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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

The Pioneer

Articles in database from The Pioneer:    39

Minutes of the Pioneer Correspondents Club, held S ...
December 3, 1880, The Pioneer (ID 2037)

Minutes of the Pioneer Correspondents Club, held Saturday, Nov. 27, 1880....The Pioneer correspondents met at Uhl's Hall.... "A Ute" of the committee on Constitution and By-Laws, reported,...which was read by sections and adopted....The following named were elected officers for the ensuing term: President, S. Shores; vice-president, F. E. Baker; secretary, J. D. Hagadorn....The secretary read an article entitled "Hints and Suggestions to Correspondents"...to be published in the Pioneer....

 

...We found the regular edition of the Pioneer ove ...
December 17, 1880, The Pioneer (ID 2043)

...We found the regular edition of the Pioneer over 300 copies short at mailing time last week. It is believed that the mistake was made at the paper mills, and that one of the bundles was 12 or 14 quires short, as our foreman positively asserts that he "wet down" and worked off two full bundles, which was presumed to be 80 quires....

 

We have received copies of the Daily and Weekly Al ...
March 18, 1881, The Pioneer (ID 2068)

We have received copies of the Daily and Weekly Albuquerque Journal, published by our old friend Tom Hughes, formerly of the Marysville News of this state....

 

The Atwood Review is a new paper received at this ...
March 25, 1881, The Pioneer (ID 2070)

The Atwood Review is a new paper received at this office. It is a three-column folio, and is printed on the material formerly used in the publication of the Atwood Pioneer. It certainly evinces grit and nerve to undertake the publication of another paper at Atwood. The last number was printed on green paper, and the publisher announces that it will continue to be published weekly even though they are compelled to print it on wrapping paper, shingles, &c.

About one year ago there arrived at Osborne City a young fellow whose name was Borin, and he announced his intention of establishing a paper at that point for the purpose of "freezing out" the Osborne County Farmer. He gave his paper the euphonious name of Truth-Teller. In the third or fourth issue of his paper he signified his intention of annihilating several other journals in northwest Kansas. The Pioneer, Kirwin Chief, Cawker City Free Press, and several other old established newspapers were "spotted" as his victims. From week to week the columns of the Truth-Teller were filled with vituperation and abuse of his superiors. The papers referred to somehow managed to survive and eke out an existence....The paper is now dead -- expired a few days ago. It was not a sudden, spasmodic death, but slow, gradual and painful....The Farmer makes the following very pertinent points: "We hope the people of Osborne City and county, before encouraging another newspaper venture, will first ask themselves what important public interest it is calculated to serve, and whether they can afford to encourage another adventure at the present time. The recent one has amounted to a tax of not less than $3,000 upon the businessmen and farmers of the county, and we defy any man to point out a single good result that has accrued from the investment, unless the crippling of an established paper that has worked hard and devoted all its energy to the advancement of local interests can be called a beneficial result. Whenever the people see their way clear to establish a paper that can do more for the local interests than the one they already have, it will be proper for them to move in the matter...."

 

On last Sunday, the 10th, there was a reunion of t ...
April 15, 1881, The Pioneer (ID 2077)

On last Sunday, the 10th, there was a reunion of the Jenkins family at Uncle John Willcutt's place three miles northeast of Cedarville. There were present: Dr. W. D. Jenkins and family of Kirwin, himself and wife Maggie and five children: Chas. F., David C., and Misses Flora, Hattie and Maggie; from Smith Center there were Frank M. Jenkins and wife Lou and baby Leonard; also A. N. Brenneman and wife Belle and baby Owen; and Will. D. Jenkins and wife 'Vira and three children, D. C., Zulu Lulu, and Will. D. J., Jr. Of Uncle John Willcutt's family there were himself and wife Ellen and three children, Marion, Clarence and Nellie. Mrs. Willcutt is a sister of Dr. W. D. Jenkins, and Mrs. Brenneman is a sister of Frank M. and Will. D. Jenkins....It is not at all probable that the entire party will ever meet again, as Dr. Jenkins and family will soon leave for the distant West, their destination being Durango, in the extreme southwestern part of Colorado, and others of the party contemplate an early removal to still more distant parts of the country....

The Kirwin Independent says: A few day since, Dr. Jenkins, preparatory to his departure for Durango, Colo., sent in his resignation to the Interior Department as examining surgeon for this district....The doctor has held the position for eight years....

 

He Did Not Advertise: There is a man in our town, ...
April 22, 1881, The Pioneer (ID 2078)

He Did Not Advertise

There is a man in our town, Of reason so bereft, He does not advertise at all, And so is always "left."

He sits within his store alone, As in a dreary den -- A customer a wondrous sight, When one comes now and then.

He wonders why his neighbors thrive, If he'd but use his eyes, He'd see they prosper in their trade, Because they advertise.

Their stores are thronged, their goods are sold, While his untouched remain, And all his schemes for drawing trade, Are profitless and vain.

Around his shelves the spiders' webs, Are filled with gnats and flies, And dust is over all his goods -- He does not advertise.

And when he dies, as die he must, His name will be forgot, And he'll be buried 'neath the dust, That gathers 'round the spot.

And o'er his grave the printer men, With sadness in their eyes, Will raise this monument of woe -- He did not advertise.

 

Dr. W. D. Jenkins, for eight years past a resident ...
April 29, 1881, The Pioneer (ID 2084)

Dr. W. D. Jenkins, for eight years past a resident of this city together with his family, leave Kirwin this week for Durango, Colo....The change of location is brought about by the ill health of Mrs. Jenkins....Dr. Jenkins was the editor and publisher of this paper for some three years and issued the first number in 1873. He is unquestionably the best newspaper writer in this part of the state, but the business was not well suited to his taste as the practice of medicine, which he has followed ever since his location in this city. He served some three years as a surgeon in the Union army.... -- Kirwin Chief.

Dr. Jenkins is an old veteran in the field of Kansas journalism. Several years ago he edited the Wathena Reporter, then a very prominent paper in that part of the state. In 1868-69 he published the Little Blue at Jenkins' Mills, Neb., a journal devoted to the best interests of the far-famed Little Blue Valley. In 1872 he established the Smith County Pioneer at Cedarville, and in 1873 established and for three years conducted the Kirwin Chief....The editor of the Pioneer is a nephew of Dr. Jenkins.

 

Geo. H. Case has retired from the Jewell County Mo ...
June 3, 1881, The Pioneer (ID 2098)

Geo. H. Case has retired from the Jewell County Monitor and By. J. Thompson again assumes editorial control.

 

The Daily News, published by Geo. B. Ficard at Osb ...
June 24, 1881, The Pioneer (ID 2101)

The Daily News, published by Geo. B. Ficard at Osborne City, is one of the latest newspaper ventures. It is a four-column folio and well filled with advertising. It is barely possible that the enterprise may prove a success, but we have our misgivings....

 

...A new paper has been established at Ludell, Raw ...
July 1, 1881, The Pioneer (ID 2102)

...A new paper has been established at Ludell, Rawlins County, by Cornish & Triem with Clint W. Triem as editor....Clint has been on the staff of Pioneer correspondents for more than a year past....

The Soldier's Reunion at Logan on Wednesday of last week is so fully written up in the Champion's correspondence, published elsewhere, that nothing more remains to be said....One of the pleasant features of the occasion was meeting and greeting several of the newspaper boys of northwest Kansas. Of those present, we met Caldwell of the Beloit Courier; McBride of the Kirwin Chief; Newell of the Plainville News; W. W. and L. L. Gray of the Logan Enterprise; Tom Nicklin of the Downs Times; Geo. H. Case, ex-editor Jewell County Monitor; Geo. W. Stinson, ex-editor Phillipsburg Herald; Noble L. Prentis and Harry Root of the Champion; C. C. Chamberlain of the Topeka Capital; and John Coulter of the Leavenworth Times.

 

A. G. McBride has sold the Kirwin Chief to a joint ...
July 15, 1881, The Pioneer (ID 2105)

A. G. McBride has sold the Kirwin Chief to a joint stock company of enterprising citizens of that city. Rev. G. W. Wood is editor in chief, and Horace Moulton business manager.

Woodward & Musser are now publishing the Jewell County Republican and are getting up a very creditable paper. The advertising patronage does not appear to be as extensive as it should....

 

Noble L. Prentis writes an interesting letter from ...
August 12, 1881, The Pioneer (ID 2111)

Noble L. Prentis writes an interesting letter from Jewell County to the Champion.... "I have before me...a little pamphlet printed in Jewell County in 1878. The title is, in brief, 'A History of Jewell County, Kansas, with a Full Account of Its Early Settlement and the Indian Atrocities Committed Within Its Borders.' It bears on its yellow cover the names of M. Winsor and James A. Scarbrough....This little book, as its surviving author tells me, was a financial failure, and yet it deserved a better fate....'

 

Mark J. Kelley...is now publishing a paper at Hubb ...
October 14, 1881, The Pioneer (ID 2127)

Mark J. Kelley...is now publishing a paper at Hubbard, Iowa. Nat Baker, another prominent newspaper man in the early days of northern Kansas, is engaged in the publication of a paper in Oregon. E. N. Emmons is in the real estate business in Washington. Dr. W. D. Jenkins is at Pueblo. Col. Tom Hughes is in New Mexico, making money as usual. Colonel Cawker is at Milwaukee. Flavius Josephus Macmillan is at Republican City, Neb. Levi Morrill has gone -- the Lord knows where perhaps, we don't. In fact, the old-timers are getting pretty well scattered.

 

Vol. X, No. 1 -- The Pioneer today enters upon the ...
October 21, 1881, The Pioneer (ID 2129)

Vol. X, No. 1 -- The Pioneer today enters upon the tenth year of its existence. Seven years ago today, the present proprietor purchased the type, press, material, subscription books, and good will of the Pioneer, all for the sum of three hundred dollars, on time. The circulation of the paper at that time did not exceed two hundred copies. One bundle of paper, forty quires, would run the institution all winter. At the present time, it requires two bundles for one week's issue....It has always been the official paper of the county. Its office is the most complete of any in the West. It is now printed on a steam power press....

M. Winsor, formerly of the Monitor-Diamond at Mankato, has after a layoff of two years returned to the newspaper business, having purchased the Review.

The Topeka Democrat daily, by Fugate & Chapman, is one of the latest newspaper ventures at the state capital. Notwithstanding its politics, for Joe Chapman's sake, we wish the journal success.

 

Capt. W. H. Nelson, present register of deeds, has ...
November 4, 1881, The Pioneer (ID 2133)

Capt. W. H. Nelson, present register of deeds, has purchased the Free Press office, including its press, type, material and subscription books, and will take possession next week. I. W. Stone will leave the latter part of next week to hunt up a more congenial clime....So far as the retiring manager is concerned, it matters but little to the people of Smith County what becomes of him. His career in this county has been a miserable failure....

 

Capt. Henry King, editor of the Topeka Capital, dr ...
November 11, 1881, The Pioneer (ID 2136)

Capt. Henry King, editor of the Topeka Capital, draws such a handsome, lifelike pen picture in his salutatory that we are constrained to reproduce it entire. He says:

We do not pretend to know why it is that the newspaper editor who contrives to escape the toilsome and harassing business is never satisfied until he returns to it again. Some say it is because, once an editor, he is ever after too good and too honest for anything else; others flippantly suggest that it is because he hasn't sense enough to make a living at any legitimate avocation. Be that as it may, the fact remains that only hanging or a call to the penitentiary can keep the prodigal from coming back....It is now over eight years since the incoming editor of the Capital threw down the traditional shears and pencil stub, and went out into the cold, wicked world to seek his fortune. He returns this morning with the delighted feeling of one who wakes from an unhappy dream. How good it is to get back among the boys whose handclasps are so earnest, and whose dear old faces, if not handsome, are still so innocent and so characteristically solid. Bless their hearts, we believe in them, and love them, and thank them our very best for the cordial way in which they have heralded our approach. The old crowd seems much the same that it used to be, save for certain shiftings of position. We can detect those same traits of speech and styles of work that we remember so well; the touch of familiarity is in it all, just as we left it. The crowd is larger, to be sure, but its identity is still unmistakable....The tools that we used to work with, too, seem not to have been changed or disturbed and all the office surroundings wear a look as of the last night we helped to get out a paper. It must be that these battered old shears are the same that we dropped as we left. We almost dare be sworn that this grimy paste pot, with the pine sliver in it, is the very one we used eight years ago; and surely we cannot be mistaken about that saddle-colored and ancient dictionary, nor about that old wheezing pipe in the window yonder, which the foreman had in his mouth when we went away. That pile of exchanges on the floor has not been gathered up since 1873. The boy who stands waiting for copy stood right there as we wrote our last paragraph -- not an inch taller, nor a particle cleaner -- and we are as ready now as we were then to give him a ticket to the minstrel show. There are tobacco stains on that old stove which John Guthrie put there during the Franco-Prussian war. The same night it was, we recollect, that Prentis and Wilder, Jake Stotler, Geo. Martin, a couple of the Murdocks, and ever so many other fellows came in to swap yarns and hear Prouty sing "The Sword of Bunker Hill." Of course it is the same office. They are all alike, and every editor knows how it is himself. And so we come back to the old home and resume the old tasks, with a sense of real pleasure and determination to do industrious and faithful service....Our guiding purpose is to produce a first-class newspaper. This the basis, and the only one, upon which we seek patronage....We seek no quarrels, in our own behalf or otherwise; but it may be well to add that we are organized for fighting should a fight at any time become necessary. And finally, let us say we have no dark designs upon the life of any rival, near or far; we desire nothing but prosperity and happiness for our competitors, with simply the right reserved on our part, as we think we have the facilities and the opportunity, to make the name of the Capital, like that of rare old Ben Adhem, "lead all the rest."

An awful effect -- The Champion has often warned the Smith County newspapers that their war on each other would produce disastrous results. A newspaper contest which produces such words as "billjenkins" and "webbmacknalladvocate" cannot be carried on with impunity. The public wrath at the last finds vent in the following delirious lines, forwarded by a Smith County poet:

Oh! go not forth till the morning light, For there is blood on the moon tonight.

For Jenkins, he of the Pioneer, Calls "him" of the Herald a chanticleer.

And Cap. Stone of the Free Press crew, Shouts loud and long "That's bully for you."

And McNall doth rage and wildly cry, That Gore will run and hair must fly.

And where the barnyard fowls do crow, Each seek and delve for mud to throw.

'Tis the saddest sight the world e'er saw, When editors bite and gouge and claw.

So go forth not, till the break of day, And the flood from the moon has passed away.

Now will you stop? -- Atchison Champion.

We had an answer prepared to the above, declaring that "blood on the moon has passed away," but sold the production to the new editor of the Free Press for a quarter. It will be published in today's paper.

 

The printer's union -- The printers employed on th ...
November 18, 1881, The Pioneer (ID 2139)

The printer's union -- The printers employed on the Topeka Capital joined in a strike recently that reflected no credit on the "Union" to which they belonged. The Printers' Union was formerly an organization that done much good for the journeyman class of printers, but its objects and purposes have been prostituted by the baser elements of its membership. In the recent strike in the Capital office, the drunken, whisky guzzling element of the "Union" attempted to dictate to the business manager the business routine of the office. Against this dictation the good sense of the Capital managers rebelled, and the foreman of the office, a "Union" printer, led the strike, compelling all other "Union" printers to follow him.

The editor of this paper formerly belonged to the Printers' Union, one of the strongest then in existence west of St. Louis, and its organization and usefulness was so impaired by the leadership of drunken blacksmith printers, who finally became the dominant element in the "Union," that it today is repudiated by the better class of printers in the West. As an organization it has been nearly disbanded for the past seven or eight years, and its day of real usefulness to the craft can only be referred to in the past tense. To put it more plainly, the Printers' Unions are rapidly becoming a disgrace to the profession and, when we read of strikes by members of the "Union," we naturally feel, in view of past observations, that the strikers are in the wrong.

 

Capt. Frank B. Swift, an old Kansas printer of 27 ...
December 2, 1881, The Pioneer (ID 2142)

Capt. Frank B. Swift, an old Kansas printer of 27 years standing, now has charge of the typography of the Junction City Union. We sincerely hope that he is getting his $50 a week, for there is no printer in the state who so richly deserves a "phat take" as does Capt. Swift.

 

The editor of the Pioneer left on the morning of t ...
December 9, 1881, The Pioneer (ID 2144)

The editor of the Pioneer left on the morning of the 5th for an extended tour through the Eastern and Middle states. It is his intention to pay a flying visit to all the principal cities, and he will probably be absent for several weeks....

 

Geo. A. Jenkins, brother of ye editor, will leave ...
December 30, 1881, The Pioneer (ID 2148)

Geo. A. Jenkins, brother of ye editor, will leave today for Fairbury, Neb. George has been with the Pioneer for the past three years, and during the entire time has not lost a single day. He has been a faithful, industrious boy, and has served his regular apprenticeship, and is now qualified to travel and receive wages as a full-fledged journeyman printer.

 

A. A. Holdridge is officiating as engineer in the ...
January 6, 1882, The Pioneer (ID 2150)

A. A. Holdridge is officiating as engineer in the Pioneer press rooms.

 

Farewell, old friends -- The Pioneer Steam Printin ...
January 13, 1882, The Pioneer (ID 2152)

Farewell, old friends -- The Pioneer Steam Printing establishment, together with the subscription books and good will, was sold to W. H. Nelson about six weeks ago, and final possession given on Monday, the 9th inst.

For the past eight years we have labored earnestly to give the people of Smith County a good local paper, and we retire feeling that in a great measure we have been successful. We assumed the publication of the Pioneer in the month of September 1874, at a time when it seemed an utter impossibility to make a success of the newspaper business or any other venture that required an outlay of money to conduct.

From the little 7x9 sheet, printed one page at a time on an army press, with fifty pounds of long primer type and an oyster can half full of ink, the purchase price of the entire outfit of which was one hundred and fifty dollars, we have today to turn over to our successor the best equipped country printing office in the state of Kansas, including a steam power press from which is printed a handsome eight column, all home print paper, the recognized leading journal of northwest Kansas. This has been the result of persistent industry on our part, and the liberal patronage rendered us by the intelligent, public spirited citizens of Smith County.

...We realize the fact that we have made enemies during the past eight years, and we are glad of it. We feel that, if we had not engendered the ill will of a certain class in this county, our career as a country journalist would not have been a success, and right here we desire to say that we have no apologies to offer to this class, neither do we ask any. But to our friends, and their name is legion, we return or most sincere and heartfelt thanks....

The change of ownership brings about a consolidation of the two Republican papers of this city -- the subscription books and advertising patronage of the Free Press having been transferred to the Pioneer....By the consolidation of the subscription lists, the Pioneer will now have a circulation far more than double that of any other journal in northern Kansas, thereby making it the best advertising medium in the West.

...We shall leave within a few days for the Pacific Coast, and our only regrets are that every one of our old friends and patrons are not going with us.... -- Will. D. Jenkins.

In consolidating the offices of the Free Press and Pioneer, I have been actuated by a desire to not only better my own condition, but to lighten the expense on the people and business men. Smith County is not in a condition to support so many newspapers, as it has necessarily had to do, and more especially so where they all are the same shade of politics. With these matters under consideration, I have not acted hastily, but after much reflection.... -- W. H. Nelson.

 

The Smith County Record passed into the hands of E ...
January 20, 1882, The Pioneer (ID 2154)

The Smith County Record passed into the hands of E. M. Burr last Monday morning. We welcome Mr. Burr into the newspaper field, and are sorry the pasture is not larger.

 

The meeting of the correspondents of the Smith Cou ...
January 27, 1882, The Pioneer (ID 2155)

The meeting of the correspondents of the Smith County Pioneer was held...on Saturday, Jan. 21st, in the parlor of the Kansas Central Hotel. Excellent music was furnished by the Smith Centre String Band, with organ accompaniment by Miss Flora Axton, until dinner was announced.

The dinner was in every respect a grand success....There were samples of cake molded by the fair hands of Mrs. Will D. Jenkins....But the cake was not the only feature worth mentioning, bread of unexcelled whiteness, chicken done precisely to turn, coffee of the finest flavor, and all the et ceteras that make up the superb were furnished with a lavish generosity only exceeded by the boss of givers, Will D. Jenkins.

...After dinner, an organization was effected by the election of Will D. Jenkins as president, and S. Shores, secretary. A committee was appointed by the chair, consisting of S. Shores, G. W. Thomas and S. R. Herren, who reported the following resolution:

Resolved; that we, the correspondents of the Pioneer, do hereby express our appreciation of our former editor, Will D. Jenkins, as a man and as an editor....

Resolved; That we recognize in W. H. Nelson, our present editor, the genial and accommodating gentleman whose acknowledged ability will sustain the enviable reputation of the Pioneer....

Resolved; That we recognize in the Pioneer, at the present as in the past, the journal of the people without a successful competitor.

...S. Shores, in behalf of the correspondents, presented, in a briefly worded speech, Will D. Jenkins an elegant autograph album, purchased by the joint contributions of those present....

An adjournment to the rooms of Daguerrian artist W. N. Hall was next in the order of proceedings, when as a group, features of the editors and correspondents were, after some delay and much hilarity, duly photographed....

Printing office and material for sale. One power press (Gurnsey), 9 column; one job press (Liberty), and a complete outfit of material, job type, etc., suitable for a country office, for sale cheap, on good terms. Inquire at this office.

 

Squire Headley, foreman of the Gaylord Herald, and ...
May 12, 1882, The Pioneer (ID 2176)

Squire Headley, foreman of the Gaylord Herald, and one of the best printers in the northwest, called on us Monday.

 

Our contemporary, the Record, has changed hands, G ...
May 26, 1882, The Pioneer (ID 2178)

Our contemporary, the Record, has changed hands, G. L. Burr, the son of the former editor becoming the editor and proprietor.

Vol. 1, No. 1, of the Riverton (Neb.) Free Press, J. Jay Lane editor and proprietor, has been received. It is a neat little five-column quarto....The mechanical work is first class, which goes to show that its foreman, R. D. Graham (a whilom comp. on the Pioneer), has "been there" before.

 

Salutatory -- I have associated with me in this en ...
July 21, 1882, The Pioneer (ID 2184)

Salutatory -- I have associated with me in this enterprise Dr. Neely Thompson, long and favorably known throughout the state as a journalist of no mean ability, and with this issue we assume the control of the pioneer as sole editors and proprietors....We are Republican and shall maintain the best principles of that great party. We are advocates of prohibition, believing that it is the cause of the people and knowing it to be just and righteous.... -- P. S. Noble.

Adieu -- With this number our connection with the Pioneer ceases. It is with feelings of regret that we are compelled to give up this business, which we have grown to admire, although but a short time engaged in it, and the only cause we can assign for leaving the business is constantly failing health, which we expect to regain by the necessary rest. We have sold the entire business to Col. P. S. Noble of Atchison.... -- W. H. Nelson.

The Smith County Pioneer has changed hands....It...will be conducted for an indefinite length of time by Neely Thompson, of Free Press notoriety....It will be difficult to get anyone who will please the many readers of the Pioneer so well as the pleasant, genial man who never, in the heat of altercation, forgot for an instant that he was a gentleman. -- Smith County Record.

 

Our old foreman of the Free Press is again in char ...
July 28, 1882, The Pioneer (ID 2185)

Our old foreman of the Free Press is again in charge of our office. J. W. Stewart is the two front letters of his name.

We are moving this week and, when one has as large an establishment as the Pioneer to move, he has a job on his hands of no mean magnitude. Bowen and Booth have had charge of the moving of the steam press, and part of the time they have had a large force employed.

 

The Portis Patriot publishes the famous Kansas poe ...
August 25, 1882, The Pioneer (ID 2192)

The Portis Patriot publishes the famous Kansas poem, "The Little Old Sod Dugout on the Claim," as having been written by an Osborne County man, name unknown. To the best of our recollection, that "epic" belongs to Smith County. The "soddy" is on the road from Gaylord to Smith Centre; the "Billy" of the poem is Mr. Will D. Jenkins, formerly of the Smith County Pioneer, and the author is Jerome, once of the same paper. -- Champion.

Col. Martin is eminently correct. The sod claim rendered famous in "song and story" is located about one mile southwest of Smith Centre, and was written expressly for Billy Jenkins and his "Little Ohl Sod Dugout on the Claim" by Frank E. Jerome, now of the Russell Hawkeye.

 

The Kansas Jewelite, Vol. 1, No. 2, published at M ...
September 1, 1882, The Pioneer (ID 2194)

The Kansas Jewelite, Vol. 1, No. 2, published at Mankato by E. P. Worchester, has reached us. It is an 8-column folio, full of local and miscellaneous news, Republican in politics, the typography is excellent....

 

S. S. Story of Sweet Home stopped his paper a few ...
September 15, 1882, The Pioneer (ID 2197)

S. S. Story of Sweet Home stopped his paper a few days ago because he was displeased at an article which appeared in the Pioneer denunciatory of Geo. Martin for supporting a man like Jim Lane, and abusing St. John. The article was a clipping sent to us by Gen. Noble, one of the proprietors of the Pioneer, living at Topeka. The article was written by Sol Miller and published in the Troy Chief. The editor of the Pioneer takes occasion to say, however, that he is personally acquainted with Jim Lane's career and probably has much better reason to be acquainted with his character than Mr. Story, and he fully endorses Sol Miller's estimate of Lane's character. The article was true, every word of it....

 

Vol. 1, No. 1, of the Cedarville Review has been r ...
February 8, 1884, The Pioneer (ID 2270)

Vol. 1, No. 1, of the Cedarville Review has been received....It's a daisy.

 

We are in receipt of the first number of a paper l ...
February 29, 1884, The Pioneer (ID 2273)

We are in receipt of the first number of a paper lately started at Reamsville,...with a request to exchange; but owing to the fact that we are not able, in the present state of our finances, to employ an expert to decipher it for us each week, we are compelled to forego the luxury. -- Gaylord Herald.

The pleasure of exchanging with that monstrosity has not been tendered to us yet. When it is, we expect to send it to the State Historical Society as a curiosity.

 

Valedictory -- With this issue of the Pioneer, we ...
March 14, 1884, The Pioneer (ID 2278)

Valedictory -- With this issue of the Pioneer, we sever our connection therewith, having sold the same to Geo. W. Anderson, late of the Lincoln County Register, a newspaper man of long and varied experience....He will make a newspaper worthy of the name. In taking leave of this journal, although we have only operated it but a brief time, yet we have formed many attachments and associations that gave us pain to sever.... -- Pioneer Pub. Co.

The South Half is the name of a spicy little paper just started at Blue Rapids.

The Smith Centre Record is now the Bulletin and is published by John Q. Royce.

 

The newspaper publishers will appreciate this: A p ...
April 11, 1884, The Pioneer (ID 2280)

The newspaper publishers will appreciate this: A patent medicine manufacturer died recently in New York. Just before he died, his old friends asked him how he would desire to be buried. He had only strength enough left to say: "Insert me top column next reading matter fifty-two time electro by mail," and then he closed his eyes and passed away to that bourne where there are no omissions or wrong insertions.

Geo. W. Anderson, a veteran Kansas journalist, formerly of the Beloit Gazette, and lately of the Lincoln Register, has purchased the Smith Centre Pioneer.... -- Washington Republican.

The Smith County Pioneer has been sold by Messrs. Burrow & White to Geo. W. Anderson, late of the Lincoln Register....Burrow & White improved the paper during their management, and Mr. Anderson is making it still better.... -- Kirwin Chief.

 

From the edition of Geo. P. Rowell & Co.'s America ...
April 18, 1884, The Pioneer (ID 2281)

From the edition of Geo. P. Rowell & Co.'s America Newspaper Directory now in press, it appears that the newspapers and periodicals of all kinds at present issued in the United States and Canada reach a grand total of 13,402. This is a net gain of precisely 1,600 during the last 12 months, and exhibits an increase of 5,618 over the total number published just ten years since in 1874....

 

The Mail, a Democratic paper just started at Omio ...
May 23, 1884, The Pioneer (ID 2285)

The Mail, a Democratic paper just started at Omio in Jewell County, with Jack Scott as editor, is neat and twice as good as that town will be able to support.

The Cultivator and Herdsman, just started at Garden City, is what its name implies. It is put up in an unbound magazine form. L. D. Bailey, its editor and publisher, has given it a good sendoff in the first issue.

 

Among the many callers at the Pioneer office Satur ...
July 18, 1884, The Pioneer (ID 2291)

Among the many callers at the Pioneer office Saturday were Walt Whitmore of the Harlan Chief, N. F. Hewitt of the Cedarville Review, L. C. Headley of the Gaylord Herald, B. O. Shollenbarger of the Reamsville Dispatch, and M. H. Hoyt of the Portis Patriot.

 

(Advertisement) The Pioneer. Oldest paper in the c ...
April 17, 1885, The Pioneer (ID 2328)

(Advertisement) The Pioneer. Oldest paper in the county. The best local paper in the county. All home print! The Pioneer is now owned and backed by a very strong company of stockholders, who are all pledged to its success. No expense will be spared in making it the best and most reliable newspaper in northwest Kansas....Politically the Pioneer will be Republican....The school interests of the county will receive especial attention, a department of the paper being devoted to schools under supervision of Mrs. Frances R. Millard, superintendent of schools.

(Legal notice) Charter of the Pioneer Printing Co. of Smith County, Kansas. The undersigned citizens of the State of Kansas do hereby voluntarily associate ourselves together for the purpose of forming a private corporation under the laws of the State of Kansas, and do hereby certify:...Fifth -- That the number of directors or trustees of this corporation shall be six, and the names and residences of those who are appointed for the first year are: J. S. McDowell, Smith Centre; B. W. Perdue, Smith Centre; S. D. Cummings, Smith Centre; M. C. Herriman, Smith Centre; Perry Stafford, Smith Centre; J. N. Clemans, Jacksonburg. Sixth -- That the estimated value of the goods, chattels, lands, rights and credits owned by the corporation is $1,400; that the amount of the capital stock of this corporation shall be $3,000 and shall be divided into 60 shares of $50 each....