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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

State Record

Articles in database from State Record:    201

Our sanctum was illumined on Monday evening last b ...
October 15, 1859, State Record (ID 3631)

Our sanctum was illumined on Monday evening last by the genial phiz of Champ Vaughn, editor of the Leavenworth Times. Champ is one of the pioneers of Kansas journalism -- a little given to the sensation style; a "hale fellow well met" and last, but not least, an ardent Republican.

C. F. de Vivaldi of the Manhattan Express paid us a visit on Monday evening last....He came to this country about a year since, a refugee from Italian tyranny, and of course speaks by the card when he talks about the blessings of free government.

Wm. Kempf of the Kansas Zeitung arrived Tuesday. The Zeitung is a powerful element for Republicanism among the German citizens of Kansas....

T. Dwight Thacher of the Lawrence Republican, the fearless and talented exponent of Republicanism in central Kansas, was also with us. The Republican has long been the pole star of the liberty loving men of the interior of Kansas.

The Palermo Leader, another of the reliable journals of the party of freedom, was represented in the person of its editor, Mr. Emory....

And now comes John A. Martin and deposes and says that Atchison is "all right"...which is in great part attributable to the indefatigable, uncompromising labors of the Champion, of which he is the editor and proprietor.

That old standby of the cause, P. B. Plumb of the Emporia News, who has on all occasions for four years past stood up for the right, and never flinched, was also with us. P. B. has again assumed the editorship of the News....

Our friend and fellow laborer, Jeff L. Dugger of the Leavenworth Daily Register, was in attendance at the convention. Mr. Dugger is a recent comer into the territory and has manifested a zeal in the cause of Republicanism....

Sam Wood -- everybody knows Sam of the Kansas Press, Cottonwood Falls, was on hand and enlivened the proceedings of the convention by his inimitable wit and humor....

The Emporia News has again changed hands, Mr. Stotler retiring and our old and esteemed friend and co-laborer, P. B. Plumb, associated with Dudley Randall, assuming charge of the paper. It is but fair to say that the retiring editor has maintained the creditable position in which he found it.

 

Topeka Tribune. The last number of this paper cont ...
November 19, 1859, State Record (ID 3654)

Topeka Tribune. The last number of this paper contains the salutatory of H. C. Hawkins as one of its editors....Although a Democrat, he has evinced a degree of sincerity, candor and liberality in the maintenance of his peculiar views which is not characteristic of that party....

Retired. Col. L. J. Eastin and W. H. Adams have disposed of their interest in the Leavenworth Herald to Wm. A. Gill, the present editor, and Judge Fain. Eastin & Adams are the oldest publishers in Kansas, having started the Herald in 1854 under the shelter of a tree.

 

We stated last week that the Free South, a Free So ...
December 6, 1859, State Record (ID 3662)

We stated last week that the Free South, a Free Soil newspaper of Newport, Ky., had been mobbed and destroyed at the bidding of the slave power. The following are some further details:

*"A Mob of Newport Citizens Make a Demonstration on the Office of the Free South. At about half past seven o'clock last evening, a mob of some 30 men, citizens of Newport, Ky., entered the printing office of Wm. S. Bailey, publisher of the Free South, and proceeded to make certain depredations upon the printing materials. Bailey and his daughters, who were present, protested against the proceedings of the mob, but without effect. After they had carried off two of the forms into the street and pied them, the girls put out the lights in the establishment, which induced them to suspend further demonstrations. As they retired, they informed Bailey that he might consider this attack only a warning, and that if he did not cease the publication of his paper, which they considered a nuisance, they would demolish his entire office.

"Later. On Saturday, the bells were rung, a large crowd of the most respectable (?) people of Newport got together in the court house yard. Mayor Hallam was made chairman, Col. Jones offered resolutions denouncing the Free South newspaper, but recommended non-action. On motion, the non-action part was struck out of the resolutions, a motion was made to remove the office to Cincinnati, the crowd adjourned to the Free South office, burst in the doors, took all the material in wagons, started towards Cincinnati but, on arriving at the river, threw it all into the Ohio. The meeting again met and appointed a vigilance committee to see that the paper is not again established in Newport." -- Cleveland Herald.

 

Rejuvenated. The Leavenworth Evening Dispatch come ...
January 7, 1860, State Record (ID 3678)

Rejuvenated. The Leavenworth Evening Dispatch comes to us in a new dress throughout. It is very much improved, both in appearance and matter. It is independent in politics with a decided leaning towards Democracy.

 

The last number of the Lecompton Democrat announce ...
January 14, 1860, State Record (ID 3684)

The last number of the Lecompton Democrat announces the accession of A. P. Walker to the editorial department of that paper. Mr. Walker was the Democratic candidate for secretary of state under the Wyandott Constitution. The Democrat is a prominent Administration journal and is conducted with ability.

We are pleased to announce the revival of the Osawatomie Herald under the sole supervision of its former editor, C. E. Griffith. The Herald is a live Republican paper.

 

Ladies Should Read Newspapers. It is one great mis ...
January 28, 1860, State Record (ID 3690)

Ladies Should Read Newspapers. It is one great mistake in female education to keep a young lady's time and attention devoted to only the fashionable literature of the day. If you would qualify her for conversation, you must give her something to talk about, give her education with the actual world and its transpiring events. Urge her to read newspapers and become familiar with the present character and improvement of our race. History is of some importance, but the past world is dead, and we have little comparatively to do with it. Our thoughts and our concerns should be for the present world, to know what it is, and improve its condition. Let her have an intelligent conversation concerning the mental, moral, political and religious improvements of our times. Let the gilded annuals and poems on the centre table be kept a part of the time covered with journals. Let the family -- men, women and children -- read the newspapers.

S. N. Wood has withdrawn from the Kansas Press as publisher, but still remains the editor.

 

The Leavenworth Dailies. Since the suspension of t ...
February 4, 1860, State Record (ID 3692)

The Leavenworth Dailies. Since the suspension of the "navigation" of the Kaw, we have unfortunately been much of the time deprived of these valuable sources of news, until their Eastern dispatches have been anticipated by other sources. We hope, however, that this state of things will not long continue. The publishers of the Daily Times, Register, and Dispatch have placed us under lasting obligations to them for their condescension in giving us their valuable daily issues for our weekly. We hope someday, however, to be able to reciprocate, daily for daily.

 

Fine Printing. We are in receipt of the "Typograph ...
February 11, 1860, State Record (ID 3696)

Fine Printing. We are in receipt of the "Typographic Advertiser," published by L. Johnson & Co., Philadelphia, and the "Power Press" by L. T. Wells, Cincinnati, both of them very fine specimens of printing, containing some new and elegant styles of type, borders, &c.

 

We are in receipt of the first number of the Leave ...
February 25, 1860, State Record (ID 3703)

We are in receipt of the first number of the Leavenworth Dollar Dispatch. This is the first dollar weekly yet started in Kansas. Its appearance is highly creditable.

 

The interest of C. Vaughan in the Leavenworth Time ...
March 10, 1860, State Record (ID 3711)

The interest of C. Vaughan in the Leavenworth Times has been transferred to J. K. Bartlett, his former partner, and the co-partnership dissolved. Mr. Vaughan continues to edit the Times.

 

Our genial friend and co-laborer, S. O. Thacher of ...
March 17, 1860, State Record (ID 3714)

Our genial friend and co-laborer, S. O. Thacher of the Lawrence Republican, paid us a visit on Thursday last. Solon...is deservedly popular with the people of his district, having been elected district judge under the Wyandott Constitution....

 

We understand that E. C. K. Garvey of this city ha ...
March 31, 1860, State Record (ID 3719)

We understand that E. C. K. Garvey of this city has purchased the material upon which the Leavenworth Register was printed, and contemplates removing it to Topeka for the purpose of starting a Democratic paper.

 

F. M. Tracy, formerly of the Elwood Press, has bec ...
April 7, 1860, State Record (ID 3723)

F. M. Tracy, formerly of the Elwood Press, has become editor of the St. Joseph Free Democrat.

 

The St. Joseph Daily West has been discontinued. T ...
May 12, 1860, State Record (ID 3732)

The St. Joseph Daily West has been discontinued. The proprietors say they have sunk $1,500 in its publication during the past year.

 

We regret to learn by the last Lawrence Republican ...
May 19, 1860, State Record (ID 3734)

We regret to learn by the last Lawrence Republican that the connection of S. O. Thacher with that able paper has ceased.

We learn that our neighbors of Auburn contemplate starting a newspaper to be under the supervision of D. B. Emmert, now of this city.

The Myria Type. We find the following description in the London Morning Star: The invention of the Myria type of Combarieu has been submitted to the government and accepted for inspection. This marvelous invention, being designed to effect an immediate revolution in the art of printing, it is worth description. Hitherto the characters used in printing have been composed of a mixture of lead and copper and antimony. These characters, by reason of their extreme softness, wear out quickly and are, besides, very expensive. The characters are molded one by one; the best workmen can scarcely produce 5,000 in a day in the rough. They have afterwards to be finished up and pass through several hands. M. Cambarieu, by an ingeniously invented machine, produces 10,000 of these characters at one stroke. Each letter is then separated by a mechanical saw, which divides them with mathematical regularity and precision. The consequences of this invention will be: production increased, the exactitude and regularity hitherto unattainable, the use of the harder metal which will avoid frequent renewal of printers' materials, reducing by one-half of the outlay; and at length the one great object, an increase of printing and an enormous diminution in the price of books!...M. Combarieu announces his intention of producing the characters in steel, the durability of which will be beyond calculation.

 

We have neglected...to notice the enlargement of o ...
June 9, 1860, State Record (ID 3739)

We have neglected...to notice the enlargement of our neighbor, the Emporia News, and the return of P. B. Plumb to its editorial head....We welcome back to the corps our old friend Plumb, one of the Old Guard of Kansas.

 

The last number of the Grasshopper Falls Gazette c ...
June 23, 1860, State Record (ID 3746)

The last number of the Grasshopper Falls Gazette comes to us enlarged to a handsome 24-column paper.

The Auburn Docket makes its appearance upon our table this week, D. B. Emmert editor and publisher.

 

We are not much given to boasting but, in justice ...
July 14, 1860, State Record (ID 3759)

We are not much given to boasting but, in justice to the young men in our employ, we must say that we have the fastest and cleanest typesetters that can be found in Kansas. We give the amount of type set by our apprentices in one day (10 hours)....The type set was solid Brevier. Franklin Crane, 9,150 ems; worked at the business nine months. John Speer, 5,600 ems; worked at the business three months. James Conwell, 5,200 ems; worked at the business four months. In justice to Mr. Conwell, we must say that he was called from his case several times to attend to other business.

The office of the Leavenworth Times has been removed to a building opposite the old stand, the Times building having been so seriously damaged by the late fire as to necessitate a general repair.

 

"Editor Assaulted. W. W. Ross, one of the talented ...
July 21, 1860, State Record (ID 3761)

"Editor Assaulted. W. W. Ross, one of the talented and gentlemanly editors of the Topeka State Record, was assaulted upon the sidewalk in front of the Eldridge House last Saturday evening by a man by the name of Jones, a resident of this city. The alleged provocation was the publishment of some article in the Record which Jones thought reflected upon him. R. G. Elliott interfered and prevented any violence; when Mr. Ross very properly took no further notice of his assailant and passed on. Mr. Ross is incapable of an ungentlemanly action, and his cool and dignified demeanor under the circumstances meets the entire approval of our citizens." -- Lawrence Republican.

Our staunch German contemporary, the Zeitung at Leavenworth City, is now issued semi-weekly instead of weekly. L. Sousman editor and publisher.

 

*A newspaper establishment was destroyed in Lexing ...
July 28, 1860, State Record (ID 3767)

*A newspaper establishment was destroyed in Lexington, Mo., last week for advocating the election of Lincoln & Hamlin. This is the town that attained so much celebrity in the Kansas troubles by mobbing Free State men, stopping steamboats, &c., &c., and her people doubtless wish to keep their reputation good.

Wm. H. Gill, editor in chief of the Leavenworth Herald, has retired from that journal. The publication is continued by W. P. Fain & Co., Mr. Fain as principal and Ward Burlingame as assistant editor. Mr. Fain has been connected with the concern as publisher for several months, while Mr. Burlingame has been long and favorably known as the "local" of that establishment.

The Council Grove Press of July 23d comes to us enlarged and greatly improved.

 

"The St. Jo West has changed proprietors and polit ...
August 4, 1860, State Record (ID 3773)

"The St. Jo West has changed proprietors and politics. F. M. Posegate, the publisher, and W. Jones, the editor, have retired from the paper. Tracy, Fish & Co. have purchased the office and will publish a daily evening Breckenridge organ. E. Y. Shields is to be the editor." -- Times.

A general overturning seems to be taking place in the proprietorship of the Kansas press. In addition to those already announced, we see by the last Atchison Union that G. O. Chase, who published and edited that paper for the last 18 months in a very acceptable manner, at least to the Democracy, has disposed of the concern to W. H. Adams & C. M. Stebbins....The Union assumes a neutral position between the two Democratic candidates.

State Record Reading Room. In addition to all the papers in Kansas, and a good number of the principal weeklies both of the Eastern and Western states, we are in the regular receipt of the following dailies: Leavenworth Times and Dispatch, Kansas City Journal of Commerce, St. Louis Republican, Chicago Press & Tribune, Lafayette Courier, and New York World. All are promptly placed on file in our reading room for the inspection of the public, and furnish a pleasant and profitable occupation for an occasional hour of leisure. The room and files are free to all.

 

Frank F. Barclay last week disposed of his interes ...
August 11, 1860, State Record (ID 3779)

Frank F. Barclay last week disposed of his interest in the Grasshopper Gazette to P. Hanford Hubbell, who will continue its publication.

We learn that the Linn County Herald and Paola Chief have discontinued. The Manhattan Express also, temporarily.

 

We learn that the publication of the Manhattan Exp ...
August 18, 1860, State Record (ID 3785)

We learn that the publication of the Manhattan Express is to be resumed in a few weeks at Junction City and Manhattan, and is to be called the Western Republican. The recent conversion of the Junction City Statesman into an extreme Democratic journal has rendered the establishment of a Republican paper at that point necessary.

 

We are in receipt of the Doniphan County Dispatch, ...
September 8, 1860, State Record (ID 3794)

We are in receipt of the Doniphan County Dispatch, a new Democratic paper published at Troy, Doniphan County.

"Two new papers are about to be established at our county seat, one Democratic and the other Republican. Our county will then have five papers -- three Republican, one Democratic and one Independent -- more than any other county in the Territory except Leavenworth." -- Doniphan Post.

 

The Steam Press. In the course of his eloquent add ...
November 3, 1860, State Record (ID 3819)

The Steam Press. In the course of his eloquent address at the tract meeting, Dr. Fuller said:

"Who can measure the power of the press? An ounce of lead molded into a bullet, and put into a minie rifle, with a few grains of powder beneath it, will do its errand sufficiently upon a man two miles distant if it encounters no obstacles; but that ounce of lead, made into type and put into one of Hoe's lightning printing presses, will go thousands of miles and do its errand sufficiently, not on one man merely but on millions, and that though oceans, rivers, mountains may intervene.

"A steam printing press! Did you ever go down into one of those spacious vaults beneath your sidewalks and watch the monsters? I feel something like awe in looking at them. It seems to me like one of Ezekiel's living creatures, with the hand of a man, and the sound of many waters, and the spirit of the living creature at the wheels.

"It asks no nourishment, knows no weariness. How it strips itself to its work and toils on with a strength that mocks to scorn the might of the giant, and with a clangor as if it would shiver to pieces every substance in its grasp. And yet, with a delicacy and precision unattainable by human muscles, it receives a fabric so delicate that a rude touch would rend it and imprints upon it within the twinkling of an eye that which costs hours to compose. It flings off sheet after sheet to entertain, instruct, regenerate, and bless the earth. None of us have yet begun to appreciate the influence of the press as an agent for the diffusion of knowledge, whether it be in volumes, pamphlets or, above all, through the daily newspaper, that moral institute which has revolutionized not only the literary but the commercial and political world."

 

A Triumph of Science and Journalism. The N.Y. Worl ...
November 17, 1860, State Record (ID 3825)

A Triumph of Science and Journalism. The N.Y. World of the 5th comes to us containing a representation and description of the new mammoth printing press upon which that paper is now printed....Astonishing, however, as is the mechanical achievement displayed therein, it is fully equaled by the success of The World, as manifested in the necessity for such a press in the first half year of its existence....The edition of the 5th says:

"The World is printed today, and will hereafter be printed, upon the largest, most highly finished and most rapidly working press which has yet been made. It comes, of course, from the factory of R. Hoe & Co. Its capacity is 20,000 copies an hour. Its cost is $30,000....When making preparations for the publication of The World, we provided ourselves with an excellent six-cylinder press from the same makers, which is capable of throwing off 12,000 impressions a hour....It is a source of gratification to us...that we are at last able to announce to our readers that the new ten-cylinder press, which has been constructing for us for several months, is now set up and in running order....

"The dimensions of the press are nearly as follows: length, 40 feet; width, 15 feet; height, 16 feet. The large horizontal cylinder in the centre is about 4.5 feet in diameter, and on it are placed the forms of type or, more correctly, the "form." there are in fact four forms used at a time, which contain the type for the four pages on one side of the paper. Each of these constitute a segment of a circle, and the whole four occupy a segment of only about one-fourth of the surface of the cylinder, the other three-fourths being used as an ink-distributing surface. Around this main cylinder, and parallel with it, are ten smaller impression cylinders, according to the number of which a press is termed a four, six, or ten cylinder press. The large cylinder being set in revolution, the form of types is carried successively to all the impression cylinders, at each of which a sheet is introduced and receives the impression of the types as the form passes. Thus as many sheets are printed at each revolution of the main cylinder as there are impression cylinders around it. One person is required at each impression cylinder to supply the sheets of paper, which are taken at the proper moment by fingers or grippers and, after being printed, are conveyed out by tapes and laid in heaps by means of self-acting flyers, thereby dispensing with the hands required in ordinary machines to receive and pile the sheets. The grippers hold the sheet securely, so that the thinnest newspaper can be printed without waste....The ink is contained in a fountain placed beneath the main cylinder, and is conveyed by means of distributing rollers to the distributing surface on the main cylinder. This surface, being lower or less in diameter than the form of types, passes by the impression cylinders without touching them. For each impression, there are two inking rollers which receive their supply of ink from the distributing surface of the main cylinder and raise and ink the form as it passes under them, after which they again fall to the distributing surface.

"Each page of the paper is locked up on a detached segment of the large cylinder, called by the compositors a 'turtle,' and this constitutes its bed and chase. The column rules run parallel with the shaft of the cylinder, and are consequently straight, while the head, advertising and dash rules are in the form of segments of a circle. The column rules are in the form of a wedge, with the thin part directly towards the axis of the cylinder so as to bind the types securely, and at the same time to keep the ink from collecting between the types and rules. They are held down to the bed by tongues, projecting at intervals along their length, which slide into rebated grooves, cut crosswise into the face of the bed. The spaces in the grooves between the column rules are accurately fitted with sliding blocks of metal, even with the surface of the bed, the ends of the blocks being cut away underneath to receive a projection on the sides of the column rules. The form of type is locked up in the bed by means of screws at the foot and sides, by which the type is held as securely as in the ordinary manner upon a flat bed, if not even more so. The speed of the machine is limited only by the ability of the feeders to supply the sheets. Twenty-five hundred is about as many as a man can supply in an hour, and multiplying this by ten -- one man being at each cylinder -- we have 25,000 sheets an hour as the capacity of our new press."

 

The Americus Sentinel entered, in its issue of the ...
November 24, 1860, State Record (ID 3828)

The Americus Sentinel entered, in its issue of the 17th, upon its second volume. it is much improved in appearance and presents evidences of thrift unusual in these hard times.

 

The West, the proslavery disunion organ of St. Jos ...
December 1, 1860, State Record (ID 3830)

The West, the proslavery disunion organ of St. Joseph, has been discontinued for want of patronage. A good indication of the political condition of Missouri.

The Junction City Statesman has again changed hands, this time much for the better. The retiring editor takes occasion to shake the dust from off his shoes as he leaves for the Sunny South, where he can enjoy to their full the "blessings" of slavery, and at his pleasure call down maledictions upon Abolitionists. Henry T. Geery is now the editor and proprietor of the paper and, although yet radically Democratic, and is wont to indulge in the customary partizan balderdash about the election of a "sectional President," it is very much improved in tone.

 

*We learn by the last Lawrence Republican that tha ...
January 5, 1861, State Record (ID 3842)

*We learn by the last Lawrence Republican that that establishment has changed hands, Mr. Thacher retiring and John Speer and Nicholas Smith succeeding to the proprietorship. While we regret to part with Mr. Thacher, whose whole career in Kansas has been characterized by manliness, integrity, and independence, and whose talent has made the Republican one of the leading papers of the West, we rejoice that his paper has fallen into so good hands. Mr. Speer is well known as being one of the first Free State editors in Kansas, having established the Kansas Tribune at Lawrence early in 1855, and has ever since been a prompt, fearless, and able representative of the radical school of Republicans in the territory.

 

...The fierce storm has reached the culminating po ...
January 12, 1861, State Record (ID 3847)

...The fierce storm has reached the culminating point at the city of St. Joseph. on the 31st of December, the Union was saved and the honor of Southern chivalry redeemed by the arrest of Mr. Landon, a printer and carrier in the office of the St. Joseph Democrat, a Republican paper which is probably to be declared a nuisance and thrown into the river. The Democrat says of it:

"On Monday, Dec. 31st, eight stalwart men, officer et al, came into our office, arrested Spencer C. Landon, a printer, and made diligent inquiries for Frank M. Tracy, D. W. Wilder and B. P. Chenoweth. On receiving an intimation from our bright eyed devil that said parties were non est comeatibus, the squad departed. Mr. Landon gave bail -- only $2,000 was required -- for his appearance at the March term of the court. Mr. Landon is a young man of irreproachable character and the head and front of his offending hath this extent -- he works in a Republican office and is the carrier of a Republican paper. He is the son, however, of Dr. G. W. H. Landon, a prominent Republican, and we presume he is made a criminal for this excellent reason."

After this remarkable feat was accomplished, the officers of the law rested from their labors for one day, and then proceeded to the store of C. C. Woodworth, a bookseller who was added to the list of the indicted. He is charged with having sold the Helper book, which he asserts is a false charge.

*WE ARE TOLD by Mr. Johnson of Quindaro that G. S. Parks of Parkville, Mo., has brought an action in the district court of Missouri to recover damages on the press and material of the old Parkville Luminary, which was baptized in the turbid waters of the Missouri River in the fall of 1854 by a pro-slavery mob.

 

We shall commence, with the convening of the state ...
February 16, 1861, State Record (ID 3869)

We shall commence, with the convening of the state legislature, the publication of the Daily State Record....Having had several years experience in the publication of daily papers in the East, we feel warranted in promising to our patrons such a paper as will be satisfactory to them, and creditable to the town from which it shall emanate. We shall make our arrangements to publish it for three months, the limit of the session, and perhaps for the year. Terms $2.00 for three months, or $7.00 per annum.

 

We learn that the office of the Junction City Stat ...
March 2, 1861, State Record (ID 3879)

We learn that the office of the Junction City Statesman has been purchased by Republican parties and is soon to be revived under the editorial supervision of F. N. Blake. Mr. B. is well known in western Kansas as a thoroughgoing Republican.

 

P. S. Post, editor and proprietor of the Wyandott ...
March 16, 1861, State Record (ID 3885)

P. S. Post, editor and proprietor of the Wyandott Argus, has sold that establishment to Mr. Taylor, who, though not stated, we presume to be the former proprietor of the Gazette.

 

Presidential Appointments....F. G. Adams, register ...
May 4, 1861, State Record (ID 3909)

Presidential Appointments....F. G. Adams, register of the land office at Lecompton....W. W. Ross, receiver at Lecompton.

We also learn from another source:...John A. Martin, postmaster at Atchison.

 

The Bulletin is the title of a new Democratic pape ...
June 29, 1861, State Record (ID 3946)

The Bulletin is the title of a new Democratic paper just started at Atchison by Driggs & Co. It is well executed mechanically.

 

Whipping an Editor. G. W. Glick of Atchison tried, ...
July 6, 1861, State Record (ID 3951)

Whipping an Editor. G. W. Glick of Atchison tried, a few days since, the old and nearly obsolete remedy for private grief of whipping an editor. The aforesaid editor was no less than John Martin of the Champion. In addition to getting whaled, Mr. G. has the satisfaction of seeing his name very conspicuously and frequently repeated in the Champion of last Saturday, in connections more emphatic than flattering. Bully for John. Editor whipping don't pay -- in Atchison.

The Leavenworth Daily Herald has been suspended.

The St. Joseph Daily Gazette, the leading pro-slavery, secession organ of that city, has been suspended for want of patronage.

 

M. Frankinberger has opened a new book bindery in ...
July 8, 1861, State Record (ID 3953)

M. Frankinberger has opened a new book bindery in the third story of the State Record building....Mr. F. has had a long experience in the business....Those having old files of newspapers or old books which they wish to preserve by rebinding will do well to give him a call.

 

J. E. Clardy, formerly editor of the Marysville Pa ...
August 10, 1861, State Record (ID 3964)

J. E. Clardy, formerly editor of the Marysville Palmetto, was in town. Mr. C. is now residing near Indianola, having abdicated the editorial tripod for the more peaceful and lucrative empire of the husbandman.

 

*Secession Paper Stopped. "M. B. Haas of this city ...
August 24, 1861, State Record (ID 3971)

*Secession Paper Stopped. "M. B. Haas of this city returned yesterday from a trip to northwest Missouri and Nebraska. He informs us that a company of federal troops went up to Savannah, Mo., on Sunday last and quietly took possession of the press and type of the North West Democrat, a rampant secession paper formerly published there. The Democrat boldly carried at the head of its columns the name of Jeff Davis for president and Claib. Jackson for vice president. We think this is the right course to pursue, not only in regard to secession sheets in Missouri, but elsewhere. Treason should be put down wherever and in whatever shape it rears itself." -- Leavenworth Times.

 

The press is being remembered in the distribution ...
September 21, 1861, State Record (ID 3982)

The press is being remembered in the distribution of military honors. John A. Martin of the Atchison Champion is lieutenant colonel and Ed. F. Schneider major of the Home Guard regiment. D. R. Anthony is lieutenant colonel of Jennison's regiment. We commend the judgment of the Governor in these appointments, as printers are proverbially brave, and invariably good fellows.

 

We are compelled again to issue a half sheet owing ...
October 5, 1861, State Record (ID 3990)

We are compelled again to issue a half sheet owing to the utter impossibility of procuring paper for our usual size in Kansas.

 

We have received the first number of the Louisvill ...
October 12, 1861, State Record (ID 3993)

We have received the first number of the Louisville Republican, published at Louisville, Pottawatomie County, John L. Wilson publisher. The Republican certainly sails under good colors: "Union & Liberty, now and forever, one and inseparable."

 

We are in receipt of the Dakotian, published at Ya ...
June 18, 1862, State Record (ID 4104)

We are in receipt of the Dakotian, published at Yankton, D.T., by our genial friend and co-laborer G. W. Kingsbury.

 

F. G. Adams & S. D. Macdonald.: Volume 4th of the ...
November 5, 1862, State Record (ID 4232)

F. G. Adams & S. D. Macdonald.

Volume 4th of the State Record commences with this present number. The present proprietors have had charge of the paper for a little more than two months. We find the Record prospering notwithstanding the war....Increasing facilities will enable us to continue to make the Record a sterling newspaper, published at the capital of the state....

We have arrangements by which we will furnish to new subscribers to the Record, at our regular subscription price of $2 per annum, the Record for one year and the Valley Farmer, or the American Agriculturist, for the same time....

Clubs. We will furnish the State Record to clubs of ten subscribers for one year for ten dollars. We make this liberal offer because we are determined to give the Record a circulation in every neighborhood in the state....

 

Volume 4th of the State Record commenced with the ...
November 5, 1862, State Record (ID 4238)

Volume 4th of the State Record commenced with the present number. The present proprietors have had charge of the paper for a little more than two months. We find the Record prospering, notwithstanding the war....Increasing facilities will enable us to continue to make the Record a sterling newspaper....

 

*"There was quite an excitement in town on last Su ...
November 12, 1862, State Record (ID 4240)

*"There was quite an excitement in town on last Sunday night owing to a rumor...that Quantrell was to pay us a visit at that time. Captain Swift's company turned out and were under arms a good portion of the night. A strong guard is stationed round the town now every night; and if Quantrell does make us a visit he will be apt to get a warm reception. Arms have been sent to Franklin for a company there, and there are two companies at Eudora, one of them cavalry, so that, if the noted guerrilla ventures too far into the interior, he may find it hard work to get back again into Missouri." -- Lawrence Republican of the 6th.

 

The Leavenworth Bulletin now issues a morning as w ...
November 19, 1862, State Record (ID 4243)

The Leavenworth Bulletin now issues a morning as well as evening edition. This paper is rapidly gaining favor....

We have just received a letter from Capt. E. G. Ross, dated however October 14th, coming quite too late for publication. Our readers will be glad to know that Capt. Ross promises us frequent communications from the army.

The Fort Scott Bulletin has changed editors. The editor, C. B. Hayward, is a practical printer and a vigorous writer.

The Leavenworth Conservative has issued an evening edition, a new indication of the enterprise and spirit of the publishers. The Conservative has been foremost in giving the news of the elections.

The Big Blue Union comes to us under the editorial charge of L. A. Woodard. The new editor says he is independent in politics but in favor of crushing out the rebellion if it takes half the population of the North to do it.

Subscribers, bring us wood; the cold weather is coming on. Subscribers, bring us corn, potatoes, or other produce in payment of arrearages.

 

Revived. The Kansas City Journal of Commerce is ag ...
December 17, 1862, State Record (ID 4262)

Revived. The Kansas City Journal of Commerce is again on its legs. It is a well conducted paper, and if the people of Jackson county can't support it, they ought to be added to the Southern Confederacy.

We ask our readers to aid us in extending the circulation of the Record. These are peculiarly hard times for newspaper publishers. Almost all their expenses have largely increased, so much so that generally throughout the country the profits at the usual subscription rates have changed to absolute losses. Generally in the East publishers are increasing their prices. We do not intend to do this if we can avoid it. But subscribers who are owing us must pay up, and we must largely increase our circulation, or we shall have to raise our prices....

*W. J. Marion now publishes the Democratic Standard, formerly the Atchison Union. The new paper announces as a candidate for president in 1864 Geo. B. McClellan, and for vice president Sam Medary. We wish the Standard success, but it has made a bad selection of candidates.

 

John Francis of the Olathe Mirror advertises his p ...
December 31, 1862, State Record (ID 4271)

John Francis of the Olathe Mirror advertises his printing office for sale. The press is a good one, the job letter is a good one, but the news fonts are "rather mixed."...

 

The Kansas Weekly Tribune is the name of the new p ...
January 7, 1863, State Record (ID 4277)

The Kansas Weekly Tribune is the name of the new paper just issued by John Speer of Lawrence. Kansas newspaper readers need not be told that Mr. Speer will make the Tribune a thoroughly radical and able paper.

 

The Leavenworth Typographical Association will cel ...
January 7, 1863, State Record (ID 4278)

The Leavenworth Typographical Association will celebrate the anniversary of Ben. Franklin's birth on Monday evening, Jan. 19, with a grand banquet and ball.

 

The Council Grove Press is to be resuscitated by S ...
January 21, 1863, State Record (ID 4288)

The Council Grove Press is to be resuscitated by Sam Wood about the first of February.

 

With the present number my connection with the Sta ...
February 11, 1863, State Record (ID 4298)

With the present number my connection with the State Record ceases. I take pleasure in commending the gentlemen who will continue its publication as entirely worthy of the public confidence. They will,...as I have done, endeavor to promote all the important interests of the community and of the state.... -- F. G. Adams.

The undersigned, in connection with S. D. Macdonald, will hereafter have control of the Record....At a future time I shall give my views of state and national affairs, and at all times speak out boldly and freely on all questions that agitate the community....I hope to do so without exhibiting acrimony, and trust that I shall maintain friendly relations with all. -- F. P. Baker.

 

With the present number my connection with the Sta ...
February 11, 1863, State Record (ID 4300)

With the present number my connection with the State Record ceases. I take pleasure in commending the gentlemen who will continue its publication as entirely worthy of the public confidence.... -- F. G. Adams.

The undersigned, in connection with S. D. Macdonald, will hereafter have control of the Record....At a future time, I shall give my views of state and national affairs, and at all times speak out boldly and freely on all questions that agitate the community....I hope to do so without exhibiting acrimony.... -- F. P. Baker.

 

Subscribers of the Weekly Record will get the laws ...
March 4, 1863, State Record (ID 4317)

Subscribers of the Weekly Record will get the laws of Congress passed at the present session complete. The Record is one of the papers selected by the Secretary of State of the United States in which to publish the Laws of Congress.

 

R. B. Taylor of the Wyandotte Gazette has been app ...
March 25, 1863, State Record (ID 4322)

R. B. Taylor of the Wyandotte Gazette has been appointed postmaster at Wyandotte in place of T. J. Barker, resigned.

 

F. G. Adams, recently one of the editors of the Re ...
April 8, 1863, State Record (ID 4334)

F. G. Adams, recently one of the editors of the Record, is cultivating a farm near this city and will plant fifty acres of cotton. Several varieties will be tested, and great care taken in the cultivation....

 

*John Francis has started the Mirror at Olathe, Jo ...
April 15, 1863, State Record (ID 4337)

*John Francis has started the Mirror at Olathe, Johnson county, again. It will be recollected that his paper was destroyed by Quantrille's band last fall. We hope you may have better luck this time, John.

Sam Wood has started his paper, the Press, again at Council Grove. He says: "It is thought a wild adventure to establish a paper here at this time; our only apology is that our local interest requires a paper, and one should be supported here....We have determined to publish it one year at least." Sam always gets up a readable paper....

 

*John Francis has started the Mirror at Olathe, Jo ...
April 15, 1863, State Record (ID 4338)

*John Francis has started the Mirror at Olathe, Johnson County, again. It will be recollected that his paper was destroyed by Quantrill's band last fall.

Sam Wood has started his paper, the Press, again at Council Grove. He says: "It is thought a wild adventure to establish a paper here at this time; our only apology is that our local interest requires a paper and one should be supported here...." Sam always gets up a readable paper....

 

Advertisements:: St. Louis Paper Warehouse, H. B. ...
April 29, 1863, State Record (ID 4342)

Advertisements:

St. Louis Paper Warehouse, H. B. Graham & Co. No. 32 2d Street, St. Louis, Mo. Rag and straw wrapping paper at mill prices. Manila Tea and Hardware Papers. Letter, Cap and Note Papers and Envelopes. News and Book Printing Paper, all sizes. Printer's Cut Cards and Sheets. Printer's and Binder's Stock of all kinds. All at Eastern prices, with freight. Cash paid for Cotton and Woolen Rags, Old Rope, Gunnies, Old Pamphlets, and all Paper Stock.

Wholesale Paper Warehouse, M. S. Holmes (Successor to Otis Goodman, deceased.) Agent for Manufacturers and Dealers in News, Writing and Wrapping Paper, Printing Ink, and Paper Bags. 28 Second St., 2 doors north of Chestnut, St. Louis. Cash for Rags, Rope and Gunnies.

 

The Troy Patriot comes to us enlarged and a new ed ...
May 20, 1863, State Record (ID 4348)

The Troy Patriot comes to us enlarged and a new editor in the person of Frank Tracy, Who is now associated with Dr. Grant Tracy, has the reputation of being a ready writer. The northern part of the state should give them a liberal patronage.

The Bulletin in Leavenworth is enlarged, and is now the largest daily in that city. When it was started, less than a year ago, it was considered a doubtful experiment to print three papers in that city....The Bulletin is conducted by practical printers....

 

Gen. Ewing has appointed Maj. P. B. Plumb, now in ...
June 24, 1863, State Record (ID 4356)

Gen. Ewing has appointed Maj. P. B. Plumb, now in command of the 11th Kansas Volunteers, provost marshal general of the District of the Border. -- Kansas City Journal of Commerce.

 

The Jeffersonian is the name of a new paper just s ...
July 1, 1863, State Record (ID 4359)

The Jeffersonian is the name of a new paper just started in Grasshopper Falls, Jefferson county. It is edited by R. H. Crosby and is an outspoken radical Republican paper. In its first number it comes out against whisky selling and drinking, for the change of the name of Sautrelle back to Grasshopper Falls, for the prosecution of the war to the bitter end, and for Gov. Carney for the next United States senator.

 

To convince those acquainted with J. F. Cummings o ...
July 29, 1863, State Record (ID 4377)

To convince those acquainted with J. F. Cummings or the undersigned that the charges made against me in the last Topeka Tribune are false, it is unnecessary for me to deny them. To those who are not so acquainted, I would say that they are unqualifiedly false, malicious and untrue in each and every particular. Mr. Cummings will have an opportunity to prove them in the courts of the state, or suffer the consequences of his acts. -- F. P. Baker.

J. F. Cummings, one of the editors of the Topeka Tribune, was arrested this afternoon and brought before Esquire Williams on a charge of publishing, in the last issue of his paper, a libelous article on F. P. Baker, one of the editors of this paper. His examination stands adjourned till next Tuesday morning.

 

The examination of J. F. Cummings before Squire Wi ...
August 5, 1863, State Record (ID 4379)

The examination of J. F. Cummings before Squire Williams for publishing a libel in the Topeka Tribune came off yesterday. He was very ably defended by Judge Elmore, J. & D. Brockway and A. Williams. The state was as ably represented by the district attorney, A. H. Case. Mr. Cummings was held to bail in the sum of $1,500 (which at his earnest solicitation was reduced to $1,000) for his appearance at the next term of the district court to answer the charges preferred against him. Drs. Deming and Milligan became security for his appearance.

*The Lawrence people got into a scare about Quantrel last week. The rumor was that he was coming into town with 600 men. The upshot is that two companies of cavalry have been stationed there -- one of them Capt. Ross's company of the 11th. The result will be that the soldiers will spend a large amount of money in that city. Was that what the scare was got up for?

The Bourbon County Monitor and Fort Scott Bulletin are to be discontinued, the Union Monitor to take their places.

The Manhattan Independent is a new paper just started at Manhattan by Mr. Pillsbury. It is well got up.

 

The proprietors of the State Journal at Lawrence h ...
August 12, 1863, State Record (ID 4385)

The proprietors of the State Journal at Lawrence have opened a book bindery in connection with their newspaper office....

 

Premiums to New Subscribers to the State Record. E ...
August 19, 1863, State Record (ID 4392)

Premiums to New Subscribers to the State Record. Each new subscriber...who, prior to the 15th day of October next, shall pay us $2.00 in cash for a year's subscription, or old subscribers who pay up their arrearages and $2.00 in advance, will be entitled to one dollar's worth of trees or plants, viz: Four choice apple trees, three years old....Selections can be made from a large number of varieties that have been tested and found adapted to our soil and climate. Or three cherry trees, a good variety....Or strawberries at $1.50 per hundred; or Lawton blackberries at 25 cents per root, $2.00 per dozen. Those preferring shade trees can have the European Mountain Ash, 5 to 8 feet high, worth 50 cents each. The trees, &c., will be delivered in Topeka during the month of November next.

 

From the Leavenworth Conservative:: *The Lawrence ...
August 26, 1863, State Record (ID 4402)

From the Leavenworth Conservative:

*The Lawrence Massacre. Complete List of the Killed. Unheard of Barbarism. Total Loss $2,000,000. Cash Loss $250,000....We left this city at two o'clock on Friday afternoon and arrived at Lawrence at seven the same evening. Flying rumors had painted a terrible picture, but the reality exceeded report. We found Massachusetts, the main street, one mass of mouldering ruins and crumbling walls, the light from which cast a sickening glare upon the little knots of excited men and distracted women, gazing upon the ruins of their once happy homes and prosperous business. Only two business houses were left upon this street -- one known as the Armory and the other the "old Miller block." About 125 houses in all were burned, and only one or two escaped being ransacked, and every thing of value carried away or destroyed. Six or eight soldiers, camped on this side of the river, and who fired across at every rebel who appeared upon the bank, deterred the cowards from destroying some of the houses near the ferry, and from cutting down the flag pole. The force of the rebels is variously estimated from 250 to 400. Reliable parties place it at 300....They entered the town on the gallop, firing into every house, and when the occupants appeared in the door, they were shot down like dogs. The arms of the town were in the armory, of which the rebels took possession, although they did not carry them off. Samuel Jones, a blacksmith, was shot down at his anvil, one of the first victims. His body still lay there at ten o'clock yesterday morning. Five bodies, burned to a crisp, lay near the ruins of the Eldridge House. They could not be recognized. Eighteen out of 22 unarmed recruits, camped south of town, were murdered in their tents. Their bodies lay in the Colored church when we arrived. Messrs. Trask, Dr. Griswold, Baker and Thorp were shot down in the yard of Dr. G., before the eyes of their families. Judge Carpenter was wounded in his yard and fell, when his wife and sister threw themselves upon his body, begging for mercy, but of no avail. The fiends dismounted, stuck their pistols between the persons of his protectors, and fired. Miss Stone, daughter of the proprietor of the City Hotel, had a diamond ring stolen from her finger. Quantrile obliged the man to restore it. In revenge for this, the ruffians afterwards came back and shot her father before the mother's eyes. They also tried to kill Miss Stone. Gen. Collamore went into his well to hide and the bad air killed him. His son and Pat Keefe lost their lives trying to get the father out. All three of the bodies were in the well when we left. The life of S. A. Riggs, district attorney, was saved by the heroism of his wife, who seized the bridle of the rebel's horse, who attempted to shoot him as he ran. Several cases of extraordinary bravery of women were related to us. The wife of Sheriff Brown three successive times put out the fire kindled to burn the house. Her husband was hidden under the floor. The house was saved by this heroism.

*The offices of the Journal, Tribune, and Republican were, of course, leveled to the ground. John Speer, Jr., of the Tribune started to his home from the office after the rebels came in. Mr. Murdock, a printer in the office, tried to induce him to accompany him into a well nearby, for safety, but he would do nothing but go home to defend the house, which he did and was killed. Murdock went into the well and was saved. A younger son of John Speer, Sr., killed a rebel and left.

Guests at the Eldridge were ordered out, their rooms pillaged, and some of the people shot. Two men from Ohio were wounded there and are now in this city. Only the presence and preemptory orders of Quantrile prevented the massacre of all the occupants after they had been marched out on the street. The rebels were told that there was a negro baby still in the house, but they said, "We will burn the G--d d--d little brat up," and they did. We saw its charred remains, burned black as the hearts of its murderers. The books of the county and district clerks were burned, but those of the register of deeds were in the safe, and are supposed to have been saved. Every safe in the city but two was robbed. In the Eldridge store, James Eldridge and James Prine gave the rebels all the money in the safe and were immediately shot down....The loss in cash is estimated at $250,000, and in property and all at $2,000,000. This is a low estimate. The number of bodies up to the time we left was 113, of which about twenty were burned so badly as to render recognition impossible. There were a large number of strangers in town, and when the entire loss is ascertained, we think it will reach 150 killed. Many were doubtless killed by the rebel pickets in the brush....We have seen battlefields and scenes of carnage and bloodshed, but have never witnessed a spectacle so terrible as that seen among the mouldering ruins of Lawrence. No fighting, no resistance -- but cold blooded murder was there. We give below a list of 76 killed and several wounded....J. C. Trask of the State Journal....John Speer, Jr., of Kansas Tribune....---- Twitch, book binder at Journal office....Charles Palmer of the Journal....

From the Leavenworth Bulletin:

*Statement of Wm. Kempf. We publish the following statement written for The Bulletin by Mr. Kempf, an attache of the provost marshal's office at Lawrence. It was written hurriedly....Yesterday, the 21st of August, about 4-1/2 o'clock, the citizens of Lawrence were surprised to hear a body of cavalry ride rapidly towards the Kansas river. As soon as the first of these men reached the river by Massachusetts street and the streets east and west of it, they raised a shout which was repeated down the street as far as it was possible to hear. The citizens, startled by the noise, rushed into the street to ascertain the cause. Many of the citizens were then shot down. With the quickness of lightning the news spread over town that the accursed Quantrell, with his bushwhackers, was in town. The surprise was so complete that it was utterly impossible for the citizens to undertake anything whatever for their defense. The few who heroically ran out with their guns were quickly murdered, as were, in fact, all who showed themselves during the first half hour. The hills above and the woods below the town were well guarded by guerrillas, so that it was impossible for persons living on the outskirts of town to make their escape....After they had spread over town they commenced to plunder in the most deliberate manner conceivable. Every store was broken open by a few men, guarded against surprise from the inside. The first thing they looked after was the safe, then everything else of value. Every safe was bursted open when they could not get the key; but they were so well informed about everything that they sent, in several instances, to the private residences of persons, demanding the keys for the safes in the stores....They had been in town some time before they commenced burning the buildings. The inmates of the Eldridge House were roused up by somebody violently beating the gong. Most of them soon assembled in the hall and it was found that not one arm was in the house. Capt. Banks told them the best thing they could do was to surrender, and this being agreed upon, Capt. B. took a white sheet and waved it from the balcony. This was greeted by a universal shout from the guerrillas. The commander of the bushwhackers around the house asked B.: Do you surrender this house? We do and hope that you will treat our women and children with decency. To this the rebels agreed, and B. asked for Col. Quantrell. Quantrell was sent for and soon came. He asked B. whether he was a federal officer, and being answered in the affirmative assured B. that they would all be treated as prisoners and should not be molested. They were all searched and everything valuable taken from them -- even the finger rings of men and women. The whole house was then ransacked and everything of value taken out by the guerrillas. The prisoners were marched over to the Whitney House and there guarded. By this time most of the plunder had been secured on horses driven together from all parts of town. The safes had all been broken, some blown up by powder, others deliberately chiseled open. They picked out the horses, only retaining the best and driving the poorer ones off. At about seven o'clock they set fire to the courthouse. We heard several explosions which, at a distance, would have been taken for cannon shots. We heard some person riding down the street, commanding their friends to burn the stores; and we soon heard the crackling of the fire, and saw most of the buildings east and west of us wrapped in flames. To the south we could not see from the houses we were in. During all this time citizens were being murdered everywhere. Germans and negroes, when caught, were shot immediately.

Many persons were shot down after they had been taken prisoners, and had been assured that they would not be hurt if they would surrender. Trask and Baker and two other citizens were so taken, and while being marched towards the river as prisoners, after being assured that they would not be harmed, some guerrillas asked their names. Mr. Trask gave the names, when they were immediately fired upon, and all four killed on the spot, except Mr. Baker, who is not expected to live, however.

Mr. Dix had been taken prisoner and his house set on fire, when one of the fiends told him if he would given them his money he would not be killed, otherwise he would. Mr. Dix went into the burning house and got a thousand dollars and handed it over. He was told to march towards the river, and had not proceeded 20 steps when he was shot dead from behind. Mr. Hampton, clerk of the provost marshal, had a revolver and tried to defend the few things he had saved from the Johnson House. His

 

*"Quantrell's retreat was marked by all the outrag ...
September 2, 1863, State Record (ID 4412)

*"Quantrell's retreat was marked by all the outrages he and his command could find time to commit....As soon as Quantrell had left Lawrence, Gen. Lane organized a force of about sixty of the people who had come in from the country around, armed mainly with shotguns, and started in pursuit. He overtook them near Brooklyn, but his force was too small to do anything but harass the enemy's rear. After the forces of Major Plumb had been joined by the citizens, under Gen. Lane, a joint pursuit was kept up. Quantrell's forces were mounted on fresh and excellent horses, obtained at Lawrence and along the road, and were able constantly to outstrip his pursuers. About four miles below Brooklyn, he struck off across the prairie to the southeast in the direction of Paola. After nightfall he doubled on his track, going back from within about a mile of Paola, and crossing Bull creek at Rock ford. After crossing, he marched into a low bottom where the grass is very high and camped for a few hours near a small pond or lake. A little after midnight he again took up his line of march for the border, which he re-crossed not far from the point where he originally entered the state. The pursuing force lost his trail after night came on and, after wandering about for some time, finally went to Paola and camped....During the night, a scouting party under Major Phillips discovered Quantrell's trail again and a vigorous pursuit was resumed. After reaching the head of Grand river, Quantrell divided his forces into several squads and scattered through the country. Gen. Ewing by this time had come up with the advance and our forces being largely reinforced by detachments from various posts along the border, were divided into six parties, and the most vigorous possible pursuit ordered. It is still going on, and with every prospect of killing a large portion of Quantrell's force. During his retreat up to Sunday, he had lost over thirty men...." -- Kansas City Journal of Commerce.

Death of John Speer. "Among the victims of the late terrible Lawrence calamity was John Speer, formerly editor of the Medina, Ohio, Gazette, and one of the early emigrants from that part of Ohio to Kansas. He established the first newspaper in Lawrence, and shared in all the vicissitudes of the infant city and Territory during the rugged days of Missouri border ruffianism. His letters from Kansas to the Herald in that struggle of freedom with slavery were ever reliable and full of interest...." -- Chicago Tribune. The above is a just recognition of the valuable services rendered by Mr. Speer as a correspondent and journalist, and as a public officer, but his life has fortunately been spared. His son, John Speer, Jr., was killed and another son is missing. John was a young man of promise, working as a compositor in his father's office. He was employed for about a year in the office of this paper, and left many warm friends here to mourn his untimely end. We are glad to know that Mr. Speer is making arrangements to re-establish his paper.

*Up to Tuesday morning of last week, 138 bodies had been buried at Lawrence. Eighty of the men killed were heads of families, and nearly 250 children were made fatherless by their death. One hundred and eighty-two buildings in all were burned, nearly one half of them stores, shops and public buildings. A joint stock company has been formed for the rebuilding of the Eldridge House.

 

"We had the pleasure yesterday of a call from F. G ...
September 23, 1863, State Record (ID 4429)

"We had the pleasure yesterday of a call from F. G. Adams, editor of the Kansas Farmer, and also secretary of the Kansas State Agricultural Society. The Kansas Farmer is becoming the leading institution of the state and its influence under the able management of Mr. Adams is working a wonderful revolution in the interest of scientific farming in Kansas. It has been by the influence of Mr. Adams and his journal principally that agricultural societies have been springing up in almost every county in the state...." -- Doniphan Patriot.

 

From the Doniphan Patriot: We had the pleasure of ...
September 26, 1863, State Record (ID 4433)

From the Doniphan Patriot: We had the pleasure of a call from F. G. Adams, editor of the Kansas Farmer and also secretary of the Kansas State Agricultural Society. The Kansas Farmer is becoming the leading institution in the state, and its influence under the able management of Mr. Adams is working a wonderful revolution in the interest of scientific farming in Kansas. It has been by the influence of Mr. Adams and his journal principally that agricultural societies have been springing up in almost every county in the state....

 

*John Speer offers one hundred dollars for certain ...
October 14, 1863, State Record (ID 4449)

*John Speer offers one hundred dollars for certain information of his son Robert, who has not been heard from since the destruction of Lawrence.

Judge Mark W. Delahay and F. G. Adams, clerk, having arrived, the district court will be ready for business tomorrow.

We are compelled to issue a half sheet this week on account of a lack of paper. Although there are three paper warehouses in Leavenworth, they have none on hand. We have telegraphed to St. Louis for a supply, and hope to get enough to last through the winter.

*Our New Judge. The Conservative says: "Judge Delahay is one of the oldest residents and most prominent men of Kansas. He came here in '54 and published the first Free State paper in Leavenworth, the Register. The office was destroyed and the press thrown into the river by the Border Ruffians. He was the most prominent advocate in the state of Mr. Lincoln for the Presidency, and adhered to him after our state convention elected Seward delegates. As surveyor general he has given universal satisfaction....

 

The Conservative says the Leavenworth Times has be ...
October 21, 1863, State Record (ID 4454)

The Conservative says the Leavenworth Times has been bought by Gov. Carney for $10,000. It is to be edited in a manner to take off the taint of copperheadism that has been attached to it for some time.

Army Correspondence. Chattanooga, Tenn., Sept. 28th, 1863. The telegraph has doubtless informed you ere this of the terrible battle which has recently been fought in this vicinity....The men of Kansas have signalized themselves here...and I have heard our regiment highly spoken of by those who witnessed its unyielding and persistent bearing in the recent battle. I am happy to state that our field officers were uninjured. Col. Martin, though in the foremost of the battle on horseback, came out uninjured, though the bullet holes in his garments show how narrow his escape was....

 

The first No. of the Nemaha Courier, published wee ...
November 25, 1863, State Record (ID 4479)

The first No. of the Nemaha Courier, published weekly at Seneca,...is at hand. It is a good sized sheet and well got up.

"Editors in Luck. J. F. Cummings of the Topeka Tribune, Sam Wood of the Council Grove Press, and Mr. Ellis of the Paola Crusader were all elected to the House of Representatives at the recent elections. We are pleased to see the press so well represented in the halls of legislation. The first thing for these gentlemen to do is to introduce and urge to final passage a bill to repeal the printer's starvation bill of last winter, and to restore the old price for publishing delinquent lands. See to it Cummings that this is done." -- Oskaloosa Independent.

 

The press of Kansas was well represented in Topeka ...
April 27, 1864, State Record (ID 4558)

The press of Kansas was well represented in Topeka during the session of the late state convention. The following papers represented by the gentlemen named below: The Conservative by Gen. D. W. Wilder; Bulletin, Mr. Buckingham, Times, Col. Vaughn; Champion, A. H. Horton; Oskaloosa Independent, Rev. Mr. Roberts; Nemaha Courier, Mr. Cone; Manhattan Independent, D. Wilson; Junction City Union, S. M. Strickler; Osage Chronicle, Mr. Murdock; Emporia News, Jake Stotler; Bourbon County Monitor, D. B. Emmert; Paola Herald, C. A. Colton; Troy Investigator, C. C. Camp; Lawrence Tribune, John Speer; Lawrence Journal, Lowman and Smith; Olathe Mirror, Mr. McKee; Neosho Valley Register, Mr. Payne; Jeffersonian, Mr. Dodge; Border Sentinel, Mr. Snoddy; Council Grove Press, S. N. Wood; and the Observer, Prof. Emery. The following papers were unrepresented: White Cloud Chief, Big Blue Union, Wyandotte Gazette, Crusader, and the Zeitung.

 

...
February 22, 1865, State Record (ID 5763)

Vol. 6, No. 19. The Weekly State Record is published every Wednesday at Topeka, the capital of the state. It is double the size of the Daily State Record and is in quarto form. Terms $2 per year in advance....Terms of advertising for one column, one year $30, for G?? column $35, for G?? column $20, for 1/8 column $12. For 6 months, two-thirds of the above prices. For 3 months one-third....Address S. D. Macdonald & Co.

 

We are in receipt of the Railway Advance, publishe ...
November 13, 1867, State Record (ID 787)

We are in receipt of the Railway Advance, published at Hayes City, Ellis County. It is a small tri-weekly four-column paper. There are no names given as publishers or editors, but we understand that Joe Clarke, Willis Emery and Bisbee of the Leavenworth Times are the proprietors. Hayes City is the point to which the cars now run, and is about 250 miles west of Topeka. Three months ago, there was not a house there; now, if we judge by the advertising columns of the Advance, there is quite a town.

 

...
November 20, 1867, State Record (ID 5766)

We believe in the largest liberty of the press, but sometimes we would be glad to have a law that would prohibit blackguards from using the press for the purpose of defaming private citizens. This being out of the question, we can only be thankful that the malice shown by some publishers is so patent to all that it can have no effect upon decent people....

 

About Ourselves. On the 20th of August, 1862, a li ...
December 4, 1867, State Record (ID 792)

About Ourselves. On the 20th of August, 1862, a little over five years ago, S. D. Macdonald and F. G. Adams purchased of E. G. Ross the material on which the State Record was printed, together with the accounts, good will, &c. At the time, in comparison with the present, the office was worth but little. A Washington press and a Gordon job press, with fonts of well-worn Brevier and Nonpareil type and a few fonts of old job type was all there was of the Record office. On the 9th of February, 1863, Mr. Adams disposed of his interest and F. P. Baker became connected with the office, since which time there has been no change....Today we believe we have as valuable an office as there is in the state....The old presses have been exchanged for new ones of greater power and of the best patterns. We have constantly been adding font after font of type, not only for the paper but for the job department. Within the last four months, in preparation for the enlargement which our readers will perceive we have made, we have paid in cash for new material more than the cost price of any office in the city....We increase our paper from 40 columns to 48 columns. The present size is 220 square inches, or one-fourth larger than before....

We understand that the Tribune will resume publication as a daily in a few days under the proprietorship of Judge Greer and under the editorial control of A. L. Williams. Mr. Williams is a pithy, pungent writer....We believe that no telegraphic dispatches are to be taken. A daily without the telegraph in these days is really of but little account and cannot expect to get much circulation....

 

Col. Hoyt has again retired from the Conservative ...
December 11, 1867, State Record (ID 794)

Col. Hoyt has again retired from the Conservative and G. T. Anthony, editor of the Bulletin and publisher of the Kansas Farmer, yesterday took his seat as editor of that paper. Mr. Anthony is a good writer and, when he has entire control of the paper, makes it a good one.

 

The Tribune has again stopped and this time for "g ...
December 18, 1867, State Record (ID 795)

The Tribune has again stopped and this time for "good and all." Its last issue was on the 14th. Judge Greer sold the office to Tibbles & McHenry of Kansas City, Mo., for the patent right of the Victor loom for the state. The new owners issued one paper Tuesday morning, calling it the Old Line Democrat. It was gotten out as a burlesque on Democracy and caused a good deal of fun. The office will be taken to some other point.

 

Topeka Printing Association. Notice of corporators ...
December 25, 1867, State Record (ID 800)

Topeka Printing Association. Notice of corporators. The undersigned persons named as corporators in a certificate of incorporation styled the "Topeka Printing Association," filed with the secretary of state...of Kansas on the 19th day of December, A.D. 1867, under the provision of an act entitled "An act to provide for the creation and regulation of incorporated companies in the state of Kansas,"...give public notice that they will cause books to be opened for receiving subscriptions at the office of John Guthrie in the city of Topeka,...on the 27th day of January, A.D. 1868, and will so be kept open until the whole amount of capital stock is subscribed....M. G. Farnham, J. R. Swallow, L. C. Wilmarth, John A. Lee, Ira H. Smith.

 

Newspaper Changes. Mr. Rankin has disposed of his ...
January 15, 1868, State Record (ID 806)

Newspaper Changes. Mr. Rankin has disposed of his interest in the Lawrence Journal to his partner, Mr. Reynolds, who is sole proprietor. Mr. Kitts has retired from the Ottawa Journal, leaving Mr. Kalloch alone in the paper. H. Buckingham, who is well known to Topekaites, is one-half proprietor of the Leavenworth Times; the firm is Vaughn & Buckingham. E. F. Campbell, formerly of Council Grove but latterly of Topeka, commenced publishing a tri-weekly Democratic paper at Ellsworth, but last week sold out to Mr. Wilson, also formerly of Topeka.

 

Editorial Convention. At the annual convention of ...
January 22, 1868, State Record (ID 807)

Editorial Convention. At the annual convention of editors and publishers last Friday, the old officers were re-elected, as follows: President, R. B. Taylor of the Wyandotte Gazette; vice presidents, M. W. Reynolds of the Lawrence State Journal, Jno. A. Martin of the Atchison Champion, M. M. Murdock of the Osage Chronicle, and Geo. W. Martin of the Junction City Union; secretary, S. D. Macdonald of the Kansas State Record; treasurer, P. H. Peters of the Marysville Enterprize. The association then selected Jno. A. Martin to deliver the annual address at the next meeting with R. B. Taylor as alternate. M. W. Reynolds then delivered his address.

 

...The dissolution of co-partnership between the s ...
February 5, 1868, State Record (ID 817)

...The dissolution of co-partnership between the subscriber and his associate in publishing the State Record has taken place. We, the subscriber, retire with many regrets....We bid adieu to the readers of the Record, thanking them sincerely for their generous patronage.... -- S. D. Macdonald.

From the above, it will be seen that Mr. Macdonald has retired from this office, and that hereafter I have the entire charge of the editorial department of the Record as well as the business of the office. It lacks but one week of five years that we have been associated...and during that time not a harsh word has passed between us....Our separation now is not caused by any "incompatibility of feeling," but simply because it was believed that it was for our mutual interests.... -- F. P. Baker.

 

...
February 5, 1868, State Record (ID 5767)

...The dissolution of co-partnership between the subscriber and his associate in publishing the State Record has taken place. We, the subscriber, retire with many regrets....We bid adieu to the readers of the Record, thanking them sincerely for their generous patronage.... -- S. D. Macdonald.

From the above, it will be seen that Mr. Macdonald has retired from this office, and that hereafter I have the entire charge of the editorial department of the Record as well as the business of the office. It lacks but one week of five years that we have been associated...and during that time not a harsh word has passed between us....Our separation now is not caused by any "incompatibility of feeling," but simply because it was believed that it was for our mutual interests.... -- F. P. Baker.

Mills, Smith & Jennings have just out the February number of their Real Estate Advertiser. They issue 10,000 copies this month, and intend to do the same for the months of March and April. They are sent all over the states east of us and are read by thousands....It is filled with reading matter, setting forth the advantages of Kansas.

 

*T. Dwight Thacher, the editor and proprietor of t ...
February 12, 1868, State Record (ID 819)

*T. Dwight Thacher, the editor and proprietor of the Republican at Lawrence at the time of the Quantrell raid, has returned to Lawrence and re-established that paper, publishing a daily evening paper and a weekly. Since the burning of his former office, Mr. Thacher has been connected with the daily press, first in Kansas City and afterwards in Philadelphia.

 

L. R. Elliott has left the Atchison Free Press. He ...
February 19, 1868, State Record (ID 822)

L. R. Elliott has left the Atchison Free Press. He says he will not leave the state nor the "ink long remain dry on the nib."...The Free Press will be under the control of Frank Root, who has been connected there for a number of years....

 

...
March 11, 1868, State Record (ID 5768)

The two German papers in Leavenworth have consolidated. If the four English papers there would simmer down to two, it would be well.

The North Lawrence Sentinel has started. It is a reprint of the Lawrence Journal.

 

...
March 15, 1868, State Record (ID 5769)

The Evening Bulletin is the name of a new spicy daily in Kansas City. It starts with a subscription of 700 and good advertising patronage. Mr. Macdonald, formerly of the Record, is one of its editors and proprietors.

A Startling Fact. (Don't read the following unless you owe this office.) As strange as it may seem to some, it is nevertheless a fact that newspaper publishers have to eat, dress, procure paper, pay compositors, pressmen, &c., &c. Some of our readers, we suppose, will be astonished at this statement, judging from the fact that they never pay for the paper, advertising and job work, but we assure them that it is true. We hope they will believe us and come forward and pay us those little accounts that have been running, some of them for years. It will be "so handy" just now to have those little sums that we feel sure you will accommodate us....P.S. If you should get angry at this public dun and stop the paper, we would manage to survive, providing when you did so you paid up. P.S. No. 2. If you have offsets, please be so kind as to make out your bill and it shall be allowed, but don't get angry and flare up and abuse the collector when he calls; it ain't gentlemanly....We want it distinctly understood that we are not joking this time.

 

Our friends may be glad to know that the circulati ...
April 15, 1868, State Record (ID 836)

Our friends may be glad to know that the circulation of the Record has largely increased since January last;...our advertising patronage keeps up to the full extent of the capacity of our columns. If it were possible to enlarge our paper without changing our elegant Hoe press, we should do so. As it is, we print as large a paper as the press will take on, and the largest one in the state. In job work, we are doing much more than ever before....

 

...
May 13, 1868, State Record (ID 5770)

...The Atchison Champion says: "Newspapers are the life blood of a city. Without them, no town can prosper. And especially is this the case in the West. The journals of Kansas have built all the towns in it. They have attracted emigrants, they have encouraged and sustained business, they have advocated and impelled improvements, they have kept up public confidence, and to their labors and influence, more than to any other cause, is due the prosperity and rapid developments of the state.

"Newspaper publishers do more gratuitous work than any other class of business men. Their services are called for more frequently, and requested with fewer thanks, than those of any other profession. They do more favors for men who never remember them as favors; they do more thankless labor for communities that never think of it as labor than any other men could or would do.

"We have been led to these remarks by noticing the reprehensible conduct of many of our business men, who ask the aid of the press most frequently and yet seem to be under no consciousness of obligation for its services in their behalf. For, if they have any job work to do, they have it done in the East, because they possibly get it done a few cents cheaper, or go to a job office not attached in one of the newspaper establishments."

Our experience coincides with that of the Champion. The newspapers of Topeka are called upon to do gratuitous work that, if asked of any other class of business men, would be looked upon as an insult. Yet if journalists ever hint that they should at least receive back the cash outlay that they have been to, eyes are opened wide with astonishment.

...There are men in the city who, largely through the influence of the press, have been made wealthy and advanced to positions of honor and profit, and who have never paid the press for even job printing done for them. There are others who are reaping large profits from business that in a great measure has been made by the newspapers, who never advertise, and who procure much of their job work in Eastern cities. These men seem to think that they "patronize" the papers by taking them, and paying for them grudgingly at the end of two or three years, or never....

 

...
May 27, 1868, State Record (ID 5771)

We have received the first number of the Neosho County Eagle, edited by B. K. Land and published in Jacksonville....Of Mr. Land we have first rate accounts. He is an old soldier and a radical from convictions (as he says, strengthened by eating corn rations in Andersonville, Belle Isle, Pemberton, Libby and Savannah.)

 

"F. P. Baker of the Topeka State Record has commen ...
June 10, 1868, State Record (ID 848)

"F. P. Baker of the Topeka State Record has commenced the publication of a daily....It is just half the size of the Weekly Record. Its columns are well filled with interesting reading matter and it is, altogether, a very creditable daily...." -- Champion.

 

On Thursday of the present week we shall commence ...
June 17, 1868, State Record (ID 850)

On Thursday of the present week we shall commence the issue of a tri-weekly edition of the Record. It will be published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, early in the morning in time for the mails...at $4 a year in advance....The daily is now on a firm basis and is a fixture of Topeka.....

 

...
June 17, 1868, State Record (ID 5772)

On Thursday of the present week we shall commence the issue of a tri-weekly edition of the Record. It will be published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, early in the morning in time for the mails...at $4 a year in advance....The daily is now on a firm basis and is a fixture of Topeka.....

The Daily State Record is giving more reading matter than any other daily in the state. This is no fiction. Topeka is building up faster than any other city in the state. This is truth. The citizens of Topeka are patronizing their daily better than any other paper in the state is patronized. We wish we could say that this was the truth, but we can't mislead our readers and therefore must say that the last statement is not true. But they are beginning to find out that a live daily is being published in Topeka and, as soon as they are satisfied that it is not going to flash in the pan, like its predecessors, they will come in with their advertisements and let the world know that there are business men in Topeka. At present, to judge by the appearance of their daily, no business is done in Topeka.

 

...
July 1, 1868, State Record (ID 5773)

We have neglected to notice the change in the Leavenworth Times. Mr. Buckingham has retired and Col. Champion Vaughan is associated with his father, J. C. Vaughan, in the paper.

 

The Chase County Banner, published at Cottonwood F ...
July 8, 1868, State Record (ID 852)

The Chase County Banner, published at Cottonwood Falls, is the only paper printed in Chase, Butler, Marion and Morris counties. It is read by every man, woman and child in the first two counties and extensively in the others, and is therefore the best advertising medium in southwestern Kansas....Theo. Alvord, publisher. P.S. It is the only independently Republican, universal suffrage paper in the state.

 

The Atchison Champion and Free Press have consolid ...
August 12, 1868, State Record (ID 857)

The Atchison Champion and Free Press have consolidated and hereafter will appear under the name of Champion and Press and be published by John A. Martin and Frank Root. Its editorial columns will be entirely under the control of Col. Martin.

 

The press of Kansas has improved during the last t ...
August 26, 1868, State Record (ID 858)

The press of Kansas has improved during the last two or three years in many respects. There is not so much dealing in personalities, low tirades against contemporaries, and low flings against everyone whose views do not correspond with their own. Yet the approach of another state election shows that there is still room for improvement....

 

The Daily Times and Leavenworth Conservative are m ...
September 23, 1868, State Record (ID 860)

The Daily Times and Leavenworth Conservative are merged, fused, blended, amalgamated and, so far as is known, the Conservative does the absorption. Col. Vaughn gracefully retires and receives, under the wing of Mr. Seward, a handsome diplomatic appointment. Web Wilder will run the consolidated institution....

The Manhattan Standard, Elliott's new enterprise, erected on a Radical and Independent foundation, comes to us fresh, spirited, and winsome. Friend Pillsbury retires from the Independent, which paper, like the Radical, has been merged into the Standard. Pillsbury has been appointed assistant collector of revenue for Riley, Davis, Republic, Washington, Wabaunsee and Cloud counties.

 

The Weekly Statesman takes its place among the Kan ...
October 7, 1868, State Record (ID 862)

The Weekly Statesman takes its place among the Kansas newspapers. It is published at Oskaloosa by Wilson & Heil and edited by the former gentleman in the interest of the Democracy.

 

A new paper, being the third published in Doniphan ...
December 2, 1868, State Record (ID 867)

A new paper, being the third published in Doniphan County, made its appearance in our sanctum. It is called the Doniphan County Republican, published by C. G. Bridges at Troy, the county seat....Mr. Bridges has been publishing a radical newspaper in northern Missouri for several years....

G. W. Larzalere has abdicated the chair of the Wathena Reporter and is succeeded by his father, Col. A. Larzalere....That he will make the Reporter a better and stronger paper is patent to all who are acquainted with his sterling qualities.

 

We...are trying to meet the demands of our fast-gr ...
January 6, 1869, State Record (ID 871)

We...are trying to meet the demands of our fast-growing town in the newspaper and job work line....We have purchased, and it is on its way, a large addition to our job office. When received, we shall be no whit behind any office in the West....The entrance to the office is now on 6th Street, next door to the post office....

 

State Printer Elected....As is well known, we woul ...
January 20, 1869, State Record (ID 874)

State Printer Elected....As is well known, we would have preferred the election of Mr. Macdonald....Next to him we preferred that the successful candidate, Mr. Prouty, should be elected. We were anxious that the work should actually be done in Topeka and, with Mr. Prouty as state printer, it will be done here as the Constitution directs....Mr. Prouty has, for a number of years, been editor and publisher of the Patriot at Burlington, Coffey County....He was a delegate to the last national convention at Chicago and has occupied numerous places of honor and trust....

 

...
March 3, 1869, State Record (ID 5774)

We heard...that Mr. Prouty and his brother-in-law, Mr. Davis, late of Syracuse, N.Y., purchased the office of the Leader in this city and took possession yesterday. We know nothing of the particulars.

The Home Journal of Ottawa, the Kansas State Journal and the Republican of Lawrence have consolidated. The daily will be called the Republican Daily Journal and the weekly the Western Home Journal. Reynolds, Thacher & Kalloch are to be the editors and proprietors.

 

...
March 24, 1869, State Record (ID 5775)

Owing to the unprecedented increase of book and job work in the Record office, we have been forced to enlarge our borders. We have procured a large addition to our material and put it into another room on the ground floor, next to the press room. All our book work will be done in this room, and also the real estate papers which we publish. Mr. Dunlap has charge of this room.

 

...
June 16, 1869, State Record (ID 5776)

Daily, tri-weekly and weekly. Baker, King & Edwards proprietors.

(Burned Out)

"Kansas State Record. Baker again in his glory. The first issue of this valuable paper is on our table and is truly the neatest paper in the West, printed on clean white paper with an entire new dress. If getting burned out improves the appearance of a paper as it has the Record, it's a pity more of them are not purified by fire. Mr. Baker has connected with him King and Edwards of Illinois, who are old editors and understand their business." - Oswego Register.

"The Topeka Record, which was burned out some time since, makes its appearance in an entire new dress and very much improved in every particular. Major Edwards and Captain King, old newspaper men, are now associated with F. P. Baker in its publication...." - Paola Republican.

"We notice in the Kansas Daily State Record, published at Topeka,...that our esteemed friend, Maj. A. W. Edwards of Carlivuille, and vice-president of the Illinois Press Association, has become one of its proprietors. We congratulate the Record on its acquisition of so able and experienced a newspaper man as Maj. Edwards...." - Tazewell (Ill.) Republican.

 

...
June 23, 1869, State Record (ID 5777)

At last we are hopeful after numerous delays and hopeless wishing. We have secured the services of Chas. E. Cumming, late of the Railroad and State Printing House of Johnson & Bradford, Springfield, Ill. Mr. Cumming has had 20 years' experience as foreman of some of the largest and best printing establishments in the United States....He is the very best practical job printing man in the entire West. Mr. Cumming will have full charge and control of the entire mechanical work of the Record office....W. N. Underwood, late foreman of the Carlinville (Ill.) Democrat, has accepted the position as foreman of our news room.....We ask a kind indulgence for past shortcomings and for what may happen until we are located in our new office....

 

...
July 7, 1869, State Record (ID 5778)

S. S. Prouty has sold his interest in the Commonwealth to Geo. H. Crane and A. W. Edwards.

My connection with the Kansas State Record has ceased. I am indebted to citizens of Topeka for many kindnesses.... - A. W. Edwards.

 

...
July 21, 1869, State Record (ID 5779)

Our new office is so nearly complete we will give a description of it. There are yet many conveniences to be added and little things to be arranged, but in the main it is complete. The main room is 26 by ?? feet. On one side of the front, a room for the managing editor is cut 12 by 14 feet. This room is fitted up with Brussels carpet and papered with the best quality of wall paper. The furniture consists of an elegant desk made expressly for us by Haywood & Co., a sofa, cane-seated arm chairs, and one revolving chair. The walls are decorated with a number of fine pictures which Capt. King brought with him from Quincy, Ill.

North of this room is the room of the local editor, 8 by 17 feet. The floor of this room is covered with matting. It has an ordinary office desk, revolving chair, &c. On one side of it there will be arranged an inclined table on which will be placed daily the leading papers of the state.

At the back or north end of the rooms, and to which a hall leads, is the counting room. In this is a large office desk, a safe, and a cabinet for blanks and fine paper. In the cabinet are 60 pigeon holes, all 18 inches deep, and varying from 12 to 18 inches wide and 8 to 16 inches high. These are for keeping the various blanks that we intend to constantly keep on hand. There is also in this room a cabinet for keeping cardboard and cut cards. We buy our cardboard in large quantities and our flat paper for job work by the case.

The composing room is 82 feet long and 24 feet wide, well lighted by eight very large windows. The front part of the room is occupied by the news office, and the back part by the job office. In it are 12 stands, 2 standing galleys, 6 imposing stones, 1 large double Eagle cabinet and 2 ordinary sized cabinets. In this room is also a paper cutter of the most improved pattern and card cutter. In the rear of the room is a sink with a lead pipe from it through the hall and down into the alley. This sink is used for washing by the hands, and also is large enough for washing small job forms.

In this room is also a small Liberty press on which is worked cards and small jobs, and which is never idle an hour from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Here also is a Hoe proof press. The office is 14 feet high, is thoroughly ventilated and the arrangements for lighting it are complete.

All of our fonts are large. That of the Brevier which is used for the body of the paper being 1,200 pounds. The job office has 151 fonts of new type, and every one of them selected by a man of great experience.

The office is in the second story of S. D. Macdonald's new building; the first story of which is occupied by the post office and Geo. Wilmarth's book store. In the rear of this, and connected with it, is a building 16x25 feet, 3 stories high, all of which is occupied by us. The third story is reached by 6 steps up from the composing room, is occupied by 6 stands and 3 imposing stones. This room is used for our book work and real estate papers. In this room the laws of 1869 were set up and the journals of the last Legislature are now being set. We print three real estate papers each month, which are set up here.

In the second story of this building are our Globe job press for printing large jobs, and a Washington press. The latter is the only thing in the whole office that is not entirely new. This room is also used for folding and mailing papers and as a store room for news and book paper. We have today, in this room and the one under it, 102 bundles of paper.

On the front or ground floor is our large Taylor power press. This is kept running on the average 19 hours out of 24. Two sets of hands alternate in running this so as to enable us to get off the large amount of work that we are doing. Forms are lowered to the press from the two stories above it by pulley and tackle, and after they are used are taken back in the same manner. We have one man whose business it is to take charge of these rooms. He does nothing else, and sleeps in the building. It is his business to sweep out, clean lamps, and light them; see that the office is ready in the morning and is properly secured at night.

There are employed in all the various departments 25 men, boys and girls. It will be seen that we are prepared to do work of every description, do it well and promptly. We have made this large outlay in the firm belief that our fellow citizens would sustain us. So far, we have no reason to complain, and have no fears for the future.

 

...
August 18, 1869, State Record (ID 5780)

Jake Stotler of the Emporia News has his new power press up and feels proud of it. He says it is the first power press south of the Kaw. The Record office and the Lawrence Tribune have had power presses since 1864 and, if we mistake not, the Lawrence Republican had a power press at the time of the Quantrell raid.

 

...
September 15, 1869, State Record (ID 5781)

We have received the first number of a new weekly paper called the Pioneer, published by E. R. Trask at Independence, Montgomery County.

The proprietors of the Record have purchased the book bindery known as the Record Book Bindery, which has been in operation a short time in the room adjoining the Record office....Mr. Ricketts will have charge and he will have with him none but first-class workmen.

 

...
September 29, 1869, State Record (ID 5782)

We have received the first number of the Weekly Mercury, published at Seneca, Nemaha County, by Kames & Co. It is a neat seven-column paper.

 

...
October 13, 1869, State Record (ID 5783)

The first number of the Emporia Tribune made its appearance yesterday. It is neatly printed and ably edited. Mr. Mains in his opening editorial says: "In politics, The Tribune will be Republican...."

 

...
October 20, 1869, State Record (ID 5784)

The issue of the Weekly Record today commences the 11th volume. As our files were burned at the fire of April 3rd last, we are unable to compare the issue of today with that of 10 years ago....We have hundreds of subscribers on our books today who have taken the weekly ever since the first number was issued....It was started by E. G. Ross and his brother, W. W. Ross. Both were practical printers and able editors. The first number was issued from a single room in the rear of a building on the lot in which is the present mammoth Record office. The Ross Brothers did yeoman's work in the early struggles of Kansas. They were poor, the town and state were poor, but they struggled along, always getting out a live paper but sometimes but a half sheet.

After the election of Lincoln, in the spring of 1861, W. W. Ross received the appointment of Indian agent to the Pottawatomie Indians and transferred his interest to his brother. E. G. Ross continued its publication alone until Aug. 20, 1862. He had expended nearly every cent of his earnings in the canvass preceding the election in November 1861 that resulted in making Topeka the permanent capital of the state. He entered into that contest with his whole energy, as he always did in everything that would benefit his adopted city or state.

On Aug. 20, 1862, Mr. Ross transferred his interest to S. D. Macdonald and F. G. Adams for the sum of $2,000, in long and easy payments. They kept up the reputation that the paper had previously attained until the 9th of February, 1863, when Mr. Adams transferred his interest and F. P. Baker, one of the present proprietors, became associated with Mr. Macdonald in the editorial and business management of the Record.

The new firm continued together nearly five years or till Feb. 1, 1868. During that time they were constantly adding to the office what was needed to keep up with the growth of the city and state....On the 1st of February, 1868, F. P. Baker became sole editor and publisher and from that time to April 3, 1869, when the office was entirely burned, continued to add to its material....On the 3d of June 1868, he commenced the issue of a daily edition 21 by 29 inches in size. On the 1st of December, it was enlarged to 24 by 36 inches. At the time of the fire, the Record office was one of the most complete in the state....The office was out of debt and preparations were being made for still more material.

...The office had increased in value from $2,000 paid for it in 1862 till in February previous to the fire $14,000 was asked for it and considered its value....On the 20th of April 1869, Capt. H. King became associated with F. P. Baker in its ownership, publication and editorship. We have procured as good an office as is west of Chicago, outside of St. Louis. We have added to it a first class book bindery, have increased the size of the daily and weekly, and changed the form of the latter....Its circulation has rapidly increased since its enlargement and its influence is felt all over the state....

 

...
November 10, 1869, State Record (ID 5785)

We are in receipt of the first number of The Workingmen's Journal, published at Columbus, Cherokee County, by Amos Sanford. It is in the interest of the settlers on the Neutral Lands and of workingmen generally....

 

...
November 17, 1869, State Record (ID 5786)

We take pleasure in announcing that we have secured the services of Noble L. Prentis, late of the Illinois press, who reached here yesterday and will at once assume the duties of a position on the editorial staff of the State Record. Mr. Prentis is a gentleman of talent, energy and thorough newspaper experience.

The first number of the long-talked-of daily Fort Scott Monitor reached us yesterday and proved a worthy and welcome visitor. The daily Monitor is a handsome seven-column sheet and is crowded full of Fort Scott items. As a specimen brick of the style in which Crawford "hails" things, we give the following....

All who subscribe at the Record office for Hearth and Home at the regular rates of that paper ($4 per year) will receive the Weekly Record one year free! No subscription taken for less than a year....

 

...
November 24, 1869, State Record (ID 5787)

We are in receipt of a new real estate paper. It is the Southwestern Land Advertiser, published by O. H. Sheldon at Burlingame.

 

...
December 1, 1869, State Record (ID 5788)

We are in receipt of the first number of the Kansas Valley, a new paper started at Wamego by T. W. Lane & Co. and edited by John O. Flannegan. It professes to be neutral, or independent, in politics, but it is evident that it has Democratic proclivities.

 

...
January 5, 1870, State Record (ID 5789)

Pursuant to previous call, the editors, printers and bookbinders of Topeka met at the Record office at 11 a.m. for the purpose of making preliminary arrangements for a banquet and ball to be given in commemoration of the birthday of Benjamin Franklin on the evening of Jan. 17, 1870. E. F. Campbell was called to the chair and H. C. Price appointed secretary....

The Ottawa Republic. In a few days we shall receive this live paper, enlarged to 32 columns and with a new name, the proprietors having decided to call their sheet the Ottawa Journal.

 

...
January 19, 1870, State Record (ID 5790)

...On the morning of the 3rd day of April, 1869, the old Record office was a heap of smoldering ashes. The paper was issued on a half sheet until the 19th of May, when what may be called the new State Record, printed on new type, in a new and enlarged form, and issued from a new office, in a new building, appeared under the proprietorship of a new firm....We are now printing over 3,500 copies of the Daily Record, and our regular weekly list is more than double that number. It is safe to say that, in the course of the week, the two editions of the State Record are read by at least 50,000 people. This large circulation has come to us; we have not hunted it up....

The Franklin Festival. The editors, printers and binders of Topeka had their first banquet and ball in honor of the birth of Benjamin Franklin on Monday evening....The members of the Editorial Association and a few outsiders met at Union Hall at 7 o'clock to listen to R. B. Taylor's address on the "Press of Kansas." Mr. Taylor had evidently bestowed great care and labor on his address, and the portion of it read was highly appreciated by the editorial fraternity, but the hall was so wretchedly cold and uncomfortable that the stove proved a greater attraction than Mr. Taylor....Mr. Taylor read...but a part of his address when supper was announced; but before adjourning a resolution was passed requesting the publication of the address in book form....By the time supper was announced, Germania Hall was well filled. The company sat down to a supper not exactly such as the printers of Topeka expected to set before their friends, but still the invincible good humor of all present partially made up for the deficiency. F. P. Baker,...who presided, after supper announced the first regular toast, "Benjamin Franklin." Col. Vaughan, who was expected to respond, sent a telegram instead and Col. Wilder of the Leavenworth Times and Conservative responded. Mr. W.'s speech was witty and interesting, a model after-supper speech....Gov. Harvey responded to the next sentiment, "The State of Kansas," in a sensible little speech...."The Press of the State" was spoken for by I. S. Kalloch....The fourth regular sentiment, "Exemplars of the Art Preservative," was responded to by F. B. Colver, compositor, in behalf of the type-stickers in good and regular standing. The "Newspapers of the Capital" brought slowly to his feet the manly form of Maj. Davis of the Commonwealth, who astonished all his friends by a speech worthy of the oldest and most convivial diner-out in the country. "The Legislature" was spoken for by Lieut. Gov. Eskridge, who made out the Kansas Legislature a body of uncommon wisdom....Judge Kingman responded to the last regular toast, "The Ladies," in a fine speech....A volunteer toast, "The Tramping Jour Printer," was responded to by W. C. Webb of the House, who narrated a brief chapter from the biography of a "tramp" now an honored member of the Kansas Legislature. All hands then adjourned to Union Hall, where "all our sorrows had an end." The hall had got warm, the "bran new" gas lights shone o'er fair women and brave men, and a little the nicest dance of the season commenced then and there and lasted far into Tuesday....

We learn from the Leavenworth Commercial that Dr. Turner pulled the nose of Mr. Price, local editor of the Evening Call, for which valuable service he received in return a first-class cowhiding at the hands of Price. The doctor claimed that Price, as editor, had used "words not fitly spoken" touching his moral character.

 

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February 2, 1870, State Record (ID 5791)

Mr. Reynolds of the Lawrence Journal spent a few days in Topeka last week. He writes up the city...in good style and says:

"But Topeka has other and more important institutions than any or all of these. We refer, of course, to her newspapers - the pride of the city, an index and reflection of the current thoughts and intelligence of the place - an institution that is doing more to build up and advance the material, moral and social influences of the place than all other agencies and influences combined.

"The capital of Michigan, a comparatively old town with ten or twelve thousand inhabitants, has one weekly newspaper. Topeka has two splendid dailies that would be a credit to a city of 50,000 inhabitants. At Topeka, as elsewhere in the state, the newspapers are far in advance of the towns and the country....The newspapers of Kansas today, in enterprise, ability and makeup, would be sufficient for the state if she had a million and a half of inhabitants. During our recent visit to the capital, we of course called upon our newspaper friends and looked over their fine establishments.

"The Commonwealth is kept busy by the state work. Prouty & Davis are doing this work conscientiously and seem determined to give satisfaction to all. They use excellent paper, use only the best and newest material, of the latest styles and patterns, and are determined to win an honorable name and reputation among the craft. Sidney Bennet, their superintendent of state work, is a master of the art preservative and everything under his supervision is well and elegantly done. We could wish that our ancient oleaginous friend might make a fortune out of his newspaper enterprise at the capital. He deserves it. But we are not sure that he will do it, and we presume he is not quite certain how the ledger account will stand on this question in the future.

"The fact is that too much of the profits of the job room have to go to support the dailies of this state. Each department should support itself. But it does not, and simply because the dailies are in advance of the progress the state has yet made in wealth and population. However, the thing will come out even on the latter score in good time if the timely suggestions of the governor are heeded and practiced upon.

"The editorial staff of the Commonwealth at present consists of Prof. Parker, an old college mate of ours, a graduate of Michigan University; Prouty, Davis and Spooner. Mr. Prouty is the general business manager but, of course, writes a good deal for the paper. The rooms at present occupied by the Commonwealth are not so large and convenient as could be desired, though they do very well for the purposes of carrying on a first-class printing establishment. It is the design of Prouty & Crane to build, the coming season, a spacious building costing $10,000 specially for a printing office....

"And what of Father Baker? He is all right and we are glad of it. We always did have a rather warm side for Baker. We have been careful never to say anything of him that would prevent, at any moment, an acceptance from him to take a drink - of soda water. In conjunction with his partner, Capt. King, he has built up one of the finest printing establishments in the West. Its appointments are all first class. The rooms, division of labor, and facilities for work are equal to any printing office in the state. The press rooms are on the first floor; editorial rooms - which excel those of any office in Kansas - composition, job and bindery departments are on the second floor - all lighted with gas, roomy, airy, convenient and inviting. The capital invested, $20,000, is about the same as that of the Commonwealth, and they employ about the same number of men - from 25 to 30. The editorial staff consists of King, Baker and Prentis, Mr. Baker being general business manager who also assists editorially. Mr. Nellis is the accountant and is an accomplished business man and indispensable in his department. Capt. King writes, usually, the "heavy" editorials - those which printers technically style "heavy," we mean. Prof. Parker occupies the same position, relatively, on the Commonwealth. Both these gentlemen are able, conscientious writers and devoted to their profession....

 

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February 16, 1870, State Record (ID 5792)

We are in receipt of the first number of the Holton Leader, edited and published by J. W. Fox. He is a graduate of the Topeka printing office and a son of Mr. Fox of Auburn in this county.

 

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March 9, 1870, State Record (ID 5793)

The Lyndon Signal, the new paper in the new town in Osage County, makes a fine start. It is a handsome seven-column sheet and is well filled with reading matter....

Murdock & Danford have sent on the first number of their Walnut Valley Times, published at Eldorado, Butler County...being printed on brevier and nonpareil type without being disfigured with "loud" display lines or muddy looking cuts.

 

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March 16, 1870, State Record (ID 5794)

The cold-blooded murder of Colonel Wilder at Kansas City day before yesterday caused profound feeling here, where the murdered man had many acquaintances, particularly among the typographical fraternity....We give the version of the affair telegraphed from Kansas City to the Leavenworth Times and Conservative: "The cause of this fatal act was this. Hutchinson had circulated a scandalous story relative to a daughter of Judge Wm. Stevens, to whom Colonel Wilder was engaged to be married, and a brother of hers had cowhided Hutchinson. The latter believed Wilder to be the cause of his punishment and had threatened to shoot him the first time they met. He thus murdered a man who had never wronged him and whose character was pure and spotless. Wilder was born in Concord, Mass., and was the son on a Congregational clergyman. He graduated at Union College and at the Harvard Law School. He entered the army as a private soldier and came out a colonel. His murderer was a Virginian and a believer in the lost cause. Wilder came here three years ago and bought the Journal of Commerce, of which he has since been the editor. He was a frequent contributor to our best magazines."

 

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June 8, 1870, State Record (ID 5795)

G. D. Baker, at present of this office,...has shipped to Parker, Montgomery County, the material of a first-class country office and will soon go to Parker to take charge of a new paper, the Parker Record.

Let Him Alone. The Leavenworth Bulletin suggests Prof. Sol Miller of the White Cloud Chief as a candidate for governor. We object. Sol can't be spared. The press gang of Kansas can't afford thus to sacrifice one of its ablest and most influential members in time of peace. Besides, there would be no honor in it, either for Sol or the gang generally. To be editor of a first-class political newspaper is to occupy a position just as creditable as, and far more useful than, that of governor....We can get along with almost anybody for governor, but to have the Chief placed in "green hands" for two years would be an absolute misfortune.

*Scraps of History. Reminiscences of the Struggle in Kansas.

We have before us a copy of the New York Weekly Tribune of April 11, 1855, which contains...interesting matter relative to the contest that was then raging in Kansas between the friends of freedom and the champions of slavery. First we find an article from No. 5 of The Squatter Sovereign, issued March 13 (1855) at Atchison by Stringfellow and Kelly, and carrying at the head of its columns: "For President, David R. Atchison of Missouri; for delegate to Congress, Gen. J. W. Whitfield - subject to the decision of the Squatter Sovereigns at the polls." The following is the article quoted:

"Within the last few days, we have welcomed to Kansas a great many of our old friends from Missouri. They are coming in to make permanent settlement, and we are glad to see them in before the election, as it is very obvious that our nominal governor is devoting all his time to try and carry the ensuing election for the Abolitionists. He is (we have no doubt) delaying the election as long as he dare for the purpose of getting as many of his negro-thieving friends from Thayer & Co. as he can prior to the election, and to drill his secret confederates as thoroughly as possible before the fight comes off. Won't it be a glorious sight to see this regiment of His Excellency? Falstaff's ragged regiment would be beautiful compared to it. And it is intimated that they will really have death-dealing revolvers and huge Bowie knives, every ragged rascal of them. We hope none of the 'bloody villains' will come this way; 'our folks' are not used to the smell of gunpowder, and the gleaming of knives; it makes us feel like fainting to talk about it; we really think the government ought to be called on to protect us from these bloody minded Thayer men.

"We hope our timid friends in Missouri will not be scared out of their intention of coming here, however; perhaps we may persuade them not to hurt us. Provisions are scarce in Kansas; we would therefore suggest to the emigrants to bring their guns and ammunition with them, as game is very abundant - deer, turkeys, &c., and a Missourian can always make a living with his gun in a game country. We would also advise that they bring plenty of well-twisted hemp rope, as there may be a great many new horse thieves about the time of our election and it might be necessary to hang some of them by way of example, and to prevent the shedding of blood....We are order-loving and law-abiding men but, until we make laws, we are higher law men. We go in for hanging thieves of all kinds, as high as Haman, as a gentle hint to evil-disposed men to deter them from the commission of crime."...

 

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June 29, 1870, State Record (ID 5796)

We have received No. 1 of the Journal published at La Cygne, Linn County....On the 1st of September last, there was not a house on the town plat of La Cygne; today there are 280 of them, and the Journal is full of announcements of future improvements.

 

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September 21, 1870, State Record (ID 5797)

We have received the first number of the Southern Kansas Statesman, published at Iola by J. A. Berry and S. B. Campbell. In politics it is to be "independently democratic...."

 

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October 12, 1870, State Record (ID 5798)

The Council Grove Democrat will be issued in the next two or three weeks. All the material except the press is already on hand....The names of Isaac Sharp and E. S. Bertram will appear as editors and the office is owned by S. M. Hays.

 

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November 23, 1870, State Record (ID 5799)

The Printers' Strike.

For about two months the managers of the State Record have submitted to a vigorous lampooning from some anonymous individuals signing themselves the "Executive Committee" of the "Printers' Union" of this city. This system of defamation and insult has been carried on through the friendly columns of the Commonwealth, and by means of handbills posted on coal houses and other outbuildings, and also by secret circulars sent through the mails. We may add also that several well meaning but ignorant newspapers in the state have assisted in this scandalous business by their notices of the first "strike" in the Record office which occurred in September.

As far as our personal inclination goes, we would be content to let the "Executive Committee" blaze away till they get tired of it, on the principle that their lying slang amuses them and don't hurt the Record, but duty to the public and to the typographical profession, in whose behalf this "Executive Committee" assumes to speak, urges us to give a full and explicit statement of the troubles in the Record office, together with a sketch of the nature and habits of the Printers' Union of this city, to which we shall add, from time to time, if called upon, biographical notices of several of the "blacksmiths" who compose it.

The Typographical Union of this city, in its present shape, was organized, or rather re-organized, in January 1870, but for months afterward its members who belonged to the Record office worked from day to day without a word of complaint concerning prices or anything else. They received all the wages they asked for, were paid promptly every Saturday, and expressed no dissatisfaction with their employers. Several of them received advances on their wages, and in no instance was one of them refused any reasonable accommodation in the way of money or credit.

In return for this style of treatment, these gentlemen saw fit, while the Republican State Convention was in session on Wednesday, the busiest day of the week, and at a time when they thought they could most seriously embarrass and injure the business of the office, to strike. They assigned no cause for this except that two apprentices had been employed, whereas the rules of the Union allowed but one. That this was a mere pretence is shown by the fact that one of their so-called "apprentices" had at that time worked three years at the business and had, moreover, been allowed for months the run of the hook with these gentlemen of the Typographical Union, without a suspicion on their part that he was an apprentice.

Mr. Baker very properly refused to turn this young man (his son) out of the office at the bidding of the Typographical Union, or to discharge his nephew, the apprentice. It will be seen then that the first move of this "Union" was to say to the managers of the Record, "We run this office, not you. With us rests the business of saying who shall work here and who shall not. If you submit to our dictation, well and good; if not, we will leave you without help; we will post you all over the country; we will prevent by force, if we are strong enough, other printers from coming to work for you; we will hoot and howl around your office day and night; we will skulk about your premises and threaten darkly about what we can do; we will lie about you in our newspaper, the Commonwealth; we will, in short, do all we can to intimidate and browbeat you into handing your office over to us or we will break you up in your business."

We do not lay claim to any especially extraordinary firmness, bravery or anything of that sort. We did what most men with any sort of manly feeling would have done. We said, "Very well, you can go, and we will get other men to take your places." Our Mr. Souther happened to be in St. Louis and we telegraphed him to send on some men and he did so. This valorous Union then thought it gentlemanly and decent to insult these strangers on the streets, simply because they chose to work in the Record office. This dodge failed to win. The new men were treated in the Record office as the old ones had been, they were paid good wages and paid promptly, and they continued to work faithfully and cheerfully until last Monday night, when they also struck, by order of the Printers' Union, because our former foreman, Mr. Richter, wishing to go South, we employed Wm. G. Souther in his place.

In leaving the office, the last "strikers" expressed themselves as perfectly satisfied with their treatment in the Record office, declared they had no objection to Mr. Souther personally, and that they struck only because they had been ordered to do so by the "Union." The only alternative offered us was to remove Mr. Souther. This we had no reason to do; he had been employed in various capacities in the office for nearly two years, we had always found him capable and industrious, and he was the most available man for the place, in fact there was no other man who suited us that we could get. We declined to be dictated to in this matter and our second hands left us as the first had done. In 15 minutes, we had set No. 3 and the paper appeared as usual Tuesday morning, and as will it appear every morning, Mondays excepted, till further notice.

In connection with this strike there appeared in the Commonwealth of yesterday (Wednesday) morning a card from the "Executive Committee" which contains numerous separate and distinct falsehoods. For instance, the statement that the hands lately working in the Record office joined the "Union" without solicitation is a lie. For weeks, emissaries of the "Union" were prowling about the Record news room, circulating the infamous falsehood that a reduction of wages was contemplated by the Record. The statement that our hands "were obliged to take recourse to the law to obtain their wages" is a barefaced lie. No hand employed in the office was ever kept out of his money an hour, and nobody knows this better than the members of the "Executive Committee." The assertion that the "situation" (foremanship) was "offered to a gentleman of this city, who was fully competent, and unexceptionable to the Union" is a falsehood, unless it means that the Union kindly offered to place a foreman in charge of the Record news room.

Such are some of the petty falsehoods retailed out by this batch of sneaks calling themselves an "Executive Committee."

In concluding this history we have this to say: that while the National Typographical Union may be a good thing, the Topeka Typographical Union No. 121 is a nuisance and, as that body has been at so much pains to "post" the Record, we take occasion to inform publishers throughout the country that the leaders of the aforesaid "Union" are as incapable of gratitude as so many hyenas; that they will in any office where they are employed work secretly against the interests of their employers, no matter how liberally they may be treated. They are a gang of cowards, in this that they threatened violence to anyone employed by us, and after blustering around for weeks, sneaked around to induce the late objects of their displeasure to join the "Union." They are hypocrites because, while endeavoring to undermine us in our business, they have professed great friendship for the managers of the Record; they are humbugs because while professing to be masters of the trade and assuming to dictate the qualifications of others, a majority of them are the veriest "blacksmiths" who ever held a dirty pair of cases; they are base, wicked and malicious slanderers, as every "card" they have published shows. They are the worst and most selfish enemies of the workingman. The leaders get up strikes to injure the Record, and throw other printers out of employment, but they always take good care of themselves.

To this crowd the Record will never yield an inch. They shall not dictate to us in the slightest particular. We neither love nor fear them. We shall hire whom we please and discharge men in like manner. The Record has always paid the highest wages known to the craft in this state. It will continue to do so. We propose to hire hands to set type, run the presses, etc., but at present we are not hiring anybody to dictate to us in regard to the general management of our own property.

More About Strikes - The Commonwealth of Sunday morning contained something over a column of lying trash signed by several members of the Printers' Union, but evidently the work of the "learned blacksmith" who does up the literary work for this high-toned organization. That the appearance of this mixture of maliciousness and twaddle was in accordance with the real sentiments and wishes of the proprietors of the Commonwealth we do not believe; but, having yielded to the Printers' Union in one instance, they are now forced, under the pains and penalties of a "strike," to publish whatever these blackguards may write. A specimen brick out of this structure of stupid falsehood is the assertion that Mr. Souther went to St. Louis for the sole purpose of hiring hands for the Record office. Mr. Souther went to St. Louis on Monday; the strike did not occur till the Wednesday following. The publishers of the Commonwealth are perfectly familiar with all the facts as to the telegraphic dispatches sent Mr. Souther to bring on hands, etc. The Printers' Union, through its mouthpiece, loftily declares that most of the members of the union have not set foot in the Record establishment since the first strike. We suppose they thought it sufficient to send F. B. Colver and L. D. Bramble to skulk in and out, night after night, without the whole crowd appearing in a body

 

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December 14, 1870, State Record (ID 5800)

The Erie Dispatch has been sold by Kimball & Burton to Col. J. A. Trenchard.

Dr. Webb received yesterday a copy of the Real Estate Circular, dated St. Louis, Feb. 1, 1850, and published by Leffingwell & Elliott. The Elliott of the firm is R. S. Elliott, now industrial agent of the Kansas Pacific Railway....The Real Estate Circular is a small sheet, 12 by 17 inches in size. It contains a few advertisements of lands in and around St. Louis for sale....

 

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December 28, 1870, State Record (ID 5801)

We have received the first number of the Nationalist, the successor of the Manhattan Standard and all the other Manhattan papers. Mr. Griffin, the editor and publisher,...commences where our friend Elliott left off....Mr. Griffin formerly conducted the Mobile (Ala.) Nationalist and before the war, we are informed, he published a paper at Osawatomie.

Leslie J. Perry retires from the Garnett Plaindealer and announces his intention of becoming connected with a daily paper. Mr. Perry is a young man....He has, we believe, done well at Garnett. He has certainly made the Plaindealer a good paper.

M. G. Mains has sold the Emporia Tribune to Randall and Miller. Mr. Mains...speaks of Mr. Randall as well known in Lyon County as "a practical printer, a thorough business man and a good writer." Mr. Miller also comes well recommended. Dudley Randall is to assist in the editorial management of the paper.

 

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February 22, 1871, State Record (ID 5802)

In assuming the duties of managing editor of the Record it is unnecessary for me to say much. Old readers of the Record know that I had editorial charge of this paper from Feb. 9, 1863, to May 20, 1869. Knowing this, it is unnecessary to say that the Record will continue to be radical, progressive and the "People's Paper."...There will be no change in the editorial corps except the retirement of Capt. King.... - F. P. Baker.

 

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March 1, 1871, State Record (ID 5803)

We publish on the fourth page of this morning's paper a long list of comments of the Kansas papers on the retirement of the late managing editor of the Record. Captain King certainly has reason to feel proud of the handsome compliments which his withdrawal from the field of journalism has called forth....

 

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March 15, 1871, State Record (ID 5804)

We have received the first number of the North Topeka Times....The Times is well printed. Mr. Maynard, in his salutatory, shows himself a vigorous writer and a sound Republican.

 

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March 22, 1871, State Record (ID 5805)

*Early Leavenworth Papers. The Leavenworth Bulletin, in its first issue as a morning paper, gives a sketch of the various papers which have flourished and faded in Leavenworth since the beginning. The Commercial has since corrected the Bulletin's history and has added several names to the list of dead and gone newspapers.

Both papers agree in stating that the Herald, conducted by Gen. L. G. Easten, was the pioneer paper, and both agree that the first number was printed in the open air, under a tree, though the Bulletin locates the tree at the mouth of Three Mile Creek while the Commercial's tree spreads its branches at the corner of Cherokee Street and the levee. The Herald was an old-fashioned, brass-mounted, flint-lock, pro-slavery organ; but lived after its original idea, slavery in Kansas, was as dead as a door nail, and finally passed away in 1861.

Judge Delahay's national democratic Territorial Register, according to the Bulletin, came next and apparently lived on air for some time until its unhappy existence was terminated by a gang of rowdies, whose family paper was the Herald, throwing the press, type, &c., of the Register office into the Missouri. Judge Delahay was thus happily relieved from any further concern about the paper.

In 1857, a great event occurred in the advent of the Times. This was an out and out anti-slavery paper and made the Herald howl. The Times was first published by Robert Crozier, but he was superseded by Champion Vaughan. Mr. Vaughan had associated with him J. Kemp Bartlett, who discounted our friend Taylor, of Wyandotte, in the orthographical line and continued to spell elephant with a ff until 1861.

In the interval between the foundation of the Herald and the outbreak of the war, there were several short-lived newspapers ushered into existence. There was Jack Henderson's Journal, which "winked out" in 1859. A daily paper called the Young America and George Washington McLane's Daily Ledger, of which Ward Burlingame...was city editor, also Sam Stinson's Register, No. 2, which speedily passed away. While Prescott & Hinton started the Dispatch, a promising infant which died of a dose of John C. Breckenridge, taken by mistake. The Conservative was the next "big thing" and in connection with it Web Wilder, since one of the best known of Kansas editors, came to the front.

The Inquirer, a Confederate newspaper, was conducted for a short time by B. B. Taylor, the same, we believe, who was afterwards known at Quincy, Ill., as "Buffalo Bull" Taylor. The Inquirer office was destroyed for disloyalty by C. R. Jennison and others.

The Bulletin appeared in September 1862, the Commercial shortly afterwards, and the Evening Call about two years since, and in the meantime the Times and Conservative were merged in one, and so the list of Leavenworth journals stands at present.

The struggles of the German press we have not recounted. According to the Bulletin, the Freie Presse under Mr. Faberlein's management has been the first really successful German paper in Leavenworth.

In looking back over the history of these papers, it is impossible to resist a feeling of sadness. Every editor, from Easten down, doubtless expected to reap fame if not fortune, every publisher in his mind's eye saw Leavenworth the great city of the West and his paper the most widely circulated and influential. Yet, in a few years, the very names of these papers will be forgotten, their projectors and conductors are already scattered. Gen. Easten is working away at a country weekly at Chillicothe, Mo.; Jack Henderson is in San Domingo; Wilder has abandoned Leavenworth for Fort Scott; Burlingame is in Washington; Taylor is keeping a drug store somewhere in Missouri; Bartlett...is in Philadelphia; and Champion Vaughan, now connected with the Bulletin, is about the only one left in Leavenworth of what our Hibernian friends call the "rale ould stock."

 

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April 12, 1871, State Record (ID 5806)

The Mirror is the name of a nice looking paper that comes to us from Beloit, Mitchell County, published by A. B. Carnell. He says: "The next issue of our paper will be on the 9th. We work off this issue out in the air and can boast that we have the largest press room of any Kansas paper, but the wind plays sad havoc with our sheets occasionally, so we shall defer another issue till we get in our office."

 

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April 19, 1871, State Record (ID 5807)

...The past six months has been one of the most trying periods in the history of the Kansas press since the outbreak of the rebellion. There have been more consolidations, changes, reductions in size, and suspensions than have marked the checkered course of newspaperdom in Kansas since the time we have mentioned. Up to that time, every daily in the state was carrying too much steam and collapses and explosions were a natural consequence.

Under these circumstances, we can assure our patrons that the Record establishment has done much better than we had any reason to expect.

The circulation of the Weekly Record has not only held its own but steadily increased; and this without the aid of any system of "drumming" and canvassing. We some time ago came to the conclusion that, after a paper had attained a fair circulation, it ought to hold it by its own merit....We have, moreover, adhered rigidly, without fear or favor, to the cash system.

...The Daily Record was on the 6th of March changed to an evening paper and reduced in size. We did not expect so radical a change could be made without meeting with difficulties, but so far we have encountered less trouble and complaint than we expected.

...The job work of the office has increased in a very gratifying manner. We do one-third more work than at the same time last year....

 

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May 10, 1871, State Record (ID 5808)

Fault has sometimes been found with the Kansas and Missouri Associated Press because of their charges where papers wanted the dispatches in towns where they had not had them before. It has been customary to charge from $500 to $1,000. Fort Scott, Kan., and Springfield, MO., each paid $1,000, Emporia paid $500....

 

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June 7, 1871, State Record (ID 5809)

We are in receipt of the first number of the new democratic paper, the Ledger, published at Emporia by the Ledger Company. It is a very neat eight column paper and has some well written, able editorials.

The Commonwealth this morning announces a change in its proprietors. G. W. Crane and Mr. Davis retire and Dr. F. L. Crane and S. D. Macdonald succeed them. The new firm is S. S. Prouty & Co.

 

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June 21, 1871, State Record (ID 5810)

The American Newspaper Directory for 1871, about to be issued by Geo. P. Rowell & Co., advertising agents of New York, contains interesting tables of statistics....The tables give to Kansas 14 dailies with an average circulation of 1,539; 3 tri-weeklies with an average circulation of 309; 85 weeklies with an average circulation of 1,024; 8 monthlies with an average circulation of 10,665; 1 bi-monthly with a circulation of 5,000; and 1 quarterly with a circulation of 5,000....

 

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July 5, 1871, State Record (ID 5811)

We are in receipt of the Paola Democrat, a paper just started by Sam Ellis....He was a long-time resident of Kansas but for the last seven years has lived in St. Louis. For two or three sessions, he was a member of our legislature.

 

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July 12, 1871, State Record (ID 5812)

The Eldorado Tragedy. We conversed yesterday with a gentleman who was at Eldorado last Sunday and saw the wife and child of Mr. Murdock in a moment after the terrible tragedy. It seems that Mrs. Murdock had worried over threats that had been made against her husband growing out of the county seat contest. It seems that a letter was sent to Mr. Murdock in which was a picture of a man with a rope around his neck. She has stated that for some time she could constantly see that picture. This and the tornado and other things undoubtedly unsettled her mind. She had hid the razor in the bottom of a trunk two or three weeks before and had contemplated the act all of the time. Only the morning of the deed she asked her husband which of their two children he liked best, and the child killed was not the one he expressed a preference for. The child was about 16 months old and died almost instantly. Mrs. Murdock's windpipe was cut nearly off, but the jugular vein was not injured. The windpipe was at once sewed up and she is improving fast. She could talk quite well yesterday morning. If those who make threats against and talk about newspaper men knew the effect on the female members of their families there would probably be less of it done. This insanity undoubtedly grew out of threats made against Mr. Murdock because of his course on a county seat election. Ever since the letter with the picture of a man with a rope around his neck was received she has watched whenever strangers came into town to see if they were not after her husband. Just before the deed was done, Hon. Sidney Clarke and one or two other gentlemen rode into town and she saw them and thought she saw a rope in the wagon and that they had come to hang her husband. She immediately seized her child and went out behind the house and cut the child's throat from ear to ear and then her own.

 

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August 23, 1871, State Record (ID 5813)

The Shaft is the name of a new paper which comes to us from Osage City, published by W. H. Morgan & Co.

 

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August 30, 1871, State Record (ID 5814)

The Girard Press. Mr. Warner's Defense. We published a week ago today a letter from Myron A. Wood, district clerk of Crawford County, stating his views of the burning of the office of the Girard Press. We republish such portions of the reply to that article by the Press as relates to the charges against the owners of that paper. In referring to Mr. Wood's article, it says:

He says, "The Leaguers never burned the Press, and no member of the League ever applied the torch."

If Mr. Wood knows positively who did not burn the Press, he must know of a certainty who did, as we have all the time supposed, but did not anticipate so frank a confession.

"Why did Warner save all his book accounts?"

This question can be answered by a number of our citizens - God bless them! - who carried out the desk containing them from the burning building. The desk containing our account and subscription books stood near the front door and was the first thing caught at, although a few of the account books had been pitched out of the door before it was removed.

We arrived at the smoking cinders of our office about eight o'clock in the morning, as explained in another article. We were awakened by a boy who was sent for that purpose, and as soon as a sick and distressed wife could prepare a breakfast, and a reasonable time for eating, we started to look at the ruins.

We have never declared - our files are open for inspection - that the railroad company never paid us a cent; but, on the contrary, have said that they have always paid our bills for labor and material promptly. But we have said many times, and now repeat it, that neither Mr. Joy nor any man connected, directly or indirectly, with the railroad company ever paid us one cent for any editorial article in our paper, or even dictated, or advised in any way, a single word, line or sentiment found in our editorial columns. Nor have they ever said, or dictated, what course we should take on the land title question, or any other question discussed in our columns. Nor did Mr. Joy or any railroad man ever ask, or advise, us to bring the Press from Fort Scott to Girard, and any such insinuation is false.

...In closing his malicious article, he says, "The fact is, we have proof that we can rely upon that the new press was put here by the aid of Mr. Joy, or the railroad company," &c.

In answer to the above "fact," we here say that he has no such proof and we defy him to produce it; that this last declaration is as false as the others that have preceded. We are prepared to substantiate our statements by affidavits.

...He knows that a committee was appointed at that meeting, that the second day thereafter we were presented with the following petition, signed by residents of the public square, many of whom are our patrons and friends, and would not sign such a paper, except through intimidation and a fear that their property, and the entire town, would be destroyed:

"Girard, August 1, 1871, Editors of the Girard Press, Girard, Kansas: We, the undersigned, citizens of the town of Girard, knowing the bitter feeling existing throughout the county against the Girard Press and believing that the lives and property of our citizens may be jeopardized by the location of your paper on the Public Square, would, most respectfully, request that your office be located so that it will not directly endanger the lives and property of our citizens."

 

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September 20, 1871, State Record (ID 5815)

We saw this morning with no little pleasure the first number of the Kansas Staats Zeitung, the new German paper started in this city by Tauber & Carqueville. The new "organ" is a seven column paper, very handsomely gotten up....It is to be Republican in politics....

 

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September 27, 1871, State Record (ID 5816)

We have received the first number of the Marion County Record, published at Marion Centre. The Record succeeds the Giant, now deceased,...and is edited and published by Charles S. Triplett, late foreman of the Burlingame Chronicle office. The Record is little but good.

 

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November 1, 1871, State Record (ID 5817)

The Editorial Convention. Lawrence, Oct. 25, 1871. What may be termed the second brigade of the Editorial Association reached here yesterday afternoon. The Commonwealth had five representatives and the Record two....On the train we found Mr. and Mrs. Elliott of Manhattan, Mr. Griffith and lady of the Nationalist of Manhattan, Barnes of the Louisville Reporter, Judge Clardy, A. J. Jinkins of the Wamego Dispatch, W. D. Walker of the Emporia Ledger and others.

On reaching the Eldridge House, the convention was found to be in session....The convention...had been called to order at noon by Marsh Murdock and organized by the election of W. L. Winter of the Fort Scott Occasional as secretary, and was pursuing its labors....

Web Wilder presented his project for a Kansas magazine on the plan of the Overland Monthly. The convention expressed its approval of the project and appointed Wilder, Prouty and King as a committee....

In the evening, the convention re-assembled and Capt. Henry King delivered the annual address, which was warmly received....The ball at Liberty Hall was a brilliant affair and was attended by the beauty and fashion of Lawrence. After the ball, a very nice spread furnished by the citizens of Lawrence was discovered by the hungry "associationists" at Platt & Co.'s restaurant under the Journal office....

Humboldt, Oct. 25, 1871 - The last news sent the Record left the editorial convention "hanging by the gills" on various important questions. This morning the committees reported and an animated discussion sprang up about all the questions brought before the convention. An official report of the proceedings of the convention is to be published, but in advance of this we may state that the following points were settled so far as the opinion of the convention was concerned.

First, that the law providing that the state shall furnish certain school officers with the Educational Journal should be repealed.

Second, that the law creating an official state paper should be repealed, to take effect at the close of Mr. Prouty's term as state printer, and that the state binding should be let by contract.

Third, that the law requiring the publication of the estray notices in the Kansas Farmer should be repealed and such notices should be published in the county papers.

Fourth, that the law passed last winter creating a State Insurance Department should be repealed.

Fifth, that local notices coming under the head of "benevolent and religious," such as notices of church "sociables," etc., should be charged for.

A scale of prices for advertising and job work was agreed upon. It will be published hereafter.

A committee of five was appointed to bring the recommendations of the association to the notice of the legislature.

The association re-elected Milt Reynolds president and S. D. Macdonald secretary, and selected George A. Crawford to deliver the next annual address, with Web Wilder as alternate. The next annual meeting will be held at Emporia.

The Lawrence Standard publishes a very readable set of personal notices of the notable men in the Editorial Convention. Here is its talk about our absent senior: "There sits Baker of the Topeka Record, a square-faced, tough-looking man. His hair is tinged with gray and his head is finely set. He looks pugnacious as he starts up to strike another blow at his old opponents. Mr. F. P. Baker came to what is now the state of Kansas in the Territorial days of 1860. He settled in Centralia and represented three counties in the legislature of 1862. He removed to Topeka in February 1863 and started a weekly which he ran up to June 1868, when the Daily Record was started. He is probably the best abused man in the state. He says he never commences a fight, but when once in he strikes without mercy. His last bout with Sol Miller shows that he is capable of using up the most unsparing adversary...."

The Kansas Democrat, published at Independence, has reappeared after passing through a dormant condition for several months. Amos Sanford, late of he Workingman's Journal, has taken a full partnership therein and assumed the editorial control.

 

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November 8, 1871, State Record (ID 5818)

The Fort Scott Monitor, in commenting on Capt. King's excellent address before the State Editorial Association, speaks approvingly of that portion of the address devoted to "Personalities," and endorses the position taken therein. This position, as we understand it, is that a paper, to be worth anything, must be outspoken about individuals as well as parties, about men as well as measures. It must be capable of saying "Thou art the man" whenever the public good requires such an expression. Villains must the pointed out by their given and surnames, and fools, who are nearly as dangerous to the public peace, must be talked to in a manner that even a fool can understand. In looking over our exchange list, we are reminded every day that Capt. King's doctrine is that of nearly every leading and influential paper in the country....

We hope Capt. King's address will have a good effect in Kansas and that Kansas editors will all realize that independent and courageous journalism does not consist entirely in calling the editor of the opposition paper hard names but... "holding the mirror up to nature" in all cases, even though the mirror might reflect the countenance of a United States Senator or some other great man....

The People's Advocate of Osage Mission has changed hands and is now issued under the management of S. D. Rich as a straight-out democratic paper.

 

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November 15, 1871, State Record (ID 5819)

Newspaper Pictures. The local contests decided at the late elections in this state were, in many localities, waged up to the close of the polls on Tuesday evening with extreme bitterness....There is one feature of these contests, now happily over, that we have greatly deplored.

We allude to the pictorial business. Several of our brethren of the press, unable to depict their scorn of their opponents in words, have resorted to jack-knives and pine boards and adorned (?) their columns with blood-chilling "cuts" representing their adversaries in various disgraceful conditions and attitudes, drinking whisky out of enormous bottles, stealing chickens, being kicked by enraged saloon keepers, and in one case actually descending head foremost into "everlasting blazes."

We object to all this. In the first place, the cuts are horribly ugly and, we should think, dangerous to have lying around in a family at certain times. In the next place, they are a confession of weakness which a proud Kansas editor ought not to make. If he cannot, with his pen alone, sufficiently brand, wither, burn, blast and generally use up his foes, he ought to abandon the contest rather than call in the aid of a wood butcher to manufacture the fearful pictures we have alluded to. The pictures add nothing to the force of the language used. When you, brother editor, have called Smith a hog, it does not serve any good purpose to also produce a wood cut which any respectable hog would grow faint in looking at, and write underneath it "This is a hog, the which his name is Smith." People are apt to sympathize with the hog and Smith too, and call you a fool for your pains....

Too Many Newspapers. George Martin of the Junction City Union, a man who, whether right or wrong, seldom writes about any subject without throwing some light upon it, picks up a paragraph from the Denver News to the effect that Kansas had better support a first-class daily before it tries a hand on a magazine, and says:

"Next to the narrow gauge (railroad), we think that Kansas magazine business the biggest humbug of the day. We could spend several $50 shares, if we had them, in improving the Union, and there are a number growing frantic over this is-to-be peer of the Overland Monthly who ought to use even more in improving their issues. The Lawrence dailies and the Atchison Champion are good but cramped, the latter principally because it has no good mail connection with the interior; the Topeka Record comes next, while the Leavenworth dailies are the most insufferably stupid things now published. The Topeka Commonwealth has been going downhill for the past few months, and has been for about that time a typographical botch - if this criticism is deemed unjust, then quit sending us 'printers.' The Fort Scott Monitor affords no room for Web Wilder to do himself justice. Highfalutin and buncombe aside, and a due allowance for a difference of tastes, and it is about a correct estimate to say there are probably 15 or 20 respectable weeklies in the state, and 40 which are a disgrace to the profession. There is no earthly use for such a magazine as is talked about. The truth is, the press as it now exists in Kansas has not capital sufficient to work off the gratuitous brains at its command. If our neighbors at Topeka, Lawrence, Leavenworth, Atchison, Fort Scott and elsewhere could pay larger composition bills, there might be room to spread out into a monthly literary publication, but the sickly looks of all are not very encouraging to an enterprise of this kind. Our criticisms are based upon the belief that there are too many publications for the demand, and not that we question the ability of any of the above named. Corner-lot speculations have multiplied papers and reduced the territory of legitimate ones until all are half starved. There is an infinite amount of room for improvement in the Union and, having no use for scattered forces, we decline to take stock in the Kansas Magazine."

While we cannot agree with the Union in calling the Kansas Magazine a "humbug," and cannot see that the publication of such a magazine can possibly make our state papers any worse, we join with the Union in recognizing and regretting the declining condition of the Kansas press, and generally attribute that condition to overcrowding. Stinginess and bad faith on the part of the public has something to do with it; lack of brains, honesty, or character on the part of the newspaper men injures the press in a few localities, but in a majority of cases the papers pine or perish because they are too thick to thrive. In the county of Pottawatomie, barely able to support one newspaper, the number varies, according to the season, from three to four; in the new condition on the border where there are as yet hardly any roads, bridges or mails, three or four papers are frequently published. The question of wealth and population, of ability to support a newspaper, does not appear to enter the heads of the daring gentlemen whose mission it is to move hand presses about the country. The most thinly settled counties in the state have as many papers each as the oldest and wealthiest. Neither does the political complexion of the country have anything to do with the starting of these papers. Every day or two, some enterprising gentleman starts a democratic paper where there is not a democrat within a hundred miles of him.

It is needless to say these papers cannot prosper. They ought not to. They drag out a sickly existence, miss issues, print half sheets, resort to "patent outsides," and only live at all by changing hands about once in three months.

It has been the custom among our papers to encourage this sort of thing. All of us on receipt of a new paper have been in the habit of saying "We have received No. 1 of the Comanche County World, edited and published by John Smith. The World is a neat eight-column paper and carefully edited. Mr. Smith will undoubtedly make it a great success." Now we ought to quit this and tell the truth as follows: "We are sorry to receive No. 1 of the Comanche County World. The World is badly printed and has a sickly poverty-stricken appearance. Mr. John Smith, its publisher, is an idiot. If the 'leading men' of Comanche County are responsible for the foundation of this paper, they ought to be sent to the penitentiary. We trust that Mr. Smith will stop the publication of his paper and save his money."

...Not another paper ought to be started in this state for ten years. As the new counties settle up, let the publishers already in the state "scatter out." The consolidation of the News and Tribune at Emporia was a glimpse of returning reason and, while we are sorry for the Burkes, who are first-class men, we could not feel regret when we heard that the Bulletin, after a desperate fight for life, had been purchased by the Times. Let us shorten our line, close up and move forward.

Exactly So. Our excellent contemporary, the Fort Scott Monitor, has reached the beginning of its fifth volume. In an editorial noticing the fact, Gen. Wilder says: "Neither the Monitor nor any other newspaper in Kansas is getting rich. By the exercise of the greatest economy, the Monitor is kept out of debt - and to do that is to do much. We have had as long and as hard an experience with the daily press of Kansas as anyone, and we have made no money by all these long years of hard work; and there is not a paper in the state that has made money, from the early Territorial days till now. They have done much for the state, little for themselves."...

 

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November 29, 1871, State Record (ID 5820)

The editor of the Independence Tribune was cowhided one night last week by a man named Robinson, whom the Tribune had denounced as a fraud and "deadbeat," alleging among other things that he had fraudulently personated a Baptist preacher and had also acted as a bogus insurance agent. The sympathies of the people of Independence are said to be with Robinson, and three prominent lawyers at once volunteered to defend him on his trial for assault and battery.

The office of the Parker Record was moved on Saturday last to Coffeyville and Ross' Paper is to be printed with it, G. D. Baker, the owner, having sold it to Mr. Ross.....

 

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December 13, 1871, State Record (ID 5821)

Farewell. With this issue of the Kansas State Record, that paper ends its existence as a daily and the undersigned severs his connection with the press of Kansas.

It is customary when an editor leaves the profession, particularly after a term of years, that in making his farewell bow he also indulge in a "few remarks." These remarks are usually complimentary to his patrons and his successor, and are very frequently insincere and untruthful. In closing my editorial career, I do not propose to add to my sins of omission or commission by uttering, as I go off the stage, anything that I do not mean.

I commenced the publication of the Kansas State Record in February 1863, now nearly nine years ago. Topeka was then little more than a hamlet, containing perhaps 1,000 inhabitants. A town of great hopes but with little prospect of realization. From the day I took hold of the Record, I commenced to work like a slave, and I believe the numerous gentlemen who at different times have called me "pet names" have never called me a loafer or an idler.

It is unnecessary for me to review the political conflicts which have raged from the year 1863 onward for years. It is enough for me to say that, in all those fights, bitter and merciless as they were, the Record always "took a hand." Right or wrong, it was always somewhere, and did not parley, or dilly-dally, or skulk, or whine, or sneak, or sit shivering on the top rail of the fence waiting till the last moment to decide on which side to fall off. The magnitude of the fight made no difference. Whether it was a contest for United States Senator or town constable, the Record had its preference and expressed it.

We, or perhaps it is more proper to say I, think that this work was not all expended in vain, as far as the promotion of the interests of certain politicians was concerned. I can count over a number of men now high in political station, or making a very comfortable showing on the assessor's rolls, who were aided in their hours of struggling obscurity by the State Record. Some of these men at different times have had in their hands the disposal of immense patronage. Men were virtually appointed to federal offices by them. These offices were disposed of without reference to the claims of the State Record. I was assistant assessor of Internal Revenue before I purchased the Record, and held the office for perhaps a year after that event. I was appointed on the Board of Enrollment for some time, and that is the extent of my services as "a bloated office holder" since my connection with the press. It is evident that if I worked for office I was poorly paid. How I got my pay in other ways I will show further on.

In June 1868, I was induced to start a daily paper here. The citizens of Topeka were unanimous in their desire for thee establishment of such a paper. I will do the people of Topeka the justice to say that they have very generally given the Record a fair support. At any rate, I do not feel like finding fault with them now. A vast amount of federal patronage was promised to encourage the new enterprise. It is hardly necessary to say that these promises were not fulfilled.

In April 1869, less than a year after the establishment of the daily, the office was burned to ashes. Amid the ashes came the same promises from high official sources, and the daily was revived, larger and handsomer than ever, doubtless more worthy of patronage than ever; certainly more expensive than ever, but still paying no better than before.

Hardly, however, had the Record got up out of the ashes before a new rival appeared, being nothing less than the State of Kansas. Under the construction of the State Printer Act, it was deemed proper that the state should start a paper to compete with individual enterprise; to send out hundreds and thousands of copies free, thus under-bidding any newspaper conducted by an individual. The new "official paper" was started with the avowed purpose of breaking the Record down. Predictions were made that the latter paper would not live six months.

Contrary to these predictions, the Record lived, and made a sturdy fight for continued existence. It even ventured to attack the ruling politician of the time, a man hitherto deemed invincible, and in short, headed the "Purifier" movement. That movement was successful; Clarke was defeated, Judge Lowe was triumphantly elected. Naturally one would suppose then that what a "Purifier" Congressman could do to aid a "Purifier" paper would be done. Not a bit of it. The lucky paper was the Lawrence Tribune, a bitter Clarke organ, and the determined foe of the "Purifier" movement. We put time, money and labor into the campaign, as it turned out, to build up the enemies of our cause. Not only this, but the small amount of federal patronage we had previously enjoyed was taken from us on the first symptom of hostility to Clarke.

In this little sketch I have not, so far, alluded to purely personal grievances. I do so with reluctance now. I will only say that during my editorial experience I have not only been assailed by the usual terms of vilification employed in editorial controversies, but have in addition been accused of every crime known to the calendar, the blackest of which humanity is capable. These charges have been brought not only by drunken and irresponsible scoundrels, known and recognized as such, but have been repeated by men professing the religion of Jesus Christ; men who were husbands and fathers, and who must have known the suffering their hideous scandal was carrying to the bosom of an innocent family.

The conclusion I draw from my editorial experience is that independent journalism in Kansas is not a brilliant success, especially at the Capital. I would advise no young man to enter the editorial profession. If he does so, and expects to make a living by it, if he has no higher motive, I would advise him to avoid the luxury of independence; to cringe at the feet of power; to always help the strong and kick the weak; to avoid indulging any opinion where results are doubtful; and thus avoid the misfortunes of F. P. BAKER.

...Subscribers who have paid in advance will be furnished with the daily Commonwealth, to the proprietors of which the franchises of the daily Record have been sold. All accounts due on daily subscription will be paid to the State Record Co. The Weekly Record will be continued. All balances due on subscriptions to the weekly...will be paid to the new publishers....F. P. Baker, secretary.

In assuming the control of the Weekly State Record, the publisher has only to say that his aim will be to retain for it its well earned reputation for unfaltering courage in the support of true principles....The Record will continue its business in every respect the same as heretofore except there will be no daily edition....The Record job printing office will still continue to do as good work as can be had anywhere.... (Unsigned)

 

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December 20, 1871, State Record (ID 5822)

The Lawrence Republican says: "The last issue of the Topeka Record contains the valedictory of its editor, F. P. Baker, in which he announces the discontinuance of the State Record. That paper has been an earnest Republican journal and has been conducted with great ability. There are few men in the state who have worked harder than Mr. Baker and he seems to have met the usual success of those who do the hard work in any cause. Differing as we often have with that paper, we must say it has been a paper of much power and influence, and its editor deserves to have been at least pecuniarily successful. 'It is the still sow that drinks the swill,' and Baker was too outspoken. While he was thundering forth the arguments which were to build a party and sustain the cause of the country, the shrewd, quiet fellows without convictions, and caring not which party they cling to, nor whom they supported, so that 'thrift might follow fawning,' got the rewards. We hope that the remainder of his days may be spent in business more profitable than sustaining politicians who always forget their friends."

Ross's Paper has this: "We regret to learn of the suspension of the Daily State Record of Topeka. That paper had reached, by the careful industry of its editor, a high position of usefulness in the state and was a credit to the Western press. The Weekly is continued under the management of G. D. Baker."

N. L. Prentis, long and favorably known as the lively local editor of the Topeka Record, has accepted the local chair of the Lawrence Republican. We are glad of it. Kansas journalism couldn't afford to lose Prentis, for he is a good local, and in saying this we think we are paying him a rare compliment....A good local is one in a million - which his name is Prentis. - Leavenworth Times.

 

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January 3, 1872, State Record (ID 5823)

As will be seen in the reduced size of the Record this week, it is following the example so much needed to be followed by many who have not the courage to do it, cutting down expenses. This reduction in the size of the Record will not materially affect its value as a newspaper, as about the same amount of reading matter will be given as heretofore. The size is merely made to conform with the amount of advertising which the business of the community demands....

 

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January 10, 1872, State Record (ID 5824)

The Kansas Magazine. The press of the state have all had their say about this new pet. Never did any publication start out with so many encouraging words and such entire absence of harsh criticism....The edition of 5,000 of this first number sounds large but the prospect is that an increase will be required for the February number....

The Western World. This new candidate for the reading public's favor has appeared. It is a magazine published at Kansas City and makes such loud talk that it is evident that large capital is backing it, or that it is a stupendous bubble. Its typographical execution is excellent, and its matter, mostly of the novelette variety, appears attractive. Entering the field as it has simultaneously with the Kansas Magazine, it cannot be considered a rival, for its aim seems to be to fill a different demand.

 

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January 24, 1872, State Record (ID 5825)

The Missouri Valley Press Association met and elected the following officers: President, F. P. Baker; secretary and treasurer, George F. Prescott; directors, John Bittinger, John A. Martin, D. R. Anthony, John Hutchings, B. K. Abeel and M. Mumford. The record shows that six daily papers have ceased to exist during the past year.

 

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February 7, 1872, State Record (ID 5826)

The Record is losing some of its old subscribers....This was expected...as the legitimate result of the change....While we have dropped half a hundred names, we have had the satisfaction of adding twelve hundred....

 

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February 21, 1872, State Record (ID 5827)

G. D. Baker & Co. For some time past, we have been conducting the Record under many and various sources of vexation and general disadvantage. It is tolerably well known that, when the Daily Record was stopped, the office was consolidated with the Commonwealth, both really becoming the property of a new corporation called the Commonwealth Printing Company....The present editor of the Record was by that company employed to conduct it, subject to his master, of course. That master caused the cutting down of the size of this paper and otherwise belittled it in such ways as seemed most subservient to its own interests. The result has been...poor paper, poor press work, a limited amount of reading matter, etc.

There is now a new order of things. The firm whose title heads this article have purchased the paper and the printing establishment intact....And there is one other thing in the bill of sale worth noticing right here, and that is this clause: "free from any and all debts, encumbrance, lien or cloud of title."...No debt was made in purchasing the office. The Record, then, may be considered as on its feet once more....

 

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April 3, 1872, State Record (ID 5829)

J. W. McCullagh, recently of the Chicago Republican, has become one of the editors and proprietors of the Kansas City Journal. He is a brother of "Mack" of the St. Louis Democrat and is a very brilliant writer.

"During our protracted absence...the Topeka Record again changed hands and was materially enlarged....S. D. Macdonald & G. D. Baker are now the editors and proprietors. They are both indefatigable workers and thorough printers and we sincerely hope for their success." - Paola Spirit. Correct except that we are not both practical printers although a goodly time in the biz.

 

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April 10, 1872, State Record (ID 5830)

D. B. Emmert has bought W. R. Spooner's interest in the Humboldt Union and assumes the editorial and business desks of that first class establishment....Mr. Spooner remains as assistant editor.

 

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April 17, 1872, State Record (ID 5831)

The officers and executive committee of the Kansas Editors and Publishers Association met at thee Eldridge House, Lawrence, today at 3 p.m. for the purpose of consultation in reference to the holding of the annual convention....The officers of the association are: M. W. Reynolds, president; G. F. Prescott, D. W. Wilder, Geo. C. Crowther and Albert Griffin, vice-presidents; S. D. Macdonald, secretary, and S. S. Prouty treasurer.

Frank A. Root, late of the Seneca Courier, has issued the first number of a new paper at Holton which he has named the Holton Express.

 

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April 24, 1872, State Record (ID 5832)

Senator Ross' Loss. ...Your readers are aware that E. G. Ross has lost his all by the late tornado at Coffeyville. I have it from good authority that he is left almost penniless. Will not his old friends in Topeka give him a helping hand? Those who were here from 1857 to 1862 know that but few did more than him to give Topeka the start that has made her what she is. As publisher of the Tribune, and afterwards of the Record, he labored with great effort in making Topeka the capital of the state. His time, money and influence were always used to advance the interests of this city. Will not Crane, Giles, Smith, Horne and others of the old citizens tell the newer residents of Mr. Ross' early labors, and try to get up something to aid him to begin the world anew?

 

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May 1, 1872, State Record (ID 5833)

The Topeka Record is one of the largest and best papers in the state. S. D. Macdonald, one of the oldest newspaper men in Kansas, is again connected with it as senior proprietor, and G. D. Baker, a gentleman of considerable newspaper experience, is the junior member. Together they make a good team. - Holton Express.

 

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May 8, 1872, State Record (ID 5834)

F. P. Baker, who was appointed last winter by Gov. Harvey to look after the school lands of the state, spent a portion of last week on that business in Fort Scott. This week he has gone to Marysville in Marshall County on a like errand. It was a merciful act on the part of Gov. Harvey to give Mr. Baker something to do, and for this reason: He can't keep still. With anything like forced quiet, he would die in a fortnight.

 

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May 15, 1872, State Record (ID 5835)

E. G. Ross was in the city Saturday. He called at the Record office, his old headquarters. We are glad to learn that he has a new and complete office on the way from Cincinnati and that his paper will soon make its reappearance at Coffeyville. The Major is a vigorous writer and a first class newspaper man, and his friends in Shawnee County, without distinction of party, should remit him without delay $2, the subscription price of his paper.

 

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May 29, 1872, State Record (ID 5836)

Homestead Guide. F. G. Adams of the Waterville Telegraph has a book in press with the above title. We know of no man in the country more likely to give the public, and especially the homestead settlers, a reliable and valuable book on this subject. His long residence near government lands, with his previous position as register of a land office, and his well known interest in the settlement of Kansas, as well as his extreme caution to make what he writes reliable, are sufficient assurance that the book will be valuable.

E. F. Campbell, an old Topeka typo, has taken a sit on the Ottawa Journal.

 

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June 5, 1872, State Record (ID 5837)

The annual convention of editors and publishers was held at Emporia on the 28th and was very well attended....The following account of it written by T. Dwight Thacher of the Lawrence Journal is so full and complete that we copy it entire.

The convention met at 2 o'clock on Tuesday at Bancroft's Hall....In the absence of the president and secretary, M. M. Murdock was elected chairman and J. S. Wilson secretary pro tem. The election of officers for the ensuing year then took place and resulted as follows: President, T. Dwight Thacher of the Lawrence Journal; vice-presidents, Albert Griffin of the Manhattan Nationalist, D. W. Wilder of the Fort Scott Monitor, and W. D. Walker of the Emporia Ledger; secretary, J. S. Wilson of the Garnett Plaindealer; treasurer, W. F. Chalfant of the Osage Chronicle; orator, I. S. Kalloch of the Kansas Spirit; alternate, Geo. W. Martin of the Junction City Union; poet, Capt. J. W. Steele of the Topeka Commonwealth. The place of next year's meeting was fixed at Atchison on the third Tuesday of May. In the evening, the convention and a large concourse of the people of the town listened to the annual address by D. W. Wilder....The association having received a kind invitation from Col. T. J. Peter, general manager of the AT&SF RR, to take a trip over that road as far as Wichita and return to Topeka, and placing an extra train at their disposal, the invitation was accepted and Wednesday was devoted to the excursion....

 

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June 19, 1872, State Record (ID 5838)

The South West, which has been promised so long, has come to hand. The first number dated at Humboldt June 13, 1872, is an eight column sheet and bears the name of G. P. Smith as publisher, with his and Byron C. Smith's names as editors....The paper is a resurrection of the Humboldt Statesman with new material added and exhibits both talent and taste.

The Columbus Independent is removed to Oswego. A. T. Lea has sold his interest in the paper to F. B. McGill of Oswego. The younger Lea goes with the paper and retains his interest.

 

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June 26, 1872, State Record (ID 5839)

The Wichita Vidette has changed hands. Hutch has sold the entire outfit to Judge Perkins, whose salutatory appears in this week's issue.

Staats Zeitung. This German paper, which has been for some weeks in a dormant state, is again revived. It is now owned by a stock company of the following gentlemen: A. Thoman, J. M. Spencer, C. Kreipe, Hugo Kullak, T. J. Anderson, Jacob Smith, F. Poppendick, L. Pauley, F. Durein, Wm. Haug, Geo. Gehring, D. Goslin, C. Kimmerle, H. and C. and P. Moeser, S. Gerstel, C. and A. Herboldsheimer, Edwin Pape and others. The board of directors consists of A. Thoman, president; C. Kreipe, secretary and treasurer; P. Moeser, E. Pape and J. M. Spencer. It is understood that Mr. Thoman assumes the editorial control of the paper....

 

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July 10, 1872, State Record (ID 5840)

The LaCygne Journal, after giving the announcement that D. W. Wilder leaves the Monitor, says: "...We understand he is succeeded by W. W. Bloss of Titusville, Penn., formerly of Rochester, N.Y. We have known 'Billy' for at least 25 years and can vouch that he handles a sharp pen as well as being a first class practical printer. Under his control, the Monitor will lose none of its influence or editorial brightness."

The Baxter Springs Sentinel is offered for sale by its proprietors, Hornor Bros. They say they bought the office at public sale, are not printers and do not desire to make publishing their business.

 

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July 24, 1872, State Record (ID 5841)

The Weekly Kansas Chief is the name that Sol Miller has substituted for the old name of the White Cloud Chief since his removal to Troy. The Chief has always been a first class newspaper with one great drawback. For years, its local department has been very meager. Its first issue at Troy shows a great improvement in this regard. If the local department of the Chief is kept up as it has started, it must take the lead in that part of the state....

 

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July 31, 1872, State Record (ID 5842)

The Wood Chopper, edited by F. P. Baker and issued from the State Print mill up street, is doing some good for the cause; but our friends about the state must remember that it has no connection with the Record.

 

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August 7, 1872, State Record (ID 5843)

The Settler's Advocate is the name of a new paper just started at Parsons by Bancroft & Cory.

 

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August 21, 1872, State Record (ID 5844)

The Commonwealth Printing Company

The above company is first class in every respect and is composed of shrewd politicians. The company has, since the campaign opened, published two papers - one the Commonwealth, a non-committal sheet for nobody in particular for office, opposed to opposing Pomeroy or Clarke, or anybody else inside the Republican fold, and willing to advocate either or both of them if nominated by party caucuses, and if they succeed in getting nominated, no matter how, then look for fulsome laudations of them from the pen of the editor and anathemas without number on the devoted heads of those miscreants who dare to say aught against these pure and spotless chieftains of the party.

The other paper is a campaign sheet - the Wood Chopper - edited by F. P. Baker, a large stockholder in the concern, and fights for Greeley and Brown. And this week they have added a new paper called the Tanner and Cobbler, edited by M. R. Moore and J. L. King. This little sheet pitches into the Wood Chopper and the Wood Chopper will doubtless reply, and an interesting time will be had by the boys in seeing which can throw the most dirt.

And Prouty stands complacently by, witnessing the combat, saying gentlemen take either paper you want; this company is bound to make money and publishes papers to suit all tastes.

It is understood that the company will have a meeting this week and decide whether to publish a campaign paper for Barnum, the great showman, edited by the Gorilla.

The concern has no principles, is in the market, and expects to go in next winter, body and breeches, for Pomeroy, the caucus nominee.

 

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August 28, 1872, State Record (ID 5845)

The Newton Kansan has made its appearance. Mr. Ashbaugh, its proprietor and editor, seems confident that he has struck a field where his labor will meet with a recompense.

 

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September 4, 1872, State Record (ID 5846)

Adams and Hughes have sold the Waterville Telegraph to A. M. Baker, whom they recommend "as an accomplished editor and publisher."

 

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September 11, 1872, State Record (ID 5847)

The Evangel. This new monthly made its appearance this week. It is put forth with the names of Rev. E. O. Taylor of Topeka and Rev. T. W. Greene of Junction City as editors, and Frank B. Colver as publisher....The subscription price is 50 cents per year.

 

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September 18, 1872, State Record (ID 5848)

C. R. Bentley retires from the Lyndon Observer and is succeeded by Geo. W. Hoover.

 

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September 25, 1872, State Record (ID 5849)

To the subscribers of the Wood Chopper. I have made arrangements with the publishers of the State Record to supply you with copies of that paper until the close of the campaign instead of the Wood Chopper. I have done so for the reason that it hardly seems desirable to keep up two papers in Topeka, both in favor of the election of Greeley and Brown....F. P. Baker.

L. C. Carey, founder and editor of the La Cygne Journal, died on the 17th. Mr. Carey was from Wisconsin, in which state his worth and ability were recognized, as they have been here in Kansas. His life...will show a "cleaner proof" than that of most of us.

 

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October 9, 1872, State Record (ID 5850)

Career of a Printer. Twelve years ago, Mr. Reynolds, a printer, took a farm between Tecumseh and Big Springs and, after remaining there for two years, working part of the time with John Speer in his office, then moving to Topeka and working on the paper of E. G. Ross. His wife dying here, he moved to Jefferson County, where he married again and came back to work on the Record with Macdonald and Baker, living in the rear of the office until it was burned out, when himself and family barely escaped, losing everything. The printers made him up a purse, when he started to Arkansas, living there a year or some little longer, and going from there into the Cherokee Nation. All this time, being a good writer, he was corresponding for different newspapers. He has now returned to Topeka and is at work in the Record office again, satisfied that in all his wanderings he has not encountered so good a place as Topeka.

 

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October 16, 1872, State Record (ID 5851)

F. B. Baker, lately largely interested as a stockholder in the Commonwealth establishment, has disposed of his interest in it to the other stockholders and is now footloose.

 

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October 23, 1872, State Record (ID 5852)

We acknowledge the receipt of the Wichita Daily Beacon, published by Millison & Sowers....Mr. Millison has long been a resident of this city and is an old typo.

 

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November 6, 1872, State Record (ID 5853)

Campaign subscribers of the Record who get their papers in the Topeka post office, or in Shawnee County anywhere, are requested to inform this office before Nov. 15th whether they desire to take the Record after that date.

 

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November 20, 1872, State Record (ID 5854)

The Topeka Humorist is the name of a new publication in German from the material of the defunct Zeitung. The first number is said, by those who can read it, to be sprightly and worthy of the patronage of all German readers.

 

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December 4, 1872, State Record (ID 5855)

E. G. Ross has moved the material of Ross's Paper from Coffeyville to Lawrence.

 

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December 11, 1872, State Record (ID 5856)

The Record office blanks still continue popular throughout the state. They comprise blanks for U. S. commissioners, U.S. marshals, justices of the peace, constables, sheriffs, county clerks, clerks of the district courts, notaries public, registers of deeds, probate judges, real estate agents, police justices, school district officers and all business men.

 

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January 1, 1873, State Record (ID 5857)

The first number of the Denison Journal under the new management, which includes F. P. Baker of this city, is at hand. The paper shows the earmarks of the former editor of the Record unmistakably, and is a sheet of which he may be proud. It also shows up the condition of things in Denison and northern Texas in a flattering aspect. That new railroad town, all enterprise and grit now, will necessarily settle down to its gait and march on to success and greatness.

 

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January 15, 1873, State Record (ID 5858)

The Evening Paper is the name of E. G. Ross's new venture at Lawrence. Its first appearance was on Jan. 8th....Success to the paper and its indefatigable publisher, the man who never finds out that he is whipped.

The Farmers' Union is what it is called and J. A. Cramer, who says he is a farmer, is the publisher. This new paper at Lawrence takes a field which ought to be productive of profit to farmers.

 

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January 22, 1873, State Record (ID 5859)

The election yesterday of George Martin of the Junction City Union as state printer to succeed S. S. Prouty, and over him as the competing candidate, is the result of the indignant feelings of the entire press of Kansas, with a few minor exceptions. This feeling has not been against Mr. Prouty personally, but against the Commonwealth Printing Company. The arrogance of that concern, as exhibited in the course of its paper, the Commonwealth, has become so outrageous as to be repugnant to the press of the state, so that the publishers have consulted together and, as the result of their caucusing, Mr. Martin was induced to become their candidate. Mr. Prouty has our sympathy, because we know that he will leave the office a poorer man than when he took it. He has fed, by their connection with him in doing the work for the state, a set of leeches who have swallowed the profits of the state printing, and put the concern under a load of debt from which it cannot recover. Swelled to the extent of bursting, the concern has outgrown any sense of justice or courtesy toward its neighbors....

 

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January 29, 1873, State Record (ID 5860)

George W. Martin, state printer elect, in his paper gives credit where it is due, to the publishers of the state for his election. He says:

"We would be doing injustice, however, to those who made the fight, were we to ignore all the issues which entered into it. A contest so remarkable in the political history of our state should have some of its features noted. It is not our place, even if it were true, to claim it as a personal issue. Of course, personal likes and dislikes had much to do with it. But the greatest power at work in our behalf was the newspaper representatives. They fought the Commonwealth newspaper, claiming that it was a subsidized institution against which legitimate newspaper enterprises elsewhere could not compete. They claimed that the law did not contemplate the publication of a mammoth daily, far exceeding any demanded at better points. With rural printers the idea was that the establishment did not confine itself to legitimate state printing, but sent its runners through the state, seeking to gather in all, at such prices as that those who had their own and small capital could not compete. Politicians claimed that the paper was opinionless - that men and measures should alike be fearlessly discussed by a paper so directly connected with the Treasury.

 

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January 29, 1873, State Record (ID 5861)

The Grasshopper is the name of a paper just started at Grasshopper Falls....We know only one of the firm, G. W. Huron, and of him know that he has the ability to do it.

 

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April 30, 1873, State Record (ID 5863)

The Atchison Daily Globe has made its appearance, No. 1 being dated Sunday, April 27. It has all the features of a first class daily, lacking only in the fact that it has no editors. At least no names appear, which is bad both in taste and practice.

J. G. Wood, late local and commercial editor of the Commonwealth, goes to St. Joseph, Mo., to take a like position on the St. Joseph Herald.

 

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May 14, 1873, State Record (ID 5864)

W. S. Burke of the Leavenworth Argus was in to "shake" yesterday. The Argus, a new evening daily, will be issued about the first of June.

 

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May 21, 1873, State Record (ID 5866)

Col. Haberlein, editor of the Kansas Freie Presse at Leavenworth, was buried last Sunday. His was the only German daily in Kansas and he among the most able of German writers.

John S. Gilmore of the late Neodesha Citizen has bought the Fredonia Journal and will soon merge it and his old Citizen into a new paper to be called the Wilson County Journal.

 

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May 28, 1873, State Record (ID 5867)

Sol Miller did not make his appearance at the editorial convention or with the excursionists. He said he was too busy. We saw him on Friday delving away at his interminable galleys of poetry, which always make a leading feature on the Chief's front page. Sol is about removing his family to Troy, and is to occupy the residence there owned by Capt. Henry King of Topeka.

 

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July 9, 1873, State Record (ID 5868)

F. P. Baker is again at home. Having sold his interest in the Denison (Texas) Journal, he has more leisure.

 

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July 30, 1873, State Record (ID 5870)

Noble L. Prentis, it is stated, is about to leave Lawrence and the Journal to take editorial control of the Junction City Union. Prentis will here have a field in which he can get credit for all the good things which he writes. We know how it used to be on the Record, and imagine the same thing has occurred in the Journal sometimes, where Prentis frequently wrote articles which were fathered by others.

 

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August 27, 1873, State Record (ID 5871)

The Leavenworth Argus has been purchased by W. H. Taylor. Mr. Burke, its former owner, takes the position of local editor on the Commercial.

 

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December 10, 1873, State Record (ID 5873)

The Record bids a hearty welcome to John McReynolds, the new local editor of the Blade. He has had a large experience with the editorial Faber No. 2 and will prove a valuable addition to our neighbor.

 

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January 7, 1874, State Record (ID 5874)

Senator V. P. Wilson of Dickinson County, late publisher of the Abilene Chronicle, has purchased the Topeka Times of Capt. Admire.