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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Weekly Free Press

Articles in database from Weekly Free Press:    56

Vol. 2, No. 7. Office on Main Street in Price's Br ...
June 22, 1865, Weekly Free Press (ID 519)

Vol. 2, No. 7. Office on Main Street in Price's Brick Block, 3d story, bet. 3d & 4th....F. A. Root & Co., publishers and proprietors. Daniel Negly, agent.

The Free Press was Tuesday morning declared the official paper of the county. Bids were received by the board of county commissioners and, on opening them, it was found that the bid of the Press was lower than that of the Champion.

Newspaper Change. The Lawrence Journal was the bitterest of all that class of Kansas newspapers which tried to make all its political views hinge upon hostility to Senator Lane....Lately, however, the Journal has been sold to Captain James Christian, who, though formerly a pro-slavery Democrat, always had a personal attachment for the Grim Chieftain, and was at one time his law partner. The Captain has been in the army too, and appears to have become thoroughly cured of all conservatism, and he announces that the Journal will hereafter be a radical Republican journal...The Journal of the 8th contains the following very friendly personal allusion to Senator Lane: "...'James Henry' has his faults and his failings, and just show us the man that has none and we will treat to the lager....But he is a much better man than he gets credit for....His position today is a proud one, for although it may not be generally acknowledged, it is nevertheless true that he is the father and author of that true policy that overthrew the rebellion, 'Liberating the slaves and making soldiers of them.' We confess that at first we doubted this policy, but time has proven him right and us wrong...."

 

Prof. Negley, our agent, who has been canvassing f ...
June 29, 1865, Weekly Free Press (ID 521)

Prof. Negley, our agent, who has been canvassing for The Free Press the past month in southern and western Kansas, returned Saturday night with the names of 593 subscribers.

 

Our friend and brother "typo," Lt. Robt. B. Grimes ...
July 20, 1865, Weekly Free Press (ID 524)

Our friend and brother "typo," Lt. Robt. B. Grimes of the gallant 13th, with whom we have toiled man a day "sticking type," has just returned to his home in this city after an absence of nearly three years in the mountains of southwest Missouri and the swamps of Arkansas.

The Printer's New Hand Book. We have received this neat little work, just issued by Geo. H. Bidwell, containing 110 pages beautifully printed and in a form convenient to slip in the side pocket. It is a treatise on the imposition of forms, embracing a system of rules and principles for laying the pages, applicable to all forms; with instructions for making margin and register, turning and folding the sheets, etc.; and diagrams of all the standard forms showing their relation to each other, with explanations of their variations and transpositions. Also a table of signatures, &c., useful to compositors, pressmen and publishers. No printer should be without a copy. Address Raymond & Caulon, Publishers, 88 Cedar St., N.Y.

 

*The notorious B. B. Taylor, formerly editor of th ...
August 17, 1865, Weekly Free Press (ID 537)

*The notorious B. B. Taylor, formerly editor of the Leavenworth Inquirer, is now editor of the detestable Quincy Herald.

Eastern paper mills are running half time and news print advanced last week in the eastern markets 2 cents per pound. A further rise of 4 cents, it is understood, is what has been determined upon.

 

We are in receipt of the first number of the New E ...
September 28, 1865, Weekly Free Press (ID 547)

We are in receipt of the first number of the New Era, a new paper published at Lecompton by S. Weaver. The paper indicates very decided ability in the editorial department....We happen to know that the political character of Lecompton changed years ago, and that almost the last of the devotees of slavery there went into the rebel army early in the rebellion, and that their places were in part at least supplied by local men. After the removal of the capital of the state to Topeka, Lecompton did indeed appear a good deal forsaken, and it became not a little dilapidated. But we always believed that the place would recover and ultimately become a thriving and pleasant village if not a prosperous town....We are glad that Lecompton is not, like the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah, to become utterly desolate....

 

Ward Burlingame announces that he designs to estab ...
October 21, 1865, Weekly Free Press (ID 557)

Ward Burlingame announces that he designs to establish in Topeka "a first class weekly newspaper, to be called the Weekly Leader."

 

*The Weston Landmark is the regular organ of the s ...
November 4, 1865, Weekly Free Press (ID 563)

*The Weston Landmark is the regular organ of the sympathizers of Platte County, Mo. One of its publishers is Wm. H. Adams, publisher of the old Atchison Union, and afterwards associated with Burrell Taylor in the publication of the Leavenworth Inquirer, which was suppressed on account of its traitorous course during the war. The Landmark thus rejoices at the movements of its Democratic brethren for the organization of the party in Kansas.

 

The Jeffersonian at Grasshopper Falls has changed ...
November 11, 1865, Weekly Free Press (ID 565)

The Jeffersonian at Grasshopper Falls has changed hands, Geo. T. Isbell, late "local" of the Leavenworth Conservative, taking charge as editor and proprietor.

 

We assure the editor of the Champion that our corr ...
November 18, 1865, Weekly Free Press (ID 566)

We assure the editor of the Champion that our correspondent "Soldier" served gallantly in the Union Army in the war against the slaveholder's rebellion. He did not, however, become so "distinguished" as did the editor of the Champion, for the reason that he did not himself write fulsome laudations of his own achievements, and publish them....

 

The material upon which the Fort Scott Monitor is ...
December 16, 1865, Weekly Free Press (ID 578)

The material upon which the Fort Scott Monitor is printed has been sold to W. W. & C. B. Hayward, who will commence the publication of an independent journal.

We have received the first number of the Western Home Journal, published at Ottawa by I. S. Kalloch. The paper claims to be independent in politics. It is edited with ability....

 

...Col. D. R. Anthony has been removed from the po ...
February 3, 1866, Weekly Free Press (ID 597)

...Col. D. R. Anthony has been removed from the post office at Leavenworth and James L. McDowell appointed in his stead.

 

W. W. Ross, mayor of Topeka, will leave home next ...
March 3, 1866, Weekly Free Press (ID 603)

W. W. Ross, mayor of Topeka, will leave home next week to be absent about a year. He contemplates visiting Cuba and California for the benefit of his health.

 

Juvenile Compositor. In a late number of the Garne ...
March 31, 1866, Weekly Free Press (ID 609)

Juvenile Compositor. In a late number of the Garnett Plaindealer we notice that Charles M. Olney, a son of the editor of that paper, aged 11 years and 4 months, recently composed 4,000 ems solid long primer in six hours and a half. The proof was as clean as any ordinary printer's work. Very good typesetting....

 

With the present number commences the third volume ...
May 12, 1866, Weekly Free Press (ID 618)

With the present number commences the third volume of the Free Press. The discouragements which attended the first months of our efforts to establish the first daily newspaper in Atchison have long since passed away and the Free Press is enjoying continued and most gratifying prosperity....Our daily edition, which commenced as a five-column paper, has been twice enlarged....Our weekly edition is enlarged with our issue of the present week. It is now the largest weekly paper published in northern Kansas....

Col. Martin, appreciating the kindness and cordial support which he had received during his term as mayor, tendered to the officers of the city government a supper. Last evening, after the adjournment of the council, the guests of His Honor met at Vogler and Spelti's, where was served a splendid supper....

 

The American Printer is a new manual of typography ...
May 19, 1866, Weekly Free Press (ID 625)

The American Printer is a new manual of typography just issued by L. Johnson & Co., type founders, Philadelphia. It is undoubtedly the most complete work on the subject yet issued....Among the general subjects treated are the following: rise and progress of printing, implements or tools of the art, composition, imposition, proof reading and correcting, the foreman or overseer, the press and its working, warehouse department, orthographical, law and copyright, technical terms, &c....

S. B. Emery, a typo who has for the past three months been employed in our office, left for Denver on Thursday, having become sorely afflicted with "the plains" on the brain.

 

Robert Tracy has purchased the type and material o ...
May 26, 1866, Weekly Free Press (ID 627)

Robert Tracy has purchased the type and material of the Troy Reporter and will continue the publication of the paper.

Ward Burlingame is to be editor of the Leavenworth Conservative under the new dispensation.

The Paola Argus announces that G. A. Colton has taken editorial charge of the Free Press, Mr. Higgins retiring. The paper will support the administration. Mr. Colton is an Indian agent.

 

The Emporia News nominates Prouty of the Burlingto ...
June 16, 1866, Weekly Free Press (ID 633)

The Emporia News nominates Prouty of the Burlington Patriot for the United States Senate. This is a way the editors down in the Neosho Valley have of complimenting one another. The new candidate for Senatorial honors, and his paper, are thus mentioned by a correspondent of the Lawrence Journal: "The people of Burlington have been fortunate in having published in their town one of the most ably conducted sheets in the state, the Kansas Patriot, a neat, seven-column paper published by S. S. Prouty, one of those large, round, plump gentlemen, and withal possessing fine abilities as a writer and journalist...."

McReynolds and Kane have disposed of the Paola Argus to Major G. A. Colton, late of the Miami Press, and the latter paper becomes merged into the Argus. Mr. Colton says the paper will support the President, neither condemning him nor anyone else until they are known to be wrong....

 

Kansas Educational Journal. We are in receipt of t ...
June 23, 1866, Weekly Free Press (ID 635)

Kansas Educational Journal. We are in receipt of the June number of this publication. Owing to a change of publishers, it has been suspended since January last....It is published at Topeka, Rev. P. McVicar editor, and Prof. C. H. Haynes business manager....Under a law of the state, the Journal is furnished to the clerks of all school districts....Send names and one dollar each to Professor C. H. Haynes, Topeka.

 

The Leavenworth Times says a weekly paper is to be ...
June 30, 1866, Weekly Free Press (ID 638)

The Leavenworth Times says a weekly paper is to be started in North Lawrence called the Advertiser. It says that, where two years ago there was scarcely a dwelling house, in a district covered by a dense forest, there are now some 20 thriving business establishments...and a growing young city of about 1,500 inhabitants....

 

We have received the first number of a new paper j ...
July 14, 1866, Weekly Free Press (ID 641)

We have received the first number of a new paper just started at Platte City, Mo., by Park & Field, and called the Reveille. Mr. Park, the editor, was formerly with this paper as local editor....

 

Senator Ross. Congress has not yet adjourned and t ...
July 28, 1866, Weekly Free Press (ID 650)

Senator Ross. Congress has not yet adjourned and the new Senator from Kansas has a prospect of a brief period of official service the present session. He will have six or eight weeks service next winter, at least, before the Senator to be elected to fill the vacancy can arrive to take his seat....He is one of the oldest citizens of Kansas and has always been true to freedom. He came from Ohio to Kansas and, as early as in 1856, became one of the publishers of the Topeka Tribune, a staunch Free State paper. Retiring from that paper in 1859, in connection with his brother, Maj. W. W. Ross, he established the State Record. Edmund G. Ross, the Senator, in 1862 raised a company for the 11th Kansas and became its captain. He was promoted to major and served through the war with great credit....

 

H. P. Stebbins, for the past two years the editor ...
August 18, 1866, Weekly Free Press (ID 659)

H. P. Stebbins, for the past two years the editor and publisher of the Hiawatha Sentinel, has sold out to Ira J. Lacock, who will conduct the paper. The White Cloud Chief of the 9th pays the following compliment to Mr. Stebbins: "This week's issue concludes the second year of the Hiawatha Sentinel and H. P. Stebbins, the publisher, retires from the concern. In this connection, we wish to mention several facts which we do not believe have a parallel in newspaper history. Mr. Stebbins has published the Sentinel for two years without missing an issue, or not more than one at most; he has done all his job work, type-setting, press work, rolling, etc., without any assistance from any other person; the material, when purchased, was old and much worn, and among the rubbish he found an old, cast-away roller; with this roller, and on this material, he has brought out every issue of the Sentinel and done all of his other printing for the last two years. The paper has invariably looked neat and clear, and there has not been a better printed sheet in the state. Finally, we believe all the office work was done by daylight...."

 

As we have not got our eye on the new paper, the M ...
September 1, 1866, Weekly Free Press (ID 665)

As we have not got our eye on the new paper, the Miami County Republican, yet, we quote from the Bulletin....As its name indicates, it is radically Republican and, in the contest between the one man power of Andy Johnson and the people, it is radically right. Typographically the Republican presents a very neat and tasty appearance, which was to be expected from John McReynolds, one of the best printers in the West....

 

...We have recently engaged the services of L. R. ...
September 15, 1866, Weekly Free Press (ID 671)

...We have recently engaged the services of L. R. Elliott, who will hereafter assist us in the editorial and business management of the Free Press. Mr. Elliott is a writer of 10 or 15 years experience, having been connected as one of the editors with the Binghamton (N.Y.) Standard for the past eight years, besides having considerable experience with the press elsewhere East and West.

 

E. S. McKee has associated with himself in the edi ...
October 13, 1866, Weekly Free Press (ID 681)

E. S. McKee has associated with himself in the editorial management of the Olathe Mirror, J. L. Wines. Mr. Wines is a staunch Republican of the Lincoln school.

The Junction City Union will be published daily about the 15th. By that time trains will be running through to that place.

One half of the Ottawa Home Journal has been purchased by Chas. R. Prescott, late of Boston.

The Commercial is the name of a new Democratic paper in Leavenworth.

 

D. B. Emmett has retired from the editorial chair ...
October 20, 1866, Weekly Free Press (ID 683)

D. B. Emmett has retired from the editorial chair of the Fort Scott Monitor. Col. Webb, late of Wisconsin, who brings with him an experience in the newspaper business of 15 years, succeeds Mr. Emmett.

 

John McReynolds, editor of the Republican, has bee ...
October 27, 1866, Weekly Free Press (ID 684)

John McReynolds, editor of the Republican, has been removed from the post office at Paola and Col. Torry, a Democrat of the old school, has been appointed in his place.

 

We are in receipt of the first numbers of the Junc ...
November 10, 1866, Weekly Free Press (ID 690)

We are in receipt of the first numbers of the Junction City Daily Union, published...by Porter & Martin....This makes three dailies and one weekly started in Kansas within a month, and runs up the number of dailies in the state to 12, and of weeklies to 29, we think. If the population be 250,000, which it won't exceed, this makes 6,341 persons, or probably 1,200 families, support a newspaper!

 

Associated Press. There is a proposition on foot i ...
December 1, 1866, Weekly Free Press (ID 694)

Associated Press. There is a proposition on foot in the Eastern states to organize a new association for the purpose of furnishing telegrams in opposition to the present Associated Press. We would hail with pleasure such an organization, especially if it could be so managed as to furnish valuable items of news without encumbering the dispatches with such little trivial things as the picking of somebody's pocket on a New York street car, the death of somebody's horse, or a street brawl in which one rowdy cracked another's skull. The telegrams furnished to the press throughout the whole West have been so clogged with useless verbiage, nonsense and unimportant details that most readers have become disgusted, and all newspaper publishers greatly perplexed with them....

 

With today's issue F. A. Root discontinues his con ...
January 5, 1867, Weekly Free Press (ID 700)

With today's issue F. A. Root discontinues his connection with the publication of the Free Press. He has been connected with the paper for the past 18 months. -- Daily Free Press, Dec. 31.

Greeting. Beginning the labors of the year 1867 with this issue of the Free Press, we shall endeavor to make the paper more interesting, if possible, in its local department, and ever a welcome visitor at the fireside.... -- L. R. Elliott.

 

The Allen County Courant is the name of a new pape ...
February 23, 1867, Weekly Free Press (ID 715)

The Allen County Courant is the name of a new paper just started at Iola. It is edited and published by W. H. Johnson, presents a neat appearance.

 

Judge Adams of the Free Press, who has been for so ...
March 9, 1867, Weekly Free Press (ID 718)

Judge Adams of the Free Press, who has been for some weeks in Washington attending upon the council of Indians now in progress there,...was summoned home by a telegram announcing severe sickness in his family and the death of one of his children....

 

Salina Herald. This is the name of a neatly printe ...
March 16, 1867, Weekly Free Press (ID 719)

Salina Herald. This is the name of a neatly printed, large and very readable paper published weekly at Salina, a new and thriving town on the frontier of civilization, and some miles in advance of the U.P. Railroad. It is edited with ability by B. J. F. Hanna.

 

The Manhattan Radical of the 9th says: "Last Thurs ...
March 23, 1867, Weekly Free Press (ID 721)

The Manhattan Radical of the 9th says: "Last Thursday the stockholders of the Kansas Paper Mill Co. met at the court house and elected the board of directors for the ensuing year. Ed. Russell, W. H. Bush, M. J. Gove, E. C. Manning and Henry Laffer were chosen directors. The directors met in the evening and elected M. J. Gove president, H. Laffer vice president, E. Russell treasurer, E. C. Manning secretary, and W. H. Bush superintendent. Mr. Bush and the foreman of the manufactory have gone east after the machinery. The foreman mentioned is H. N., brother of the local editor of this paper and a man of considerable experience in the manufacture of paper. He left on Saturday, expecting to meet Mr. Bush at the celebrated Niagara Falls Paper Mill, on Bath Island, where they intend to examine into the method of manufacture there employed in converting straw into print paper, and decide whether the Kansas company will adopt it. They will proceed eastward to procure the requisite machinery for their mill. The process in use at Niagara Falls is comparatively new, but the mill has partially supplied the N.Y. Tribune for several years and is, we believe, owned by the Tribune company.

Valediction. My connection with the Free Press ceases from this date....I resign the position I have tried to fill for the past half year....I do not retire from the ranks of the profession nor from the state, but hope to take a position of more extended labors and usefulness elsewhere. -- L. R. Elliott.

We had a call from G. T. Isbell of the Grasshopper Falls Jeffersonian. The publication...has been temporarily suspended for a few weeks, but...will be resumed again next week.

 

Having sold the Free Press to L. R. Elliott and F. ...
April 6, 1867, Weekly Free Press (ID 725)

Having sold the Free Press to L. R. Elliott and F. A. Root, I close my connection with it today.... -- F. G. Adams.

With this issue of the Free Press the undersigned assume charge of it as publishers and proprietors.... -- F. A. Root, L. R. Elliott.

The Editorial Bow. Two weeks ago I retired from the editorial management of the Free Press with no certain idea then as to when or where I should turn up in the work again....Today I take pleasure in saying to the readers...that I begin the editorial duties in the old chair, but under different, perhaps more auspicious, circumstances.... -- L. R. Elliott.

 

The Atchison Free Press has changed hands, F. G. A ...
April 13, 1867, Weekly Free Press (ID 726)

The Atchison Free Press has changed hands, F. G. Adams retiring....Mr. Adams was the founder of the paper and has always been connected with it. We regret to lose him from the editorial ranks.... -- Leavenworth Times.

 

....The Free Press office will occupy the room ove ...
April 20, 1867, Weekly Free Press (ID 730)

....The Free Press office will occupy the room over John Bemer's Boot and Shoe Store on Commercial Street, near the Market.

The Reporter now hails from Wathena. The county seat question caused it to "forsake Troy."

 

With this number, Volume Three of the Weekly Free ...
May 4, 1867, Weekly Free Press (ID 734)

With this number, Volume Three of the Weekly Free Press is completed....To any person who will send us the names of 65 new yearly subscribers, with the cash in advance, we will deliver at our office a new Finkle & Lyon Sewing Machine which sells for $70 here....Should anyone get 35 subscribers,...we will give for the 35 half the price of a Finkle & Lyon machine. Or for 25 subscribers we will give Webster's Unabridged Dictionary (Latest Pictorial Edition)....

 

The Lecompton New Era has become the Kansas Weekly ...
June 1, 1867, Weekly Free Press (ID 741)

The Lecompton New Era has become the Kansas Weekly New Era and is now published at Medina, Jefferson County. Medina is on the U.P. Railroad, about 1.5 miles from Lecompton, and on the opposite side of the river....

The Wathena Reporter announces a change of proprietorship, Mr. Tracy, the former publisher, having disposed of the office to Snow & Larzelere.

 

The Emporia News says: "The first number of the Em ...
June 15, 1867, Weekly Free Press (ID 746)

The Emporia News says: "The first number of the Emporia News was issued 10 years ago yesterday. There were then only three houses in Emporia, one of them finished. The office was set up in the hotel building before the floor was laid. What an eventful 10 years, and how rapidly they have flown...."

 

Pottawatomie Gazette. We are in receipt of the fir ...
July 20, 1867, Weekly Free Press (ID 759)

Pottawatomie Gazette. We are in receipt of the first number of a lively and apparently able weekly paper bearing the above title, published at Louisville, Pottawatomie County....

The Wyandotte Gazette has again come into the hands of R. B. Taylor, its former editor and proprietor.

 

The first number of a seven column paper published ...
September 18, 1867, Weekly Free Press (ID 776)

The first number of a seven column paper published at Grasshopper falls by P. H. Hubbell lies on our table. It is a good paper, decidedly good....The Gazette...is radically Republican....

 

The Clarion. We have received the first number of ...
October 12, 1867, Weekly Free Press (ID 780)

The Clarion. We have received the first number of a new weekly paper with the above title. It is published at Lawrence by Whitney & Boughton.

Geo. C. Crowther has leased the Manhattan Radical of the proprietor, Mr. Manning. Manning, however, continues in charge of the editorial department. Crowther is a practical printer.

 

John McReynolds has retired from the editorial cha ...
October 26, 1867, Weekly Free Press (ID 784)

John McReynolds has retired from the editorial chair of the Miami County Republican, and is succeeded by B. M. Simpson....

 

The foreman of our newspaper department, Michael L ...
December 21, 1867, Weekly Free Press (ID 799)

The foreman of our newspaper department, Michael Lawlor, leaves us today to take up his residence in Columbia, Mo....Mr. Lawlor's place will be filled by Geo. W. Buckingham, who is a good printer with several years experience and has been employed in our office for some time past.

We are to have a German paper in Atchison. A letter received today from H. W. Kastor of Wyandotte, who was in the city a few days ago making preliminary arrangements, informs us that he has decided to come here, and will commence the publication of Die Fackel (The Torch) semi-weekly and weekly about the first of January....The office will be in the rooms adjoining the Free Press office, and we shall print the paper on our power press....

 

E. H. Snow and G. W. Larzelere have dissolved part ...
January 4, 1868, Weekly Free Press (ID 802)

E. H. Snow and G. W. Larzelere have dissolved partnership in the publication of the Wathena Reporter. Mr. Larzelere is now sole proprietor.

 

Valedictory. From this date my connection with the ...
February 15, 1868, Weekly Free Press (ID 821)

Valedictory. From this date my connection with the editorial and business management of the Free Press ceases. I have sold my interest in the office to my former partner, F. A. Root.... -- L. R. Elliott.

The business of the Free Press in all its departments will be conducted, and all accounts of whatever nature will be settled, at the office, south side Commercial, near Third Street, by the undersigned, F. A. Root & Co.

An exchange makes the following remarks on ready edited papers, which are now becoming quite numerous in the rural districts: "It is rather amusing to pick up two or three exchanges whose insides are precisely alike. It may be well enough. It may be that it will aid in centralizing the sentiments of the people and do good...but somehow we can't help laughing at a sheet half Chicago and half something else -- the outside bearing the marks of an old hand press, and the inside the work of a cylinder."

If this should meet the eye of one Augustine, a printer, he is earnestly requested to return to his home in Ohio immediately and relieve the anxieties of a distressed family. Exchanges copy.

We have received number two, volume one, of the Kansas Family Visitor,...published at Baldwin City by J. E. Bryan and A. S. Corey. We recognize in the latter gentleman, a former chum of the publisher of this paper on the Quindaro Chindowan.

 

Our columns contained a notice the other day of th ...
February 22, 1868, Weekly Free Press (ID 826)

Our columns contained a notice the other day of the birth of a son to the publisher of our German contemporary. Today the youngster, who is also a son of Abraham, had performed upon him the ceremony of circumcision. The ceremony was conducted with all the usual solemnities, succeeded by rare festivities among the boys of Die Fackel office.

...That sprightly paper, the Hays City Railway Advance, will appear in a new dress and in an enlarged form on Monday next.

 

The Journal and the Zeitung, Leavenworth German pa ...
March 14, 1868, Weekly Free Press (ID 829)

The Journal and the Zeitung, Leavenworth German papers, have consolidated under the name of the Kansas State Zeitung.

 

The Grasshopper Falls Gazette has been removed to ...
March 21, 1868, Weekly Free Press (ID 832)

The Grasshopper Falls Gazette has been removed to Ellsworth.

 

The Champion came out yesterday enlarged and in ne ...
March 28, 1868, Weekly Free Press (ID 834)

The Champion came out yesterday enlarged and in new dress.

F. G. Adams was chosen Saturday by the Republicans of Lancaster and Grasshopper townships, in this county, to represent them in the state convention.

 

*Burrell B. Taylor's Repudiator, lately started in ...
April 18, 1868, Weekly Free Press (ID 837)

*Burrell B. Taylor's Repudiator, lately started in St. Louis, has been repudiated by the people. It has suspended for want of patronage.

 

Our splendid new Montague Power Press has done us ...
May 2, 1868, Weekly Free Press (ID 840)

Our splendid new Montague Power Press has done us excellent service in the issue of our large immigration edition of the Free Press. It run off 167 quires, making 4,008 sheets, in a little less than five hours. This is good evidence of the value of the Montague Press.

We learn from George Crowther of the Manhattan Radical that the paper mill at that place will be ready for operation in six weeks. Mr. Crowther is on his way to St. Joseph to purchase the engine for the mill....

 

We have received the first number of the Neosho Va ...
May 16, 1868, Weekly Free Press (ID 842)

We have received the first number of the Neosho Valley Eagle, published by B. K. Land, Jacksonville, Neosho County,...devoted to the principals of the Republican party.

 

Senator Ross' Explanation. The people of Kansas wi ...
June 6, 1868, Weekly Free Press (ID 847)

Senator Ross' Explanation. The people of Kansas will be glad to be convinced of the purity of Mr. Ross' motives in voting for the acquittal of the President. They never can be satisfied of the correctness of his judgment; and unless the united testimony of a host of witnesses be impeached, Mr. Ross stands convicted at least of vacillation and inexcusable weakness, if not of a positive violation of pledges, to vote for acquittal. But he asks for a thorough investigation of the charges made against him, and we hope it will be had. In the Senate on the 27th, he made a personal explanation, in which he says he had been and still was an earnest opponent to Mr. Johnson's Reconstruction policy, and that he was very anxious that the administration of the Government should accord with the views of the dominant party of the country and plans of Congress; but he could not with the light before him declare the President guilty of high crimes and misdemeanors on mere differences as to Government policy. He called on the Senate to assert the integrity of his conduct as one of the judges and to denounce the falsehood set afloat affecting his honor as a Senator, and demanded of the Senate that all charges of Impeachment influence brought to bear on Senators should be speedily and thoroughly examined into, and not be committed to secret investigation. He challenged any man to appear before the Senate and exhibit accusations or evidence against him, and announced that he should call by motion that all testimony taken by the Managers should be laid before the Senate, and said that it was true that up to a few days previous to taking the vote he intended to support a portion of the articles, and so told different persons, but he changed his mind, being fully convinced that it would be wrong to vote for conviction; but no man had positive assurance that he would vote for conviction or acquittal on the 11th or either of the other articles voted on prior to Thursday, the 14th. That his colleague had no such assurance, but was fully informed of his position on those articles, will be amply shown on the investigation contemplated by the testimony of the Senators on both sides of the question of impeachment. Senator Ross closed as follows: "Mr. President, I feel that this charge is heralded all over the land, and evidence ostentatiously sought to sustain it to make me a scape goat for the egregious blunders, weakness and hates which have characterized this whole Impeachment movement, itself a stupendous blunder, from its inception to the present time. I have been singled out as the object of assault, doubtless because I am a new member, untrained in debate, unknown in politics, and comparatively without the means of self-defense possessed by abler and more experienced members. I am conscious of these disadvantages, as well as of the strength and malignity of my accusers. They have today at their back a large majority of the great patriotic party to which they and I belong; with nearly all its machinery of vengeance, while i have but a feeble voice, backed, however, by that never failing source of strength, my own conscientiousness of rectitude and honest purpose. Let them do their worst; there is a just people behind us all who constitute the court of last resort, in which all our acts are tried and judged. Dearly as I love my hard-earned reputation, the chief property of myself, my wife and my children, profoundly as I appreciate my own weakness, and the strength of my accusers, I am upheld by a consciousness of rectitude which no power can shake, and I bid defiance to them and their calumnies."

 

Employed in the Free Press office is a colored man ...
July 11, 1868, Weekly Free Press (ID 853)

Employed in the Free Press office is a colored man. He is a pressman. He has been a pressman for 12 years. While a slave at St. Joseph, he hired his time and learned to work a press in the old Gazette office. In the course of the rebellion, he came to Atchison and became free. He has been in the Free Press office for three years and more, and during that time not many impressions of the paper have been worked off that Alf has not had a hand in. He is as honest and prudent as he is industrious and faithful; he is rearing and educating a large family. He has bought a lot and built him a house, and in a few weeks he will have the last dollar paid on his homestead....