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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Smith County Pioneer

Articles in database from Smith County Pioneer:    49

And now we have it from good authority that Horace ...
January 14, 1876, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1480)

And now we have it from good authority that Horace Greeley and John C. Fremont were the first white men that visited the county....Read the article on the opposite page, headed "The Old Mormon Trail." F. G. Adams of Homestead Guide notoriety is the author.

 

The Kansas State Historical Society is now a perma ...
February 4, 1876, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1483)

The Kansas State Historical Society is now a permanent organization. S. A. Kingman is president and F. G. Adams, the old veteran newspaper man of Kansas, is secretary....The organization at Topeka cannot be made a complete success without the assistance of every newspaper in the state, and the newspapers must be assisted by county organizations....

 

No paper last week but we have no space for apolog ...
March 31, 1876, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1487)

No paper last week but we have no space for apologies; but we'd like to devote about three columns to the benefit of that swindling institution known as the Southwestern Express Company, whose line runs into Jewell City. By the diabolical blundering of the agent at that place, our paper was detained 14 days at Jewell City, instead of being sent to Cawker City in accordance with the address and the order of the shippers. But when our readers consider the fact that only three issues have been missed during the past 20 months, then we know they'll excuse us. (Will D. Jenkins, publisher.)

 

Three weeks' issues of the Norton County Locomotiv ...
April 7, 1876, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1489)

Three weeks' issues of the Norton County Locomotive came down in Tuesday's mail....The editor of the Locomotive informs us by letter that he does not receive the Pioneer at all. Surely something is wrong....

What in thunder is the reason that the Pioneer does not reach our Salem, Jewell County, subscribers regularly? We hear complaints from there nearly every week. We have about 20 or 30 copies going to that place, 25 miles distant from this office, yet it takes the paper from three to four weeks to get there, and sometimes it never reaches its destination at all....

 

The editor of this paper (Will D. Jenkins) is 23 y ...
April 21, 1876, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1494)

The editor of this paper (Will D. Jenkins) is 23 years old today. Let's see, how old does one have to be before they can be allowed to fill the presidential chair? But thunder, we're in no hurry. A seat in Congress will do us until we are 25.

 

When we consider the fact that the Topeka Weekly C ...
May 5, 1876, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1500)

When we consider the fact that the Topeka Weekly Commonwealth, the largest and best paper in the state, has...a circulation of only 507 in its own county, then it is with a feeling of pride that we can state that the Pioneer goes to 480 subscribers in Smith County, and they are all cash paying ones too....The Kansas Farmer has a circulation of only 234 in the county in which it is published....

Barnhart of the Osborne County Farmer passed through this place...and writes back to his paper: Smith Center is a nice little town....The first call made, of course, was on friend Jenkins of the Pioneer. Billy is a fine boy, and we are glad to know that he is prospering. Although he does run a "7x9" sheet, it is always in demand, being edited with a good deal of genuine vim and ability, and sought alike by friend and foe....

 

(Advertisement) Real Estate Agency. Those having c ...
May 12, 1876, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1503)

(Advertisement) Real Estate Agency. Those having claims for sale will find it to their advantage to call of Will D. Jenkins of the Smith County Real Estate agency. Terms made known on application. Immigrants, or anyone else desirous of purchasing claims and real estate, can secure bargains by calling on or addressing Will D. Jenkins....(Several farms listed.)

 

Friend Jenkins of the Pioneer -- that's us -- in c ...
May 19, 1876, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1506)

Friend Jenkins of the Pioneer -- that's us -- in company with T. M. Helm will start for Topeka tomorrow. During our absence the mechanical work on the Pioneer will be done by Scott Elliott. Capt. W. H. Nelson will "furnish copy."...

 

Dr. Jenkins of Kirwin spent two or three days in o ...
June 9, 1876, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1509)

Dr. Jenkins of Kirwin spent two or three days in our city this week. He is editor of the Kirwin Chief and makes a lively No. 1 paper.... -- Abilene Chronicle.

 

Small pigs will be taken on subscription to the Pi ...
July 20, 1876, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1517)

Small pigs will be taken on subscription to the Pioneer. We are going into the pork-raising business....We might pay some cash on choice lots.

 

History of Smith County, compiled and written by R ...
July 27, 1876, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1522)

History of Smith County, compiled and written by Rev. W. M. Wellman and delivered July 4th, 1876, in the presence of two thousand honest pioneers.

...Cedarville became visible, the first store and school house was erected there, and it subsequently assumed the proportions of the first county seat. And in December 1872 afforded the first and most western newspaper, the Smith County Pioneer, edited and published by Dr. W. D. Jenkins, late of the Kirwin Chief. The Smith County Pioneer still exists, though it has had many changes and passed through many ordeals, and the young editor now managing the paper, Mr. Will D. Jenkins, Jr., has, with a persistency that characterizes Western men, striven hard to give it enlargement and strength....

...Owing to the extraordinarily large edition, the extra typesetting and press work, we are a few hours late this week....Publishers will more fully understand the inconvenience and disadvantage under which we have been compelled to labor this week when we state that we have issued an edition of 1,000 and worked one page at a time, and distribute that before any type setting could be done on the next.

 

Maj. W. Scott Elliott, the right hand bower of the ...
August 31, 1876, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1529)

Maj. W. Scott Elliott, the right hand bower of the Pioneer office, went down to Jewell County this week to take in the sights and see the mastodon. In the capacity of newspaper reporter, he called on the individual who has the skeleton on exhibition....

 

Vol. 4, No. 1 --With this number we enter upon the ...
September 21, 1876, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1537)

Vol. 4, No. 1 --With this number we enter upon the fourth year of the Pioneer's existence. It is with feeling of pride that we place Vol. 4 at the head of this paper. Out of the past three years' career of this little sheet, the present proprietor has had two years' control. We bought the office, going in debt for the same, in the latter part of September 1874. At that time, it did not seem possible that a paper could, in any event, survive the hard times. By judicious management, we kept up the publication, at many times being at a loss to know where the funds should come from wherewith to buy the next bill of paper and to pay the board bills that were accumulating. By persistent industry and close attention to business, we worried through the long dreary winter of '74, barely making enough to pay expenses. About one year ago, the office began to PAY and since then we have had much to feel grateful for....At the present time we are not too modest to say that the Pioneer is a PAYING institution....By reference to the old subscription books, it will be seen that in September 1874 the Pioneer had a circulation only of 180 copies, all told. The circulation now exceeds 550, BONAFIDE cash subscribers. Of this number, 120 copies are taken at this post office, 300 copies go to other offices in the county, and over 100 go to subscribers living outside of the state, the greater part going to Iowa....Some time ago, we promised our readers a larger and better paper, but circumstances unlooked for and unavoidable have prevented us from fulfilling the promises....

 

The type, press, cases and the entire outfit and m ...
November 9, 1876, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1548)

The type, press, cases and the entire outfit and material on which the Pioneer is printed will be sold for $225 cash down. The same material could not be purchased at the foundry for less than $450.

 

The Norton County Locomotive, published by Nat. L. ...
November 16, 1876, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1549)

The Norton County Locomotive, published by Nat. L. Baker at Leota, is non est. Nat published a good paper and we are sorry to know that he has "busted his biler."

 

Maj. Mark J. Kelley, one of the former publishers ...
November 23, 1876, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1551)

Maj. Mark J. Kelley, one of the former publishers of this paper, has been elected to the office of probate judge of Mitchell County....

The editor of this paper will probably be absent during the next ten days, and Capt. W. H. Nelson will "furnish copy" for the next two issues of the Pioneer. Maj. W. Scott Elliott will look after the business management.

 

Will D. Jenkins, editor of the Pioneer, started la ...
November 30, 1876, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1553)

Will D. Jenkins, editor of the Pioneer, started last Sunday morning on a visit to his father's at Fairbury, Neb....

 

Those parties that "inveigled" themselves into our ...
December 21, 1876, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1556)

Those parties that "inveigled" themselves into our confidence and induced us to send them the Pioneer for wood that they would bring "next week" can secure our forgiveness by bringing the wood forthwith. We are dead broke and freezing.

The Pioneer for one year for five bushels of corn. We are in need of this article just now, hence this liberal proposition.

The Pioneer outfit desires to engage in the grand hunt next week, and otherwise get the full benefits of the holidays, hence no paper will be issued next week.

Nat. L. Baker, late of the Norton County Locomotive, and an old stick companion of ours, accompanied by E. Pattison Hugill, another old knight of the stick, paid the Pioneer office a pleasant visit last week. They contemplate going into the newspaper business at Norton Centre, and it is not at all improbable that the type, press and material on which the Pioneer is printed will be moved to that place for that purpose....To relieve all anxiety regarding the future of the Pioneer, we will state that it is to receive a new dress out and out, direct from the foundry, and will be enlarged to a 28-column paper....

 

We announced last week that no paper would be issu ...
December 28, 1876, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1560)

We announced last week that no paper would be issued during the holidays. We changed our mind. The paper, however, is behind time....Next week we shall change the publication day to Saturday.

 

And now comes the Kirwin Progress, six column, fou ...
January 6, 1877, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1562)

And now comes the Kirwin Progress, six column, four page paper, with E. F. Robinson, editor and publisher....

And now we can receive tidings from the frontier through the Norton County Bee, a lively little sheet published at Norton Centre by Harmer & Hugill....

 

Topliff of the Cawker City Echo has been getting m ...
January 13, 1877, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1566)

Topliff of the Cawker City Echo has been getting married. Miss Mary Englehart of Lower Oak was the unfortunate victim....

 

The following is a list of newspapers published in ...
February 3, 1877, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1571)

The following is a list of newspapers published in the 15th Judicial District: Beloit Gazette, Cawker City Echo, Jewell County Diamond, Jewell County Monitor, Smith County Pioneer, Osborne County Farmer, Stockton News, Kirwin Progress, Phillipsburg Chief, and Norton County Bee, 10 in all....

"Eternal vigilance is the Price of Liberty and $1.50 is the price of the Jewell County Monitor" is the way it appears in the motto across the heading of the paper.

...The Jewell County Monitor has been enlarged to a 7 column paper, and otherwise improved. The Monitor is fast becoming one of the substantial newspapers of the Northwest....The untiring industry of the editor, and liberal patronage bestowed upon the Monitor by the business men of Jewell Centre are the elements that have secured its success. The Pioneer will soon be enlarged to the size of the Monitor, but you can bet your bottom dollar that it is not the liberal (?) patronage received from the business men of Smith Centre that justifies the improvement. Sixty dollars a year will cover the amount of patronage bestowed upon the Pioneer by the enterprizing merchants of this town, and 40 dollars of that is paid by one firm -- G. L. Gaylord. Yet we have never whined about the matter, and we feel just as independent as "a swine on frozen water." We console ourself with the belief that sometime, it may be in the distant future, more merchants will locate at this town, and pitying our sad, humble and poverty-stricken condition, will add at any rate $40 more to our income, and thereby make it $100 per year. We can run the machine on that amount, and clear 95 cents a year, besides the amount that we can beat our creditors out of.

F. W. Dunn, a boy 18 years old, formerly partner of John Marloy in the Council Grove Democrat, has bought the paper entire and will hereafter be editor and publisher. This change will settle the question of "who is the youngest editor in the state". -- Topeka Blade. Guess it does. The editor of the Pioneer has flattered himself with the idea that he was the "youngest editor" in the state, but 18 holds under us.

 

The Beloit Record, Vol. 1, No. 1, with Mark J. Kel ...
March 10, 1877, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1576)

The Beloit Record, Vol. 1, No. 1, with Mark J. Kelley and G. W. Bertram as editors and proprietors, came in the other day....The publishers are both old friends of ours....The Record is devoted chiefly to the real estate interests of western Kansas; is published monthly, and costs only 50 cents a year.

 

The Kirwin Progress now comes to us with a clean f ...
April 7, 1877, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1588)

The Kirwin Progress now comes to us with a clean face. A new head, clean type, and a first-class printer have brought about this pleasing state of affairs. F. E. Jerome, one of the best workmen in the state, has taken charge of the mechanical department....

The Jewell County Diamond and Cawker City Echo both come to us this week printed on the co-operative plan, and in the case of the Diamond it is a vast improvement....It is possible that the Pioneer will "follow suit."

 

The Osborne County Farmer has been enlarged to an ...
April 21, 1877, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1592)

The Osborne County Farmer has been enlarged to an 8 page paper, with 4 pages printed on the cooperative plan. The Farmer is now not only one of the best printed papers, but is the largest in northwest Kansas....

The Old Printing Press, by George W. Somerville

A song to the Press, the Printing Press! Of the good old-fashioned kind, Ere the giant machine with its pulse of steam, Elbows it out of mind. In the days of yore, Our fathers hoar, by his sturdy limbs have wrought, Of iron and oak, His teachings spoke, The language of burning thought.

A song to the Press, the Printing Press! As the carriage rolls merrily along. His stout sides groan, as the bar pulls home, Keeping time to the pressman's song; And the crisp, wet sheet, On its errand fleet, By anxious hands is sped. Though oft elsewhere, It may sorrow bear, It brings to the printer bread.

Then here's to the Press -- the old Printing Press, Though his days be numbered now, A fond heart weaves of the laurel leaves, A garland to deck his brow; Though the giant machine, With its pulse of steam, Has doomed his form to decay, His stout old frame, From our hearts shall claim, Remembrances for many a day.

 

The Pioneer is having more commodious quarters ere ...
April 28, 1877, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1595)

The Pioneer is having more commodious quarters erected on the west side of the Public Square. Boddy & Watson are the victimized contractors. The building is now being enclosed, and will be ready for occupancy in a few days. We then want all our friends who have been withholding their patronage to come forward and plank down $1.50 and take the Pioneer, the oldest paper in northwest Kansas. And if you don't want the Pioneer, we will endeavor to fit you out in the furniture line, an extensive stock of "the which" will be on in a few days.

The Lively Times is soon to appear at Kirwin with Jenkins & McBride as editors.

Ye printer's hogs are hungry, and a doleful and piteous squall comes from the direction in which the pen is located. Do bring on that corn that you promised to bring "next week."

 

Come and see us in our new quarters. The Pioneer i ...
May 5, 1877, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1599)

Come and see us in our new quarters. The Pioneer is proud of its building and commodious quarters.

Rail road prices duplicated at the Pioneer Furniture Rooms. When you come to town, call and see us. Bring your woman along and examine the extensive stock of furniture at the Pioneer Rooms.

The initial number of the Lively Times, published at Kirwin by McBride & Gray, was received this week. It is a neat little 4-page, 16-column sheet, and the reading matter it contained was suggestive of its name....

C. Hickenlooper is now editor of the Phillipsburg Chief. In his salutatory, he says: "Although this is still The Chief, the war paint is washed from its face, its bow is unstrung and its hatchet is buried; its clarion war-note will not be carried over the lovely Phillipsburg plains."

The St. Joe Herald now comes to us as an exchange. Although published in Missouri, it is decidedly a Kansas paper, and is edited by a Kansas man, Webb Wilder....

We have...placed on our exchange list the Clipper, a neat little 4-page, 12-column paper, published at Fairbury, Neb., by Saxon & Butler. Mr. Saxon is a man of fine literary attainments, and Dr. Butler is an old-time friend and schoolmate of ye editor, and a brother of Gov. Butler's....

The Pioneer comes enlarged to a four page, six column, with patent inside...a great improvement on the former half sheet.... -- Progress.

 

The time necessarily consumed in removing the Pion ...
May 19, 1877, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1606)

The time necessarily consumed in removing the Pioneer office this week has thrown us behind.

When you come to town hereafter, call in and subscribe for the oldest paper in the Kirwin Land District, $1.50 per year. Don't forget that we have moved and are now occupying our commodious quarters on Broadway between the Iowa House and R. K.'s.

 

A new stock of furniture has just been received at ...
June 9, 1877, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1614)

A new stock of furniture has just been received at the Pioneer Furniture Rooms.

The Wilson-Swayze Trial -- The great murder trial at Topeka, wherein John W. Wilson was being tried for the murder of J. Clarke Swayze, of the Topeka Blade, after a ten days duration, has finally come to a close, and the jury...has returned a verdict of "not guilty." This will generally be a surprise to the people of the state. It has been considered by all unprejudiced thinkers as a cold-blooded murder. Old Baker of the Commonwealth is jubilant over the verdict and eulogizes Wilson and applauds the dastardly murderer. It will now be in order, and eminently proper in the eyes of the Commonwealth and its rotten outfit, for any man in the state who has a grievance against any editor to go immediately and shoot said offensive editor....Swayze made enemies by his fearless exposure of corruption in private social and political circles, and never shielded anyone high or low. The great state paper and moral organ, the Commonwealth, run by and in the interest of the damnable old lottery thief, Baker, was exposed by its fearless little contemporary, the Blade, hence the murder of its editor, Swayze. Wilson was an attache of the Commonwealth, and was one of the Commonwealth outfit, and while others may hesitate to say it, yet we do not, that Wilson was paid for murdering Swayze, and that money and political influence secured his acquittal.

 

Just as we were on the verge of despair again, Orr ...
July 14, 1877, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1622)

Just as we were on the verge of despair again, Orra Jones came to our relief with an arm full of beets. And they were fine ones too.

Facts in Relation to Kansas, by D. W. Wilder in the fourth agricultural report of Kansas -- ...In 1857, there were 28 papers published in the Territory. In 1866, there were 37 newspapers in the state; in 1870, there were 67; in 1871, there were 80; in 1872, there were 121. On the first of January 1874, there were 148 newspapers published in the state, representing 64 counties. This number soon increased to 152. Only 13 states published more newspapers than Kansas....When England acknowledged the independence of the United States, in 1783, there were only 43 newspapers published in all the states, and not one daily. Kansas now has more than three times that number of weekly papers, and 14 daily papers....

 

Unto Abe Eldridge are we indebted for the first "r ...
July 28, 1877, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1629)

Unto Abe Eldridge are we indebted for the first "roastin' ears" of the season, and you bet they were good. They may have tasted better to us from the fact that we hadn't had anything to eat for several days, and were just on the point of starvation. They are all gone now, and we're afraid that we are doomed to -- and there's our family too -- oh dear -- how good a few spring chickens -- or even a side of bacon would taste. Anyone coming to our relief with either will be entitled to the Pioneer as long as we survive to publish it. A "rush" would not discommode us; we're prepared for it.

The game law, so far as it applies to prairie chickens, expires next Tuesday, after which ye editor no longer proposes to go hungry for meat. You fellows at the grocery stores that wouldn't trust us for a piece of bacon may go to -- hunt chickens too, but you won't get any -- we have them all corralled, branded, and ready for slaughter.

 

A tame prairie dog was received on subscription at ...
September 15, 1877, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1639)

A tame prairie dog was received on subscription at this office last week. It is now being stall-fed, and is in pretty good condition -- wouldn't make a bad roast now -- but we do hope our delinquent subscribers won't drive us to that. However, we propose to keep the dog fat, and in good order, so that in a case of emergency, and we should get out of meat at our house, and we should want to invite some dignitary to dine with us, and didn't want to expose our destitute condition, the prairie dog pup wouldn't come amiss.

The Stockton News now comes to us enlarged and much improved. Its energetic proprietors, Randall & Hicks, seem determined to make it one of the best local papers in the West....

 

The Kirwin Progress has changed hands, E. F. Robin ...
September 29, 1877, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1644)

The Kirwin Progress has changed hands, E. F. Robinson retiring and F. E. Jerome & L. E. Campbell take the helm. Rev. Geo. O. Blake will conduct the editorial.

Col. L. D. Burch and I. D. Blueham, editors of the Chicago Commercial Advertiser, were in town last week. These gentlemen are "writing up" northwest Kansas....

 

Ten bushels of corn will secure the Pioneer for on ...
October 20, 1877, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1650)

Ten bushels of corn will secure the Pioneer for one year if delivered within the next 30 days.

"Will D. Jenkins, the handsome and cultured proprietor of the Smith County Pioneer,...called on the leading journal last evening. Will was on his return trip home from the Leavenworth horse fair, where he has been exhibiting some of his numerous stock of fast and blooded steppers." -- Atchison Champion. "Handsome and cultured" is good, but those "fast and blooded steppers" are for sale. For further particulars, enquire at this office.

 

A Democratic paper to be published at this place i ...
November 3, 1877, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1653)

A Democratic paper to be published at this place is now being talked of by our Democratic friends. We'll subscribe $100 towards the enterprize.

 

An eight pound girl that arrived at ye editor's ho ...
November 17, 1877, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1658)

An eight pound girl that arrived at ye editor's house on Thursday morning must answer as an excuse for the late appearance of the Pioneer this week.

 

The Western Sun is the name of a new paper started ...
November 24, 1877, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1661)

The Western Sun is the name of a new paper started at Hanover with our old friend E. N. Emmons, formerly of the Cawker City Sentinel, as editor and proprietor.

 

Mrs. D. C. Jenkins of Fairbury, Neb., is visiting ...
January 5, 1878, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1670)

Mrs. D. C. Jenkins of Fairbury, Neb., is visiting her two interesting grandchildren that adorn the domicile of ye editor. She is enchanted and surprised beyond all expectation....

 

Rev. L. M. Bonnett has moved his clock works and j ...
January 12, 1878, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1672)

Rev. L. M. Bonnett has moved his clock works and jewelry establishment into the northeast corner of the Pioneer sanctum. The atmosphere in the Pioneer rooms may now partake somewhat more of the moral element, though the Elder may become completely demoralized in the meantime.

 

Billy Jenkins of the Pioneer, and the best looking ...
February 9, 1878, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1680)

Billy Jenkins of the Pioneer, and the best looking editor in the valley,...gave us a pleasant call this week. -- Kirwin Chief.

"You are not acquainted with Topliff of the Echo and Winsor of the Diamond, are you? For 'shape' and beauty they are ahead of any other pair of Faber shovers in the valley. And 'cheek,' oh, my!" -- Jewell County Diamond.

Yes, and then there is Barnhart of the Farmer, handsome; Blake of the Progress, extracted essence of boiled down beauty; Nat Bake of the Bee, charmingly beautiful; McBride of the Chief, altogether lovely; Jim Scarbrough of the Diamond, grand, gloomy and peculiar; Thompson of the Monitor, blandly beautiful; Randall of the News, shapely. And all carry on their countenance angelical, child-like simplicity, innocence and purity.

 

The Phillips County Herald, published by Chas. F. ...
February 23, 1878, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1683)

The Phillips County Herald, published by Chas. F. Jenkins at Phillipsburg, is the latest newspaper adventure.

New sidewalks grace the front of the Pioneer office and Furniture Rooms.

Anyone having a piece of land to sell, either homestead or deeded, will find it to their advantage to leave a full description of the same, and terms, at this office.

 

...Mark J. Kelley has purchased G. Webb Bertram's ...
March 9, 1878, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1688)

...Mark J. Kelley has purchased G. Webb Bertram's interest in the Beloit Record, and is now sole owner, proprietor, editor, and publisher. Kelley is one of the pioneer newspaper men of western Kansas.

 

The Beloit Record has been enlarged and is now one ...
March 23, 1878, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1692)

The Beloit Record has been enlarged and is now one of the best papers on the lower Solomon Valley.

 

History of Jewell County...by M. Winsor and Jas. A ...
June 15, 1878, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1708)

History of Jewell County...by M. Winsor and Jas. A. Scarbrough. Printed in the Diamond office, Jewell City, 1878....On page 36, we find the following relative to ourself:

"On the 24th day of March, 1872, W. P. Day, assisted by W. D. Jenkins, now of the Smith County Pioneer,...commenced the publication of a four column paper called the Jewell City Clarion. In February 1873, they sold to M. Winsor, one of the authors of this book, who continued the publication of the Clarion until May 1, 1873, when he enlarged it to a seven column paper and changed the name to the Jewell County Diamond."

We acknowledge the receipt of the Jewell County Monitor-Diamond. It is a consolidation of the Jewell Centre Monitor and Jewell City Diamond. The paper is now a 32 column sheet with M. Winsor as editor and B. J. Thompson, publisher, with Jim Scarbrough as the Jewell City editor and general reporter. The new journal is now published at Jewell Centre, the county seat, and is the only paper published in the county. It has a handsome new dress....

 

No. 1, Vol. 1, of the Norton County Advance is at ...
June 22, 1878, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1713)

No. 1, Vol. 1, of the Norton County Advance is at hand. It is a neatly printed, 20-column sheet, with our old friends M. W. Pettigrew as editor and G. W. Collins, publisher. The Advance is published at Norton Centre, the county seat.

 

The Lively Times is the name of a new paper lately ...
June 29, 1878, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1716)

The Lively Times is the name of a new paper lately started in Phillips County. R. J. Thomas, editor; Charles Dickey, proprietor.

 

The Pioneer now boasts of a telegraphic office. A ...
July 6, 1878, Smith County Pioneer (ID 1719)

The Pioneer now boasts of a telegraphic office. A full set of instruments are now in operation, with W. H. Nelson and O. M. Jenkins as operators.

The Pioneer's new outfit has "arriven" and ye printers are happy. One more edition will be issued on the old material, and then we will appear in our "new dress."

 

Vol. 1, No. 27. E. M. Burr, editor.: With this iss ...
February 3, 1882, Smith County Pioneer (ID 2157)

Vol. 1, No. 27. E. M. Burr, editor.

With this issue we send out about 100 extra copies to our friends in different parts of the country. We would like to have you subscribe....We have reduced the subscription price to $1.00 if paid in advance; if not paid in advance, the price will remain $1.50; but a reduction of 25 cents will be made to those paying in three months....We do not desire to hold any of the old subscribers of the Record to their subscription against their own free will. If you don't like the change in politics of the paper and wish to discontinue it, please notify us and the paper will be stopped....

J. R. Newell...has been helping us this week. Jim is getting to be lightning at the case, and we are sorry we can't keep him with us.

 

Two business transactions took place last week.... ...
January 17, 1946, Smith County Pioneer (ID 462)

Two business transactions took place last week....The final result was the consolidation of...The Smith County Review and the Smith County Pioneer.

The first transaction was...to dissolve the ownership of the...Pioneer, which for 35 years has been the joint property of the late Vete Hutchings or his heirs and A. L. Headley....The Hutchings heirs, Mrs. Harry Dean of Smith Center, Randall George of Franklin, and Mrs. Herschel Cunningham of Lebanon, elected to buy the interests of Mr. Headley.

...The Hutchings heirs,...reserving an interest, moved to merge the Pioneer with the Smith County Review, owned and operated by Harold Beason. The...consolidation...included the purchase of an interest in the new paper by W. E. Lee, former county superintendent of schools and grocer in Smith Center.

The new paper...will be known as The Smith County Pioneer and Mr. Beason will be its manager and business director. The purchase included the building....The Pioneer is the oldest paper in the county. Bert Headley...has been closely connected with the paper for the past 35 years....

Headley,...as a lad of 14, learned to set type under...Billy Nelson back in 1891....Headley returned to the Pioneer in 1911 and has been closely connected with the operation since that time and, since the death of Mr. Hutchings, has been the editor and publisher....

The Smith County Review had its origin in Athol and at the time of its purchase by Harold Beason, was operated by Rumsey Payne. Mr. Beason, in his first newspaper venture, purchased the paper in 1928....Mr. Beason was encouraged to come to Smith Center in 1933....

Bill Lee...will be connected with the paper in a news capacity....He is a native of the Harlan vicinity, having been born and reared on a farm near the homestead of his grandfather Lee, who came here in 1871....

Frazier L. Brown, Linotype operator and head machine man for the Review since it came to Smith Center,...will continue in that capacity....Mrs. Hattie A. Baker, who has written the society news, many of the local squibs, and her own column "Squibs," will continue to do the same work....

Ray Olson, printer and returned veteran,...will act in the same capacity....Bill Tucker, local school boy, will continue to help on Saturday and out-of-school hours.

Nate White,...printer, machinist and foreman, is heading west....Lewis Headley...has no definite plans....

Bert Headley Says Farewell....It was 55 years ago this winter that I first became connected with the newspaper business in Smith Center....My first job as a hand compositor away from the parental environment was in the Pioneer office....Nate White and Lewis Headley had been with me continually for more than a quarter of a century....