Lawrence Tribune.

"Revived. The Osage Chronicle comes to us smilingly after a suspension of several months. M. M. Murdock, proprietor, gets up an excellent paper...." - Leavenworth Conservative.

"The Chronicle at Burlingame, which has been suspended since last fall, has been started again by M. M. Murdock. He made a good paper before and we doubt not will do so hereafter." - State Record.

 

"Mr. Murdock has resuscitated the Chronicle at Bur ...
August 5, 1865, Osage Chronicle (ID 533)

"Mr. Murdock has resuscitated the Chronicle at Burlingame. It has been somewhat enlarged and makes a good typographical appearance." -- Emporia News.

"The Osage Chronicle, after sleeping for some months, has again made its appearance. It looks quite fresh and smiling after its long nap." -- Oskaloosa Independent.

"The Osage Chronicle has been revived after a suspension of several months. M. M. Murdock, the editor, is one of the live young men in the state." -- Bulletin.

 

Died. On the afternoon of Tuesday, the 22nd,...of ...
September 2, 1865, Osage Chronicle (ID 540)

Died. On the afternoon of Tuesday, the 22nd,...of spinal meningitis, Tommy Ernest, infant son of M. Marshall and Victoria Murdock, aged four months.

 

The Kansas Press -- Its Vigor and Moral Stamina. T ...
September 30, 1865, Osage Chronicle (ID 550)

The Kansas Press -- Its Vigor and Moral Stamina. The editor of the Leavenworth Conservative, under a portion of the above head, with a sense of profound responsibility and importance, gets off a dissertation in which the press of the state is read a lesson. He lays down the mark which we are to toe for the future by criticizing our past follies and shortcomings, and then winds up his sage remarks by recommending among other journals as patterns of vigor, enterprise, morality and originality worthy our emulation, himself or the Leavenworth papers, Kansas Chief, Topeka Record and Junction Union. Oh dear! Brother benighted scribblers, behold the dazzling luminaries -- once look, fall back and swear you see it, for you never will again. Well, the papers of Leavenworth are harmonious, full of etiquette and without vituperation, we expect, and we give the editor of the Conservative credit for the new discovery; and, as we admit that we hardly know what originality means, they may be full of that too. Sol Miller may be full of morality and high-toned journalism but there is very little of it sticking out of the columns of the Chief. The Record, too, is well nigh collapsed of that same vigor and clear judgment spoken of -- vigorous as a ten cent primer, and full of the same kind of lucidness found in Sunday-school literature. Space and time forbids anything further at present, yet with an exalted purpose we look to the advice and patterns set us, only hoping that, should we ever become capable, we may not make fools of ourselves by writing poor nonsense with a view to a mutual admiration society. (Written by M. Marshall Murdock.)

 

The following communications will explain themselv ...
November 4, 1865, Osage Chronicle (ID 559)

The following communications will explain themselves. We were asked, after the adjournment of the convention, if we would sustain its action. Our answer was: No! A rumor was soon afloat that we were to be bought out, followed by a proposition which we immediately answered. Then came the written proposition which we give below. Our paper not paying, we suspect we showed too much anxiety to sell; at any rate, when they learned of our readiness, their ardor very perceptibly cooled. In their proposition, they presume to dictate terms. We say, in answer, that we may as well lose money in publishing the paper as to lose it by selling the office for so much less than its worth. Their proposition was handed to us late Saturday night and we answered early Monday morning. We only publish this to stop their blowing:

...Mr. Murdock: Dear sir. You have stated that you should suspend your paper unless the people elected you to the office of county treasurer. You stated in the presence of several of our citizens yesterday...that you would sell your press and materials for three-fourths of the cost. I make this proposition: I will pay you first cost for your presses and materials. The money to be paid as soon as the bill of sale is made out, according to bills of purchase. If you bought it cheap and it is not a paying institution, you can afford to sell it for the same, adding repairs, Etc. You have proposed, I understand, to leave it to Jake Stotler, who is your brother-in-law, but that I cannot do. I will pay you cost, and for your trouble of moving it to this place. The paper shall be run in Burlingame and owned by a joint stock company, all of whom are permanent settlers of the town. An early reply is requested. Respectfully, O. H. Sheldon.

To Hon. O. H. Sheldon and Others: Sirs. Your proposition has been duly received and considered; I answer: I bought the most of the material at a great bargain, yet under the circumstances of the office not paying, I am willing to sacrifice. You have not forgotten that I told you I was willing to take just what I could prove that I was offered last spring. I will do better. If you are in earnest in the matter, and don't talk for political effect only, I will take $1,225, reserving book accounts due, except the subscription book, which you are to have. Or I will take $150 less than the current "Specimen Book" prices. The only condition asked by me is that you will run the paper the full year. A prompt answer is solicited. I am, Gentlemen, Very respectfully, M. M. Murdock.

 

Two more editors have been elected to our state se ...
November 25, 1865, Osage Chronicle (ID 562)

Two more editors have been elected to our state senate this fall, to wit: D. B. Emmert of the Fort Scott Monitor and Sol Miller of the White Cloud Chief.

 

We are in receipt of three new papers, the Topeka ...
December 23, 1865, Osage Chronicle (ID 582)

We are in receipt of three new papers, the Topeka Leader, Paola Free Press, and Ottawa Home Journal. The Home Journal is purely a literary and religious journal, such a one as should be in the hands of every teacher and minister and at every fireside in Kansas. The Miami County Free Press, published at Paola, is an eight column paper with a fine mechanical appearance and well edited. The Topeka Leader, published by J. F. Cummings & Co., and edited by Ward Burlingame, is decidedly the best appearing journal that has ever issued from the capital....

 

The Press of Council Grove has changed its editor, ...
January 13, 1866, Osage Chronicle (ID 588)

The Press of Council Grove has changed its editor, politics, and name to that of Democrat....The editor shows considerable vigor, and also that he is a believing peruser of the New York Day Book, Crisis and other sheets of that ilk. We wish the editor much joy and success in hoeing his row with the thirty-odd "Abolishioner" editors of Kansas. In mechanical appearance, he has very materially improved the paper.

 

T. C. Sears has retired from the editorial chair o ...
May 19, 1866, Osage Chronicle (ID 622)

T. C. Sears has retired from the editorial chair of the Conservative and resumed the practice of law. Mr. Sears made an able and honest editor, but lacked many requisite qualifications to make a successful political one. He was firmly fixed in his opinions, of what he considered to be right; impulsive, dictatorial and impracticable, yet generous....Ward Burlingame, long and favorably known as an able writer, assumes the editorial charge of the Conservative....

 

Circumstances in part, but inclination probably m ...
June 2, 1866, Osage Chronicle (ID 630)

Circumstances in part, but inclination probably more, has made it necessary for us to move from our present unpleasant quarters. The commissioners and contractors have kindly consented to let the county paper occupy a portion of the lower story of the courthouse. Then, after this week and until we can secure a proper place, we will be happy to meet our friends at the above place.

 

Some time last winter, during the sitting of the L ...
December 8, 1866, Osage Chronicle (ID 695)

Some time last winter, during the sitting of the Legislature, a majority of the editors of the state met at Topeka for the purpose of taking the initiatory steps in forming a Literati and Protective Association, the immediate objects of which were the more intimate cultivation of friendly relations existing among the erudite knights who control the great engine of thought in the educationally advanced state of Kansas....We disremember the name given to the association, but we do recollect that it was a very pleasant meeting and that officers were elected, some funds raised, and J. C. Vaughn selected to deliver the first annual address in January 1867....John A. Martin of the Champion was chosen alternate. The officers are, if we rightly remember: President, Taylor of the Gazette; vice-presidents, Martin of the Union and Murdock of the Chronicle; secretary, McDonald of the Record; treasurer, Peters of the Enterprise. The meeting in January...may result in much good to country printers, if generally attended. We want uniform advertising rates and the price of subscription raised, if possible. We want some protection against these swindling advertising agents who make it a business to pay promptly until confidence is gained, when an assignment is made and we left in the lurch....

 

This paper will be suspended for a short time in o ...
December 22, 1866, Osage Chronicle (ID 698)

This paper will be suspended for a short time in order that some necessary repairs, etc., can be made. Subscribers will get their full number and will lose nothing by two or three weeks' suspension.

 

For various reasons -- partly because we like an u ...
October 12, 1867, Osage Chronicle (ID 779)

For various reasons -- partly because we like an unsolicited puff as well as others, but principally that our home readers may see with what degree of favor the enlarged Chronicle has met with by the press of Kansas -- we publish some of the complimentary notices:...

"The Osage Chronicle, published at Burlingame, comes to us again after many months. This time it looks liked a thing of permanence, as its new type, new head, and well filled advertising columns amply testify. The paper has been materially enlarged, now having seven wide columns on each page, and with its new type and clean presswork presents an appearance of which any printer might well be proud. We hope the people of Osage will give it such a hearty support that there may be no more 'suspension' in its history...." -- Lawrence Tribune.

"We again have the pleasure of welcoming to our sanctum the Osage Chronicle...after a suspension of some months. It has been much enlarged and greatly improved, and we are glad to know that friend Murdock 'still lives' and can handle his quill as gracefully as ever. The Chronicle is opposed to female suffrage." -- Conservative.

"The Osage Chronicle comes to us this week enlarged and in a bright, smiling new dress. We welcome it warmly after its long absence. Murdock is a clear thinker and a ready writer, and a live newspaper man with much experience in the art preservative." -- Marysville Enterprise.

 

The Kansas Farmer comes to us very much improved i ...
October 19, 1867, Osage Chronicle (ID 782)

The Kansas Farmer comes to us very much improved in mechanical appearance. George T. Anthony, one of the very best men in Kansas, is now editor and proprietor.

 

Because of the deep affliction and sickness in our ...
October 26, 1867, Osage Chronicle (ID 785)

Because of the deep affliction and sickness in our family, the publication of the Chronicle was delayed two or three days. We know our readers will have no words of complaint when they learn the cause of the delay. We have secured the services of another printer and will, if at all possible, get out another paper before election. The paper will never suspend again if we can help it....

 

The Hays City Advance, published at the present te ...
November 23, 1867, Osage Chronicle (ID 790)

The Hays City Advance, published at the present terminus of the Kansas Pacific Railroad, comes to us with its columns filled with buffalo chips and other spicy things betokening the wide straddle being made westward by the Star of Empire, and some Leavenworth chaps -- all "bully." The Advance is a tri-weekly with four columns and plenty of news to the page.

 

Olathe Central. Mr. Goble has associated with him, ...
December 21, 1867, Osage Chronicle (ID 798)

Olathe Central. Mr. Goble has associated with him, in the editorial management of the Central, Col. John T. Burris. Col. B. writes vigorously and we think will be a valuable acquisition to the craft editorial. As speaker of the House two years ago, he made many friends.

 

At the annual convention of Editors and Publishers ...
February 1, 1868, Osage Chronicle (ID 816)

At the annual convention of Editors and Publishers at Topeka on the 17th, the old officers were all re-elected, as follows: President, R. B. Taylor of the Wyandotte Gazette; vice-presidents, M. W. Reynolds of the Lawrence State Journal, Jno. A. Martin of the Atchison Champion, M. M. Murdock of the Osage Chronicle, and Geo. W. Martin of the Junction City Union; secretary, S. M. MacDonald of the Kansas State Record; treasurer, P. H. Peters of the Marysville Enterprise. The association then selected Jno. A. Martin to deliver the annual address at the next meeting, with R. B. Taylor as alternate. M. W. Reynolds then delivered his address. It was a well written and interesting document.

 

*T. Dwight Thacher, formerly of this state but mor ...
February 8, 1868, Osage Chronicle (ID 818)

*T. Dwight Thacher, formerly of this state but more recently of Boston, has returned to his old home in Lawrence and revived the Lawrence Republican. It appears as an evening daily of the neatest makeup and full of interest. The old Republican, formerly edited and owned by Mr. T., was one of the leading papers of Kansas up to the time of its destruction by Quantrill. The new daily seems full of hope, notwithstanding the fact that Lawrence already possesses two well established papers.

 

S. S. Prouty, editor of the Burlington Patriot, pa ...
March 21, 1868, Osage Chronicle (ID 833)

S. S. Prouty, editor of the Burlington Patriot, passed through our town...en route to the capital. After his return home, he thus speaks of us and our surroundings: "...We reached Burlingame, the city of churches. Of course, we called at the courthouse and left our compliments with Col. Marsh Murdock of the Osage Chronicle, the office of which occupies two rooms of the lower story of the courthouse. We found the Colonel busily engaged in picking type for his handsome and able paper, and he gave us a welcome reception. He was elected clerk of Osage County last fall, which position he fills creditably, and we were pleased to learn that he was enjoying good success, individually and newspaporially...."

 

E. G. Ross. We have known this man for the last 12 ...
May 23, 1868, Osage Chronicle (ID 844)

E. G. Ross. We have known this man for the last 12 years and, though we knew him to be of a morose selfish disposition, we did not think that he could descend to such a depth of infamy as he has in the impeachment trial. A bold consistent traitor we can respect, but a double-faced cowardly craven-hearted wretch like Ross sinks beneath our contempt. See how he equivocated and lied up to the last moment, openly pledging himself, both orally and in writing, to vote for impeachment, and then secretly selling himself to A. Johnson & Co. Sending insulting dispatches to Kansas about his oath, his honor and his country's good, and at the same time having that prince of copperheads, Dan Voorhees of Indiana, betting his thousands on him. We can come to no other conclusion than that he was bought with money and intended to act the traitor. We believe that the facts in the case will warrant us in making that assertion; let us see. It is a fact potent to everyone familiar with the Legislature of 1867 that Ross had but ten or twelve votes to start on; but he permitted interested parties to buy up enough to secure his election and it was done by his connivance. Now it is a self evident proposition that a man who will buy a seat in the Senate with money will sell his constituents and himself the first opportunity that presents itself. And besides, since that election, he has been the property of the parties who purchased his way into the U.S. Senate. As they dictated, so he had to act, and it is well known that these same parties are the warm friends of the President. What think you now, Gov. Crawford, Col. Anthony and Sam Riggs, of your pet candidate? Had Gov. Carney been elected, and he would have been had it not been for a few jealous, tricky, corrupt Republicans, who must either rule or ruin, Kansas would not now be in the humiliating position that she is and the country would be rid of a traitorous President. It is said that every man has his price, but if Johnson & Co. paid much for Ross they got badly swindled. A man small in stature and smaller in soul and intellect is not worth much for anything. But Ross is not quite a fool, if he is a knave, and he knows perfectly well when he voted "not guilty" that he was voting against the law and the testimony, against his own convictions of justice, against the express wishes of his constituents, and against the "highest good of his country."...Yes, Ross, your name will go down in posterity along with that of Andrew Johnson, to be loathed and execrated by every honest man. But we hope that you have got heaps of money, so that you can roll in luxury, and glitter in infamy the balance of your days, for it is the price of justice and your honor.

The editor is absent attending the (Republican) Chicago Convention, which accounts for the meagerness of our editorial and local columns.

 

We are in receipt of No. 1, Vol. 1 of the Oswego R ...
June 18, 1868, Osage Chronicle (ID 851)

We are in receipt of No. 1, Vol. 1 of the Oswego Register, printed in Labette County by our old friend Trask. The paper is a paragon of typographical neatness and beauty, and ably edited.

 

After we had gone to press we learned that M. M. M ...
October 17, 1868, Osage Chronicle (ID 863)

After we had gone to press we learned that M. M. Murdock had received the nomination for senator from Coffey and Osage counties.

To Friends and Patrons. Our dateline announces the beginning of a new year, a new volume, in the life of the Osage Chronicle....Five years ago, distrusting nothing -- save our ability -- buoyant with that hope and ambition which ever urges youth on to its life work, we cast our lot with the people of this town and county. From that time to this, our home readers know of the many and long struggles made to keep the Chronicle's head above the waves financially, of discouragements that well nigh turned the first hope to despair; but few, very few, know of the other dark side of an editor's work, consisting of toil unrequited, of good intentions misinterpreted and blackened, of efforts for public good stranded by hostile personalities. Yet these in a measure have been overcome and the future is still before us, with the Chronicle upon a firm basis....

Brick Pomeroy will issue the first number of his new evening paper on Saturday next, says one of our exchanges. The editorial staff consists of J. Howard, managing editor, with the following subordinates: Caleb, Dunn, Armstrong, Jacob Urner and Fairfield. "Judge" Fletcher has been imported from the LaCrosse office to write editorials. "Brick" has fitted up a pleasant suite of rooms, and is to pay more liberal salaries than any other paper. "Brick" is about 37 years old. Singular as it may seem, he neither smokes, chews or swears. From foreman down to devil in the LaCrosse printing office, there is not one who uses tobacco or swears. And to think such men get out such a vile sheet as the Democrat.