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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Saline County Journal

Articles in database from Saline County Journal:    74

Kansas Editors. There are more prominent editors i ...
February 23, 1871, Saline County Journal (ID 1000)

Kansas Editors. There are more prominent editors in Kansas than in any other western state we know of. A great portion of them are more or less identified with the trying scenes of our early history as a state. Many of them were distinguished soldiers of the late war and several of them occupy the most prominent positions within the gift of the Kansas people. The sayings and doings of the Kansas editors are quoted largely in the most influential and leading journals of the United States....Senator Ross was formerly editor of the Topeka Record and afterwards of the Lawrence Tribune; Colonel Martin of the Atchison Champion & Press was a "champion" of the "heroic times" of Kansas and a good officer during the rebellion; the genial and brilliant conversationalist and the "noblest Roman of them all," Colonel Vaughn, has been one of the best editors in the West for a great number of years, and added largely to the popularity and circulation of the Leavenworth Times; Web Wilder, whom everybody knows, has done good service for liberty and may look with pride to his editorial history while connected with the Leavenworth Conservative; Col. S. S. Prouty, who is so large in form as well as in heart, deserves special mention for his success as a newspaper man and deserves to be called "State Printer;" Sol Miller, God bless him, one of the oldest editors in Kansas, has fought with his "Chief" boldly and without fear; Kalloch, known all over the United States, great, eloquent, brilliant and profound; Milt Reynolds, egotistic, a "great writist," is full of energy and equal to every occasion in his wars for what he thinks right; Thacher, distinguished in the newspaper business from "time out of mind" and one of our early defenders; Jake Stotler is formidable in stomach and heart, good natured and well liked and prominent in "many offices;" last but not least come the witty "fighting" man of the West, George W. Martin, who has done valiantly for his "Junction town," and battled manfully for the West. We could mention scores of other "braves" connected with the Kansas press that deserve notice if we had the space and time....

 

The Council Grove Democrat comes to us bearing the ...
March 2, 1871, Saline County Journal (ID 1003)

The Council Grove Democrat comes to us bearing the names of Sharp & Downer as proprietors. Ike Sharp, who ran last fall for governor of the Democratic ticket, is the editor. We have a slight acquaintance with Mr. Downer....The new proprietors are throwing renewed vigor into the paper....

We are in receipt of the Thayer Criterion, a neat and spicy 24-column paper that has just commenced an existence in the town of its name in Neosho County on the L.L.&G. R.R. We notice the name of our young friend, formerly of Garnett, Charley M. Ottley, associated with S. L. Perry, lately one of the proprietors and local editor of the Garnett Plaindealer, as editors and proprietors. The Criterion...says Thayer has 175 substantial business houses and dwellings all built in the last 90 days. Thayer is looking forward to county seat honors.

 

W. H. Johnson, M. D. Sampson, editors.: It shall n ...
March 9, 1871, Saline County Journal (ID 1007)

W. H. Johnson, M. D. Sampson, editors.

It shall not be often, our readers are assured, that they will be troubled with extended compliments of The journal from ourselves. But it is proper that,...the paper being only one month in age, that we should thank our patrons for their liberality, and congratulate ourselves on our own success, and them upon their public spirit....

"We have received the first number of The Saline County Journal, published by our elder brother, W. H. Johnson, & M. D. Sampson at Salina. The paper contains seven wide columns to the page (with the exception of the Signal, the widest in the state), is neat in makeup, being printed on new material. The new paper is well filled with original and selected matter and would reflect credit on any town in Kansas." -- Lyndon Signal. As you have called our attention to the matter, we have measured the two papers and find that the columns of The Journal are a particle wider than those of the Signal. So The Journal carries wider columns than any other paper in Kansas.

 

Old Fogies of the Press. Some of the Kansas editor ...
March 16, 1871, Saline County Journal (ID 1010)

Old Fogies of the Press. Some of the Kansas editors are severely exercised because our young and growing state has already over 80 newspapers, and they are constantly predicting disaster and death to all new newspaper enterprises. If readers will note those papers which are most devoted to these owlish prognostications, they will generally discover that a new paper is being contemplated somewhere in their vicinity, of which these fogies of the press are intensely afraid. The idea that our state can be overdone in the matter of lively, interesting newspapers is absurd, and if these soothsayers are not the men to command the patronage of their respective localities, it simply remains that they must retire, yield the field to younger and better heads -- heads with brain in them; alive and up to the progress of the times. The business of newspaper publishing is governed by the very same rules that control other professions. A live editor, one who can originate something that will keep his readers awake and eager to see each week's issue of his paper, is in no more danger of going to the wall than is Henry Ward Beecher in danger of an empty church to hear his Sunday sermon. What is the use of all this whining and croaking of evil, or these wise inferences drawn from past history or experience?....

 

And now comes Milt Reynolds and signifies that he ...
April 13, 1871, Saline County Journal (ID 1020)

And now comes Milt Reynolds and signifies that he will not be connected with the Lawrence Journal, as was inferred in our last issue. He has published his prospectus announcing that he will commence the issue of the Sun at Parsons, Labette County, the junction of the M.K.T. R.R. with the St. Louis branch of that road.

 

We have received the first number of the Lincoln C ...
April 20, 1871, Saline County Journal (ID 1023)

We have received the first number of the Lincoln County Gazette, published at Red Rock in that county by John Hale, the deaf mute. The paper looks neat and is well gotten up.

 

The Council Grove Democrat was on the verge of eki ...
May 4, 1871, Saline County Journal (ID 1027)

The Council Grove Democrat was on the verge of eking out its existence, but a number of the citizens rallied to its support, forming a printing association with a capital of five thousand dollars. Last week's issue came to us bearing at its head "The Council Grove Printing and Publishing Company." The newspaper history of Council Grove is somewhat varied, four papers having lived a precarious life at different periods. It is evident to the people of Council Grove this time, we guess, that it takes money to conduct a newspaper.

 

We note among our exchanges the Solomon Valley Set ...
May 25, 1871, Saline County Journal (ID 1034)

We note among our exchanges the Solomon Valley Settler, published by Steele & Wooden, real estate agents at Minneapolis, Ottawa County. It is full of valuable information for newcomers, and is a credit in typography to friend Wharton, who prints it.

 

Council Grove is to have a Republican newspaper su ...
July 6, 1871, Saline County Journal (ID 1040)

Council Grove is to have a Republican newspaper sure. The proprietor and editor, H. R. Gregory, has arrived there by this time with his presses and material.

 

M. W. Rotrock, who has been engaged in the Herald ...
August 10, 1871, Saline County Journal (ID 1044)

M. W. Rotrock, who has been engaged in the Herald office for some time, started for Minneapolis, Ottawa County, the first of the week. We understand that he is to be connected with the Ottawa County Independent. Mr. Rotrock is a fine writer and a good printer....

T. F. Garver of Topeka has purchased from John Hale a half interest in the Lincoln County Gazette at Abram, and will take the editorial charge of the paper. Mr. G. will also open a...real estate and insurance office at Abram. The Gazette, Mr. Hale informs us, will commence regular publication on September 5th....

 

We are just in receipt of the Neosha (Woodson Coun ...
August 17, 1871, Saline County Journal (ID 1045)

We are just in receipt of the Neosha (Woodson County) Advertiser. It has thrown off the spiritless, patent outside and now presents a clean, neat, all printed at home. We see our old apprentice boy, Tom Clark, is one of the firm of Jones & Clark in the publication. The Advertiser is by all odds the best newspaper Neosha Falls has ever had.

 

We have been victimized. We have become pretty wel ...
September 14, 1871, Saline County Journal (ID 1047)

We have been victimized. We have become pretty well disgusted with "tramp" printers, but they are a class that newspaper folks can not well do without sometimes. Ours this week got too much "benzine" aboard, and becoming melancholy in spirit is off in unknown climes, where creditors will know him no more. And our readers are victimized, inasmuch as he left us in the lurch without timely notice! Thanks to our own good health, we have girded on our armor, and forth comes The Journal, racy and clean as usual, only 24 hours behind time!

 

Our newspaporial neighbor, V. P. Wilson of the Chr ...
October 12, 1871, Saline County Journal (ID 1051)

Our newspaporial neighbor, V. P. Wilson of the Chronicle, Abilene, has just been appointed postmaster of that lively town.

 

The Emporia Tribune made its exit from the world W ...
October 26, 1871, Saline County Journal (ID 1053)

The Emporia Tribune made its exit from the world Wednesday of last week, consolidating with the News. W. W. Williams retires and is succeeded by Rowland & Graham; that bright star of Emporia journalism, Jacob Stotler, being retained at the head of the firm and as editor. Mr. Williams is a fine writer and, in both the News and Tribune, has succeeded admirably as a newspaper man. The reason assigned for the consolidation is that Emporia was overburdened with newspapers, and we have long thought that three papers for a town the size of Emporia is one too many.

 

We have purposely delayed this issue and for this ...
November 2, 1871, Saline County Journal (ID 1057)

We have purposely delayed this issue and for this reason: This is just before election; the Herald sometimes places a wrong construction upon our articles in its columns, which has a tendency to mislead persons that read the Herald and not The Journal. We particularly want the articles published this week to go to the people just as they are worded, and not to be mutilated by a designing critic.

 

John I. Tallman of the Washington Republican has s ...
November 9, 1871, Saline County Journal (ID 1058)

John I. Tallman of the Washington Republican has severed his connection with that paper, and is succeeded by W. P. Day. The Republican owes its present usefulness to Mr. Tallman, who originally started it.

 

"For good and satisfactory reasons the Leavenworth ...
November 16, 1871, Saline County Journal (ID 1061)

"For good and satisfactory reasons the Leavenworth Bulletin has been merged into the Times of that city, and under its distinctive name disappears from the field. Col. Anthony has purchased the business and good will of the Bulletin and Burke and Holden of its editorial staff take similar positions on the staff of the Times. This step cannot but add greatly to the strength of the Times, and it is to be congratulated on receiving the services of such talented and able journalists as these gentlemen. It was a fact apparent to everybody that Leavenworth had too many newspapers, and this consolidation is an example which should be followed in other localities in Kansas. With the combined circulation of both papers, the Times can be made a suitable enterprise and a first-class paper in every respect. The first number under the new order is before us and already presents a marked improvement." -- Topeka Commonwealth.

 

The Kansas Magazine. Without hardly noticing it, t ...
November 30, 1871, Saline County Journal (ID 1065)

The Kansas Magazine. Without hardly noticing it, the Kansas Magazine has almost bloomed into life. The first number will be issued in January at Topeka. Capt. Henry King, recently the able editor of the Topeka Record, will be the editor, and he will be assisted by Web Wilder, who lends grace and ability to any publication he may be connected with. In securing the services of these two gentlemen...the stockholders have been fortunate....The magazine commences with the guarantee of 2,000 subscribers which, at the price of $3 per copy, will go far toward sustaining it. This number will be, and is being, augmented by other thousands of copies. Kansas can sustain one well-conducted magazine. The corps of correspondents is ample and able, among them our fellow townsman Col. W. A. Phillips....

 

Among our exchanges we notice the Ellsworth Report ...
December 14, 1871, Saline County Journal (ID 1072)

Among our exchanges we notice the Ellsworth Reporter, an able and spicy 6-column sheet published at Ellsworth by M. C. Davis. We expect to see a rapid growth of our neighboring county, Ellsworth, as its resources are truthfully reported by the pioneer paper of western Kansas.

 

The Kansas Magazine. A circular from the editor of ...
December 28, 1871, Saline County Journal (ID 1079)

The Kansas Magazine. A circular from the editor of the magazine informs us that the initial number will be issued during the holidays and will contain contributions from the following writers: Wm. Ellery Channing, the distinguished American poet; John Hay, the brilliant author of "Castilian Days;" Geo. Alfred Townsend ("Gath"), the popular Washington correspondent; F. B. Sanborn of the Springfield, Mass., Republican; C. B. Wilkinson of the St. Joseph Herald; Col. Wm. A. Phillips, John J. Ingalls, M. W. Reynolds, Rev. S. F. McCabe, Fred Lockley, D. W. Wilder, Henry King, Cora M. Downs, Hattie McCoy North, Mary A. Stetson and others. Each number of the magazine will contain 100 pages....Terms: single number 35 cents, $4 a year in advance, two copies $7; five copies $16; 10 copies $30, and $3 for each additional copy; 20 copies $60, and copy free to the person sending the club....All postmasters are authorized to act as agents. Address the Kansas Magazine, Topeka, Kansas.

 

The Oldest Press in Kansas -- The Cowley County (W ...
January 11, 1872, Saline County Journal (ID 1084)

The Oldest Press in Kansas -- The Cowley County (Winfield) Censor lately made the statement that it had the oldest press in Kansas (then in disuse) in its office. We notice the White Cloud Chief and one or two other papers are inclined to dispute the point, thinking they each own the oldest press. The assertions of the latter papers prove that there are some old presses in Kansas for the age of Kansas, but we are convinced that the Censor is correct in its claim. That particular press has a somewhat varied history. If we recollect aright its story, told to us, it was brought to Kansas about 40 years ago and was used by "Toy" Jones, a Baptist missionary, in the publication of religious tracts, &c., at the Indian agency near where Ottawa now stands. S. S. Prouty used it in the publication of the Freeman's Champion at Prairie City, Douglas County, in 1857. In 1858 he removed it to Burlington, Coffey County, where he established the Neosho Valley Register, employing it on the paper till 1863, when he went in the army. It was continued on the Register at Burlington, and afterwards at Hampden, just across the Neosho River from Burlington, by a Mr. Olney until the close of the rebellion. After the cessation of "dread war's alarms," Prouty returned to Burlington and with new material started the Patriot. By some means the old office reverted to Prouty, and in 1866 he sold it to the New Era office at Lecompton. In its peregrinations it was finally, two or three years ago, brought up at Winfield and used in the publication of the Censor. The press is only large enough for a six-column paper and, on the recent enlargement of the Censor, was necessarily laid aside. It is an old style press but we have forgotten whose make it is. We will warrant it is serviceable for many years to come. Prouty can tell us farther of it. Why not make it the subject of an article for the Kansas Magazine? It is appropriate....There is, perhaps, no man who knows so much about the press as Prouty.

 

The first number of the Solomon City Times, publis ...
January 18, 1872, Saline County Journal (ID 1088)

The first number of the Solomon City Times, published by Bradley & Chaffee and dated last Saturday, is at hand. It is indeed a handsome 28-column paper and presents an ability that reflects credit upon the publishers. From a partial acquaintance with Mr. Chaffee, we judge him to be a clever gentleman, but of J. T. Bradley we hold fond recollections. He is a whole-souled fellow...and held the confidence of the people down there sufficient for him to be appointed city attorney and to have been elected county attorney had he desired it.

 

The Ross-Pomeroy Imbroglio. Some weeks ago, ex-U.S ...
January 25, 1872, Saline County Journal (ID 1092)

The Ross-Pomeroy Imbroglio. Some weeks ago, ex-U.S. Senator Ross attacked Senator Pomeroy in his paper at Coffeyville, charging him with divers manners of corruption in the use of his position and said: "Eleven years ago he went in to the Senate, still comparatively poor. Today he is reliably reported to be worth three millions of money. He has vast possessions of lands, bank stock, railroad stock, government bonds, state bonds and county bonds. How did he get them?" Pomeroy retorts in severe terms in "an open letter," recounting some of the scenes at the impeachment trial of President Johnson and Ross' vote against the impeachment, stating that the lands he owned 11 years ago form "the basis of all the property" he now owns and offering all his worldly possessions for $75,000. Ross rejoins with more causticness and nearer the point. "If he is worth but $75,000," he says, "how does it come that he owns and lives in a $30,000 house in Washington, furnished with a $30,000 outfit -- mirrors imported from France and carpets from Belgium -- that the four corners of the earth have been put under tribute to minister to his luxurious habits -- that by his own statements he spends from 10 to 15 thousand dollars a year in living -- that he boasts an elegant mansion in Boston, where he spends much of his time -- that he has a 2,000-acre farm in Kansas, stocked with expensive cattle, horses and sheep, where he spends very little of his time?"...

 

With this issue of The Journal my connection with ...
February 8, 1872, Saline County Journal (ID 1099)

With this issue of The Journal my connection with the paper ends. I desire to express my thanks to our patrons and friends for the many favors and courtesies.... -- M. D. Sampson.

 

Again on Duty. With this number, M. D. Sampson aga ...
February 22, 1872, Saline County Journal (ID 1106)

Again on Duty. With this number, M. D. Sampson again assumes a position on The Journal as one of its editors. The proprietor, desiring to put the paper up to the highest merit of excellence of a weekly newspaper, has employed him at an expense that the receipts of the office may hardly seem to warrant, but he feels assured that, with the assistance thus afforded, giving him greater opportunity for attending to the business of the office, he will receive an equivalent in an increased patronage on a first-class paper. The principal motive for taking this step is to give the paper greater scope of thought, also that no break may be made on short contemplated absences the present season.

 

We have received the first number of the Republica ...
March 7, 1872, Saline County Journal (ID 1113)

We have received the first number of the Republican and Star from St Marys, a weekly eight-page paper, of which Powell and Walters are the editors and publishers. Walters was lately employed in this office and is a good printer and fine fellow.

 

The Eagle, hailing from Wichita, M. M. Murdock's n ...
April 25, 1872, Saline County Journal (ID 1133)

The Eagle, hailing from Wichita, M. M. Murdock's new paper, is before us, neat and bright as a new silver dollar and eight columns to the page of four pages....Murdock understands what he is about when he is in the editorial or newspaper harness.

A correspondent of the Lawrence Journal, in giving brief mention of the towns along his route from Lawrence to the Arkansas Valley, speaks his mind thusly: "We find in Salina a beautifully situated city, and at the depot we procured as good a breakfast as has been our good fortune to procure in Kansas. Twelve years ago, buffalo were killed in large numbers where now stands this thriving young city. Wm. A. Phillips, the pioneer correspondent in Kansas of the New York Tribune, was its founder."

The first two numbers of the Beloit (Mitchell County) Gazette, published by Johnson & Chaffee, have already been received at this office. To name the first member is to call up one who is somewhat known in Salina, he being employed in this office for the past five months, and he is a brother of the proprietor of this paper. The Gazette is a neat 28-column paper and is well filled with interesting home news....Whilst we gave our brother credit for much, the excellent tone and style of his articles prove that we did not measure him properly. The Gazette is a credit to Beloit and the citizens appreciate by giving it their patronage. Johnson & Chaffee are young men and full of pluck....

 

The Western Kansas Plainsman, hailing from Russell ...
May 2, 1872, Saline County Journal (ID 1138)

The Western Kansas Plainsman, hailing from Russell, 75 miles west of Salina, has been received, the first number being dated April 28th. A. B. Cornell is the editor. If the paper would lay aside a few of its gew-gaws and uncouth styles it would then be quite acceptable. Cornell shows that he has ability. It is independent, with a very perceptible republican tinge. It does well for the new town which celebrated its first anniversary on the preceding Friday.

 

Clyde will have a new paper called the Herald. Nat ...
May 23, 1872, Saline County Journal (ID 1143)

Clyde will have a new paper called the Herald. Nat Baker, who has been connected with the Washington Republican, is to be editor and publisher.

The Cherokee Sentinel changes its name to the Baxter Springs Sentinel and W. H. & R. E. Horner assume control in place of Colonel Hallowell.

 

Last Thursday's number of the Ellsworth Reporter c ...
May 30, 1872, Saline County Journal (ID 1147)

Last Thursday's number of the Ellsworth Reporter contained the valedictory of M. C. Davis. G. A. Atwood, late editor of the Dallas (Iowa) Gazette, is his successor. Davis has made the Reporter an excellent paper during the past six months, when he started it....Mr. Davis, in resigning, says, "Mr. Atwood has two of the requisites in which we were lacking -- experience and capital."

 

The Emporia Ledger has been purchased by the Hunt ...
June 20, 1872, Saline County Journal (ID 1157)

The Emporia Ledger has been purchased by the Hunt Brothers, Emporia. The paper was heretofore Democratic and the Messrs. Hunt were Republicans.

Ross' Paper is to be revived, a new outfit having been secured to take the place of the office destroyed by the tornado.

 

"Three Kansas newspaper men formerly 'stuck type' ...
July 4, 1872, Saline County Journal (ID 1166)

"Three Kansas newspaper men formerly 'stuck type' on the Norwalk (Ohio) Reflector: Henry Buckingham of the Concordia Empire, Eber Rowland of the Emporia News, and Harris E. Smith, late of the Irving Recorder." -- Lawrence Journal.

A. B. Chaffee has sold out his interest in the Beloit Gazette to J. J. Johnson, who will be the sole editor and proprietor. Mr. Johnson is one of the youngest and best newspaper men in the state....

 

Printing material for sale. The material used in p ...
July 25, 1872, Saline County Journal (ID 1173)

Printing material for sale. The material used in publishing the Solomon City Times at Solomon City is offered for sale cheap. Parties desiring to establish a printing and job office will find this complete in every particular. Address or call on J. T. Bradley, Solomon City.

 

All hands at The Journal office have been making r ...
September 12, 1872, Saline County Journal (ID 1184)

All hands at The Journal office have been making rollers. They are ugly things to construct, worse than the Atlantic cable. You make a roller easy enough but it is not so easy to make it work right. Too much glue -- then too much molasses -- and vice versa. Oil and water don't mix well, neither does glue and molasses most of the time with us. Roller making, as a science, is not perfected with us. We are all demoralized in consequence of our roller troubles and are prepared to "roll away" to climes where rollers are not heard of.

 

D. R. Anthony, editor of the Leavenworth Times, is ...
September 19, 1872, Saline County Journal (ID 1187)

D. R. Anthony, editor of the Leavenworth Times, is almost ranged on the side "to beat Grant," as he is accused of being favorable to Walker, Liberal candidate for Governor, and against Osborne, Republican candidate. Anthony seems to only be in his proper element when he is "kicking the traces."

We learn from one who was at Wamego that T. Dwight Thacher, editor of the Lawrence Journal, addressed the Grant and Wilson Club of that place last Friday evening, and our informant represents Mr. Thacher's speech to be a very able one and a true exposition of the principles involved in the national canvass....

 

M. M. Murdock, editor of the Wichita Eagle, was no ...
October 17, 1872, Saline County Journal (ID 1194)

M. M. Murdock, editor of the Wichita Eagle, was nominated by the Republicans of his district for state senator on the 11th. His friends had good grit, as his nomination was not secured until the 43rd ballot. Mr. Murdock has been a member of the state senate for the past four years and has ranked as one of the ablest and most useful men of that body.

 

The Commonwealth announces that J. G. Wood has res ...
October 24, 1872, Saline County Journal (ID 1197)

The Commonwealth announces that J. G. Wood has resigned his position as local editor on that paper and that James L. King will succeed him.

We have received the first number of the Solomon City Newspaper, published at Solomon City by H. N. Farey & Bro. Mr. Farey was formerly connected with the Junction City Union....The Newspaper is the essence of typographical neatness and replete with home affairs.

 

J. J. Howard of the McPherson County Messenger, a ...
December 12, 1872, Saline County Journal (ID 1214)

J. J. Howard of the McPherson County Messenger, a new paper which has been started at the new town of McPherson, called on us last week. The style of the new printing firm is A. Yale & Co. The first number is to be issued today.

 

M. D. & L. E. Sampson.: W. H. Johnson, a late prop ...
December 19, 1872, Saline County Journal (ID 1217)

M. D. & L. E. Sampson.

W. H. Johnson, a late proprietor of this paper, has moved the presses and material which he purchased at St. Marys to Wamego. He will start a paper at the latter place soon after the first of January.

 

Col. G. P. Smith, late of the Lawrence Standard, i ...
December 26, 1872, Saline County Journal (ID 1218)

Col. G. P. Smith, late of the Lawrence Standard, is to start a paper at Neodesha, the first number to appear on the 1st of January. It will bear the name of the Wilson County Free Press. Gilmore & Adair tried it and didn't succeed; will he?

The McPherson County Messenger...has made its appearance. It is a seven-column paper and is published by A. M. York & Co. It is full of local news, which speaks well for the good sense of its editors.

 

The first number of the Kansas Monitor appeared la ...
January 16, 1873, Saline County Journal (ID 1223)

The first number of the Kansas Monitor appeared last week, Bowen & Hawkinson proprietors, Frank Hawkinson editor. The paper is the only Swedish paper published in the state, and we hope it will receive a liberal support from the Swedish element. For the present the Monitor will be issued monthly, but as soon as the patronage will permit it will be issued weekly.

 

The election of Geo. W. Martin as state printer gi ...
January 30, 1873, Saline County Journal (ID 1226)

The election of Geo. W. Martin as state printer gives universal satisfaction to the state press, while all testify to the superior work which Mr. Prouty has furnished the state for four years past. Mr. Martin will still continue the publication of the Union, without which western Kansas would be incomplete.

 

The Osborne Times is a newly fledged paper from th ...
February 27, 1873, Saline County Journal (ID 1231)

The Osborne Times is a newly fledged paper from the unknown country up northwest. We have received the first number. F. E. Jerome & Co. are the proprietors.

The contest between Prouty and Martin for the position of state printer is to be taken up the 11th of March. Col. Prouty is quite confident he will win. In our opinion, too much of a warfare was made by some on the Commonwealth company. We have never seen any cause for complaint on our part for the manner in which they have managed their business matters. The handsome vote Col. Prouty received is good evidence that his claims were not altogether ignored.

The Price of Type. Geo. P. Rowell & Co. announce that they have at their warehouse in New York an assortment of type from one of the most celebrated foundries in the world, that of Figgins, London, England, which they will sell at 20 percent discount from the American scale, when ordered in fonts of 100 pounds and upwards. They also offer to import large fonts on special orders at a greater discount from the American scale, and profess to be able to fill the largest in eight weeks from date of its receipt in New York. They supply sorts in large or small quantities from their stock on hand in New York at the American scale rate. They assert that, if the present duty on type shall be removed, the price of the article, both of home and foreign manufacture, will immediately fall 40 percent. Geo. P. Rowell & Co. are known as conducting the largest advertising business ever secured by one house, and are also extensive dealers in printing material. They are compelled to import foreign goods because American founders, governed by a close corporation or ring, keep the price vastly too high, and at the same time make it an exception to every other species of merchandise by recognizing no wholesale price; the same amount per pound being charged to the purchaser of five thousand pounds as would be paid by him who wants but fifty.

 

The Lincoln County News is the name of Lincoln Cou ...
March 13, 1873, Saline County Journal (ID 1234)

The Lincoln County News is the name of Lincoln County's only newspaper, which is published at Lincoln Center by F. H. Barnhart. Mr. Barnhart appears to be a well-informed and cultivated gentleman, a good writer and experienced printer.

Wallace H. Johnson, late publisher of this paper, has issued the first number of the Dickinson County Journal at Abilene. The beautiful, bright columns of that paper indicate that a first-class printer is at the helm. Mr. Johnson is an excellent journalist.

 

F. G. Hawkinson, editor and proprietor of the Kans ...
April 3, 1873, Saline County Journal (ID 1240)

F. G. Hawkinson, editor and proprietor of the Kansas Monitor, published at this place, has purchased material and will soon issue a weekly paper. As the Monitor is the only Swede paper in Kansas, with proper management we predict for it brilliant success.

 

The Leavenworth Commercial has been sold to D. W. ...
May 1, 1873, Saline County Journal (ID 1245)

The Leavenworth Commercial has been sold to D. W. Houston and C. N. Shaw. Col. Houston, late U.S. marshal, is one of the best men in the state.

The Kansas Monitor is now issued weekly at the building next north of the Journal office. The first number of the weekly appeared last Friday.

The Abilene Chronicle has been consolidated with the Abilene Journal and W. H. Johnson is to preside over the grand consolidation....

 

The editors and publishers of the state meet in At ...
May 8, 1873, Saline County Journal (ID 1250)

The editors and publishers of the state meet in Atchison on Tuesday, the 20th. I. S. Kalloch will deliver the oration, and Capt. Jas. W. Steele, editor of the Kansas Magazine, will read an original poem. On the following day, the editors and publishers will leave upon an excursion for Lincoln, the capital of Nebraska. The editors and publishers of the latter state meet about the same time, and the two associations will meet at the same place....

 

Noble L. Prentis, the local editor of the Lawrence ...
May 15, 1873, Saline County Journal (ID 1252)

Noble L. Prentis, the local editor of the Lawrence Journal, is one of the rising humorists of the West. His wit is original, always varied, and is bringing him out prominently before the public. He has given good success as a lecturer and draws good houses.

Miss Middy Morgan, the horse and cattle reporter of the New York Times, stopped over at Keith's on Monday night. She took the train for Ellsworth on Tuesday morning.

 

Col. John M. Haberlein of the Kansas Freie Presse ...
May 22, 1873, Saline County Journal (ID 1253)

Col. John M. Haberlein of the Kansas Freie Presse died in Leavenworth on the 16th. The Freie Presse is the only daily paper in the state printed in the German language.

The Barton County Progress, published at Great Bend by M. W. Rotrock, well and favorably known by this community, has been vastly improved under the present manager, who has no superiors as a writer in this portion of the state.

 

John S. Gilmore, once editor of the Neodesha Citiz ...
June 19, 1873, Saline County Journal (ID 1263)

John S. Gilmore, once editor of the Neodesha Citizen, now publishes the Wilson County Citizen at Fredonia.

 

I. S. Kalloch is now editor of the Lawrence Tribun ...
July 24, 1873, Saline County Journal (ID 1268)

I. S. Kalloch is now editor of the Lawrence Tribune. He is a good writer, but a better talker. He is a very good man for that chair, the vacancy of which has disturbed so many individuals....

 

Calvin Reasoner, an able member of the last legisl ...
July 31, 1873, Saline County Journal (ID 1269)

Calvin Reasoner, an able member of the last legislature,...has become editor of the Osborne City Times.

 

Noble L. Prentis assumes the editorial control of ...
August 7, 1873, Saline County Journal (ID 1271)

Noble L. Prentis assumes the editorial control of the Junction City Union this week.

The Blade, the new Topeka daily, has been issued, seven numbers of which we have received. The editors are J. C. Swayze and J. W. Monser. It is a good paper.

 

O. E. Florell of Chicago, an excellent journalist, ...
August 14, 1873, Saline County Journal (ID 1273)

O. E. Florell of Chicago, an excellent journalist, has been engaged by Mr. Hawkinson to assist him in the editorial management of the Kansas Monitor.

 

W. H. Johnson has sold his interest in the Abilene ...
August 21, 1873, Saline County Journal (ID 1274)

W. H. Johnson has sold his interest in the Abilene Chronicle-Journal to Mr. Shane, his partner. The Abilene Sun is the name of a rival paper to be started at that town by John Wilson, son of the state senator.

The Topeka Commonwealth has been sold to Capt. Henry King, who has been its editor "off and on." Col. Prouty asserts that he is happy, if he is "busted." The Commonwealth is one of our first dailies, but has been too truckling, often, in times past.

The Junction City Tribune has been issued. Theodore Alvord is editor and H. N. Farey publisher. The paper is large and well filled with interesting matter.

 

The Journal outfit...will be moved to the old U.S. ...
September 11, 1873, Saline County Journal (ID 1276)

The Journal outfit...will be moved to the old U.S. Land Office building just south of A. M. Campbell & Co.'s the latter part of this week. There we expect to spread !

 

...
September 11, 1873, Saline County Journal (ID 5872)

The Journal outfit...will be moved to the old U.S. Land Office building just south of A. M. Campbell & Co.'s the latter part of this week. There we expect to spread!

 

The type and other material of the Kansas Monitor ...
October 2, 1873, Saline County Journal (ID 1279)

The type and other material of the Kansas Monitor was moved to Topeka on Tuesday. The Swede citizens of Topeka have agreed to give that paper liberal support in consideration of its being located there....

 

"The Kansas Monitor, the only Swedish paper west o ...
October 30, 1873, Saline County Journal (ID 1283)

"The Kansas Monitor, the only Swedish paper west of Chicago, and which shared the same fate as the Commonwealth in the terrible conflagration of last Sunday night, has opened a new office at No. 131 Kansas Avenue, the business being continued by F. G. Hawkinson." -- Topeka Commonwealth.

 

The Atchison Globe, according to dispatches, has s ...
December 13, 1873, Saline County Journal (ID 1289)

The Atchison Globe, according to dispatches, has suspended for lack of patronage. From all we can learn, we judge that this journal was started, like others, which have made the same pretensions, upon the supposition that there was a lack of brains among its contemporaries, and that by easy marches the paper could soon reach the top branch and look down complacently upon all others which were striving for the same altitude. It attempted to rank first before it was fairly out of its swaddling cloth, and put on too much style before it had any claims upon the newspaper brotherhood. "Leading papers" grow to maturity only by hard labor and persistent effort, and the highest order of talent will not make a giant out of a baby....

 

M. W. Rotrock, for some time in the employ of the ...
December 25, 1873, Saline County Journal (ID 1292)

M. W. Rotrock, for some time in the employ of the Herald, went to Minneapolis Saturday to take charge of the Independent.

 

The Lawrence Daily Journal has been cut down to se ...
January 1, 1874, Saline County Journal (ID 1294)

The Lawrence Daily Journal has been cut down to seven columns on account of hard times. It is still a large and well filled paper.

 

The Oskaloosa Independent will soon commence an or ...
January 22, 1874, Saline County Journal (ID 1301)

The Oskaloosa Independent will soon commence an original serial story recounting unpublished history of early Kansas and discuss the farmers' movement.

The Topeka Times has passed into the hands of V. P. Wilson, formerly of the Abilene Chronicle. John Watson has been associated with him. The Times has been made the official paper of Topeka and of Shawnee County.

 

The Topeka Blade is no more. It admits it was a "m ...
February 5, 1874, Saline County Journal (ID 1307)

The Topeka Blade is no more. It admits it was a "mistake" and wants the "mantle of charity thrown over the whole affair." It blowed its bugle pretty lively while it breathed. The impression prevails that there is only room for one daily in Topeka, and the Commonwealth seems to fill the bill sufficiently.

 

This issue closes Volume III of the Journal. Three ...
February 5, 1874, Saline County Journal (ID 1308)

This issue closes Volume III of the Journal. Three years ago it was declared by some opposed to the movement of starting a new paper that the Journal "could not live but would die in three months' time." But it still lives with a good future before it. Always outspoken and independent, it has had bitter enemies who have endeavored to strangle it at every turn. But it has defied and still defies its enemies, and has not the least idea of ever doing less. For two years the county patronage was thrown to another source and still it lived. For two years officers county and federal endeavored to put an end to its existence, but it would not "die worth a cent." Under the greatest difficulties the Journal has struggled on until it is now the leading paper in central and western Kansas....

 

The Hays City Sentinel is the name of W. H. Johnso ...
March 5, 1874, Saline County Journal (ID 1314)

The Hays City Sentinel is the name of W. H. Johnson's new paper, just established. It is gotten up in Johnson's tasty style, and is filled with interesting reading matter.

 

"Last of a Newspaper -- Last Saturday the stock, m ...
March 12, 1874, Saline County Journal (ID 1317)

"Last of a Newspaper -- Last Saturday the stock, material, presses and fixtures of the Atchison Globe Steam Printing Company were sold at assignee's sale by Maj. B. B. Gale, the assignee appointed by the U.S. Court to dispose of same for the benefit of the numerous creditors of the defunct concern. Beale & Sanborn of the Troy Republican purchased one of the job presses; another was sold to a party in northwestern Kansas; the steam engine was purchased by an Atchison gentleman; the bindery fixtures by Mr. Goodwin of Sedalia, and the paper stock and cardboard by L. J. Perry of the Spirit. The piecemeal sales amounted to about $800. Then the balance of the office, including a large Potter cylinder job press, a large Cottrell & Babcock newspaper press and all the type and material was sold to Mr. Wendell, business manager of the Atchison Champion, for $3,300. Everything went at a song. The assignee realized about $4,000 for a newspaper which cost $12,000! This Globe was established with a great flourish of trumpets, with the express intention of crushing out the Champion. Yet in less than a year the Champion steps in and buys up the other at auction for a mere bagatelle of its original cost! There was no field for a new paper at Atchison, and every newspaper man in the state saw it. The managers of the concern have reaped the reward of their ignorance. The fate of the Globe has been a signal example to the projectors of new papers everywhere in the state." -- Western Spirit.

 

The Leavenworth Call has suspended.: ...
May 7, 1874, Saline County Journal (ID 1335)

The Leavenworth Call has suspended.

 

I. F. Clark has disposed of his interest in the Mc ...
May 14, 1874, Saline County Journal (ID 1341)

I. F. Clark has disposed of his interest in the McPherson Messenger and Mr. McClintock is now sole proprietor. The word Messenger has been expunged and Independent figures in its place.

 

At the late Kansas editorial convention the follow ...
June 4, 1874, Saline County Journal (ID 1350)

At the late Kansas editorial convention the following officers were elected for the ensuing year: President, D. R. Anthony; vice-presidents, D. W. Houston, Albert Griffin, W. T. McElroy, U. F. Sargent; treasurer, Geo. W. Martin; secretary, W. R. Spooner; orator, Geo. A. Crawford; alternate, Noble L. Prentis; poet, Mrs. L. Walker. Manhattan was selected as the place to hold the next annual meeting.

 

Albin & Albin have issued the prospectus of the Fa ...
July 9, 1874, Saline County Journal (ID 1359)

Albin & Albin have issued the prospectus of the Farmers' Advocate, which announces that "on or about the 9th of July, 1874, we expect to begin the publication of the Farmers' Advocate, a weekly newspaper devoted to the interests of the people of McPherson County generally, and to the order of Patrons of Husbandry in particular."

 

Col. G. W. Veale is now proprietor of the Topeka C ...
July 16, 1874, Saline County Journal (ID 1364)

Col. G. W. Veale is now proprietor of the Topeka Commonwealth and Henry King its editor.

 

We forgot to mention last week our reception of th ...
July 30, 1874, Saline County Journal (ID 1368)

We forgot to mention last week our reception of the first copy of the Lincoln County Farmer, a new paper just established at Lincoln Center. It is published by F. H. Barnhart, a good newspaper man.

 

W. H. Johnson has disposed of his interest in the ...
August 27, 1874, Saline County Journal (ID 1375)

W. H. Johnson has disposed of his interest in the Hays City Sentinel to Reed & Motz.

The Atchison Champion, one of the best conducted newspapers west of the Mississippi River, has come out with a bright and beautiful new dress.

We understand that F. H. Barnhart of the Lincoln Center Farmer has purchased the Lincoln Center News, and that Mr. Barker, editor of the latter paper, will embark in a newspaper enterprise at Wilson.