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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Tribune

Articles in database from Tribune:    53

The Kansas Journal, published in Topeka, is on our ...
December 24, 1855, Tribune (ID 3149)

The Kansas Journal, published in Topeka, is on our table. Mr. Conver, its editor, is a young man of talents and persevering industry....

 

Not Discontinued. We observe that several Eastern ...
January 7, 1856, Tribune (ID 3153)

Not Discontinued. We observe that several Eastern papers are publishing that the Kansas Tribune has been discontinued. The mistake probably originated from a private note written to a friend in Medina, Ohio (our and his former residence) by a journeyman in this office, without any intention of conveying any other idea than that its publication was suspended temporarily....We have spent all we possessed -- a small but comfortable competence in Ohio -- and if we could be guaranteed the wages of a hod carrier, our cherished enterprise should never be abandoned....If our friends believe our efforts worth sustaining, they can insure the Kansas Tribune's publication until the battle is ended and the victory won....We understand revolvers and rifles just as well as those who threaten them against us.

*We learn that the Territorial Register...at Leavenworth was thrown in the river a few days ago by a considerable party of ruffians. The dastardly deed was done in the night, and its villainous perpetrators had escaped before the people were aroused....The Register was a Democratic paper whose editor had the independence to condemn the lawless intrusions of those who came into the Territory to vote, and to declare himself in favor of a Free State.

*Threats of Mobbing the Kansas Tribune. We have heard that Stringfellow says we evaded the law denying us the right to declare that slavery does not legally exist in Kansas Territory by publishing our denunciations of it on the 15th of September, when as he alleges the law only takes effect "from and after" that date. It is immaterial to us whether it says "from and after" or "on and after," for we have again and again repeated our declaration, and now reiterate it, in the very language of the law, that "THERE IS NO RIGHT TO HOLD SLAVES IN THIS TERRITORY." Such is our firm, honest conviction, and there is no power on earth which can prevent us from asserting this opinion so long as we can wield a pen or have the power of utterance....We know...that slavery can only exist by positive statutory enactment, and we believe the enactments of the Kansas Legislature to be as base and fraudulent edicts as were ever sent forth by the veriest despot on earth. Since we removed to Topeka, we understand that threats have been made that the Tribune must keep cool or it will be thrown in the Kansas....It is immaterial to us. It shall never be destroyed while we have power to defend it, nor silenced until its press and types are wrenched from us by violence; and even then their place should be supplied, if it were possible to secure adequate means for that purpose.

 

We trust that our readers will excuse our shortcom ...
May 12, 1856, Tribune (ID 3171)

We trust that our readers will excuse our shortcomings this week, as we are obliged to devote most of our time to hauling logs, stone, &c., for a building, as we find it actually necessary that even editors should have something to shelter themselves from the sun and rain.

 

*We are under obligations to the Herald of Freedom ...
June 6, 1856, Tribune (ID 3177)

*We are under obligations to the Herald of Freedom for a few reams of paper. It is pretty well cut up, torn and otherwise damaged, the bundles having been broken open, pitched into the street and trampled under foot by the United States Marshal's mob at Lawrence. We trust that the people will remember when they see the marks of the dagger and the bayonet on this week's Tribune that it is in this manner that President Pierce and his cabinet show their respect for free interchange of thought, freedom of speech, and liberty of the press....

*Our Troubles. We are enabled to lay before our readers the particulars of several skirmishes which have taken place between Free State men and Border Ruffians within the past ten days....The accounts are substantially correct, though entirely different from the statements laid before the world by the Lecompton Union, which every person familiar with the facts has pronounced a base fabrication and an unmitigated falsehood without the least shadow of truth or foundation....

 

*Our pro-slavery Kansas contemporaries have conclu ...
June 23, 1856, Tribune (ID 3180)

*Our pro-slavery Kansas contemporaries have concluded not to exchange with us. Whether they have, in their ecstasy of delight and joy over the destruction of the Free State press in Lawrence, forgotten that all the truth-telling papers in Kansas are not dead,...or whether they think that we are so soon to receive the doom they have sworn to mete out to us that it is useless to exchange with us longer, or whether they do not like to see the plain facts which contradicts every line in their papers, we are unable to say....

 

*Lawrence. We have not had the pleasure of visitin ...
July 16, 1856, Tribune (ID 3182)

*Lawrence. We have not had the pleasure of visiting the unfortunate city of Lawrence...until a few days ago....When we come to look upon the ruins which we have heard described hundreds of times, we must confess that strange feelings mounted in our breasts....We see by their marks in Lawrence what these pitiful tools of the slave oligarchy will do, under the cloak of law....By visiting the office of the Herald of Freedom or the Free State and seeing the broken fragments of presses, type and other printing material, an estimate can be formed of their love of knowledge and reforms, or their ideas of the freedom of speech and Republican government....We think we have lived under the humiliating rule of despotism and foreign rule long enough....

 

*The publication of this number of the Tribune has ...
September 5, 1856, Tribune (ID 3187)

*The publication of this number of the Tribune has been delayed until today in consequence of our absence, having been in the field for the last ten days with the army of Freemen, performing our duty to ourselves and our country. There will be no paper issued from the office until our troubles shall have been settled, as the roads are blockaded so that we can get no paper and also for the reason that we shall again take the field immediately on issuing this number; every Free State arm in Kansas which is able to carry a rifle being needed to drive from our midst an armed horde of merciless invaders, who are marking their tracks through our land by the blood of our innocent citizens. When peace shall again smile upon unfortunate Kansas, we shall again exchange the rifle for the pen and resume the publication of the Tribune.

To the Patrons of the Journal....After an absence of over four months instead of six or eight weeks as intended, I am again at my post, but only to bid you perhaps a final adieu. Since reaching home I have disposed of my newspaper interest to Speer & Ross. You will therefore receive the Kansas State Journal no longer, but in its stead the Tribune to the amount of your subscription....By this arrangement, the loss is all mine; the gain yours. The Tribune is as large a paper as the Journal was, and more ably conducted; the oldest, and in fact the only, Free State paper in Kansas at this time. Its editors and proprietors, Messrs. Speer & Ross, are men of known reliability; and as Mr. Speer is state printer it will very properly be his business to furnish a State Journal....The little encouragement which Free State printers in Kansas have heretofore met with is a burning shame, not only to the present imbecile administration who has given its public printing in Kansas to such papers as the Squatter Sovereign and Kickapoo Pioneer, as well as to many of our pretended friends in the free states....You Eastern capitalists and philanthropists who feel an interest in the cause of freedom in Kansas, and wish to contribute your mites to the right place, just send them along -- not through committees, as they might never reach here in time to be of any benefit -- but mail the money yourselves, direct to Speer & Ross, and thus assist in supporting one Free State paper in Kansas. There are now some seven papers in the pro-slavery and Buchanan interest printed in Kansas. You need have no fears of the destruction of the Tribune by mob violence, as the press in Topeka will be protected as long as one of our citizens is left to draw a knife or pull a trigger, Frank Pierce and Lecompte notwithstanding.... -- P. O. Conver.

*Our Paper. Circumstances have been such for the past six months that it has been utterly impossible for us to issue our paper with...regularity....Everyone is familiar with the unsettled state of affairs in Kansas...the blockade of the Missouri River and other public thoroughfares, the smuggling process which we have been obliged to resort...in order to get what little material we have used, or run the gauntlet up the Missouri River at exorbitant prices; and the intercepting and rifling of letters...what little funds we had relied upon to aid us in the great emergency through which we have passed....By dint of the hardest of labor, and the most persevering and rigid economy, with the aid of some kind friends, we have...procured a stock...sufficient to supply us until spring....

 

...Excuse the diminutiveness of the Tribune this w ...
December 8, 1856, Tribune (ID 3201)

...Excuse the diminutiveness of the Tribune this week. We had made every necessary arrangement for the regular publication of a full sheet, but sickness of our hands compel us to issue the paper in this shape this week.

 

The present number of the Kansas Tribune closes ou ...
December 29, 1856, Tribune (ID 3207)

The present number of the Kansas Tribune closes our connection with that establishment. Our withdrawal is rather a matter of necessity than choice -- having expended a considerable sum in attempting to sustain the paper without that success which we hoped...might attend it....Regrets, however, are relieved in the fact that our successors, W. W. & E. G. Ross, are gentlemen eminently qualified....With the senior member of the new firm we have been connected in business about a year.... -- John Speer.

It is with...regret that we find ourselves disconnected with our former partner, Mr. John Speer....He has been unable to render the assistance...that is necessary for the support of a Kansas paper, having been obliged to go to Ohio early in the spring, and since that time has had no communication with the columns of the Tribune....The elder of the brothers, E. G. Ross, is in Wisconsin, where he will secure a quantity of paper and type sufficient for a new dress....The past year we have expended $500 more than has been realized from the establishment, yet...we hope to pay expenses the coming year. We did not enlist in the cause of equal rights in Kansas to make money, but we did hope to pay our way.... -- W. W. Ross.

 

There will be no Tribune issued next week, as we d ...
January 12, 1857, Tribune (ID 3210)

There will be no Tribune issued next week, as we design moving the office into our new building near the corner of Sixth and Kansas....

 

It is with feelings of pride that we look over our ...
February 2, 1857, Tribune (ID 3218)

It is with feelings of pride that we look over our office books and contrast them with what they were but a few short weeks ago. We had...a very respectable subscription list, for Kansas; but, by the prompt and energetic action of our friends, it has been very materially increased, and we are saved the (to us) dreadful alternative of suspending the Tribune....

 

The Leavenworth Times. This new Free State newspap ...
March 23, 1857, Tribune (ID 3228)

The Leavenworth Times. This new Free State newspaper, published at Leavenworth City, is before us....R. Crozier, editor. Terms $2 per annum.

Prospectus of the Kansas News. The undersigned will commence the publication of an independent newspaper, bearing the above title, on or about the 20th of March next, at Emporia....The News will advocate the principles of the Free State party....The News will be published on a double medium sheet, contain 28 columns of matter, and be furnished...at $2 per annum.... -- P. B. Plumb, Lawrence.

 

We present the Tribune...this week in a partially ...
April 25, 1857, Tribune (ID 3236)

We present the Tribune...this week in a partially new dress....Our type, which was ordered some time since, has only a portion of it arrived....

 

*The Kansas Free State, which was mobbed and destr ...
June 27, 1857, Tribune (ID 3263)

*The Kansas Free State, which was mobbed and destroyed at Lawrence on the memorable 21st of May, 1856, has been revived at Delaware City by its original proprietor, R. G. Elliott....We are gratified to see the Free State take decided and unequivocal ground in favor of the institution of the present Free State government under the Topeka Constitution....

 

For the first time since we commenced the publicat ...
August 1, 1857, Tribune (ID 3282)

For the first time since we commenced the publication of the Tribune, are we working under a good roof. For over two years we have printed it out of doors or in temporary buildings where we were exposed more or less to the sun, wind, rain and snow....

 

We regret...that J. G. Reid, proprietor of the Tec ...
November 7, 1857, Tribune (ID 3321)

We regret...that J. G. Reid, proprietor of the Tecumseh Note Book, has been compelled, for want of patronage, to discontinue the publication of his paper. This should not be...altho we venture to suggest that a paper of less radical pro-slavery predilection would probably meet with more general favor than the Note Book.

 

Welcome Change. The Leavenworth Journal, hitherto ...
December 5, 1857, Tribune (ID 3340)

Welcome Change. The Leavenworth Journal, hitherto published by the redoubtable Col. J. D. Henderson, a member of the late Bogus Convention, comes to us under the supervision of G. W. Purkins, greatly improved in tone and talent. It is yet a Democratic paper, but we very much prefer an honest, respectably enemy to a groveling, shameless Border Ruffian....

 

With this number commences the third volume of the ...
February 20, 1858, Tribune (ID 3373)

With this number commences the third volume of the Kansas Tribune. We had hoped to...greet our readers with a new dress;...but we were not fortunate enough to receive it before the close of navigation....

 

The Squatter Sovereign has again changed hands, Mr ...
February 27, 1858, Tribune (ID 3377)

The Squatter Sovereign has again changed hands, Mr. Short retiring and J. A. Martin assuming charge of the paper under the title of Freedom's Champion....

 

Farnsworth & Cummings, editors.: In assuming the r ...
September 23, 1858, Tribune (ID 3459)

Farnsworth & Cummings, editors.

In assuming the responsibility of the editorial department of the Tribune, we regard it our duty to our readers to apprise them of the principles we shall advocate....We believe it is not contrary to the Constitution to hold slaves, but a gross violation of moral law and an impediment to the highest welfare of the people and to the diffusion of the arts and sciences. We believe it to be impolitic to meddle with the "institution" in the slave states, but that it is the duty of every true American...to prevent its extension to the territories and to prevent the accession of new slave states to the Union. We believe that the people of Kansas are not yet prepared to support the burden of a state organization.... -- Loring Farnsworth, J. F. Cummings.

Valedictory. Arrangements were made...by which the office has passed into other hands. Our entire right and title to it having been transferred to J. F. Cummings, who will continue its publication and furnish his readers with a staunch and reliable Free State newspaper....In retiring from the editorial chair, which we have occupied for nearly three years, we have but few valedictory remarks....Our past course must speak for itself -- by our acts we wish to be judged.... -- W. W. Ross, E. G. Ross.

 

Troy Democrat. Jos. Thompson, formerly editor of t ...
December 16, 1858, Tribune (ID 3496)

Troy Democrat. Jos. Thompson, formerly editor of the Geary City Era, has commenced the publication of a paper under the above caption at Troy, Doniphan County. He takes the position that the principles of the Democratic party are good....We wish him pecuniary success...but we cannot sympathize in the least with a party so hopelessly corrupt and rotten as the one he has espoused.

 

The second number of the Jefferson Crescent, a pap ...
January 1, 1859, Tribune (ID 3506)

The second number of the Jefferson Crescent, a paper lately started at Grasshopper Falls, and edited by G. D. H. Gurnsey, has been received....The Crescent is Free State.

 

A great many persons will receive this number of o ...
January 6, 1859, Tribune (ID 3507)

A great many persons will receive this number of our paper who are not subscribers. Publishing nothing this week but reliable news from the gold mines of Western Kansas, the best route for emigrants to take, and the necessary outfit, our political opinion will not show forth....

 

The Kansas Press. We received the prospectus of a ...
January 20, 1859, Tribune (ID 3512)

The Kansas Press. We received the prospectus of a paper to be published the first week in March at Cottonwood Falls by S. N. Wood. Politics Free State. Single copy $1 per year.

 

Loring Farnsworth has withdrawn from the editorial ...
January 27, 1859, Tribune (ID 3516)

Loring Farnsworth has withdrawn from the editorial department of the Tribune. Other duties drawing his time and attention, he could not bestow sufficient time to his labors as an editor....

We have associated with us in the publishing department Saunders R. Shepherd.

Stolen. From the front of our office, a trough or sink for washing forms. We will give 50 cents for the return of the same, and 25 dollars for the conviction of the thief.

 

"The last Topeka Tribune announces the withdrawal ...
February 10, 1859, Tribune (ID 3521)

"The last Topeka Tribune announces the withdrawal of Loring Farnsworth from the editorial department...and the co-partnership connection of S. R. Shepherd with Mr. Cummings, the remaining publisher....The present publishers also announced that they have secured the assistance of Dr. James Fletcher, a talented man and a brilliant writer...." -- Metropolitan, Kansas City, Mo.

 

Our stock of new type has arrived at Leavenworth. ...
March 3, 1859, Tribune (ID 3529)

Our stock of new type has arrived at Leavenworth. The citizens of Topeka and of Shawnee County can boast of as good a paper in a couple of weeks as can any other section in Kansas. In enlarging our paper, and printing it entirely on new type, we necessarily incur great liabilities; and at a time too when money is scarce and hard to collect....

 

Next week we shall issue nothing but an Extra, con ...
March 10, 1859, Tribune (ID 3531)

Next week we shall issue nothing but an Extra, containing legal advertisements and such items of local news as may be of interest. The reason...is that we wish to clean out our old type and throw in new....We are constantly adding, and have just received, a large assortment of job type....

 

This week we greet our numerous patrons throughout ...
March 24, 1859, Tribune (ID 3535)

This week we greet our numerous patrons throughout Kansas and in the States in an entirely new dress....We do not propose to stop here in enlarging, but in another six months we intend adding still another column to our pages....

 

New Editor. By the following, from the pen of Judg ...
March 31, 1859, Tribune (ID 3539)

New Editor. By the following, from the pen of Judge Dow, it will be seen that we have added the name of the Judge to our editorial head....Owing to the intention of Dr. Fletcher to visit the Kansas Gold Mines, we unavoidably lost his valuable services as a co-editor of the Tribune. The Dr. will act as our regular correspondent at the Peak.... -- J.F.C.

Salutatory. From the...present issue,...the subscriber will be connected with Mr. Cummings in the editorial management....The undersigned has only to say that it is his purpose to make the Tribune, so far as he is able, consistently with the duties of his profession, readable and instructive but, at any rate, Republican.... -- L. Dow.

 

We are in constant receipt of the Daily Times, Led ...
April 7, 1859, Tribune (ID 3542)

We are in constant receipt of the Daily Times, Ledger, and Journal of Leavenworth, and the Daily Gazette and Journal of St. Joseph. As those points are connected by telegraph with all the cities of the Union, their dailies are enabled to give intelligence of everything of importance which takes place in the different parts of the United States....We receive the Leavenworth dailies early next morning after publication. Accept our thanks, gentlemen, and continue to send the news....

We have received the first number of a newspaper recently established at Olathe called the Johnson County Standard, edited and published by Barker & Eddy,...and independent in politics....Olathe is a flourishing town, situated on the Santa Fe road some 18 or 20 miles west of Westport....

 

An Editor Caned. On the morning of the 22d, A. Win ...
April 28, 1859, Tribune (ID 3551)

An Editor Caned. On the morning of the 22d, A. Winants assaulted Judge Dow, one of the editors of this paper, with a cane, striking him on the head, over the right eye, producing a cut about an inch long. The Judge informed us that he was not expecting the blow and therefore was unable to parry it at all. As soon as the blow was struck, Mr. Winants turned and ran, and the Judge followed and took his cane from him, but did not attempt to retaliate. A warrant has been sworn out for the arrest of Winants on a charge for assault and battery by Mr. Johnson, Judge Dow not wishing to prosecute, and the gentleman appeared before Judge Miller on Saturday and waived an examination, giving bonds in the sum of $300 for his appearance at the next term of the District Court. It appears that Mr. Winants became offended in consequence of an article that appeared in our issue of the 21st, headed "Not Married Yet," which article Judge Dow was not the author of and knew not that such an article was in until the paper was struck off and ready for distribution. We were the author of the article and stand personally responsible; and if any gentleman takes exceptions, let him come up into our office and we will either make an amicable settlement or be under the necessity of pitching him over the banisters.... -- C.

 

"We see that Wm. H. Gill, formerly editor of this ...
June 9, 1859, Tribune (ID 3569)

"We see that Wm. H. Gill, formerly editor of this paper, more recently editor of the Ohio Patriot, has become the senior editor of the Daily Leavenworth Herald." -- Guernsey (O.) Jeffersonian.

The same "Bill Gill," Mr. Jeffersonian. He was mean enough when conducting the paper to which the above is credited, but now it would be impossible to find a meaner Northern man. Bill Gill is associated with a man, in the editorial charge of the Leavenworth Herald, who used all his powers to make Kansas a slave state, and who advocated, through the columns of the Herald, the extermination of all Northern men during the struggles of 1856.

...Since our last issue, we have squeezed out enough time to move our office to more comfortable quarters. We are now ensconced in the third story of the Ritchey Block....The room to the right of the hall belongs exclusively to the editor-in-chief; the room to the left is where the lever that moves the world is kept....The rooms we now occupy for the Tribune office belong to Dr. James Ritchey.

We observe by the Leavenworth Daily Times that a new paper and printing warehouse has been established in that city. Something very much needed in this Western country....

 

We have ordered one of Hoe's fast steam presses an ...
July 28, 1859, Tribune (ID 3589)

We have ordered one of Hoe's fast steam presses and two thousand dollars worth of new type, all of which will be here before the close of navigation. We intend to print the largest and the best paper in Kansas....

 

Astonishing. Upon our arrival in Topeka, on Saturd ...
September 3, 1859, Tribune (ID 3606)

Astonishing. Upon our arrival in Topeka, on Saturday evening last from Leavenworth, where we had been stopping for a few days attending to business connected with the Tribune office, what should we see but the following notice conspicuously posted at every corner and turn of the street:

"Republicans. The Topeka Tribune is no longer a Republican paper. The undersigned is in no way responsible for the contents of the issue of this week...nor for its omissions. His connection with it is ended. Aug. 20, 1859. L. Dow."

Since L. Dow has taken his own method, in our absence, of "withdrawing" from the Tribune, can it be expected that we would extend to him, and does his conduct merit, the privileges usually granted in cases of honorable withdrawal from newspaper connections? He had not the least authority for saying that the "Topeka Tribune is no longer a Republican paper," neither had he the slightest grounds for bringing forth a poster containing such a mammoth falsehood....L. Dow knew at the time that there was not the merest conceivable grain of truth in his assertion....L. Dow was not, at any time, responsible for the general course of the Tribune, even during his short editorial career....His articles were always inspected by ourself, and if not deemed worthy of publication were filed away on a little peg for that purpose....We presume the new organ about to be established in our place was falling short of funds, and it became essentially necessary that a hue and cry be raised in order to stir up the enthusiasm of slumbering Republicans and impress it upon their minds that the Tribune had ceased to advocate the principles for which we all have long and strenuously labored; and then preset their fraudulent and villainous claim for "support."...

 

We welcome to our exchange list the Americus Senti ...
October 4, 1859, Tribune (ID 3622)

We welcome to our exchange list the Americus Sentinel, a paper recently started at Americus, the present county seat of Breckenridge County, by T. C. Hill and edited by R. M. Ruggles....

Leavenworth Evening Despatch. We welcome to our table again this interesting and well-gotten-up sheet, recently revived and now published and edited under the auspices of the Despatch Printing Company, consisting of its former editor and publisher, Josiah Hinton, with W. D. White, Willis Emery and C. A. Prescott....

The Kansas Statesman. This paper by Sam A. Medary, son of the Governor, has made its appearance on our table. It hails from Junction City, Riley County, which from the fact that the land office, heretofore located at Ogden, was recently removed to that place, we infer is a town of considerable promise....

 

The Neosho Valley Register has reached us from Bur ...
October 8, 1859, Tribune (ID 3627)

The Neosho Valley Register has reached us from Burlington, the county seat of Coffee County, a point about 70 miles directly south of Topeka. It is edited and published by S. S. Prouty....It is well seasoned with spicy editorials, is Republican in politics....

 

State Record. We were happy in the receipt of the ...
November 5, 1859, Tribune (ID 3644)

State Record. We were happy in the receipt of the above sheet last Thursday. It comes to us full of the spirit of enthusiasm, with which all new enterprises commence. At present, it is the best looking, and we doubt not, most ably edited Republican sheet in the Territory. Success to the Ross Brothers, and long life to the State Record.

 

In taking upon us the duties of an editor and aski ...
November 11, 1859, Tribune (ID 3649)

In taking upon us the duties of an editor and asking the public to patronize us as such, we feel that a plain statement of our principles may not be uninteresting to each reader of the Tribune....We assume the editor chair as a Democrat, and while we continue to occupy that position, we shall unflinchingly advocate what seems to us true Democratic doctrines....We believe...we must still look for the only true national party, seeking to administer the government upon the basis of impartiality and equal justice established by the founders of the Republic....H. C. Hawkins.

J. F. Cummings, H. C. Hawkins, editors.

 

For the past year and a quarter we have been publi ...
November 20, 1859, Tribune (ID 3655)

For the past year and a quarter we have been publishing the Tribune for the edification of our readers and the prosperity of our young city....When we took the office the types were worn out and filled with sand; the credit of the office had disappeared....During the first six months we ran in debt...$300....Our journeymen were pushing us hard for their dues. Our wife took sick and we were called from the office for a fortnight. In the meantime our hands quit work. The paper was obliged to suspend for two weeks. One of our journeymen went to drinking and was set upon in his drunken fury....But no one came forward to offer the least help. On the other hand, knowing ones...said the paper could not be kept up. The people of Topeka were too poor, &c. Our only answer was, emphatically, that the Tribune should be published for one year under our control....The result is before you....We have established it upon such a basis that it will be published as long as Topeka stands. It was only a few days since that the same person...who would have laid violent hands upon our material when backed by a mob, told us the whole story...."Cummings, you carried the Tribune through on nerve. Nothing else but your indomitable energy would have sufficed in that trying time when not one cent of money was to be had. You should have the credit for publishing a paper when almost any other man would have starved to death."...Will you not now give us your patronage in preference to those who...are not capable of doing either yourself, your city or your county that justice which your interests demand?...

There are gentlemen residing in Topeka who lately have labored with unusual industry...in the futile attempt...to crush out our journal....But the fun of the thing is that one of these gentlemen contributed (with unselfish motives?) money to the amount of $300, besides a nice city lot, to another paper, and for which act he received a snubbed nose by way of acknowledgement....Oh! Ritchey, you are one of the most u-n-f-o-r-t-u-n-a-t-e of men....

 

H. C. Hawkins has withdrawn from the editorial dep ...
January 7, 1860, Tribune (ID 3679)

H. C. Hawkins has withdrawn from the editorial department of the Tribune. Business of another nature is occupying his time and attention. Our relations with him have been of the most pleasant character....

 

The Auburn Transcript, a Republican paper publishe ...
February 25, 1860, Tribune (ID 3705)

The Auburn Transcript, a Republican paper published in this county, has been discontinued for want of support. The editors gave as their reason for discontinuing this Black Republican journal that their subscribers would not pay up....

 

*Our paper this week enters upon its sixth volume, ...
July 7, 1860, Tribune (ID 3756)

*Our paper this week enters upon its sixth volume, the year commencing with the first of July....Of about 25 papers now published in the Territory only one, the Leavenworth Herald, can claim seniorship to the Tribune. It was established in Lawrence in the spring of 1855 by John Speer, now of Lawrence, and S. N. Wood of the Kansas Press, and in the open street the first number was set up and worked off. In the fall of the same year it was removed to this place....

To those interested. A rare opportunity for those desirous of entering into a paying, permanent and growing business. The undersigned, being called to other parts, offers for sale his half of the Tribune establishment, including both news and jobbing departments....The office is in good condition and has yielded a fine profit during the past year and a half. Terms, cash in hand. Possession given at any time desired. -- Saunders R. Shepherd.

 

Our gallant wheel-horse, Wm. H. Gill of the Leaven ...
July 28, 1860, Tribune (ID 3770)

Our gallant wheel-horse, Wm. H. Gill of the Leavenworth Herald, has retired from the editorial chair of that paper....In the remaining editor, Wm. P. Fain, assisted by Ward Burlingame, we too recognize a writer of ability and a zealous co-laborer.

A change has also taken place in the editorial department of the Dispatch, effecting quite perceivably the political complexion of its columns, it having heretofore been an earnest advocate of Douglas, but now rampant for Breckenridge. G. P. Prescott retires, Josiah A. Green succeeding....

 

Samuel A. Medary...has disposed of the Junction Ci ...
August 11, 1860, Tribune (ID 3780)

Samuel A. Medary...has disposed of the Junction City Statesman office, Herbert and Cuddy assuming its entire management. It is to be openly Breckenridge in its politics.

 

Leavenworth Times. We notice the name of E. F. Sch ...
October 13, 1860, Tribune (ID 3810)

Leavenworth Times. We notice the name of E. F. Schneider at the editorial head of our Leavenworth contemporary. Mr. S. is an able writer and, in connection with J. K. Bartlett, the gentlemanly proprietor of the Times establishment, will doubtless maintain the position which that journal has always held -- the leading Republican paper in the Territory.

 

Our partner, S. R. Shepherd, left us Monday mornin ...
November 3, 1860, Tribune (ID 3818)

Our partner, S. R. Shepherd, left us Monday morning for a visit to the "old folks at home" principally. After an absence of six years -- an eventful ramble and a varied life, having cross the Plains -- Mr. S. now returns to his native state, Michigan, to redeem the vows of his schoolboy days and -- but that will suffice. Well, if faithfulness and good works are emblems of a Christian character, our partner will certainly enjoy Christian happiness here below....

 

W. H. Herbert and Wm. Cuddy have withdrawn from th ...
January 1, 1861, Tribune (ID 3840)

W. H. Herbert and Wm. Cuddy have withdrawn from the editorship of the Junction City Statesman. In the winding up of Mr. Herbert's valedictory, we find him strongly for disunion: "The election of such a man (Lincoln) to preside over the destinies of a great Republic, I regard as moral treason upon the part of those who elected him, and the Southerner who would submit to his rule, I would regard as committing treason against the memory of his ancestry; treason against pride and honor, and treason against his rights, his neighbors, himself and his home. I now take my leave of the people of Kansas, and leave the land of abolitionism for those who love it, to bustle in."

The Statesman is now presided over by H. T. Geary, who judging from...his salutatory will make that paper all that its ardent friends could wish. He says:

"Having uniformly favored the establishment of free institutions, not by act of Congress but by the voluntary action of the people when forming a state government, we shall advocate every measure which tends to make Kansas a Free State -- a state for free white men, and we expect to oppose that mawkish philosophy which would convert our beautiful and favored Territory into an asylum for the run-away slaves of the South."

 

Long Primer. The State Journal, in a late issue, c ...
May 18, 1861, Tribune (ID 3917)

Long Primer. The State Journal, in a late issue, comments on the style of type to be used for printing the journals of the legislature, and says that there is not an office in the state with sufficient Long Primer to do the work. In answer to that statement, we have just received from the foundry 603 pounds Long Primer, and hold ourselves in readiness to do this work.

*New Paper. The Olathe Mirror is the name of a new paper, the first number of which is before us. The Mirror is edited by Jno. Francis, former editor of he Quindaro Tribune.

 

A copy of the Brown County Union, an administratio ...
June 1, 1861, Tribune (ID 3927)

A copy of the Brown County Union, an administration paper recently established at Hiawatha, Brown county, is upon our table; P. Gould Parker, editor.

 

We are in receipt of the Union and Banner, a spicy ...
June 4, 1861, Tribune (ID 3931)

We are in receipt of the Union and Banner, a spicy little daily recently started at Atchison by John A. Martin. This is the second daily in that city, and another is on the tapis.

 

"We have been denounced as worse than abolitionist ...
June 15, 1861, Tribune (ID 3936)

"We have been denounced as worse than abolitionists because we sustain the government in its endeavors to put down rebellion. A few Democrats have declared that they had sooner take an abolition paper. Well, that's all right -- if they wish to join the Abolition party, they are privileged to do so. We intend to remain, as we have ever been, good, sound Democrats and will publish a Democratic paper." -- Leavenworth Herald.

 

The publication of the laws has been commenced by ...
June 22, 1861, Tribune (ID 3942)

The publication of the laws has been commenced by Trask & Lowman of the State Journal, and will be ready for distribution about the middle of July. The journals are being printed by Speer & Moore of the Republican.

"The examination of D. R. Anthony was concluded yesterday afternoon. At the close of the testimony a motion was made by Robt. Crozier, one of the counsel for defendant, to admit Anthony to bail. Mr. Crozier opened the argument in a very able speech. He was followed by Prosecuting Attorney Thos. P. Fenlon, who made one of his best efforts. Mr. S. A. Stinson closed on the part of the defense. Too much credit cannot be awarded to Mr. Fenlon for the able and energetic manner in which he has conducted this case, leaving nothing undone to bring to light everything connected with the unfortunate affair. Anthony was admitted to bail in the sum of ten thousand dollars, which he procured, and was released from custody." -- Leavenworth Herald.

State Bookbindery. M. Frankenberg, who has been awarded the contract for binding the laws and journals of the state, has moved to, and will make Topeka his permanent place of business.