Home

About

Newspapers

Communities

Search

Contact

Spotlight

First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Weekly Herald

Articles in database from Weekly Herald:    48

The editor of the Register ? the great and self-im ...
August 4, 1855, Weekly Herald (ID 3121)

The editor of the Register ? the great and self-important "National Anti-Bogus Democrat" of Kansas ? professes the most profound ignorance of our politics and inquires if we are Democrat or Whig. To ask the editor of a Democratic journal if he is Democrat or Whig, to say the least of it, is a foolish and impertinent question....Surely Mr. Delahay must have been in a stupor when he propounded so puerile and ridiculous a question. Although we are, and ever have been ? from sentiment and conviction ? a warm and faithful advocate of Democracy, we repudiate the immediate organization of a Democratic party in this Territory ? as proposed by Mr. Delahay ? as premature, unwise, and uncalled for. We look upon the subject of slavery as paramount to all other questions in this Territory and shall never permit...to blind and distract the attention of the Pro-slavery party of this Territory from the great paramount question upon which the fate of Kansas ? aye, of the whole South ? is suspended.

 

With the present number, the Kansas Weekly Herald ...
September 22, 1855, Weekly Herald (ID 3125)

With the present number, the Kansas Weekly Herald enters upon the second year of its existence, under circumstances peculiarly encouraging to its proprietors. Although its publication was commenced when there was not a single house in the place,...it has attained a most enviable position among western journals, and now shines forth as the brightest star in the social, literary and political firmament of Kansas....It has now an immense circulation, penetrating every State and Territory in the Union....Our open and fearless course has brought upon the Herald persecution and opposition that no one can conceive of. It has been denounced, abused and traduced by the entire Abolition press of this Territory....If misrepresentation and vilification could have killed it, it would have long since ceased to exist....During the past six months, an increased and still increasing list of subscribers has furnished ample proof of the esteem in which our paper is held by the friends of the South....

 

All persons indebted to the Herald office for the ...
October 13, 1855, Weekly Herald (ID 3129)

All persons indebted to the Herald office for the past year are hereby notified that they must pay up. One year is as long as we can afford to print on a credit. Mr. Pollard will call on those indebted to us...and we hope they will be prepared to settle....

Leavenworth City now contains a population of 1500 inhabitants with over 500 voters. There are at least 300 buildings in the place, and 12 months ago there were not more than 50 persons here and only three buildings.

 

We had a keg of ink put off at our levee by the (s ...
November 3, 1855, Weekly Herald (ID 3133)

We had a keg of ink put off at our levee by the (steamboat) Genoa, marked Herald office. Someone has taken it away by mistake, or rolled it in the river. If any person has taken it away by mistake, he will please return it to this office.

 

That the effort to organize a National Democratic ...
November 10, 1855, Weekly Herald (ID 3135)

That the effort to organize a National Democratic party in Kansas has most signally failed is now pretty generally admitted. Even Delahay, the reputed organ of the party,...has in a great measure abandoned the project....It was so understood, and pretty generally believed,...that Delahay came here as a Pro-slavery man, with Southern feelings and sentiments, and that his paper would take a high conservative tone on the slavery question, and in favor of making Kansas a slave state. He raised the wind and set his sails in the breeze of organizing the National Democracy party in Kansas. Failing to make any headway, he makes a tack, finds fault with the Kansas Legislature, its laws, and the Border Ruffians, which all at once become very odious, and now it is said he is acting with the Free State party. If this be so, let him show his hand, that the people may know where to find him....

A. L. Bounds and Henry Leis propose to publish a paper at Lawrence, K.T., to be called the Lawrence Southerner. They are both practical printers, and one of them with whom we are acquainted we know to be a good writer, and well qualified for conducting a paper. These gentlemen propose to beard the lion of abolitionism in his den....

 

Wednesday last was a proud and glorious day for th ...
November 17, 1855, Weekly Herald (ID 3137)

Wednesday last was a proud and glorious day for the State Right men, the law and order men of the Territory. There was a grand rally, a great outpouring of the people here on the 14th....It will be a day long to remember, for the death knell of the abolition, nullification and revolutionary party was sounded. The people have spoken, in tones not to be misunderstood, that law and good order shall be preserved....

Hazzard of the Pioneer wants to know who elected L. J. Eastin (the Herald editor) to the Legislature. As he seems to be literally a know nothing, we suppose this may account for his ignorance. If we wasn't afraid he would "flay" us alive, we would tell him that Reeder set the returns of the Leavenworth polls aside (just as he wants to do now) and, finding no such excuse at the other polls, declared us elected by the votes at Hickory Point.

 

*Delahay has shown the cloven foot in the last Reg ...
November 24, 1855, Weekly Herald (ID 3139)

*Delahay has shown the cloven foot in the last Register. Coming here a professed Pro-slavery and Southern man, and National Democrat, he raised the standard of National Democracy, said he had planted himself on the Pro-slavery platform of the Lexington, Mo., convention, and induced men both in conversation and through his press to believe he was a sound and conservative Pro-slavery Democrat....

This is the language of Delahay before he was taken up and elected a delegate to the Topeka Convention, and now he has the boldness to come out and declare "that Kansas would be a free state...is what we believed and this is what we advocate."

Thanks to our friend J. L. Roundy for a magnificent arm chair presented to the Herald office....He will long be held in remembrance for presenting the first chair to the first paper printed in the Territory. We can now write easier, talk better, and enjoy the luxury of a cushioned chair equal to any of our city contemporaries....

 

*The editor of the Register takes it in high dudge ...
December 1, 1855, Weekly Herald (ID 3142)

*The editor of the Register takes it in high dudgeon that it should now be said the Register was commenced as a pro-slavery paper. How is it that paper could submit to congratulations from pro-slavery journals long since without taking it as an insult? And how is it he could pass by in silence notices from the Lawrence papers that the Register had changed front on the pro-slavery question? And how is it that the editor, when commencing his paper here, would let it be known that he was a Southern man? And how is it, if the editor has always been in favor of a free state, that he has never so expressed himself until the 17th of November, 1855? In the Register of that date is the first intimation we have seen in which the editor has directly expressed himself in favor of making Kansas a free state....

 

*The following is an extract from a letter direct ...
December 8, 1855, Weekly Herald (ID 3144)

*The following is an extract from a letter direct from G. W. Brown, editor of the Kansas Herald of Freedom, published at Lawrence, to the editor of the Peru Chronicle:

"...How long before I shall be an exile I know not. Daily and daily the clouds look more dark and portentous. I can hear the thunder. They appear near at hand. The lightnings! oh, their flash is seen along the sky! When the blow comes, if I fall in fray, I pray you find an arm to fill my place. Do not mind the sacrifice or the cost. As long as there is a dollar of means belonging to my estate, I pray it may be used in prosecuting this war....I have virtually received a challenge today. It was so intended, but I profess not to understand it. After my next paper is out, I have no doubt I will receive one direct and open. My answer will drive them to desperation, as it will appear through the press. I do not pretend to appear in the street with two revolvers and a Bowie knife. Seven men set upon me the other night, and attempted to drive me from my position. If profane words and fists swinging in the air could have accomplished anything, I should have been annihilated. I stood with my hands in my breeches pocket and told them, 'Threaten as long as you please, but don't strike.' Yours for God and Freedom. ? G. W. Brown.

 

*The Kansas War. The crisis of civil war which thr ...
December 15, 1855, Weekly Herald (ID 3147)

*The Kansas War. The crisis of civil war which threatened to invade our Territory has been brief. Never before have we witnessed such a state of excitement among our people. A few misguided zealots and deluded fanatics about Lawrence concluded they had the force of arms and were capable of resisting the laws successfully. But they had reckoned without their host, and had not counted the cost, if they had they soon found that it would not pay, and in accordance with Yankee character, that which wouldn't pay they soon abandon. So it was with these Lawrence outlaws.

The cause of all this difficulty, as near as we could learn them from reliable sources at Lecompton, are as follows: A man by the name of Coleman, who was living on a valuable claim, three Abolitionists determined to drive him off. They accordingly went to his house and gave him notice to leave forthwith or they would kill him. He left, armed himself, and returning, met with one of the men who had drove him off, who renewed the assault. Coleman warned him off. The fellow advanced on Coleman and continued to threaten his life, when Coleman shot him down, killing him almost instantly. Coleman then went and gave himself up to the Sheriff.

Then commenced other outrages by the Abolitionists. Coleman's house was burned down, his wife and children driven from their home to seek shelter where they best could. Other houses of pro-slavery men were burned down. Branson, one of the leaders of these outrages, was arrested on a peace warrant and, while in possession of the Sheriff, he was forcibly rescued by a mob, who bid defiance to the laws, declared they would recognize no officer of the Territory, and would obey no process in the Sheriff's hands. In the meantime, a meeting was held in Lawrence in which it was determined to sustain this mob.

In this condition of affairs, the Sheriff called on the Governor for a sufficient force to enable him to execute the laws. The Governor promptly called out the militia, issued an order to Maj. Gen. Richardson, and was particular in defining his duties, and that was to report the forces under his command to Sheriff Jones, who are to be used for the sole purpose of aiding the Sheriff in executing the law, and for no other purpose.

The Governor had pledged himself to see the laws faithfully executed, and let it cost what it may, he was determined to enforce the laws. This then was the purpose and no other. This being done, our mission was at an end.

The people promptly responded to the call, and in less than a week at least one thousand men, armed and equipped, were at the scene of action, ready and willing to carry out the Governor's orders. It was in the winter time. Many went illy prepared for camp life, or to endure the rigors of cold weather. But, nothing daunted, they determined to brave the vicissitudes of sunshine and storm, and all the exposures of a campaign, to sustain the laws of their country.

About 700 of the men camped on the Wakarusa, about six miles below Lawrence, and about 400 at Lecompton, 12 miles above Lawrence. Both parties had out their picket guards and kept a continual watch over the movements of the other. In one of the skirmishes between a smaller force of our men and a larger one of the Lawrence party, one of the outlaws was killed. This was the only instance that we heard of in which a collision took place. Shots were exchanged on both sides, with the result as above stated.

It is understood that Dr. C. Robinson was commander in chief and J. H. Lane colonel of the Lawrence force. They calculated largely on their fortifications and trenches for defense. Their three-story stone building could have been easily demolished, and their trenches and dirt breastworks would have availed them but little in a general engagement.

Added to this was their four or five hundred Sharp's rifles, and two pieces of cannon, one a 12-pounder received while we were there. This with about seven or eight hundred men constituted their defense, upon which they vainly calculated to sustain their position. But they would have stood no more chance before the invincible Law and Order men than a bobtail pony in fly time.

But the shedding of blood between our fellow men, all of the same great country, was to be a sterner resort and, much as we should have regretted to witness it, yet our men were prepared for any emergency. The governor, in all his counsels, exhorted prudence and caution. And in order to avoid the effusion of blood, which at one time seemed almost inevitable, he determined to call on the President of the United States for the troops at Fort Leavenworth....

Gov. Shannon received an answer that the troops would be placed at his disposal after he had exhausted every effort to quell the insurrectionary movement at Lawrence. Whether the troops were call on by Gov. Shannon, we are not advised, but we understand they were called out.

A committee from Lawrence waited upon Gov. Shannon at his headquarters at Wakarusa, asking a compromise with him. Gov. Shannon met with them the next day at Lawrence and was received with manifestations of joy by the citizens. After a second conference, in which they agreed in writing to submit to, and sustain the laws of, the Territory, and furnish a posse at any time when called on by the Sheriff to execute any process, or arrest any offenders of the laws, the Governor issued the following order:

Kansas Territory, Camp Wakarusa, Dec. 8, '55. Maj. Gen. Richardson ? Sir: Being fully satisfied that there will be no further resistance to the execution of the laws of this Territory or to the service of any legal process in the county of Douglas, you are hereby ordered to cross the Kansas River to the north side, as near Lecompton as you may find is practicable, with your whole command, and disband them at such time and places, and in such portions as you may deem most convenient. Yours with great respect, Wilson Shannon.

The troops were accordingly disbanded and retired home. What the details of the negotiation are we are not advised....But we are satisfied they are fair and honorable. We were called out for the purpose of enforcing obedience to the laws; this being done, our mission was at an end....Those revolutionary spirits yielded obedience to the supremacy of the law, and agreed to abide by them hereafter. If they do not, the responsibility, which will be fearful, rests upon their own heads.

It is much better that this affair terminated without bloodshed. Civil war is to be dreaded by all good citizens....

AFTER an absence of eight or ten days from our post, to the Seat of War, we have returned and resumed the pen ? a weapon which we always keep Sharp pointed and ready for use, and expect now to handle it much to the annoyance of the traitors and their aiders and sympathizers throughout the Territory. (Lucian Eastman)

 

*The Register, after prating about National Democr ...
December 22, 1855, Weekly Herald (ID 3148)

*The Register, after prating about National Democracy, has at last come out against the Democratic administration. In this it has shown its true colors, for we have never had much confidence in its Democracy. Now that it has unmasked itself, and shown the cloven foot, we know where to place it among its allies at Lawrence, all laboring for the same great end, a free and abolition state....

*The Register, in alluding to the recent difficulties at Lawrence, and justifying their conduct, thus slanders the Missourians and those who responded to the Governor's call. The Register says: "They bear directly down upon Lawrence, swearing vengeance ? That they will raze the town, murder the men, ravish the women, and kill the children." That men from Missouri came over, and volunteered their services in the Kansas Militia, and made themselves subject to our laws, and were willing to give their aid and support in sustaining the laws we doubt not. This they had a right to do. But that they came swearing vengeance, as described in the Register, is a base libel and slander upon as generous and noble people as ever lived under the sun. That such a people swore they would ravish women, and murder children, cannot be believed by the author of the article. It is written and published for political effect elsewhere....

*The Register, after giving currency to the false and unwarrantable statements that our troops, while out at Lawrence, committed murder, theft, and acts of violence, then says: "We would simply suggest to our friends that a day of reckoning may come, when their many 'friendly acts' will be remembered." We are to understand by this, we suppose, that if Kansas should ever be so unfortunate as to become a free state (which God forbid) then these acts that are now charged against pro-slavery men are to be visited upon their heads....Who is there among our citizens, that prefer Law and Order, and peace and quiet, can longer act with such a party that call themselves the Free State party?...

 

*The Territorial Register: The press and materials ...
January 5, 1856, Weekly Herald (ID 3151)

*The Territorial Register

The press and materials of the Register office were destroyed on Saturday evening, Dec. 22d, about 8 o'clock. The press was put in the river.

The public mind had become highly excited in consequence of several inflammatory and abusive articles that had appeared in the few last numbers that were issued. Though it was established as a conservative high-toned National Democratic paper, it soon doffed the robe it had put on and appeared in its true colors as an ally of the Abolition party.

It had been floundering about, denouncing first one and then another, until finally it made a bold and reckless charge, without any justification, charging upon the troops, who like good citizens responded promptly to the call of the Governor, that they went searching vengeance, to "raze Lawrence, ravish the women, and kill children." This, with other gross and unwarrantable articles, so inflamed the people that they determined to put a stop to it. Accordingly, on the evening above mentioned, they went without molestation and silenced the Press by putting it in the river.

The original proprietors of the paper, after the last abusive article referred to had appeared, transferred the paper to other hands, thereby showing they feared the consequences of their violence would be visited on their own heads.

The press had never been paid for, and was purchased by the endorsement of several gentlemen, outsiders upon whom the loss of the press will fall. The press was destroyed by citizens of the Territory; not a single Missourian was concerned in it.

The paper was in a sickly condition and fast dying out, and we counseled that it be let alone, to die of an overdose of Abolitionism. We did not know until about 11 o'clock next day the press had shared the fate of a watery grave.

...THE Herald of Freedom of the 15th, which was not issued until the 17th, and did not leave the town of Lawrence until after the 18th, after the last "Border Ruffian" had ceased to offend the nostrils of its editor, is now out, containing 12 columns of the "history of the war" filled with falsehood, treason and exultation. Our moderate men say let them boast ? let them talk, they must have relief after their long week of pent up breath....But should all of their falsehoods go uncontradicted? This paper, it is well known, has been gotten up for effect in Yankee-land, but if such statements are permitted to go abroad without refutation, our friends will be deceived. Under this view of the matter, it is the duty of the entire Law and Order press of the country to expose this unfair dealing....It is the duty of every honest press to expose them.

 

*The Topeka Kansas Freeman states that "one of the ...
January 12, 1856, Weekly Herald (ID 3155)

*The Topeka Kansas Freeman states that "one of the gang of midnight assassins" who destroyed Delahay's press was shot by one who was sleeping in the office at the time of the attack. This will be news to the people here, where the facts are all known.

The office was destroyed while everybody in town was up, and the press was put in the river, as we learn, by the assistance of a brother of the Wm. Phillips who was tarred and feathered. There was no one sleeping in the office at the time; if there was, he made his escape very unceremoniously.

The fact is, there are but very few of our citizens that care anything about the Register press, or its destruction. It had deceived and betrayed men who would have been its friends, and denounced all who did not come up to its standard of orthodoxy. Had abused and afterwards supported Reeder, professed National Democracy and then denounced the administration. Had professed Southern principles and then fell into the embraces of Abolitionism; had been on every side and no side, had sustained the Kansas Legislature and then repudiated it, professed to be in favor of Law and Order and then supported and sustained the revolutionary movement that brought about the open rebellion to the laws at Lawrence; and finally denounced the Law and Order men with going to Lawrence swearing to ravish its women and murder the children. The fact is, the paper had got so low, there were none to protect it.

Officers of the Northern Division, Kansas Militia ? Wm. P. Richardson, major general; F. J. Marshal, brigadier general 1st Brigade; L. J. Eastin, brigadier general 2nd Brigade....

 

*Shall Kansas Be a Slave State?: We have every con ...
January 25, 1856, Weekly Herald (ID 3156)

*Shall Kansas Be a Slave State?

We have every confidence it will. Thus far, the Pro-slavery party have maintained the ascendancy. We have every confidence the Southern states will do their duty in the impending struggle. If they do not, away goes all their hopes. Then we say to the Southern states, you must settle Kansas with men who will stand up for your rights and, if need be, fight for them too. From every quarter in the South we hear they are coming! Come on, now is the time, and now the struggle that is to decide the destiny of Southern rights.

 

The new year opens finely for the Kansas Herald. N ...
February 2, 1856, Weekly Herald (ID 3159)

The new year opens finely for the Kansas Herald. New subscribers from every quarter continue to pour in upon us....We must return our thanks to our friend Jarret Todd for a club of 10 subscribers at Marysville, Nodaway County, Mo....We have no right to complain, our most sanguine anticipations have been more than realized. This paper is established on a permanent basis with a host of friends to back us. It has more than sustained itself and is now paying well....Thanks to T. J. Fain at Unionville, Tenn., for a club of 20 subscribers....

 

*Abolition lies....That Missourians came over here ...
February 9, 1856, Weekly Herald (ID 3160)

*Abolition lies....That Missourians came over here and destroyed the Register press. This is so absurd that everybody here only laugh at the impudence of those who make the statements. We say, and challenge any man here or elsewhere to contradict it, that Missourians did not come over here and destroy or aid in destroying the Register press.

 

From the Topeka Freeman, a Free State paper, we le ...
March 1, 1856, Weekly Herald (ID 3162)

From the Topeka Freeman, a Free State paper, we learn that "sentries patrol the streets at night and challenge every man who happens to be out beyond a given hour; while a guard is kept in all the fortifications, erected for the defense of the city."

They are greatly in fear of having their city destroyed by Missourians. This is their plea. They had better all go to work, become good citizens, mind their own business, and let others alone, and they need fear no danger. But Brown of the Herald of Freedom, each week in his paper, comes out and invites an attack.

 

From the Lexington (Mo.) Express:: *The good steam ...
March 15, 1856, Weekly Herald (ID 3164)

From the Lexington (Mo.) Express:

*The good steamer Arabia, Capt. John S. Shaw, arrived at our wharf about sunrise this morning. Immediately on landing, a committee was dispatched uptown to inform our citizens that a person from Massachusetts was on board, having in his possession 100 Sharp's rifles and two cannon! destined for service in Kansas and sent forward by the Massachusetts Aid Society.

This information brought together many of our most respectable and reliable citizens, when a conference was had by them with Mr. "Start" with view of inducing him to leave the "dangerous" weapons with our citizens for safekeeping. This he assented to and delivered the "goods" up, subject to the requisition of Gov. Shannon or his successor in office. The proceedings were orderly and...no one talked of violence to the poor fool that could so heartlessly lend himself to such unnatural work. The arms were locked up and marked "carpenters' tools."...

 

*Thos. J. Kay, the able editor of the Tuscumbia (A ...
April 5, 1856, Weekly Herald (ID 3167)

*Thos. J. Kay, the able editor of the Tuscumbia (Alabama) Enquirer, is now canvassing his state for a paper to be located in Kansas Territory. At the last account, he had obtained 1,000 subscribers. We received a dispatch from him in which he intimates he will locate at Lecompton. He will bring press, materials, &c., to print a first-rate States Rights paper.

 

*Late Disturbance at Lawrence ? Sheriff Jones Shot ...
April 26, 1856, Weekly Herald (ID 3169)

*Late Disturbance at Lawrence ? Sheriff Jones Shot, Probably Killed

The same fell spirit of Abolitionism and higher-lawism still pervades Lawrence. Sheriff Jones, in the exercise of his duties, arrested S. N. Wood on Saturday last. He was immediately rescued.

On the following day, Jones took four men to arrest Wood and others at Lawrence, when he again met with resistance and was treated with all sorts of indignities by a mob, who denounced Jones and declared they would resist the laws unto death.

A dispatch was sent to Fort Leavenworth and Lieut. McIntosh with 10 soldiers were sent out to aid in the arrest. While at Lawrence, six men were arrested by Lieut. M. without resistance. But threats of vengeance and revenge were made against Jones, who was there aiding in the arrests. Jones, while standing by Lt. M., was shot by one of the outlaws. Jones was then taken into Lt. M's tent and, while there laying down, he was again shot by one of the miscreants, who supposed he was helpless and in his power. Jones is badly wounded and supposed to be mortally.

This is one of the most base and cowardly outrages among all that has been committed by this lawless band. Jones was a brave, gallant and meritorious citizen, and a true officer. If he has fallen by the hands of assassins, his blood will call aloud for retributive justice. Can these lawless fanatics be permitted to take the law in their own hands and go unpunished? Will not every good citizen say no? Lawrence cannot rule the Territory.

Five companies, consisting of 300 men, have gone from Fort Leavenworth to the scene of disturbances, and it is said they will arrest the last offender and violator of the laws without any other troops....

WE MUST acknowledge the receipt of a large acquisition to our subscription list from Newman, Georgia; Franklin, Ga.; Simms Port, Louisiana; and Baton Rouge, La. Also a list of 21 subscribers from Arrow Rock, Mo., and seven from Tuscumbia, Mo., besides a number at St. Joseph and Savannah, Mo., all within the last two weeks....

 

*Arrest of Robinson: This notorious individual, as ...
May 17, 1856, Weekly Herald (ID 3172)

*Arrest of Robinson

This notorious individual, assuming to be the Governor of the State of Kansas, and who is one of the leaders in inciting the people at Lawrence to rebellion and resistance to law, took his departure from Kansas City on Friday last on the Star of the West for Boston. After getting his friends into difficulty by resisting the laws, and finding the crisis on hand, which was to test the strength of the Territorial Government, he ignominiously fled and left his friends to take the consequences of their madness and folly. He was arrested at Lexington, Mo., and is there detained subject to the order of Gov. Shannon. Writs for his arrest had been in the hands of the officer previous to his departure. Three gentlemen left here Wednesday with a requisition from Gov. Shannon for Robinson....

*THE LAST Herald of Freedom is full of inflammatory and incendiary articles, counseling resistance to the laws unto death. The editor says: "As affairs are working now, no earthly power can prevent a bloody collision." He further says: "Our men are arming themselves and training for war. Our women are formed into military companies and are practicing in the pistol gallery." This is the way the Lawrenceites "live, move and have their being." In place of turning their attention to industry and civilization, they are cultivating the art of war, encouraging treason, rebellion, and resistance to law. They are kept up and supported by the Northern Aid Societies, and it is a part of their duty to agitate and keep up strife, commit outrages, and then swear it was Pro-slavery men. Such conduct cannot be long tolerated.

 

*The Westport Border Times announces the arrival i ...
May 17, 1856, Weekly Herald (ID 3173)

*The Westport Border Times announces the arrival in that place of Maj. Buford with his company of 350 Southern emigrants for Kansas. They were kindly received and left the next day for the Territory. The Times says: "We have had the pleasure of an acquaintance with a large number of those belonging to the company and find them all gallant and accomplished gentlemen, and we predict a prosperous future for those chivalrous men, who have enrolled themselves under the Southern banner...."

 

*...All knew the conditions of affairs at Lawrence ...
May 24, 1856, Weekly Herald (ID 3175)

*...All knew the conditions of affairs at Lawrence....The Marshal called upon all good citizens to aid him in maintaining the law and summoned them as his posse. About twelve or fifteen hundred men responded to the call.

The leaders soon commenced leaving the place and the dupes soon followed, until it is said only two or three hundred men were left. On Wednesday, the Marshal made arrests of all he could find against whom he had writs. Sheriff Jones was there in person, aiding in making arrests.

They got through, the posse dismissed, when the men determined the Lawrenceites should surrender their arms, a search was made for them, none could be found....The women and children during the day had left town, and was on the surrounding hills. The artillery was opened on the Free State Hotel, which belongs to the Emigrant Aid Society, but it was soon blown up and entirely demolished with all its furniture. The two printing offices were destroyed and buried in the Kaw River.

No resistance was made, and no violence was committed to private persons or private property. When our informant left, the citizens of Lawrence were in their houses and the Sheriff's posse had retired two miles distant. There were four pieces of cannon captured and a few Sharp's rifles. The report that women and children were abused or driven out of Lawrence is false.

 

*Lawrence Subdued: On the 21st, the U.S. Marshal a ...
May 31, 1856, Weekly Herald (ID 3176)

*Lawrence Subdued

On the 21st, the U.S. Marshal and his posse placed themselves in front of Lawrence. W. P. Fain, deputy marshal, by order of the marshal, went into Lawrence with a posse of eight men and made four arrests. The Marshal then dismissed his posse. Sheriff Jones then summoned all the men as his posse and with about 20 went into Lawrence.

Jones rode up in front of the Free State Hotel and, calling for Gen. Pomeroy, demanded all the Sharp's rifles and artillery, giving him five minutes to decide whether he would surrender or not. Pomeroy said he would surrender all he could get, and 15 minutes was allowed them to stack the arms in the street.

Col. Jones then requested Col. Eldridge to move his furniture from the Free State Hotel, giving him two hours to do so in. Eldridge declined, when the posse entered and removed most of the furniture into the street. It was the express orders of Sheriff Jones that no private property should be injured, and particularly that Robinson's house should not be touched.

They then carried the artillery to the front of the Free State Hotel and fired upon it until the walls began to fall; they then set it on fire and left it in ruins. The printing materials of the Herald of Freedom and Kansas Free State offices were thrown into the river.

After a portion of the posse had left, Robinson's house was burned. During the excitement, a man attempted to run, was hailed, he did not stop ? he was shot. A pro-slavery man was accidentally killed by the falling of a stone from the hotel walls. A receipt was given by Sheriff Jones to Gen. Pomeroy for all the rifles and cannon surrendered by him to the authorities of Douglas County.

The Free State Hotel and the printing offices had been declared nuisances by the grand jury of the county, and their destruction was in obedience to law. Robinson's house was burned after the Sheriff's posse had returned to camp some two miles from Lawrence. It was done by someone on personal considerations and, if by any pro-slavery man, against the wishes and orders of every officer in command. It must have been someone, at least, disconnected with either the Marshal's or Sheriff's posse....

THE PRESS and materials of the Leavenworth Journal have arrived. We learn the first paper will be issued next week. As an auxiliary to the Pro-slavery cause, we wish it abundant success.

 

Leavenworth Journal. This paper made its appearanc ...
June 7, 1856, Weekly Herald (ID 3178)

Leavenworth Journal. This paper made its appearance last Wednesday. It is published by S. S. Goode & Co. and edited by S. S. Goode. It is gotten up in handsome style...and edited with great ability. It is devoted to the pro-slavery cause and the equal rights of the South.

 

*The Outlaws in Kansas: The abolition aid societie ...
June 14, 1856, Weekly Herald (ID 3179)

*The Outlaws in Kansas

The abolition aid societies at the North have imported a set of outlaws into the Territory for the purpose of carrying on their unholy and hellish designs of abolitionising this Territory.

Lawrence was their headquarters, where last winter and this spring they had congregated a large force with cannon and Sharp's rifles, with a fort and trenches and fortifications, that was given out to be impregnable. But all this had no terror for men who were determined to stand by the constituted authorities of the country and see the laws faithfully executed.

In the first emergency, they managed to effect a treaty by false promises and pledges on their lips with treason in their hearts. The law and order party, which was sufficient then to have crushed them and their town, took their promises of obedience to the laws and stayed the hand of executing summary justice upon that law defying fortified place, and returned quietly home.

Again the war cry rang this spring that they were ready to fight. Their "men were drilling and women practicing in the pistol gallery." Outrages were being perpetrated, pro-slavery men threatened and insulted, the Sheriff shot down, the laws defied.

The Marshal called out a posse. Some five or six hundred law-and-order men responded to the call, and when these outlaws found their leaders had deserted them, and that they had to face the music, then they began their old game of compromising, saying they would resist no legal process. It was well known they defied the laws, and did not regard any process under the Territorial laws as "legal." It was only a quibble to make it appear to the country they were law-abiding men.

The facts all go to prove their professions hypocritical, and that they set the law at defiance. About this time, these valorous, law-defying gentlemen began to evacuate the place. They dare not face one-half or even one-third their number in an open contest when they too were fortified. True to their instincts of lawlessness, they have began a guerrilla warfare, and when they catch an inferior force, or one or two pro-slavery men alone, they murder them or take them prisoners.

The time has come that calls for prompt and decisive action in putting down the spirit of lawlessness and insubordination that stalks abroad in our Territory. It behooves every good citizen to assist in the work. These things cannot be permitted to exist. The South owes it to herself and the country to send men and means to the Territory to aid the law and order party, who have thus far stood the brunt of the difficulties in settling this new country. Let the issue be met now, in a firm but decisive manner, keeping ourselves in the right, and the victory is ours.

SUBSCRIBERS continue to pour in upon us from all quarters. Within the past week, we have received an addition to our subscription list of not less than 75 ? 10 from Carroll County, Mo., 25 from Newnan, Ga., and others from Nebraska Territory, Missouri, Kentucky, Texas and South Carolina. Thus the good work goes bravely on.

 

Major W. D. Wilkes is doing good service in the So ...
July 12, 1856, Weekly Herald (ID 3181)

Major W. D. Wilkes is doing good service in the South for Kansas. He is speaking in South Carolina and Georgia and awakening an enthusiasm among Southerners that will cause many to emigrate to our Territory....We see it represented in the Southern papers that he is to be connected with the Leavenworth Journal. He is a bold and vigorous writer, a clever gentleman, and will in the capacity of an editor do yeoman's service in the good cause.

 

The Kansas Tribune, published at Topeka, reports C ...
July 19, 1856, Weekly Herald (ID 3183)

The Kansas Tribune, published at Topeka, reports Col. Sumner as having publicly said that, in dispersing the Bogus Free State Legislature, he was called upon to perform "the most painful duty of his whole life."...Painful indeed! What was there about it to make it so "painful?" Painful to disperse a band of God-forsaken traitors! Painful to disperse a band of outlaws and vagabonds!...Painful to disperse a body of men who are plotting treason and rebellion!...If dispersing that Legislature (?) was so "painful" a duty to Col. Sumner ? "the most painful duty of his whole life" ? then we must infer that his sympathies and feelings are with the Free State men of Kansas....

 

*Slaves in Kansas: "During the last six months, th ...
July 26, 1856, Weekly Herald (ID 3184)

*Slaves in Kansas

"During the last six months, the slave population in this portion of the Territory has greatly increased. Many settlers from South Carolina, Virginia and other Southern states have wisely brought slaves with them, being the most effectual way of settling the question of slavery in the Territory. These are the kind of settlers we need here now. We want men of means who will open large farms ? work their slaves, and by experiment test the adaptation of slave labor to Kansas. Every farmer in the neighborhood assures us that their servants are much healthier here than they were in the South, and are capable of performing more labor...." ? Squatter Sovereign.

 

My engagement with the proprietors of the Kansas H ...
October 4, 1856, Weekly Herald (ID 3190)

My engagement with the proprietors of the Kansas Herald having expired, it becomes my duty to announce to you that my connection with its editorial conduct ceases from this day.... ? H. Rives Pollard.

*Robinson, Brown, and others of the prisoners who were released on bail addressed a crowd of jubilant hearers at Lawrence on the 9th.

*Abolition Route to Kansas

From their own statements, we learn the abolitionists have opened a road from Nebraska City to Topeka. Along this route in Kansas, new towns are laid out, at which settlements are to be made to extend protection to the marauding parties sent into the Territory. These towns are to be a sort of depots for storing provisions and other necessaries to support the hirelings sent out here by the Northern Aid Societies. They say this route is advantageous in being remote from the Border Ruffians....

 

A. W. Jones, editor of the Lecompton Union, after ...
October 18, 1856, Weekly Herald (ID 3192)

A. W. Jones, editor of the Lecompton Union, after an absence of some two or three months on a visit to the Southern states, is again at his post....He says the South is fully aroused in our behalf and will send many of her gallant sons to become actual settlers in Kansas, who will aid us in support of the laws and in crushing out rebellion and treason. The Union is an able advocate of our rights and its editor has done much good for the cause....Terms $2 per annum. To clubs of 20, $1.50 each. Address Jones & Faris, Lecompton, K.T.

 

Introductory. Notice was given in the last issue o ...
January 17, 1857, Weekly Herald (ID 3213)

Introductory. Notice was given in the last issue of the Herald that we would preside over the editorial department of this publication during the absence of the editor (Lucian J. Eastin) at Lecompton. We are now at our post.... ? S. Green.

 

White Cloud Chief. We have received the prospectus ...
March 14, 1857, Weekly Herald (ID 3226)

White Cloud Chief. We have received the prospectus of a paper bearing the above title, proposed to be published by Sol. Miller at the town of White Cloud in Doniphan County, K.T....The town of White Cloud is located on the Missouri River, a few miles below the Nebraska line, and bids fair to become a prosperous and flourishing place.

 

Lawrence Republican is the title of a paper to be ...
March 28, 1857, Weekly Herald (ID 3229)

Lawrence Republican is the title of a paper to be issued at Lawrence, K.T., by Norman Allen on the 20th April and every week thereafter. The editor says, "It will truthfully reflect the principles and policy which govern the Free State party in Kansas and the publisher will rest satisfied with nothing short of making it one of the best and most reliable newspapers in the West." Terms $2 per annum in advance.

 

The junior partner of the Herald, W. H. Adams, aft ...
April 4, 1857, Weekly Herald (ID 3231)

The junior partner of the Herald, W. H. Adams, after a long and arduous service in the cause, has resolved to take a holiday for a twelve-month. His place will be filled during the interim by W. N. Glenn. Mr. Adams, during his peregrinations in his holiday, will take great pleasure in calling upon our delinquent subscribers and, with a profound bow, suggest to them the propriety of immediate settlement.

 

In our advertising columns will be found a notice ...
May 2, 1857, Weekly Herald (ID 3238)

In our advertising columns will be found a notice of a printing office for sale. Anyone wishing to start a newspaper would do well to call on Dolman & West, St. Joseph, Mo., and examine the materials.

Jones & Bennett of the Lecompton Union have sold their interest in that paper to Rucker & Bowling. The new proprietors desire to procure the services of an editor to take charge of the paper.

 

*Wyandott City Register is the name of a new paper ...
May 9, 1857, Weekly Herald (ID 3240)

*Wyandott City Register is the name of a new paper just issued....It is published by M. W. Delahay and is neatly printed. The editor claims to be a national democrat and sustains the Free State party. He says: "With us the negro is not paramount, but purely a convenience or inconvenience, as one may think." The number of the paper gives evidence of ability and is conservative in its tone. The editor further says: "We are more in need of other things than we are of those elements which produce strife, ill feeling and political hatred with our neighbors because of a difference of opinion about a negro."

 

L. J. Eastin, W. H. Adams, proprietors. W. N. Glen ...
May 16, 1857, Weekly Herald (ID 3242)

L. J. Eastin, W. H. Adams, proprietors. W. N. Glenn, publisher.

 

The last number of the Squatter Sovereign, hithert ...
May 23, 1857, Weekly Herald (ID 3245)

The last number of the Squatter Sovereign, hitherto a strong pro-slavery paper, comes to us with the valedictory of Lakey & Hinton. They say, in transferring the paper into the hands of the Free State party, it was the only step they could take to save themselves from great pecuniary sacrifice. That they "have repeatedly called upon the South for aid and the response has been a moneyless one." We suppose the paper was not a paying one, and hence it has been sold out. It now comes with the head of "Free State" in glaring capitals. The new editors, R. McBratney and S. C. Pomeroy, say: "In the future, the course of the paper will be slightly different from what it has been." We have no doubt it will be "slightly" different! But how slight, time alone will determine....Are we to understand that they consider it a very slight matter whether Kansas is made a slave or a free state?...

 

By correspondent of the N.Y. Tribune: *The Kansas ...
June 27, 1857, Weekly Herald (ID 3264)

By correspondent of the N.Y. Tribune

*The Kansas Herald of Freedom; Its Repudiation by the Free State Men

Lawrence, K.T. May 9, 1857. A meeting of the Free State men was held in Lawrence last evening. The position taken, and which seemed to meet general approval, was to have the state organization thoroughly completed when the Legislature meets in June and, without making any active demonstration of forcing it into vitality, to allow the people to take and carry out such portions of the state, county, and town organizations as they might ratify by their vote, and thus quietly and naturally to allow the state government to grow in a living power....

Governor Robinson was called for. His remarks were chiefly in relation to the Herald of Freedom, published in this place. He said ? and there is no doubt but truly ? that he had neither time nor inclination to meddle or have anything to do with personal difficulties. But he added that the position taken for some time by the Herald of Freedom might be prejudicial to the interests of Free Kansas in the states where the true position of that journal is not known. Here in Kansas, it was almost universally repudiated, and was using all its venom against the Free State party that had been compelled to disown it. Gov. Robinson caused a little sensation by stating the causes of this course on the part of Mr. Brown. He said he had never intended to allude to them, and would not if the interest of the cause did not require it. He stated that when Brown of the Herald of Freedom was arrested last summer, he proposed to him (Robinson) and the other prisoners to sell out the Free State Party to Governor Shannon and the Pro-Slavery men in order to secure their liberation. This fact, it was stated, several gentlemen were prepared to prove by affidavit.

 

New Papers. We have received several new papers, r ...
July 4, 1857, Weekly Herald (ID 3266)

New Papers. We have received several new papers, recently established in Kansas. The Kansas News is a Republican paper just started at Emporia. The Advertiser is a neat independent paper just started at Elwood in Doniphan County, opposite St. Joseph, Mo. The Kansas Leader, a Free State paper, just started at Centropolis.

 

Tecumseh Note Book. We have received the first num ...
July 25, 1857, Weekly Herald (ID 3272)

Tecumseh Note Book. We have received the first number of a new paper just started in Tecumseh bearing the above title, and edited by Samuel G. Reid. In mechanical execution it is plain, neat and tasty....Politically,..."It will be thoroughly Democratic in principles, both Federal and Territorial." That's the kind of talk....

 

The present number is the beginning of the fourth ...
September 12, 1857, Weekly Herald (ID 3297)

The present number is the beginning of the fourth volume of the Herald....Where our flourishing city now stands there existed at that period a forest of thicket almost impenetrable....Our town was an experiment as well as our paper, but as time progressed each prospered with age....The past three years of our editorial career has witnessed the most stirring scenes of our life. Our Territory, organized into existence under the spirit of the Kansas-Nebraska bill, has been the scene of a fierce battle between contending factions. From her very incipiency, our affairs have been in a state of agitation and fanaticism has ruled the day. Lawlessness, revolution, usurpation, and civil war have all entered into the disturbing element....

 

...
September 12, 1857, Weekly Herald (ID 5666)

The present number is the beginning of the fourth volume of the Herald....Where our flourishing city now stands there existed at that period a forest of thicket almost impenetrable....Our town was an experiment as well as our paper, but as time progressed each prospered with age....The past three years of our editorial career has witnessed the most stirring scenes of our life. Our Territory, organized into existence under the spirit of the Kansas-Nebraska bill, has been the scene of a fierce battle between contending factions. From her very incipiency, our affairs have been in a state of agitation and fanaticism has ruled the day. Lawlessness, revolution, usurpation, and civil war have all entered into the disturbing element....

 

Died. In this city on Sunday, Sept. 27th, 1857, Ma ...
October 3, 1857, Weekly Herald (ID 3307)

Died. In this city on Sunday, Sept. 27th, 1857, Maj. Ibzan J. Rice, editor of the Leavenworth Journal....Mr. Rice was a good writer and a man of no ordinary intelligence....

 

L. J. Eastin, W. H. Adams, proprietors; W. W. H. G ...
November 14, 1857, Weekly Herald (ID 3325)

L. J. Eastin, W. H. Adams, proprietors; W. W. H. Gist, publisher.

 

New Papers.: The Palmetto Kansan is the name of a ...
November 28, 1857, Weekly Herald (ID 3335)

New Papers.

The Palmetto Kansan is the name of a new paper to be started at Palmetto, or what is known as Marysville, on the Big Blue, where the California road crosses that stream. J. E. Clardy, formerly of the Lecompton Union, is to be the editor and proprietor....In politics, the Kansan will be strictly conservative and constitutional, independent in all things, neutral in nothing, battling for strengthening the bonds of that great national party which has ever been the friend of law and order.

The Crusader of Freedom is the name of a new paper proposed to be started at Doniphan, K.T., by James Redpath. From the prospectus before us, the paper will be Free State....

 

We have just received a copy of the Daily Atchison ...
November 30, 1862, Weekly Herald (ID 4251)

We have just received a copy of the Daily Atchison Union. It is a neat little sheet but we'll be hanged if we can find out what its politics are.