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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Weekly Tribune

Articles in database from Weekly Tribune:    124

*Vol. 1, No. 1. John Speer, editor and publisher. ...
January 1, 1863, Weekly Tribune (ID 4274)

*Vol. 1, No. 1. John Speer, editor and publisher. Office No. 30, Massachusetts Street.

To the People of Kansas. We herewith re-commence the publication of the Kansas Tribune, a paper established by us in the early history of the Territory of Kansas, and the first paper published in what is now the city of Lawrence. We discontinued our paper in Lawrence, after publishing it some two years. Originally devoted to...free labor in Kansas, and opposed the institution of slavery everywhere; an advocate of the equal rights of men;...we see little reason to deviate from the general course then pursued....Free labor is established in our young state, but slavery is yet living, and has for the last 20 months covered our land with gloom, and sorrow and death....We helped elect, and shall support, Mr. Lincoln and his Administration. The Emancipation Proclamation we hail as the brightest harbinger of hope and permanent peace....

 

A Nice Premium. We will send one of Mme. Demorest' ...
January 15, 1863, Weekly Tribune (ID 4284)

A Nice Premium. We will send one of Mme. Demorest's Running Stitch Sewing Machines to any person getting up a club of 25 subscribers and paying $25.

Now is the time to subscribe for the Kansas Weekly Tribune, the largest weekly in Kansas, only $1.50. Paper has raised in price 100 percent -- and we may have to raise our price. Subscribe and pay quick.

We will furnish the Kansas Tribune and Godey's Lady's Book for $3 -- only the price of the Lady's Book.

 

Paper Made of Wood. The Boston Journal is printed ...
January 29, 1863, Weekly Tribune (ID 4291)

Paper Made of Wood. The Boston Journal is printed on paper made of wood by a new process. The paper presents a clear surface, is of soft and firm texture, and admirably adapted for newspaper purpose. The Journal states that this paper is not a fair test of what the manufactures propose to do, but it certainly proves that there are other materials than rags which can be used successfully in the manufacture of white paper.

 

Paper from wood is no longer an experiment. Its fe ...
February 5, 1863, Weekly Tribune (ID 4296)

Paper from wood is no longer an experiment. Its feasibility, its good quality and its cheapness are all proven....There is a mill at Rogers' Ford, Penn., now making printing paper from 80 percent of white or bass wood, and 20 percent of the coarsest flax fiber sweepings, which is in use upon the New York Times and Boston Journal....It is harder and firmer than paper from rags, only not quite so white as the best of rag paper....The cost of production is 6 cents a pound; the price at which it sells 20 cents. This is margin enough to tempt manufacturers surely....

Mr. Olney, editor pro tem of the Burlington Register, called on us yesterday. He says Prouty is doing well as quartermaster....

 

Shooting Affair. Yesterday afternoon, policeman Ha ...
February 19, 1863, Weekly Tribune (ID 4309)

Shooting Affair. Yesterday afternoon, policeman Hathaway had an encounter with Mr. Piquet of this city. The affray took place near Henry & Garrett's store and grew out of the Inquirer affair. They both shot at each other, one ball taking effect in Hathaway's ear. During the melee, someone cut at the policeman, but as we learn without serious injury. Piquet was not hurt. -- Leavenworth Times.

The Old Kansas Tribune Office. We notice that the building formerly occupied by the first paper ever published in Kansas is being torn down. We remember when this building was considered among the best buildings in Lawrence, but now it is about the only poor building on Massachusetts St.

 

Sol Miller is president pro tem of the Senate. Sol ...
March 5, 1863, Weekly Tribune (ID 4318)

Sol Miller is president pro tem of the Senate. Sol is steadily ascending the ladder of fame....If there is one virtue which, more than other, qualifies a man for public life in these times, it is good, sound practical sense, with a disinclination for much talk. That is Sol and, although he is the only man in Kansas every guilty of declining the nomination for governor on the ground of incompetency, we hereby present his name for that position in '64. -- Topeka Tribune.

 

The Nashville correspondent of the N.Y. Tribune pa ...
June 11, 1863, Weekly Tribune (ID 4354)

The Nashville correspondent of the N.Y. Tribune pays the following compliment to the Eighth Kansas boys: "The other evening I rode out to see the dress parade of the 8th Kansas Infantry near the city. Two of the field officers are journalists. John A. Martin, editor of the Atchison Champion, is one of the youngest but, by the testimony of his immediate superiors, one of the best colonels in our volunteer service. The major, Ed. F. Schneider, late editor of the Leavenworth Times, has also won honorable repute....

 

The Union Monitor is the name of a new paper which ...
August 13, 1863, Weekly Tribune (ID 4387)

The Union Monitor is the name of a new paper which supplies the place of the Marmaton Monitor and Fort Scott Bulletin under the firm of Emmert & Hayward. It is a large and well executed paper -- a little too large, we are afraid, to be profitable....

 

*Our Paper. We cannot postpone our paper, awaiting ...
October 3, 1863, Weekly Tribune (ID 4441)

*Our Paper. We cannot postpone our paper, awaiting our type. The necessities of our city demand newspapers. On the 15th of this month will be nine years since we first issued the old Kansas Tribune, and since that period Lawrence has never been without a newspaper, except for brief periods necessary to renew them after their destruction by raids. How often have we been asked, "When will your paper be out?"...

As soon as we had recovered from the terrible catastrophe sufficiently to think of business, we repaired to Chicago and purchased a complete printing office; all the materials are now arriving. In the meantime, we have thought best to avail ourselves of the offer of our kind friends of the Conservative, and issue our paper for the first number from their office.

The Kansas Weekly Tribune will be issued in its former size, and on entirely new material.

As our entire subscription list was lost, we have no means of sending to our subscribers. We shall have to leave it to each one of them to say how long each has paid us in advance and, as fast as such information shall be forwarded, we will insert the names on our subscription book with the proper credit. Those who owe us will confer a still greater favor by forwarding the little balance due.

We have suffered as severely, perhaps, as any of our grief-stricken neighbors in this terrible calamity; but we should feel ourself derelict in the duties which a good citizen owes his country if we failed to contribute our share towards reviving the business of our place, and sustaining the hallowed principles of Freedom for which our city became historic, and for its devotion to which this great outrage has been inflicted upon us....

Advertisements. We have a large lot of business advertisements on hand, both for Leavenworth and Lawrence, as well as several in other localities, which we cannot insert until we can get into our own office....

*Singular Retribution. A demon of the name of Scaggs was heard to brag in the streets of Lawrence that he had killed 11 men. Our son, John M. Speer, was found among the dead. His brother, William, after being a prisoner, picked up a gun where they had herded our horses to steal them, as the rebel loaded it, shot this fiend. Since, Thos. McFarland of Franklin has brought us the murdered boy's pocket-book, with notes and memorandums in his own handwriting, and a dollar bill on Simpson's bank, which was found in possession of the murderer -- showing conclusively that the murderer of the elder brother met his death at the hands of the younger brother with a gun loaded by a rebel.

*"A New Printer. At the case by our side we see the well-known figure of John Speer. He is sticking type, just as he used to be 30 years ago. His paper, the Kansas Tribune, was utterly destroyed in the Lawrence Massacre. Since that time he has issued one number of his paper from the Topeka Tribune office, and another from our office. He will not disappoint his patrons or be prevented from fulfilling his obligations even by such a terrible massacre as that at Lawrence. That is the reason he is sticking type. The thousands of friends of Mr. Speer, here and elsewhere, fully appreciate his devotion." -- Leavenworth Conservative.

*Mysterious Disappearance Connected with the Lawrence Massacre. Robert Speer, aged 18, and David Purington, of about the same age, slept together in the Lawrence Republican office the night preceding. The only intelligence of them since, which seems at all reliable, is that they were seen by a colored man in the cellar under the same building, until it was on fire, and afterwards going towards the Kansas river. Various reports have reached their parents, such as that they were taken prisoners and shot, and that they had hurriedly pursued the enemy into Missouri, and there enlisted in the army. Nearly all the bodies buried in Lawrence were recognized either by persons who saw them shot, or by their features or clothing, so that it is not believed they were amongst the unrecognized buried. They may have been buried by persons who did not know them, as several were in fields, because of their being so decayed when found that they could not be removed. They were known to be very anxious to join the army, and might have joined. As they were last seen going towards the Kansas river, they may have been drowned. We are authorized by Mr. Speer to say that he will give $100, and all reasonable expenses, to any person who may discover and identify his son, Robert Speer. Should he have joined the army, he has no desire to take him out, except with his own consent and that of the proper authorities.

Geo. T. Isbell has ceased to be the local editor of this paper. We part from him with regret. In our judgment Mr. Isbell is the best local editor there has ever been in this city, and we believe we know something about the matter. He can say what he wants to in a very few words and say it well and sharply....

Kansas has another new paper. It is called the Osage Chronicle and is edited by M. Marshall Murdock. The first number is handsome typographically, and is edited with ability....

 

Half Sheet. An apology is due to the readers of th ...
October 17, 1863, Weekly Tribune (ID 4452)

Half Sheet. An apology is due to the readers of the Tribune for issuing a half sheet this week. It seems that our arrangements were misunderstood in the Conservative office, and thus the half sheet has become unavoidable. Our own printing office will very speedily be in working order.

 

J. Kemp Bartlett has retired from the Times to mak ...
October 24, 1863, Weekly Tribune (ID 4459)

J. Kemp Bartlett has retired from the Times to make way for a gubernatorial successor. Mr. Bartlett has lived in Leavenworth many years and we have said as many hard things of him as any man living. Setch is the fortune of us newspaper men. But we give him the credit of always having been an honorable opponent. In business and in private life, Mr. Bartlett has always sustained the highest reputation and we record his retirement from the newspaper fraternity with sincere regret.

 

Boy Wanted. We want a boy 17 or 18 years old to ro ...
December 10, 1863, Weekly Tribune (ID 4492)

Boy Wanted. We want a boy 17 or 18 years old to roll, turn a job press, sweep out, and do miscellaneous little chores. No objection to take a "colored American of African descent."

Nemaha Courier. We have received a number of a new paper, published at Seneca, Nemaha County, bearing this title.

Our daily is a complete success, not that it pays yet, but its circulation thus far indicates that the people want it, and its onward road is certain.

"We have received the first number of the Kansas Daily Tribune, published at Lawrence by John Speer. It is neatly printed and well edited." -- Atchison Champion.

*"G. W. Brown has fitted up the handsomest suite of Ambrotype rooms in the state and is now ready to take the 'shadow ere the substance fades' of all those who may favor him with a call." -- Paola Crusader.

 

The daily, tri-weekly, and weekly Tribune are now ...
December 17, 1863, Weekly Tribune (ID 4496)

The daily, tri-weekly, and weekly Tribune are now fairly under way....We mean to make the several editions of our paper mediums of the latest and most important news from all parts of the state.

 

The Southern Kansas Herald has again made its appe ...
December 24, 1863, Weekly Tribune (ID 4503)

The Southern Kansas Herald has again made its appearance, Col. G. A. Colton editor.

 

New Paper. The first number of the Kansas Home Cir ...
December 31, 1863, Weekly Tribune (ID 4506)

New Paper. The first number of the Kansas Home Circle, published at Baldwin City in this county, is on our table. It is published by P. A. Emery and Joseph Mount, and is ably edited by W. F. Woodworth, state senator.

*"Kansas Daily Tribune. This is the name of a new daily published at Lawrence by John Speer, the former publisher of this paper. The first paper was issued on the 26th of last November. The typography of this sheet is of a very high order. The materials are all new, and this is of the greatest importance in making a good-looking paper. All will remember the difficulties and trials which Mr. Speer was obliged to endure on his first emigration to Kansas. He entered Lawrence when it possessed but few houses, when to live there cost great sacrifice. At one time during the Kansas wars, his house was once destroyed, and afterwards accidentally burned, and everything foreboded disaster and destruction. He endured these troubles and imminent difficulties in order that that state might be clothed in the garb of freedom, and never have hung about it the foul garment of slavery. In the affairs of the state, he has done much. In assisting to build up Lawrence and make it a prosperous and flourishing town he has done more. Only lately, when the city met with such terrible slaughter and outrage, when its streets flowed with the blood of its hundred murdered citizens and the city in flames, Mr. Speer was not left unharmed; his office was again consumed, his oldest boy shot dead, a second drowned or murdered, his home fired, himself fleeing to the woods to save his life. With all this upon the head of a father and an honorable man, he yet takes courage and proceeds at once to purchase a new office, and in a few weeks sends his paper again to his many subscribers. He publishes not only a weekly but a daily paper. John Speer will never be behind in any enterprise in which he engages. He deserves the best luck that Dame Fortune ever bestows upon her sons." -- Medina (Ohio) Gazette.

 

The Neosho Valley Register of Burlington has again ...
January 7, 1864, Weekly Tribune (ID 4509)

The Neosho Valley Register of Burlington has again made its appearance. It is now under the editorial management of H. N. Bent,...favorably known to the early settlers of Lawrence. When we wrote the first anti-slavery editorial ever penned in Kansas, under a tree south of the Emigrant Aid saw mill, Mr. Bent was making an immense noise hammering iron in a temporary blacksmith shop, part logs and part cotton cloth, close by. Since that he has been "hammering" the lawyers in southern Kansas, and now he is driving the quill editorial in one of the most flourishing counties in the state....

 

Pressman Wanted. A good hand-pressman can find ste ...
January 28, 1864, Weekly Tribune (ID 4520)

Pressman Wanted. A good hand-pressman can find steady employment by applying at this office.

*Files. By the Quantrell raid, we lost our office files of the Weekly Tribune. Our two sons, John and Robert, had files at the house which lack the following numbers: John's file from 22 to 34, inclusive. Robert's file, Nos. 1, 31, 32, 33 and 34.

*No. 34 was issued on the 20th of August and the largest portion of it was either destroyed in our office or in the post office. It was circulated in town, and the southern mail put in the post office. It reached Baldwin City and a few other points by mails which were started before the assassins came in, and we presume can be found. We will pay liberally for these lost numbers, and respectfully ask our friends to send them in.

 

A Happy Editor. We have just opened a neat envelop ...
March 17, 1864, Weekly Tribune (ID 4537)

A Happy Editor. We have just opened a neat envelope, and embossed "W" and "I" on the outside, and two elegant cards appeared with "Miss Mary Irwin" and "Mr. & Mrs. D. W. Wilder" upon them. We are glad to hear that friend Wilder has been so fortunate....The happy couple are now on a bridal tour East.

 

Wanted. A boy, about 15 or 16 years of age, is wan ...
March 24, 1864, Weekly Tribune (ID 4538)

Wanted. A boy, about 15 or 16 years of age, is wanted in this office, to roll, bring water and wood, and do general chores. A good boy will be well paid.

 

W. W. Bloss, formerly a merchant in this city and ...
April 21, 1864, Weekly Tribune (ID 4553)

W. W. Bloss, formerly a merchant in this city and afterwards local editor of the Leavenworth Times, is announced as one of the editors of the Leavenworth Conservative. Mr. Bloss has been absent from the state for some years. He is a pleasant writer, and we are glad to welcome him to the editorial corps of Kansas again.

 

Atchison Daily Free Press. We have received two nu ...
May 12, 1864, Weekly Tribune (ID 4567)

Atchison Daily Free Press. We have received two numbers of the Atchison Daily Free Press by F. G. Adams, formerly one of the editors of the Topeka Record. The name of the editor alone is sufficient guarantee that the Free Press will be just what it is, an able and spirited daily. Its typography is elegant, reflecting credit upon the printer, A. W. Moore, also formerly of Topeka....

"The Kansas Farmer. The officers of the State Agricultural Society have placed the Kansas Farmer under the editorial charge of the senior of this paper. Its business affairs and publication will be henceforth under the exclusive control of the Journal Office firm. The first number of Vol. 2 will be issued from this office about the 15th of this month. Its publication is delayed by various causes....It will be published monthly as heretofore; and on good paper, octavo form, size of the Prairie Farmer published at Chicago....The price will be advanced from 50 cents to $1 for single subscribers; 85 cents for clubs of 10 or more....H. E. Lowman & Co., State Journal."

 

Vol. 2, No. 24. John Speer, editor.: D. B. Emmert ...
June 9, 1864, Weekly Tribune (ID 4578)

Vol. 2, No. 24. John Speer, editor.

D. B. Emmert of the Fort Scott Monitor is now running a daily regularly, a very neat and spicy sheet. Mr. E. evinces great enterprise and deserves success. It is no easy matter to sustain a daily paper in its early days, but the people who would let it fail for want of patronage deserve to have their town fail with it.

 

Another Fallen. Eugene Q. Thacher, brother of T. D ...
June 30, 1864, Weekly Tribune (ID 4588)

Another Fallen. Eugene Q. Thacher, brother of T. Dwight and S. M. Thacher, editors of the Kansas City Journal of Commerce, was killed in a battle near Dallas, Ga., on the 25th of last month. He was 20 years old and a member of the 107th New York Volunteers.

 

Hampden Expositor. This is the name of a new journ ...
July 7, 1864, Weekly Tribune (ID 4593)

Hampden Expositor. This is the name of a new journal published by L. E. Olney at Hampden, Coffey County. It claims to belong to no party in politics.

 

Our new power press was set up last week and was n ...
August 18, 1864, Weekly Tribune (ID 4623)

Our new power press was set up last week and was not put in full running order until late Thursday afternoon, hence the reason of the failure of our subscribers to receive their papers at the regular time. This is the first time we have failed to mail The Tribune in season since we started last fall. Hereafter the paper will be mailed promptly.

 

The Jeffersonian, published at Grasshopper Falls, ...
August 25, 1864, Weekly Tribune (ID 4626)

The Jeffersonian, published at Grasshopper Falls, has changed hands. Mr. Dodge, who controlled it for over a year, has retired and it is now owned by an association....

 

We have received the first and second numbers of t ...
September 22, 1864, Weekly Tribune (ID 4643)

We have received the first and second numbers of the Kansas Patriot, published at Burlington, Coffey County, by S. S. Prouty....Mr. Prouty is too well known to need commendation....He commenced and published a paper a year at Prairie City in 1857, and was the first recorder of Douglas County after the Free State men took hold of the Territorial government....

 

The Emporia News. This journal has been under the ...
September 29, 1864, Weekly Tribune (ID 4650)

The Emporia News. This journal has been under the management of Jacob Stotler for a long time and it has been ably conducted. We regret...that Stotler has disposed of his interest in that journal....

 

We have received the first number of the Doniphan ...
December 7, 1864, Weekly Tribune (ID 4670)

We have received the first number of the Doniphan County Soldier. It comes from the ruins of the old Patriot.

 

Newspaper Difficulties. Many of our exchanges are ...
December 15, 1864, Weekly Tribune (ID 4671)

Newspaper Difficulties. Many of our exchanges are issuing half sheets, and some are stopping on account of the scarcity of paper. We do not intend to stop our daily, but the want of paper has suspended it for three days. We think we have a supply at Leavenworth, though we are not certain. The stirring events of the times make our paper important and our office has been beset for news since our daily stopped. One says to our foreman, "Do give us the dispatches on strips of wrapping, if nothing more." "But," says the foreman, "where are the strips? I can't see them. I might do it on a soft pine shingle, but these walnut things won't take an impression." The government occupies the railroads and freight cannot pass....One thing: the stoppage of our paper has learned Lawrence men to appreciate a daily.

 

The utter impossibility of procuring printing pape ...
December 21, 1864, Weekly Tribune (ID 4677)

The utter impossibility of procuring printing paper is driving many Kansas publishers to half sheets, and some are suspending entirely, awaiting the arrival of paper which they have ordered. Our supply is very nearly exhausted and we prefer to issue a half sheet to none at all. We have made every exertion possible to keep paper on hand, and shall issue next week if that already ordered reaches us. Government has the entire monopoly of the Hannibal and St. Jo road and, until its contract is filled, nothing else can be brought over.

By great effort, express charges and a good deal of telegraphing, we have succeeded in getting paper again and our daily goes on. The daily has been a heavy expense to us. It in no degree compensates us for our labor; still, we mean it shall go on, and its stoppage was merely the fault of the transporters. Our pride has something to do with our efforts in that behalf, our love of Lawrence and the future hope of our city still more; but none of our efforts are laid out for mere amusement. It is too hard work for fun. If any citizen thinks it is sport to get out a daily paper, let him watch the lights in our third story for a single night; or let him go in and see the foreman, spectacles on his nose, comparing telegrams and correcting proof; hear him hollow "Henry" at midnight for the faithful German who does "all work" to wake the pressman, and see that useful man rise out of a corner rubbing his eyes, and then adjusting the form, and getting ready to hollow for the roller boy, and then another rise up drowsy; and finally watch for Joseph, the carrier boy, coming in as the cock crows, the lights never going out from twilight in the evening till old Sol illuminates the morning; and he will hardly think all this is done for amusement. If our paper has been missed, we hope it has impressed our readers more fully with its usefulness and the necessity of sustaining it.

 

Last week commenced a new volume of our weekly. Ou ...
January 5, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 484)

Last week commenced a new volume of our weekly. Our paper was started two years ago as an independent enterprise and, except the interruption by Quantrell's massacre, has kept steadily onward. It is a permanent institution with a good list of subscribers, embracing the leading men of the state as well as the largest local and state circulation of any paper in Kansas. It is the best medium for advertising in Kansas and we take only paying advertisements. In its infancy and amid hard times, a few names were placed on our list on credit principles. That system is played out and we shall cut them off. We can't get paper or printers short of cash, and must have pay in advance to foot up.

 

The Kansas Farmer, after a long suspension, is out ...
January 12, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 485)

The Kansas Farmer, after a long suspension, is out again. It appears this time in a new form, its pages being nearly the size of the American Agriculturist and 16 in number. The copy before us is neatly gotten up, and reflects credit upon the printers of the Journal office....Published at Lawrence by John S. Brown & Co. Rev. J. S. Brown is editor....

 

A change has been made in the business and local d ...
January 26, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 487)

A change has been made in the business and local department of the Leavenworth Bulletin. H. Buckingham, local editor; Geo. Prescott, business manager, and Harry Anderson, foreman, all retire, and give place to J. S. Coulter and H. A. Crowell -- Mr. Coulter conducting the local and business department, and Mr. Crowell the job department.

 

Now that our paper begins to pay expenses, we prop ...
March 2, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 491)

Now that our paper begins to pay expenses, we propose, if properly met by our citizens, to enlarge our daily and start a tri-weekly. We commenced the enterprise when Lawrence lay in ashes and men thought we were crazy; but the times demanded something, and he was no lover of Lawrence who could not make sacrifices. We have sacrificed. But we care not to make money, especially now. We mean to build up a paper which shall be worthy of our city, and which shall grow with its growth and prosper with its prosperity....We shall secure additional assistance in the editorial department, and make special efforts to secure news. (John Speer)

 

E. P. Harris, the excellent and well-known foreman ...
March 9, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 492)

E. P. Harris, the excellent and well-known foreman and local editor in The Tribune office, was last evening presented publicly with a fine gold pen, by Houdin....He was called to the stage, where Capt. Haskell presented it in a few well-timed remarks.

We must stop unpaid papers. After the raid, we put all the subscribers on our list whom we thought might have paid for even a single week in advance, and left the matter to them. Now we know we don't owe any of them.

 

As many of our friends on the southern and southwe ...
March 23, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 495)

As many of our friends on the southern and southwestern mail routes have been anxious to get The Tribune oftener than once a week, we have the pleasure of announcing to them that we shall commence the publication of a tri-weekly edition of our paper next week, to be published on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays....Price $3.00 per annum.

 

S. Harry Anderson, a printer of Leavenworth, died ...
April 20, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 501)

S. Harry Anderson, a printer of Leavenworth, died in that city on Saturday evening last. We were acquainted with Mr. Anderson...in the Herald of Freedom office. He afterward was employed for a few months in the Free State office at Delaware, and then went to Leavenworth....

 

T. D. Thacher has sold the Kansas City Journal of ...
May 18, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 507)

T. D. Thacher has sold the Kansas City Journal of Commerce to R. T. Van Horn. Mr. Van Horn owned the paper for some years, and was its founder.

 

Capt. H. H. Johnson has revived the Baldwin City O ...
June 1, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 512)

Capt. H. H. Johnson has revived the Baldwin City Observer. The first number was issued on the 23d.

Capt. Christian, of this city, and Milton Reynolds of Detroit have purchased the State Journal. Capt. Christian is well known, and Mr. Reynolds brings to his new enterprise much experience, having been formerly one of the editors of the Detroit Free Press, and more recently connected with the Chicago Times.

 

This morning, we present to our readers our daily ...
June 8, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 513)

This morning, we present to our readers our daily enlarged and improved. It is now over one-third larger than formerly. The general progress of our city seemed to demand this renewed effort. The daily has not been a money-making concern to its proprietor, but we flatter ourselves that it has been to our city. We believe that the starting of a daily just after the terrible raid of Quantrell, when our city lay in ashes and 150 of our best citizens had just been massacred, was an enterprise of vast importance to our material interests. For several months it was a losing concern....We looked to a future when we might hope to be recompensed. For several months it has been paying expenses, and leaving a small margin....We believe we can appeal to our business men to sustain us. We hope we are not egotistical when we claim a disinterested devotion to the interests of Lawrence, co-equal with that of the most enthusiastic of our citizens.... (John Speer)

John McReynolds and J. W. Kane have bought the material formerly used in printing the Herald and have commenced the publication of a paper at Paola entitled The Miami County Argus....Mac is an old editor and a spicy writer, and understands the newspaper business thoroughly.

 

We always thought friend Christian enjoyed a joke. ...
June 15, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 516)

We always thought friend Christian enjoyed a joke. Our little allusion to the fact that one of its editors had been an associate editor of the Detroit Free Press wears on them. We didn't even say, what is true, that the Free Press was a regular secesh paper to the end of the war. It stings our neighbor to think of it, and he explains and abuses us in a column article. If the Detroit Free Press editors have all repented, we move they be paroled on taking the oath.

 

Kansas City Journal. This paper has passed into th ...
June 22, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 518)

Kansas City Journal. This paper has passed into the hands of Col. R. T. Van Horn. It will be recollected that Col. Van Horn was for several years its editor, and always made it one of the best papers in the West. Its editor did good service both with his pen and sword during the war, having served faithfully and efficiently as an officer during most of the period of the rebellion. We and Bob were apprentices together 25 years ago, and he was a brick then as he is now....

 

The Emporia News...comes to us with an announcemen ...
July 20, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 523)

The Emporia News...comes to us with an announcement of a change in the "name and style" of the firm by which it is published. O. J. & E. L. Hunt have sold the paper to its former proprietor, Jacob Stotler, and to the new firm is added the name of D. S. Gilmore....Gilmore...has had a large experience in the newspaper business. For a long time he was connected with the Leavenworth Times....

 

*Death of Little Joseph Speer. The tragic death of ...
August 10, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 534)

*Death of Little Joseph Speer. The tragic death of our little son has been before published; but, as neither the short hurried notices in our own paper or other journals were accurate, we give the facts.

David Sholes, about 10 years old, was frequently at our house, but never lived with us or was employed, except his presence sometimes suggested a request that he should do some little errand. A short time before the accident, he came and asked our son William to give him a quarter dollar, which he promised for his holding some boards while he nailed them. At first, he said he hadn't the change, but on looking in his pocket, found it and handed it to him, though he neither knew nor inquired into the use to which he intended to apply it. David, however, went to a neighbor's house a half mile easterly from our place and bought a common little single-barreled pistol of another boy, with which he soon returned boy-like to exhibit his purchase. It was loaded when he came to our house; we presume an old load before he purchased it. William Speer, aged 18 and well accustomed to and careful with firearms, was present. David proposed to fire it off, and William told him to step away from the two little children, and he walked away and, holding it in an opposite direction, pulled the trigger two or three times without breaking the cap. He then took off the cap and said, "Joe, this cap ain't good; go in and get me one." But Joseph stood still, looking at the weapon which David held in his hand and, pleased with it, said to his brother, "Billy, won't you buy me one?" and almost that instant it went off, striking Joseph just above the right ear, David jumping with fright and dropping the weapon, and Joseph falling instantly to the ground. William did not see him pull the trigger, and has doubts whether the hammer struck the tube at all, but has the impression that the pistol "hung fire," that is that the fire produced by the boy's efforts to discharge it only reached the powder at the instant when it finally did its terrible work.

Little Joseph never spoke after he was shot, though he cried violently for a few minutes, when he became spasmodic, breathing hard until he expired. The accident occurred at five o'clock in the afternoon of Thursday, the 3d of August, and he died at half past eight o'clock the next morning. Joseph was six years, 11 months and four days old.

He had never handled firearms and was never permitted to touch them. An impression has gone abroad that the weapon was an old one with which the children were at play, but is wholly incorrect. The utmost care was taken to keep weapons from the reach of children, and the father, then absent, had carried with him the only revolver kept about the house, merely to be sure that no accident could occur by its remaining where children could reach it.

To the family remaining, it is a terrible shock. Joseph was the third son who met a violent death; his two brothers having fallen at the hands of Quantrell's murderers, John, aged nearly 20, and Robert, 18; the body of the latter never found and supposed to have been consumed by fire.

At the time of this tragic affair, the father and writer of this sketch was absent, but was telegraphed and arrived at home yesterday morning in time to see his dear boy, whose body had been carefully preserved, removed to its last resting place in the cold grave.

The dear boy has gone forever. His joyous shout of welcome as the father ascends the hill to a beautiful home will no longer be heard. A mother's cherished child's sweet voice is hushed in death.

"A lovely being, scarcely formed or moulded. A rose with all its sweetest leaves yet folded."

Has withdrawn and faded away from earth, for a home in a better land. (John Speer)

 

We have just removed to our new office, east side ...
August 31, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 539)

We have just removed to our new office, east side of Massachusetts street, opposite our former office, third story. Our office is decidedly the neatest and best in the state. The compositors' room is 25 x 40 feet, elegantly lighted and ventilated; the press room 25 x 30 with skylight and windows. The balance of the story is divided into four rooms. The whole story is 25 x 100 feet with a fine balcony in front....Our whole material is new. In the news and book room we have the best assortment of type from the best foundry in the United States, Johnson's, Philadelphia. In our office the laws of 1864 were printed, and nearly every newspaper in the state pronounced the work unsurpassed by any that had ever been done in Kansas. We have about 1,000 pounds of book type, kept especially for that purpose and used for no other. In our press room we have a new first-class Hoe's power press....There are but two other presses of the kind in the state, at the Conservative and Record offices. We have contracted for, and had shipped, three other machine presses....When all arrive here...we shall have four steam presses of the latest and most elegant patterns. Our job room is unsurpassed by any west of St. Louis....We have the very best printers both in book and job work and expect to be able to give entire satisfaction....As to our politics, we do not think it necessary to do any considerable amount of "blowing" about it. We believe we are known, and we flatter ourselves that our principles are the principles of the people of Kansas....We pursued them when mobs threatened, and United States troops pursued their adherence while "ruffians" howled their anathemas, and threatened death. When Eastern Democrats denounced us as fanatics, as negro thieves, as tramplers on the Constitution, when a Border Ruffian legislature enacted laws making their utterance penitentiary offenses of two to five years, they were only proclaimed with more earnestness and defiance. In their defense we stood when power and patronage were against us, and we still intend to adhere to them through good and through evil report. (John Speer)

The Bulletin. This excellent paper has passed out of the hands of Col. Anthony, being purchased by C. C. Roys and S. S. Ludlum. We regret to part with Col. Anthony. He was a bold, outspoken friend of true principles. Mr. Ludlum is well known as a fine writer and his partner has a good reputation.

 

Three of the best job presses in the United States ...
September 7, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 542)

Three of the best job presses in the United States are now at work in The Tribune office, viz: Hoe's, Wells' Nonpareil Improved, and Gordon's Franklin Card and Bill Head....Hoe, Wells and Gordon are as household words with printers.

We have just received over 100 new fonts of type from New York, Philadelphia, Cincinnati, and St. Louis, all of the very latest styles.

 

The publishers of the Fort Scott Monitor have ceas ...
September 14, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 545)

The publishers of the Fort Scott Monitor have ceased the publication of their daily, and now issue only a weekly paper.

 

Baldwin Observer. The last issue of this paper sho ...
September 21, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 546)

Baldwin Observer. The last issue of this paper shows that it has changed hands. H. H. Johnson has transferred it to his son, W. H. Johnson, and B. F. Henry.

 

Gratifying Change. Most of the time since The Dail ...
September 28, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 549)

Gratifying Change. Most of the time since The Daily Tribune was started, a period of nearly two years, the telegraphic reports have been received from St. Louis through a "repeater" at Leavenworth. Often this "repeater" was badly out of order, and the dispatches were received here terribly mangled, causing a good deal of swearing among both operators and printers. A change in the manner of sending the reports has recently been made, and they are now sent to Kansas City and repeated to this place. The consequence is that every word comes through correctly and rapidly. Mr. Galliher informs us that the whole time occupied in receiving the report last evening was only about half an hour; whereas formerly it often took two hours to receive one of equal length....

 

The Topeka Tribune has been revived under the ausp ...
October 12, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 554)

The Topeka Tribune has been revived under the auspices of Greer & Bronston. The editorial management of that paper cannot but be improved by the change.

The Big Blue Union, published at Marysville, Marshall County, by E. C. Manning, has been revived after a suspension of nearly a year.

The Atchison Champion says D. W. Wilder, formerly of the Conservative, and his father, A. C. Wilder, have purchased the Rochester Democrat and will hereafter conduct it.

 

We are in receipt of the first (October) number of ...
October 19, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 556)

We are in receipt of the first (October) number of the Christian Messenger, a new periodical to be published monthly by an association of Christian brethren at Ottumwa, Kan. Printed at The Kansas Tribune office....This magazine is devoted to the interests of the Christian Church....Its pages are filled with original and selected matter of peculiar interest to churchmen and others. 22 pp, $1.50 per annum in advance. H. H. Johnson, publisher and financial agent.

 

We noticed at the depot Saturday the press and mat ...
November 9, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 560)

We noticed at the depot Saturday the press and material of the Home Journal, a new paper about to be started at Ottawa by C. T. Evans of that place.

 

Geo. T. Isbelia, the former local of the Conservat ...
November 16, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 561)

Geo. T. Isbelia, the former local of the Conservative, has become editor of the Grasshopper Jeffersonian. He is a spicy, spirited writer....

Change of Editors. Our readers will observe that Major (E. G.) Ross has been associated with us in the publication of the daily, weekly and tri-weekly Tribune as a full partner in interest....As a soldier and editor all Kansas know him. He is a vigorous writer, a true Republican and an upright man....Major Ross will devote his whole time to the paper, and that is the best guaranty that it will be worthy of patronage. -- John Speer.

We present to our readers this morning The Daily Tribune, enlarged the second time within six months. The increasing press of advertising upon our columns has necessitated this step, although such is the extraordinary expense of carrying on a daily paper now we have been hesitating some weeks in regard to its propriety.....

 

The Topeka Tribune has passed into the control of ...
November 30, 1865, Weekly Tribune (ID 570)

The Topeka Tribune has passed into the control of W. H. Bronston, who is now sole editor and proprietor. The Tribune is very much improved in appearance and ability. It is the oldest newspaper in Kansas; lived through the early troubles of '56, during a portion of which time it was the only Free State paper in the (then) Territory, under the supervision, in part, of one of the present editors of this paper. We naturally feel an interest in its success.

A new paper, to be called The Kansas Independent, is about to be started at Leavenworth under the supervision of Rev. J. G. Reaser and Rev. John Ekin. In their prospectus the editors say: "While candor requires us to state that, in its control and doctrinal preference, our paper will be Presbyterian, we nevertheless disclaim all denominational antagonism...."

A new paper, to be called the Miami County Free Press, will be issued at Paola on the 5th of December. It will be edited by B. F. Smythe.

The materials for a new paper in Topeka, to be called the Weekly Leader, reached here last Friday. From a prospectus in the Leavenworth papers, we learn that Cummings & Burlingame are to be the proprietors, and Ward Burlingame its editor. It farther says it "will be thoroughly devoted to Radical principles."

The Conservative says: Owing to our constantly increasing circulation, we have been compelled to procure some faster means of running off our large edition. Our caloric engine arrived here yesterday, and is now being put in its place. It will be all ready and running in a day or two, when we will be enabled to strike off papers at the rate of 1,000 or 1,200 an hour.

 

*Enquirer Claim. At the last meeting of the Leaven ...
April 12, 1866, Weekly Tribune (ID 610)

*Enquirer Claim. At the last meeting of the Leavenworth City Council, Dr. Houston, from the special committee to which was referred a proposition...to settle the long-pending suit for damages on account of the destruction of the Enquirer printing office, recommended the payment of $2,000 in cash and $2,000 in city bonds, provided the plaintiffs will pay costs and withdraw the suit....A motion to adopt the report passed 10 to 2....

 

Rev. I. S. Kalloch, president of Ottawa University ...
May 10, 1866, Weekly Tribune (ID 616)

Rev. I. S. Kalloch, president of Ottawa University, will deliver the annual address at the close of the present collegiate year of Lane University.

 

The editor of the Doniphan County Reporter died re ...
May 17, 1866, Weekly Tribune (ID 620)

The editor of the Doniphan County Reporter died recently from injuries received in falling from the roof of his house. His widow...continues to publish and edit the paper. In her salutary, she says: "This paper is now being published by Mrs. Elizabeth H. Hunt, widow of the late Joseph H. Hunt. She is a practical printer and will continue the publication until she can sell the office for a reasonable price...."

Judge Green has assumed the editorial chair of the Topeka Tribune.

 

McReynolds & Simpson will commence publication of ...
June 21, 1866, Weekly Tribune (ID 634)

McReynolds & Simpson will commence publication of a new paper to be called the Miami County Republican at Paola in July next. As its name indicates, it will be Republican in politics.

 

Maj. E. G. Ross of this city was on Thursday night ...
July 26, 1866, Weekly Tribune (ID 645)

Maj. E. G. Ross of this city was on Thursday night appointed by the governor to the vacancy occasioned in the United States Senate by the death of Gen. Lane.

Gov. Crawford and His Action. The public will bear us out that selfishness has not been our characteristic. When we have been a candidate for nomination and been defeated, as we have been, we never failed to rise in meeting and pledge our support to our successful opponent....We shall strive as ever to maintain the integrity of the Republican party. We always sustained Gov. Crawford, it is true, and perhaps our feeling may be a little traceable to disappointment....Is he a strong man? Is he a true man? Has he listened to his friends? Has gratitude been his characteristic? If so, we have offended. Who will say it? Let him speak. We do not oppose him because we were disappointed, but because he turned heel upon his friends. We say nothing against Major Ross except that he was a bitter enemy of Gen. Lane, and when he called on Gen. Lane's widow she burst into tears, and respect to the memory of her husband forbade her to see him, for the appointment was an insult to his memory and her family....Gov. Crawford will bear us out that we said, in all sincerity, that we would support any good radical man who was a friend of Lane, or any man who had been a friend of Crawford. He spoke of the soldier influence and we named a dozen men we would support, and told him he might take the rosters of the 18 Kansas regiments and name his man, officer or private, and we would go for him, if his bitterness towards Lane, Crawford and his friends had not been such as to disgust all who had supported Crawford. (John Speer)

Kansas Paper Mill. Everything is prospering finely with this new enterprise....The Bulletin says that more than half its stock is already subscribed. The expectation is to locate the mill on the corner of Choctaw and Broadway. The building will be 48 x 100 feet, of brick and stone. Water is to be obtained from wells....Printing and wrapping papers are to be manufactured. Capital stock $30,000, divided into 60 shares of $500 each....Let farmers save their straw and everybody hang onto the rags, for this will make a permanent market for them....

From the Leavenworth Bulletin we learn that a project is now in progress for the establishment of a paper mill in or near Leavenworth....C. S. Lambdin of this city is to have entire superintendence of the enterprise. Mr. L. has many years of experience,...having carried on an extensive paper mill at Wheeling, Va., for 30 years....We regret that the project of putting up a paper mill at this place last fall was allowed to fail....

 

The Topeka Record is rampant on our opposition to ...
August 2, 1866, Weekly Tribune (ID 654)

The Topeka Record is rampant on our opposition to Governor Crawford. That patriotic individual, whose eyes are as keen as a cat's at a rat hole, looking for "something to turn up," has discovered a little selfishness in our recent action. Suppose we admit it -- what then? Nobody denied that the governor was wholly controlled by selfish ends -- his own election....If a governor may be thus selfish, why may not a poor editor be pardoned for selfishness? But we deny any selfishness in the matter. We pledged ourself to support the governor if he would be true to his friends....We cannot be betrayed into any strictures on Major Ross, between whom and us the most friendly relations have always existed. He was, however, a violent opponent of Gen. Lane. Against our advice, he was active in getting up the meeting in Lawrence to denounce Gen. Lane, and he wrote the resolutions against him, and was chairman of the committee. When we asked him to go with us to call on Gen. Lane, he refused to go. All these things went to unseat Gen Lane's mind. Contrary to the general belief, he was a very sensitive man. We are not for keeping up any Lane party, but we did think -- and still think -- that Gov. Crawford ought to have consulted the feelings of Gen. Lane's family.... (John Speer)

 

"We are gratified to see that our good friend Capt ...
August 9, 1866, Weekly Tribune (ID 656)

"We are gratified to see that our good friend Capt. Frank B. Swift, late of the First Kansas Regiment, has succeeded Major Ross as assistant editor of the Lawrence Tribune. Frank came to Kansas in 1855, soon after the first Border Ruffian invasion of the Territory; took an active part in the "Wakarusa War" and in all the struggles of the Free State men; was wounded several times; was taken prisoner and confined five or six months in a loathsome jail at Lecompton. In 1861, he was one of the earliest volunteers and raised Company D of the First Kansas, which he commanded at Wilson's Creek, where he was shot through the body, and left for dead on the field. Twice he has seen Lawrence laid in ashes by pro-slavery ruffians. He is a most uncompromising Radical, a vigorous writer, a first-rate printer, and a good fellow. We are pleased to see the Captain in a position where he can make his blows felt in the good cause for which he has shed his blood and so often periled his life." -- Leavenworth Bulletin.

 

Kaw Valley Courier -- No. 7 of our North Lawrence ...
September 13, 1866, Weekly Tribune (ID 668)

Kaw Valley Courier -- No. 7 of our North Lawrence contemporary comes to us this week enlarged and improved....It is published every Saturday by J. S. Boughton at $2 a year.

 

*"John Speer, the U.S. Collector of this state, ha ...
September 27, 1866, Weekly Tribune (ID 676)

*"John Speer, the U.S. Collector of this state, has been removed from office because he refused to leave the party that elected Andy Johnson vice-president, and refused to belie his whole political life by endorsing the course of the President. We like such men, notwithstanding we cannot always agree with them on minor questions...." -- Topeka Record.

One-half of the Ottawa Home Journal establishment has been purchased by Chas. R. Prescott, late of Boston, who proposes to make Ottawa his future home.

The Garnett Plaindealer comes to us this week dressed in mourning in consequence of the death of its editor, I. E. Olney, who died of typhoid fever...on the 15th. The Plaindealer is at present conducted by Mrs. D. E. Olney.

 

The first number of the Daily Topeka Tribune is be ...
November 1, 1866, Weekly Tribune (ID 685)

The first number of the Daily Topeka Tribune is before us. We are agreeably surprised at the neat appearance of this, the first-born of Topeka dailies....Although that flourishing city has had daily papers before, it was only during a session of the Legislature. This is the first attempt at permanency that has yet been made by a Topeka publisher.

 

Kaw Valley Courier. Three years ago, the white man ...
November 8, 1866, Weekly Tribune (ID 688)

Kaw Valley Courier. Three years ago, the white man's ax first began to cleave away the huge "monarchs of the forest" that covered the bottoms on the north side of the river opposite Lawrence, and a few settlers erected there their humble cabins. Today a flourishing town...boasting some 1,500 inhabitants occupies the ground....Today in that town is published a weekly newspaper as large and handsome as any in the state....The Kaw Valley Courier, in enlarged form, was laid on our table yesterday....

 

R. H. Boughton, long and favorably known as a Kans ...
December 20, 1866, Weekly Tribune (ID 696)

R. H. Boughton, long and favorably known as a Kansas journalist, died in Leavenworth on last Tuesday.

The publication of the Paola Argus has been transferred to P. A. J. Russell, G. A. Colton retiring with the last number. Mr. Colton still retains his connection with the paper as editor. The new publisher (who moreover is local editor)...says: "We bring to our work a practical knowledge of the art preservative...."

 

The Manhattan Radical says the stock is all taken ...
January 10, 1867, Weekly Tribune (ID 702)

The Manhattan Radical says the stock is all taken for the establishment of a paper mill at that point....This week parties will commence quarrying the rock for the building, which is to be two stories high, 36 x 60 feet. The mill is to be run by a 60-horsepower engine.

 

The Osage Chronicle has suspended publication. Mr. ...
February 7, 1867, Weekly Tribune (ID 709)

The Osage Chronicle has suspended publication. Mr. Murdock thinks of removing his office to some other point.

"Paper Mill. During the past week, the active gentleman of the paper mill enterprise, Mr. Bush, visited our place and informed our citizens that he had not met with the success in obtaining subscriptions in Leavenworth that was guaranteed him, and that we would be obliged to raise the subscriptions of Manhattan up to $15,000....Some of our active citizens bestirred themselves and secured that amount....The company is now on a substantial basis and the machinery will be ordered during the next 20 days. Ten thousand dollars have been secured in Leavenworth. This will leave a majority of the stock among our citizens, as it should be." -- Manhattan Radical.

 

L. R. Elliott has retired from the editorial and b ...
March 28, 1867, Weekly Tribune (ID 723)

L. R. Elliott has retired from the editorial and business department of the Atchison Free Press.

J. S. Coulter, W. Witteborg and A. B. Kelly have each purchased an interest in the Bulletin Printing Company, Leavenworth. They are all practical printers.

 

The libel suit of the old Town Board of North Lawr ...
May 2, 1867, Weekly Tribune (ID 732)

The libel suit of the old Town Board of North Lawrence vs. Boughton Brothers of the Kaw Valley Courier, which has been in progress...for the past two days, was concluded last night. The jury returned a verdict of "not guilty."

 

The Kansas Jeffersonian, after a short suspension, ...
May 16, 1867, Weekly Tribune (ID 737)

The Kansas Jeffersonian, after a short suspension, again makes its appearance, hailing from Oskaloosa. G. T. Isbell is publisher and proprietor.

 

Senator Ross arrived home Saturday from Washington ...
May 23, 1867, Weekly Tribune (ID 739)

Senator Ross arrived home Saturday from Washington and was called upon by numerous friends. In the short but important period of Major Ross's official service, he has gained the esteem of even those who opposed his election, and has marked himself as an unostentatious gentleman of sound practical ability and untiring energy; and the people greet him with the plaudit "well done."...

 

"We note with pleasure that Hon. E. G. Ross reache ...
June 6, 1867, Weekly Tribune (ID 743)

"We note with pleasure that Hon. E. G. Ross reached home Saturday last, in good health though quite jaded and fatigued from his arduous labors in Congress, and his more arduous labors on behalf of his constituents in the departments since the session closed. Our state in general and his constituents in detail have never had a truer representative and friend in Congress than Senator Ross....At the close of the last session of Congress, when other Senators were hurrying away to their homes or to Europe, our young Senator had all the various claims and business of the people whose servant he is essentially,...and he determined to not leave Washington until he had given his personal attention to every item, no matter how insignificant....He is regarded in the Senate as the especial representative of the soldiers....But there is no class of our citizens who have so much cause to "rise and call him blessed" as our pioneers; of their interests he is peculiarly watchful. It is a favorite idea with Senator Ross that every man has a right to a home in the public domain "without money and without price," and that the hardships and dangers of pioneer life are a sufficient compensation for a little spot of virgin soil "in the wilderness."...It is the intention of Senator Ross to visit the entire state during the fall, to take part in the general canvass, when all of our people will have the pleasure of taking him by the hand." -- Humboldt Union.

We have received the first number of the Wyandotte Democrat, a new Conservative organ just started in that city. It is a fair-looking, well-filled paper and is edited with considerable ability. We are sorry so much enterprise and energy are thrown away on such an unprofitable undertaking as a Conservative paper in Kansas....

 

The Kansas Farmer for August is on our table. With ...
August 8, 1867, Weekly Tribune (ID 763)

The Kansas Farmer for August is on our table. With the present number the original founder and editor, John S. Brown, retires, having disposed of the Farmer to Capt. George T. Anthony of Leavenworth, late editor of the Bulletin. Mr. Brown commenced the Farmer rather as an experiment, at the most discouraging time in our state's history, but under his able management it has become one of the ablest agricultural journals of the West....Geo. A. Crawford of Fort Scott will still be connected with it as corresponding editor and general agent for the state.

 

Major Wm. Ross, brother of Senator Ross, is stoppi ...
August 15, 1867, Weekly Tribune (ID 765)

Major Wm. Ross, brother of Senator Ross, is stopping a few days at Lawrence. The Major has made an extensive tour of California and the Western Coast, as well as visited Florida and other sections on account of his health. His many friends will be glad to learn that he returns fully recuperated. It was our fortune to make the Major's acquaintance at an early and trying period in Kansas history. He was our partner in the Kansas Tribune in the trying period of 1855-6, the paper at that time being published at Topeka. There never was a truer man to the good cause than Wm. Ross....

 

Our present very handsomely executed weekly is pri ...
January 7, 1869, Weekly Tribune (ID 872)

Our present very handsomely executed weekly is printed on the large size Taylor steam printing press, manufactured by the firm of A. B. Taylor's Son & Co., Chicago. The printing of the paper shows what it can do....The distribution of ink is admirable; better, we think, than that of any cylinder press we have seen....

*The Kansas Weekly Tribune is, in one sense, the oldest paper in the state. We started The Tribune in 1854, under the most discouraging circumstances. Early in the year we sold our little printing office in Ohio, mortgaged our home because we could not sell it, and purchased a small lot of types and a hand press, and brought them to Kansas -- not, however, till after we had visited this country and selected Lawrence (then without a house, except the log cabin at the north end of Massachusetts street) as our residence.

We penned our introductory against slavery under a tree on the bank of the Kansas River (the first anti-slavery editorial ever written in Kansas); and from the day that it was written to the present, the editor has never failed to consistently and earnestly utter his thoughts against slavery, and for the rights of humanity.

The Kansas Tribune is a Republican paper, advocating the true interests of the Republican party. The editor's motto has been "Principles, not men;" and if he has ever varied from that idea, it has been to resist assaults upon some Republican leader who was assailed by portions of the newspaper press of the state.

In the years which The Kansas Tribune has been before the reading public, we have seen the party of freedom carried from a mere minority, heroically resisting the tyranny of slavery, to a triumphant party, numbering a larger proportional majority than that of any state in the Union.

...Thus our paper, starting from a small weekly printed on a hand press, has advanced to the most extensive printing office west of St. Louis, running five steam or power presses, embracing among them a cylinder Hoe press, a mammoth Taylor cylinder press, an Adams book press (the only real steam book press ever invented), a Nonpareil Jobber, and a Gordon....

The Kansas Daily Tribune has become one of the first papers in the state, employing, besides the editor, who has the entire supervision of the paper, and writes its leading articles, two able editors whose writing on local affairs as gatherings from all portions of the state (one of whom is constantly traversing our country, by rail, by carriage and on horseback), until all cliques and all parties recognize The Tribune as the most reliable and best informed of all Kansas newspapers.

...The Tri-Weekly Tribune, containing in each number two days of the reading matter of the daily, is circulated wherever mail facilities make it a better medium of thought and intelligence than a weekly paper.

The Kansas Weekly Tribune has the largest circulation of any paper in Kansas, and is the largest paper in the West, containing 40 columns, and embracing all the news of the state, including the most minute details of local events, full and comprehensive telegraphic reports from all portions of the Union and the world. Besides the telegraphic reports to the Associated Press, it has arrangements for telegraphic reports from all parts of the state having telegraphic communication.

...Its circulation in Kansas is more than threefold that of any other paper published in or out of Kansas and, as an advertising medium, it is unrivaled, reaching every post office in the state, and being read by nearly the entire reading population of Kansas. It is taken by the most intelligent, enterprising farmers, mechanics and business men from the Missouri River to the Rocky Mountains, besides having a large number of subscribers and readers in the Eastern states -- the immigrants recognizing it as the best medium of information in regard to the productions, resources, population and agricultural capacities of our state, its soil, its climate, and everything that relates to our material advantages.

The Kansas Tribune will have reporters in the coming Legislature who will give full and correct abstracts of all proceedings, up to the very latest hours before the morning issues. No paper in the state will contain so full reports.

In view of the fact that we have spared no pains to make The Tribune a representative paper of our state and people, we appeal to the people of Kansas to give it such support as its immense outlays warrant us in asking. (John Speer)

 

J. S. Boughton, traveling correspondent.: The firs ...
January 14, 1869, Weekly Tribune (ID 873)

J. S. Boughton, traveling correspondent.

The first number of the Chetopa Advance, published by A. S. Corey and J. W. Horner, formerly of this county, has made its appearance.

 

The telegraph informed us last evening that S. S. ...
January 21, 1869, Weekly Tribune (ID 875)

The telegraph informed us last evening that S. S. Prouty, editor and proprietor of the Burlington Patriot, was elected state printer yesterday by the Legislature.

 

S. S. Prouty, the new state printer, is too well k ...
January 28, 1869, Weekly Tribune (ID 877)

S. S. Prouty, the new state printer, is too well known in Kansas to need any commendation from us. At an early period in Kansas history, he started a neat little paper, printed in a tent at Prairie City, Douglas County, which was then alive with energy and high hopes of becoming a large town....Some of his editorials of those days would do credit to a leading editor at the state capital or anywhere else....Afterwards,...he pushed further south and established himself at Burlington with his paper, where he has done noble service....

 

"It is reported that the Lawrence Journal, Lawrenc ...
February 18, 1869, Weekly Tribune (ID 878)

"It is reported that the Lawrence Journal, Lawrence Republican and Ottawa Home Journal are to be consolidated and the joint concern published in Lawrence. Three barrels of land-gobble and anti-Clarke brine boiled down to one ought to make a powerful strong broth." -- White Cloud Chief.

 

Great Fire in Topeka. We take the following accoun ...
April 8, 1869, Weekly Tribune (ID 883)

Great Fire in Topeka. We take the following account of the destructive fire in Topeka from the Record of Sunday morning: "At a few minutes past 11 o'clock last night, just after locking up the forms for this morning's Record, fire was discovered in the rear end of Mason & Co. and Dr. Greeno's store, directly under the editorial rooms of the Record. In an incredibly short time the entire length of the stone building on the alley, comprising Greeno and Mason & Co.'s store and the Record news and job rooms, was wrapped in flames, which communicated to Mrs. Steel's building, occupied as post office, and Wilmarth's news and book store....A hasty mention at this hour, 2 a.m., is all that can be given....The loss from fire was principally confined to F. P. Baker, Record office; Dr. Greeno, stock of drugs; Mason & Co., dry goods; Wilmarth, books and stationery; furniture and fixtures of the post office; and S. D. Macdonald and Mrs. Steele, owners of the buildings. Mr. Reynolds, foreman of the Record office, with his family occupied rooms in the third story rear over the Record office and lost everything....No lives, we believe, were lost....The forms of the daily and a small amount of paper only were saved from the Record office.

The proprietor of the Topeka Record, F. P. Baker, has shown true Western energy and enterprise since...having his office destroyed by fire. He started East on Thursday to procure new presses and material, and promises to have another office...in running order within a few days. In the meantime, the Record is issued regularly in the Leader office....In speaking of his office, he says: "The Lawrence Tribune establishment is, we presume, the most valuable one in the state; the Record office was next to it in point of value."

The Oswego Register comes to us much enlarged and improved. The first number was issued in June last, when there were but three or four business houses in Oswego. E. R. Trask, its editor, publishes a larger paper because the town is making such rapid strides.

 

Lawrence Press History:: In the history of Kansas, ...
April 29, 1869, Weekly Tribune (ID 886)

Lawrence Press History:

In the history of Kansas,...the press of the state will have a leading part. In the establishment of freedom here, and the turning back of the tide of slavery, from which arose all the troubles culminating in war, the press of the Territory had so large a share of influence that we have thought that brief sketches of each of the newspapers of Kansas might be of value, though imperfectly written up. As time runs away, much connected with everything is lost....In these brief sketches we shall endeavor to make a plain, unvarnished account, nothing extenuate, or aught set down in malice.

*Chapter I, the Lawrence Press

The Herald of Freedom -- This paper was established in the fall of 1854 by G. W. Brown, by the printing first of a specimen copy at Conneautvile, Penn., where its proprietor resided, which bears date of October 25, 1854. It was dated at "Wakarusa," by which name the settlement around Lawrence had been generally known in the Eastern states. The proprietor had never been in Kansas, and had to draw some upon his imagination for his local ideas of his new home, though the paper was a beautiful specimen of typography, and its ideas generally correct. It was an earnest paper in the advocacy of the Free State cause. It got the reputation of being the organ of the Emigrant Aid Society, which its editor denied, on account of considerable unpopularity attaching to that institution, especially from the Free State men who emigrated from the Western states. It was destroyed by a band of Border Ruffians, under Sheriff Jones, on the 21st of May, 1856. The press, a first-class Hoe hand press, was broken with sledges, the material scattered in the streets and thrown in the river. Shortly after, its editor was arrested and held a prisoner in a camp of United States soldiers on an indictment for treason -- a ridiculous, trumped up charge because his paper denounced what were known generally as the Bogus Laws -- Territorial laws passed in 1855. He was released about the first of September of that year and the paper was revived with a very large circulation, secured greatly through sympathy and principally from the Eastern states and Ohio. The circulation of the paper before its destruction was largely from these states, and increased wonderfully afterward. The paper went into bad odor on account of its temporizing policy in regard to what was known as the Lecompton Constitution, and it was discontinued in the fall of 1859. There is one thing in reference to the Herald of Freedom which is worthy of note. While its editor was an anti-slavery man and desired earnestly to sustain that attitude before the world, he was also a very timid man.

On the 30th of March, 1855, the general election was held for the election of the first Territorial Legislature. As is well known, the Territory was overrun by pro-slavery men from Missouri, who came in without the semblance of the right to vote, with the avowed object of carrying the election. About 700 came here the evening before, armed with revolvers and double-barreled shotguns, and one piece of cannon. The Herald of Freedom was issued on the forenoon of election and without a single word to indicate that anything unusual was going on, or even a word against the institution of slavery. Seven hundred non-residents, who lay in their wagons and tents along the ravine near Kimball's foundry and on the prairies beyond, walked deliberately up to the polls and voted, electing the pro-slavery ticket. At the same time the paper was hawked around for sale -- as tame a paper as ever was issued. The next morning (Saturday), the "border ruffians" broke up their camp and left; and they were scarcely out of sight when the press was stopped, the common articles of news taken out, and the most violent and bitter denunciations of the outrage inserted to the amount of a couple of columns, and this paper was intended for Eastern circulation, which would show the editor up as a hero who was fairly bearding the lions of slavery in their den.

This timidity, followed by so much braggadocio, was a good deal commented upon and ridiculed. Sunday was the first of April, and as quiet and beautiful a day as the balmiest spring could bring forth. Two or three persons happened together, commenting on the matter, and the suggestion was made that an effort be made to April-fool Brown, and soon it was determined to send him a letter informing him that the "border ruffians" had got hold of his paper and were about to return to Lawrence to wreak their vengeance. It was thought that a message from the superintendent of the Friends' Mission near Westport, where the "border ruffians" would probably encamp for the night, would be just the thing to get up a good scare with. Richard Mendenhall was as honest a man as ever lived, and as true a friend of the oppressed Free State people. Accordingly, the following letter was penned and three printers -- Charles F. Garrett, Joseph Boyer and ---- Atwood -- were entrusted to see that it got to Brown:

"Friends' Mission, 4th Mo., 1st day, 1855. Friend Brown -- I dispatch a messenger to inform thee that a large party of Missourians, camping at Mill Creek last night, got hold of the second edition of thy Herald, read it in camp, and immediately resolved to return to Lawrence, throw thy press in the river, and hang thee and other prominent Free State men. Their plan is to proceed from Lawrence to Hickory Point, and hang Kibbee, and perhaps Goodin, and others. The messenger will repair in great haste to Hickory Point to inform the inhabitants. In haste, thy friend, Richard Mendenhall."

One of these jolly printers, Joe Boyer, copied the letter in a nice hand and all of them went down to a squatter's cabin,...hired a boy for a dollar to ride up with it and deliver it to Brown, which he did, never stopping to explain, but pushing southward towards Hickory Point (the name that Palmyra was then known by), going out of sight, and returning to report to the boys. Brown read the document, consulted one or two persons, among them Sam Wood, who was in the secret, and they advised that something should be done for defense. Forthwith Brown was seen in the streets with a spy glass in one hand and a dinner bell in the other, watching for the enemy and ringing for a public meeting. Rev. S. Y. Lum was preaching. The parson stopped preaching and he and his congregation went for their arms, messengers were sent out to the Wakarusa, a public meeting was organized, speeches made, resolutions to fight to the death passed, and three military companies organized. The excitement ran high, pro-slavery residents were threatened, and the whole Sunday afternoon occupied in drilling, and preparing for a desperate encounter. The streets were actually guarded till a late hour at night, without any person, except a few who were in the secret, ever discovering that the day was the first of April, and the story an April-fool hoax. Indeed, such was the indignation that the man who should have avowed himself its author would have been in danger of experiencing the treatment threatened in the letter.

A few days after, we met the honest Quaker gentleman whose name had been thus unwarrantedly used, and said to him: "Mr. Mendenhall, Brown got a letter from you which caused a great deal of excitement in our town." He laughed and quietly replied: "Friend Speer, I reckon thee knows more about that than I do." That April-fool gathering was really the first military organization ever effected in Kansas. The captain of the company in which we trained was a good old Presbyterian elder, Mr. Lyon, since deceased. Thinking it was a shame to deceive him, we stepped out of the ranks and told him the real facts, requesting him not to announce them, but suggesting that he could simply dismiss his company, which he did a short time afterwards, remarking that a little drill would not hurt the people.

*The Kansas Free State -- This was the title of a paper started at Lawrence, its first number being issued in the first week of January 1855, Josiah Miller and Robert G. Elliott, editors and proprietors. Judge Miller visited Kansas during the previous summer and a prospectus was issued for its publication at Wyandotte, but that was nothing but an Indian village, and its issue was prohibited; when the proprietors came with the materials, they pushed west until they arrived at Lawrence, where they located. As the name of the paper implied, it was devoted to Free State principles. It was a most earnest, able, and frequently a very defiant paper, sometimes a little too severe. It was first located in a house made of clapboards, without chinking or daubing, and with only a sawdust floor, the cabin standing near the ravine on Kentucky street, between Winthrop and Pinckney. One of its editors, Judge Miller, was taken prisoner and carried to Lecompton and tried on a charge of treason to South Carolina. The Judge being a South Carolinian, to oppose slavery was the highest offense known to Buford and his band of South Carolinians, who came to Kansas to establish slavery, and murder and drive out all who opposed them. There is no doubt but the Judge's life was in jeopardy until some pro-slavery men interfered to save him. This paper was destroyed May 21, 1856, by Sheriff Jones and his posse, as he called the pro-slavery mob which destroyed the presses and a portion of Lawrence on that occasion. There was no part of the office saved, and the bed of the press, now remaining in the Kansas Tribune office, is the only relic left of the establishment. The Free State was revived by Robert G. Elliott, and published at Delaware, in Leavenworth County, during 1857, but, though an able paper, the failure of the town made its publication impossible on a paying basis, and it was discontinued.

*The Kansas Tribune -- This paper was started by John and Joseph L. Speer. The prospectus wa

 

Our increasing business compels us to add a steam ...
May 6, 1869, Weekly Tribune (ID 888)

Our increasing business compels us to add a steam engine to our establishment. We are now running a Hoe power press, a Taylor power press, an Adams book press, a Wells jobber, and a Gordon. They are all machine presses, requiring steam power....We have ordered the celebrated Ruddick steam engine from the Pennsylvania Iron Works at Chester, Pa....We expect in a short time to have in our new Tribune building an engine which shall be a model of beauty and unsurpassed for such purposes.

The Tribune office has established a first-class bindery where we are prepared to do all kinds of work: books, magazines, music, blank books for counties, insurance and railroad offices, and for all kinds of business....Having employed Otto Hilpert, a first-class workman, as foreman, we can warrant all work.

"The Kansas Tribune is edited by John Speer of Lawrence. Mr. Speer has been intimately identified with Kansas in all her history, and has ever been a true and steadfast friend to her people....A prominent actor in the fierce and bloody struggles preceding her admission as a state, an earnest participant in all her subsequent political contests, no man has done more than he to shape and mould the politics of the state....With the widest circulation of any paper in the state, it has exerted a wide and telling influence....The Tribune has done more than any other paper in the country to call attention to the advantages of southern Kansas. Boughton, its traveling agent and correspondent, is as zealous and indefatigable as a Jesuit Missionary; travels with his ears and eyes open and of course gets everybody to subscribe to his paper....He paid us a visit the other day, fell in love with Chetopa, selected his lots, and made provision in our live town for his future home." -- Chetopa Advance.

 

The Paola Republican says: Adolph Glaser, editor a ...
June 17, 1869, Weekly Tribune (ID 897)

The Paola Republican says: Adolph Glaser, editor and proprietor of the Kansas City Staats Zeitung, is going to establish a German paper in this city, to be called the Paola Land and Stadtbote (City and County Advertiser)....The outside...will be printed in German and the inside in English.

 

In the past three or four months, we have heard mo ...
July 15, 1869, Weekly Tribune (ID 899)

In the past three or four months, we have heard more said about "independent newspapers," "the independent press," &c, than in all the previous months of the existence of Kansas as a state....It is only the most virulent, partisan sheets that make such strong professions of independence, as a general rule. The really independent papers...such as the Junction Union, Topeka Commonwealth, Burlington Patriot, and others like them, make no professions at all; and still they...have their say on all matters of public importance....

 

Prouty has got back into the Topeka Commonwealth, ...
August 5, 1869, Weekly Tribune (ID 901)

Prouty has got back into the Topeka Commonwealth, having bought the interest of Mr. Edwards, who bought the interest of Mr. Prouty about three weeks ago.

 

"S. H. Dodge, formerly a resident of this city, bu ...
August 12, 1869, Weekly Tribune (ID 902)

"S. H. Dodge, formerly a resident of this city, but for several years a citizen of Lawrence, called on our office. Mr. Dodge is in The Tribune office, and it would be hard to find a typo that fills the measure of a gentleman or member of the craft more complete than he does." -- Atchison Patriot.

 

Our New Offices. The removal of The Tribune establ ...
October 14, 1869, Weekly Tribune (ID 905)

Our New Offices. The removal of The Tribune establishment into its new quarters was finished Saturday with the exception of the Hoe machine upon which our daily and tri-weekly issues are printed. The new rooms are on the third floor of the building adjoining the old office on the north, and access to them is had by the same entrance and stairway as heretofore.....The front apartment is the newspaper composing room,...well arranged and furnished, lighted from four front windows and two on the north. The middle apartment contains The Tribune job bindery....The new job printing room occupies the east end of the establishment,...25 by 50 feet and lighted by four windows on the north, four on the east, and an immense skylight overhead....Of course, these rooms cannot contain the three large newspaper and book printing machines,...nor is there space for the counting room, which retains its old position, nor for the editors' sanctum, which is at present an undefined locality.

Lyon County...has acquired some reputation heretofore for enterprise, and now gives additional proof in the shape of a new weekly paper. The Emporia Tribune is its title, a 32-column paper published by Mains & Nixon....Politically it will be Republican....

 

On noticing the departure of Mr. Harris from The T ...
October 21, 1869, Weekly Tribune (ID 907)

On noticing the departure of Mr. Harris from The Tribune, we forgot to mention that S. H. Dodge takes the place made vacant by Mr. H. Mr. Dodge is an old attache of this establishment, has been a newspaper publisher, is a careful and competent printer.

G. W. Larzelere of the Wathena Reporter has disposed of that paper to F. H. Drenning and J. Holt.

 

The Fort Scott Press has ceased to be. The publish ...
November 11, 1869, Weekly Tribune (ID 908)

The Fort Scott Press has ceased to be. The publishers, Warren & Wasser, have removed their material to Girard, Crawford County, where they will shortly issue a paper.

 

The citizens of Fort Scott have been boasting...th ...
November 18, 1869, Weekly Tribune (ID 909)

The citizens of Fort Scott have been boasting...that their town was one of the most energetic, wide-awake, prosperous cities of the state. We have tangible evidence before us....Said evidence comes in the shape of a first-class daily paper, the Daily Monitor. George A. Crawford is the editor and proprietor....He is well known as one of the most polished and vigorous writers in the West....Typographically it is as handsome as the most critical old typo could ask....

We are in receipt of the first number of a new weekly paper just started at Frankfort, Marshall County, and printed in the English and Scandinavian languages. It is a very neat six-column paper and is published by J. Wiesbach and R. S. Newell. John Anderson is editor....

We have received the first number of the Workingmen's Journal, a new paper published at Columbus, Cherokee County, in the interests of the settlers on the neutral lands. The editor is Judge Amos Sanford, recently elected representative from that county. The office and material is owned by the Neutral Land Printing Company,...incorporated under the laws of the state. The directors...are Sidney S. Smith, Joshua S. Vincent, Henry D. Moore, Henry T. Coffin and S. J. Langdon. The shares are established at $2.50 each to enable all to become members and assist in its support....

 

H. W. McCune will commence the publication of a pa ...
November 25, 1869, Weekly Tribune (ID 910)

H. W. McCune will commence the publication of a paper at Eldorado, Butler County, about the first of January next.

 

A Calamity. All the files of the state newspapers ...
December 30, 1869, Weekly Tribune (ID 917)

A Calamity. All the files of the state newspapers that were under the charge of the state auditor were destroyed in the burning of the Ritchie block. They were stored in the bindery of Crane & Byron, there having been insufficient room...in the late quarters of the auditor. There were, among these files, papers that dated back to 1855, and among them was a complete file of the old slavery Squatter Sovereign. The loss of these papers is an irreparable calamity to the state.

 

The State Editors' and Publishers' Association of ...
January 6, 1870, Weekly Tribune (ID 918)

The State Editors' and Publishers' Association of Kansas will meet at Topeka on Monday, Jan. 17th, Franklin's birthday. The annual address is to be delivered by R. B. Taylor, late of the Wyandotte Gazette.

 

The Waterville Telegraph says: Judge F. G. Adams i ...
January 13, 1870, Weekly Tribune (ID 919)

The Waterville Telegraph says: Judge F. G. Adams intends to plant a peck of beechnuts next spring and experiment with them on his farm near Netawaka, on the Kickapoo Reserve.

Brick Pomeroy, having made a fortune with the LaCrosse Democrat, went to New York last year and started, on the 15th of August, the New York Democrat. On the 11th, he announced that thenceforth his journal would be sold at one cent a copy, two cents having been the price up to that time. Now we are informed that its publication is to be permanently discontinued. It is said that Pomeroy started the enterprise with a cash capital of $100,000. He will probably quit with no capital at all.

 

Dr. S. D. Tobey assumes the position of local edit ...
February 3, 1870, Weekly Tribune (ID 923)

Dr. S. D. Tobey assumes the position of local editor of the Tribune today....For a number of years, he occupied an important position on a leading Chicago daily, and is an editor of large experience.

 

*"John Speer....It will take far better evidence t ...
February 10, 1870, Weekly Tribune (ID 924)

*"John Speer....It will take far better evidence than that adduced in the letter of L. C. Wilmarth to convince us that John Speer acted dishonestly or corruptly in his management of the Collector's office of this state. Mr. Speer is not a prudent business man nor a careful accountant, and he is very apt to trust those who are utterly unworthy of his favor....But we do not believe that he is a dishonest man, and we don't believe that there is a single man in the state, who knows him, that does believe it. If his accounts show deficiencies, we believe that somebody else, and not John Speer, was guilty of these defalcations...." -- Atchison Champion.

 

*To the People of Kansas. John Speer's Statement.: ...
May 5, 1870, Weekly Tribune (ID 927)

*To the People of Kansas. John Speer's Statement.

Washington, April 25, 1870. While here attempting to promote the settlement of my accounts, I find dispatches and articles calculated to do me great injustice going the rounds of the papers. I have heretofore thought that no answer was required from me, as no good could be accomplished either to myself of the government through newspaper discussions, and I do not propose to enter into details which properly belong to officers or courts.

It is believed that I did not give that personal attention to the business of my office of United States Collector which the intricacies of the position required, for reasons which are too well known to those acquainted with me and my circumstances to need recapitulation. A just public will discriminate between errors, whatever may be their cause, and willful wrong.

While I utter no censure on others, and hesitate not to take any just responsibility upon myself, it is but truth to say that I did not personally make up the claims for abatements and, while here, am unable to explain intelligibly their character. These accounts involved between one and two millions of dollars, embracing great numbers of items, running through four years of the most exciting times of the war. Every paper and book, with a considerable amount of stamps, were destroyed in the Quantrell raid, and in the Price raid, a year after, all the books, papers and moneys were carried off by my clerk and buried in the earth when Price's army was reported to be advancing on Lawrence, and while I was with the troops. These and other unavoidable circumstances would have confused and distracted better men than I claim to be.

The public know that I had three children murdered during the period alluded to. In the terrible visitation of Quantrell, my oldest boy was shot, unarmed, innocent and unoffending, in the streets. Another was supposed to have been burned to death in the ruins of the town, his body never found. Two years later, when I was on my way to Washington for the purpose of consulting in regard to my accounts, I received a dispatch at St. Louis, stating that a third son -- a promising boy of seven years -- had been accidentally shot and killed. I do not claim that these sad afflictions gave me right to do wrong -- I ask no sympathy -- I have a right to demand justice without the prejudice of newspaper abuse for political purposes.

If any parent can contemplate the spectacle of two sons carried to his hearth to wash the brains from their heads -- of another expiring in the tortures of fire and burnt to ashes beyond recognition -- if he can contemplate the agonies of such a bereavement -- can imagine the fruitless searches for his remains -- the hope against hope for years that he might be a prisoner and would again return to partially console and bless a mother in her afflictions for those carried to the grave -- of the time spent to bring to justice the murderers -- and still be unable to realize reasons why I might have failed to discharge intricate duties, I would rather be guilty of the worst my enemies have said of me than be so heartless a wretch as that.

I beg the public to consider that sending dispatches over the country is politics, not business -- and to suspend their judgment. Whatever investigations have been made are entirely ex parte, and I have not seen a line of the result, and was never notified to be present, nor permitted. From the fact that the Supervisor of Revenue, who had the accounts in charge, voluntarily assured me that his investigations should not be made public, and that I have not seen them, I think I am warranted in saying that no reporter could have sent out just accounts. For instance, for political purposes, it is stated that Gen. C. W. Babcock and Gov. Thomas Carney are on the bonds, when their names never were on any bonds of mine as United States Collector, or in any other official capacity.

I have resided in Kansas for 15 years, and I can appeal to my neighbors of all parties for the integrity of my character, and I unhesitatingly assert that I have never intended to defraud the government out of a dollar. Whatever may be the result of investigations, I shall shrink from no responsibility. I shall do all in my power to save the government and my securities. All that I have, I have ever been ready to give up, and would rather be a pauper than do injustice to either.

I shall soon be in Kansas, and I hope to be able to satisfy all reasonable men that I am not deserving of the treatment which I have received.

It is unnecessary to say that Hon. Sidney Clarke had no knowledge of the state of my accounts, and no possible connection with them, and that the assertion that I ever attempted to stifle investigation, or know of any person else doing so, is entirely without foundation in fact. -- John Speer.

Note: The above article was written in Washington, two days before I left, but by the mail's delay only arrived yesterday, but I still thought it best to publish it. J.S.

The Fort Scott Post has changed hands and will be conducted by Caffrey & Shorter.

The last issue of the Garnett Plaindealer says: The next paper issued from this office will be under the auspices of L. J. Perry, editor, publisher and proprietor. We commend him to the tender mercies of all the old patrons of the Plaindealer, and the hosts of new ones who have only been waiting for "a good paper, edited by an able and experienced writer."

 

The Brute Kalloch. There is no instance in the his ...
May 12, 1870, Weekly Tribune (ID 929)

The Brute Kalloch. There is no instance in the history of a question of any kind before a court where any man has been attacked with the virulence and brutality which this besotted priest has heaped upon us. An escaped convict, who eluded the penitentiary in the East by a divided jury, on a charge of the vilest crime which a minister of the gospel could be guilty of, he has no respect for the rights of anybody. If it were true that we were in the situation he represents us to be in, no man but an overbearing coward would take advantage of us, to attempt to create public opinion against us. On one day he plays the part of the hypocrite, and expresses sympathy -- the meanest mode of abuse which such a scoundrel could adopt. If he has any sympathy, let him bestow it upon the poor old Baptist minister whose daughter he seduced. We ask none of it. We expect none of it. A debased wretch, who baptizes a girl and then prostitutes her in the vestibule of the church is not expected to show generosity to any human being. It has been known for years that this dirty scoundrel involved as good a man as ever lived in Douglas County in difficulties which broke him down in spirit and ruined him. In the Ottawa transaction, there was an honest man and a thief -- a virtuous man and a prostitute. The honest man travels on foot; the thief rides in a chariot. The virtuous man delivers all his property to his bondsmen; the prostitute conveys his to his wife. And the name of that scoundrel, thief and coward is Isaac S. Kalloch.

 

*"John Speer. The gentleman whose name heads this ...
May 19, 1870, Weekly Tribune (ID 931)

*"John Speer. The gentleman whose name heads this article is well known to the people of Kansas. He is the editor and proprietor of the Lawrence Tribune, and at one time was Collector for the state of Kansas. Recently, charges have been preferred against him and some of his friends that they have appropriated a large amount of the money coming into his hands as Collector for their own use....Now we have no personal acquaintance with Mr. Speer, and do not know whether he is guilty or innocent of the charges preferred. Yet we do think it would be more becoming in very many editors in the state to let the man alone until the investigation is over. If by that investigation it shall be proven that he is guilty of the charges against him, it strikes us it will be time enough to attack him. Mr. Speer is universally conceded to be an honest man, and it seems to us that the almost wholesale attack upon him, under all the circumstances, is not only uncalled for, but is devilish, mean and cowardly besides." -- Emporia Tribune.

O. H. Gregg, late of this paper, and since connected with the Olathe News Letter,...is now editor of the Olathe Mirror.

 

Cummings, in his new paper, the Independent, has t ...
June 23, 1870, Weekly Tribune (ID 935)

Cummings, in his new paper, the Independent, has the following in regard to Kansas papers: Thirteen daily and 64 weekly papers in the state of Kansas. How they grow and multiply. We well recollect when there was but one, and that weekly. In less than six months there were five. The first paper in Kansas was printed under the shade of a large elm tree on the levee in the city of Leavenworth. Not much of a city that day. Next was the Herald of Freedom, Tribune and Free Press at Lawrence. The first type for the Kansas Freeman of Topeka was set on the open prairie under a June sun. Again we used the tables in the boarding house of A. W. Moore on which to rest our cases. This house was made of cottonwood, shed roof, and stood about where the west end of the Topeka mill now stands. Those were happy days in Topeka; everybody was everybody's friend....

 

*"We have not joined in the clamor raised about Jo ...
August 11, 1870, Weekly Tribune (ID 943)

*"We have not joined in the clamor raised about John Speer's supposed defalcation by the press of the state....If he is guilty of an intentional crime, it is not the province of the press to create prejudice....Our silence is due to another cause. We have always liked John Speer as a man....Some 28 years ago, we 'tramped' the state of Ohio as a journeyman printer. Work was very scarce and we often went hungry.....One hot August afternoon we arrived in Medina, Ohio, sore footed, fatigued and strapped. There was a little printing office in the village, at which we applied for work. The editor, in kindly accents, told us his business was too small to require or afford a journeyman, otherwise it would give him pleasure to employ us; and as we turned to go out he called to us and said: 'You must come and take supper with me.' Now, let the author of these words -- spoken so gently and so frankly -- be ever so unfortunate, or ever so derelict in his business, or let whatever disgrace overtake him, this printer shall be the last to say an unkind word about him. It is not our nature." -- Neosho Falls Advertiser.

 

Ely Moore has returned from the East with material ...
September 8, 1870, Weekly Tribune (ID 947)

Ely Moore has returned from the East with materials for the new Democratic paper to be published in this city, to be called the Democratic Standard.

 

Col. Geo. H. Hoyt and O. H. Gregg have been employ ...
October 6, 1870, Weekly Tribune (ID 954)

Col. Geo. H. Hoyt and O. H. Gregg have been employed to take charge for the present of the editorial columns of The Tribune. Col. Hoyt is well known...as a forcible and ready writer, and as an uncompromising opponent of land and other monopolies....Mr. Gregg, as heretofore, will have charge of the local columns....

 

A new Democratic paper will be issued at Council G ...
October 13, 1870, Weekly Tribune (ID 956)

A new Democratic paper will be issued at Council Grove...under the editorial management of Isaac Sharp, Democratic candidate for governor, and E. S. Bartram.

Chas. A. Faris, long and favorably known as the local editor of the Journal, has been employed by The Tribune as business manager.

 

...The Kansas Pacific Railway Company made ample a ...
October 20, 1870, Weekly Tribune (ID 959)

...The Kansas Pacific Railway Company made ample and generous arrangements for the editorial excursion to Denver and the mountains which started Tuesday. The train consisted of one mail and express and one baggage coach, four passenger coaches, two fine day sleeping coaches and three elegant and comfortable sleeping coaches. The train arrived at the Lawrence depot about 12:15 p.m. and was soon wending its way westward.

Among the gentlemen connected with the Kansas press...were Col. John A. Martin and ladies of the Atchison Champion; Nelson Abbott and wife, Atchison Patriot; F. A. Root, Waterville Telegraph; P. H. Peters, Marysville Locomotive; R. B. Taylor, Wyandotte Gazette; Gen. W. H. M. Fishback, Olathe News Letter; M. M. Lewis, Iola Register; Amos Sanford, Workingman's Journal, Columbus; M. M. Murdock and wife of the Osage Chronicle; S. Weaver and wife of the Medina New Era; S. S. Prouty and daughter of the Topeka Commonwealth; J. W. Roberts and wife of the Oskaloosa Independent; J. E. Cherry and wife of the Wamego Kansas Valley; L. R. Elliott and wife of the Manhattan Standard. B. J. F. Hanna of the Salina Herald; Dan Negley and wife of the state at large; Stimson of the Leavenworth Call; Geo. F. Prescott of the Leavenworth Commercial; and W. S. Burke of the Leavenworth Bulletin. The Kansas City press was ably represented....Reynolds and wife of the Journal, Gregg and daughter of the Tribune, Ely Moore and wife of the Standard, and Capt. John G. Lindsay of the Garnett Plaindealer joined the excursion as this place....

 

At a meeting of the Lawrence Typographical Union N ...
December 8, 1870, Weekly Tribune (ID 970)

At a meeting of the Lawrence Typographical Union No. 73,...United States Senator (E. G.) Ross, an honorary member, was expelled. This action was taken on account of his sympathizing with "rats," and for assisting in a "rat" office during a Union strike.

 

A libel suit is something almost unknown in Kansas ...
December 15, 1870, Weekly Tribune (ID 973)

A libel suit is something almost unknown in Kansas, and more particularly in newspaperdom. At last, however, a precedent is furnished that may be followed with fearful consequences. Hon. Geo. A. Crawford...has brought suit against Dr. A. Danford and the editor and publishers of the Fort Scott Telegram, laying the damages at $30,000. A card in the Telegram, signed by Danford, and containing 13 different charges and criminal accusations is the prime cause of the suit....If this precedent is followed to any extent, there will indeed be a fearful quaking throughout Kansas. Plainness of speech has been the rule here in the year or two past, and when politicians and editors thought they saw a weak point in a rival they generally made the most of it....

 

The annual convention of the editors and publisher ...
December 22, 1870, Weekly Tribune (ID 976)

The annual convention of the editors and publishers of Kansas will be held on the anniversary of Franklin's birth, Jan. 17th, 1871, at 2 p.m. in the governor's rooms in the state capitol....In the evening,...the annual address will be delivered by Ward Burlingame, editor of the Commonwealth, in the hall of the House of Representatives, if it can be obtained. At the last annual meeting, D. W. Wilder offered the following resolution, which was passed: Resolved, that Jacob Stotler, M. M. Murdock and Geo. C. Crowther be requested to ask the Legislature to obtain from the widow of Thomas H. Webb, of Boston, the newspaper files and scrapbooks containing the most complete record now in existence of the early history of Kansas. On motion of R. B. Taylor, a resolution was adopted asking the editors of the Kansas press to publish a newspaper history of their several counties....S. D. Macdonald, secretary.

 

Kansas Banner. This is the title of a new German p ...
January 5, 1871, Weekly Tribune (ID 980)

Kansas Banner. This is the title of a new German paper just issued in Lawrence, and edited and conducted by O. Haeberlein. It is a very handsomely printed paper on new type. Mr. Haeberlein is a young man...who was connected with the Freie Presse before it was removed from Lawrence, and has since been with the paper at Leavenworth.

 

Capt. Henry King has been re-elected managing edit ...
January 12, 1871, Weekly Tribune (ID 982)

Capt. Henry King has been re-elected managing editor of the Topeka Record.

 

"Kansas Editors and Publishers Association. The ab ...
January 19, 1871, Weekly Tribune (ID 984)

"Kansas Editors and Publishers Association. The above named association had a very pleasant annual meeting last night, the president of the association, Jacob Stotler, presiding. The business meeting came first....William Goddard of the Solomon Valley Pioneer sent in his initiatory fee....Jacob Stotler was re-nominated for president but declined the honor. M. W. Reynolds of the Lawrence Journal was then unanimously chosen president for the ensuing year. R. B. Taylor of the Wyandotte Gazette having declined, T. B. Murdock was elected vice-president. Capt. King was selected to deliver the next annual address with Geo. A. Crawford as alternate. A resolution was adopted requesting the committee appointed last year to go before the ways and means committee of the House and endeavor to obtain an appropriation of not over $1,000 for the purchase for the state of the scrapbooks made up of early Kansas newspapers by the late Dr. Webb, now in the possession of his widow near Boston. The president then introduced Ward Burlingame, who proceeded to deliver the annual address. Mr. Burlingame's address is to be published in pamphlet form....The old veteran editor, Judge J. C. Vaughn, was loudly called for and made a very impressive little speech. It was an appeal for toleration among the brethren of the quill toward each other....At the suggestion of George W. Prescott, Hon. Sidney Clarke was called up. Mr. Clarke narrated his early newspaper experience; his first venture in public being to write an article, when a boy, for the Boston Commonwealth....Afterward, when barely of age, he conducted the Southbridge (Mass.) Press....His first trip to Kansas was to establish a paper at Manhattan in connection with Prof. Denison, now of the Agricultural College. He thought then that Manhattan was too far from Boston to amount to much and gave up the project....He assured everybody that he cherished no ill will toward any member of the Kansas press, and that he expected...to enter the editorial profession again....Mr. Clarke was then admitted to the association as a member. Governor Harvey then made a short speech and was also admitted. After speeches by Judge Thacher and Tom Fenlon, the meeting adjourned till Jan. 17th, 1872." -- Topeka Record.

 

*Valedictory. In accordance with a determination l ...
February 2, 1871, Weekly Tribune (ID 992)

*Valedictory. In accordance with a determination long since entertained, the undersigned has retired from all control of and connection with The Kansas Tribune, and the paper will hereafter be conducted by The Kansas Tribune Company. In thus retiring from the newspaper business, we desire to offer thanks to the public for its generous confidence and hearty support....The paper will...continue to be the advocate of the Republican cause and the rights of the people....For most of the time for 16 years we have been connected with the press of the state....Bred to the business, we liked it, and esteemed above that of all others the good will of our editorial brethren. We have published a newspaper -- we mean different newspapers -- as editor and proprietor for a little over 30 years, and could not fail to become attached to printers and to editors' sanctums....John Speer.

 

*Mr. Speer Among the Printers....It was a tribute ...
February 2, 1871, Weekly Tribune (ID 996)

*Mr. Speer Among the Printers....It was a tribute on the part of the men who knew Mr. Speer, and who had learned...to like and to respect him. The printers present were from all the offices in the city. The cane and the pen and pencil are of elaborate finish and beautiful design....Mr. Harris said: ...In behalf of the printers, I...present to you these testimonials of their high and friendly regard for you...."

 

The Topeka papers announce the abolition of the "f ...
February 23, 1871, Weekly Tribune (ID 999)

The Topeka papers announce the abolition of the "free puff" system, so far as those papers are concerned....This whole thing of puffing and blowing every little wooden nutmeg affair that comes along, and that too before the public has any opportunity of knowing anything about it, has been carried quite too far by the press generally....

 

John P. Cone has sold the Seneca Courier to Root & ...
March 2, 1871, Weekly Tribune (ID 1004)

John P. Cone has sold the Seneca Courier to Root & Wilkinson.

Kansas and Missouri Associated Press. There seems to have been a good attendance at the annual meeting...in Leavenworth on Thursday. These officers were elected for the ensuing year: President, F. P. Baker; secretary and treasurer, Geo. C. Prescott; directors, John A. Martin, T. D. Thacher, W. W. Burke, Frank Hudson, P. H. Tiernan and J. J. Hinman.

G. C. Bridges, formerly editor and proprietor of the Doniphan County Republican, has sold that paper to A. W. Beale and A. G. Sanborn.

L. A. Huffman, formerly foreman of the Doniphan County Republican, has taken charge of the Seneca Independent Press.

The Mound City Press has been sold by Henry Plum to J. H. Rogers & Co.

The Emporia Tribune again changes hands. Randall & Miller have sold to E. W. Cunningham, of the firm of Buck & Cunningham, attorneys at law, and E. E. Rowland, who for more than a year has had charge of the job department of the News.

The Republican Watchman is the name of a newspaper which has just been started at Clyde, Cloud County, by Kelly & Davis. The outside of the paper is printed at home.

 

The South Kansas Tribune, a weekly newspaper publi ...
March 23, 1871, Weekly Tribune (ID 1011)

The South Kansas Tribune, a weekly newspaper published by the Tribune Printing Company, for $2 a year at Independence, comes to us. It is a large, fine looking sheet, printed with new type, and has a nice look....

"The Lawrence Tribune, now edited by J. S. Emery, an old citizen of Kansas, a sound lawyer and a ready writer, comes to us regularly. It is the 'old reliable' among Kansas newspapers." The Chetopa Advance says this and the "old reliable" part of it is particularly agreeable to The Tribune.

 

Minute Paper. Microscopic photography has been the ...
April 13, 1871, Weekly Tribune (ID 1021)

Minute Paper. Microscopic photography has been the most interesting, if not the most important, scientific event of the war, and everybody has read with wonder of the London Times having been sent into Paris reduced in size to the palm of the hand. We have in our office, for public inspection, four pages of the London Times or eight pages of Harper's Weekly, that might have come from Lilliput, reduced to carrier pigeon size. L. H. Rogers & Co., 61 William Street, New York, will furnish all who want copies at 25 cents each.

 

We have just received the first number of the Home ...
April 27, 1871, Weekly Tribune (ID 1026)

We have just received the first number of the Home Visitor, published at Leavenworth by M. M. Bogen. It is a monthly publication....

 

We have received the first number of the Florence ...
May 11, 1871, Weekly Tribune (ID 1031)

We have received the first number of the Florence Pioneer, a 32-column paper published by McReynolds & Mitchell.

 

*Case of Mr. Speer. We are sure that there will be ...
May 18, 1871, Weekly Tribune (ID 1033)

*Case of Mr. Speer. We are sure that there will be a general and generous response by the people and press of Kansas to the action of the Treasury Department in adjusting...the differences between Mr. Speer and their trust. And we are also fully persuaded that the guerdon that follows good-doing will come to Senator Pomeroy for the efficient service rendered in bringing about the result.

...This generous action was heartily indorsed by nearly every journalist in Kansas, by all the state officers, and by every member of the state senate but one. The petition referred to, with the endorsement it received, is as follows:

To the Com'r of Internal Revenue. Sir: The undersigned, members of the press in the state of Kansas, some of whom, during the political excitement of the past few years, have said many severe things about the Hon. John Speer, now that the contest which in part, at least, excited them is ended, are willing and glad to state:

That they believe Mr. Speer, while he has been unfortunate and, perhaps, careless, has not been intentionally criminal in his official conduct as Collector of Internal Revenue;

That his previously well known and universally admitted good character for integrity and honesty should go far toward strengthening this presumption;

That as an able and influential pioneer of Kansas, with a family in the deepest affliction from previous calamities, both the state and his friends would be relieved and gratified by his receiving as lenient treatment as it is possible for your department to show him;

That we have no hesitation in recommending such a settlement of his difficulties with the government as is within his means to make, and believe that it will be satisfactory to the general sentiment and conservative of the public welfare of our state:

(Editors signing) I. S. Kalloch, Geo. C Hume, W. S. Burke, John M. Haeberlein, Jos. Clarke, H. S. Sleeper, J. C. Vaughn, Jacob Stotler, Oscar Haeberline, George W. Martin, Nathan Cree, John A. Martin, Nelson Abbott, C. C. Clover, Sol Miller, F. P. Baker, S. S. Prouty, John W. Horner, M. M. Murdock, John O'Flanagan, Albert Griffin, V. P. Wilson, B. F. J. Hanna, Isaac Sharp, W. H. Johnson, C. G. Patterson, H. W. Talcott, Anderson & Town, F. H. Stout, H. E. Smith, F. G. Adams, Amos Sanford, A. L. Lea, W. E. C. Lyon, Wm. H. Warner, Goode Bros., Perry D. Martin, Jas. J. Marks, Cary & Kenen, B. M. Simpson, Warren M. Mitchell, John McReynolds, S. E. McKee, John A. Canut, S. Weaver, F. H. Drenning, Frank A. Root, A. N. Ruley, P. H. Peters, Geo C. Crowther.

*Topeka, Feb. 27, 1871. The undersigned state officers of the state of Kansas cordially indorse the foregoing statements of the members of the press of Kansas, and recommend a settlement with John Speer, late U.S. Collector, on the basis therein set forth. James M. Harvey, governor; P. P. Elder, lieutenant governor; J. E. Hayes, treasurer of state; W. H. Smallwood, secretary of state; A. Thoman, auditor of state; David Whittaker, adjutant general; H. S. McCarty, supt. public instruction; Samuel A. Kingman, chief justice; D. M. Valentine, associate justice; D. J. Brewer, associate justice.

The undersigned, members of the Kansas State Senate, heartily indorse the statement and recommendations of the press of Kansas, and of our state officers, relative to the difficulties of John Speer with the government....

Senator Pomeroy at once recognized these names as a sufficient indorsement for action in Mr. Speer's behalf, and presented to the department the petition, together with a proposition made by Mr. Speer and his friends for a compromise and settlement. The whole matter was carefully and impartially investigated, and the result was that the internal revenue department accepted the compromise offered by Mr. Speer as a full settlement of the case. Accordingly, Judge Horton, U.S. attorney, received orders a few days ago to withdraw the civil suits pending against Mr. Speer and his bondsmen on the payment of the money agreed upon....

We are heartily glad that these cases are at last settled, and that John Speer is relieved of the weight that has so long oppressed him....He is poor. He is not a man of extravagant habits. He neither gambles nor drinks. He could not have wasted the money he was accused of appropriating in extravagant living or dissipation, because anything of that character is utterly foreign to his habits and life. He has nothing except the homestead on which he settled 17 years ago, and the only value that it has is the result of the growth of the country. And it is understood that Mr. Speer must sacrifice that in order to settle his affairs and relieve himself of the difficulties that have so long oppressed him.

The settlement of this case is, Senator Pomeroy says, "a tribute to the press of Kansas," as the petition, signed by nearly every journalist in the state, representing all shades of political opinion, was one that could not fail to carry with it conviction and favorable consideration. Such an appeal, signed as it was, was irresistible.

PAPER MILL for Lawrence.....We announced that steps were being taken to erect a paper mill at this place. J. B. Clark...proposes to erect a first-class paper mill,...to run by steam power, and to have sufficient boilers to generate steam not only to run the machinery but to cook the straw. The machinery is to be all new and to have capacity for making at least 2.5 tons of board paper in a day of 24 hours....$45,000 will represent the stock of the mill. Mr. Clark will furnish $30,000 and desires the citizens to subscribe or take the remaining $15,000....Should everything be favorable, Mr. Clark states that the mill could be completed by December next.

 

In four or five months another weekly paper will b ...
June 19, 1871, Weekly Tribune (ID 1038)

In four or five months another weekly paper will be started in this city. It will be called the Baptist Quiver, to be published by T. W. Green & Co. The company is Rev. F. M. Ellis of the Baptist Church in this city, a gentleman of culture,...and Rev. T. W. Green....Mr. Green has just retired from the Journal....The Baptist Quiver will be strictly a religious paper.

 

Growth and development involves change. The increa ...
January 16, 1878, Weekly Tribune (ID 1673)

Growth and development involves change. The increasing business and circulation of The Tribune have at length made necessary a change in its methods, and an addition to its editorial force -- the combined duties of editor and publisher pressing too heavily to be longer borne by one pair of shoulders, unless broader and stronger than ours. We have, therefore, invited L. D. Bailey to take charge of the editorial department....Judge Bailey is an old citizen of Kansas, well known to our readers, and to the press and people of the state, as an able and vigorous writer, and an uncompromising advocate of the great cause of which The Tribune is the unflinching champion and exponent.... -- J. E. Covel.

In taking the editorial chair of The Tribune, I am deeply sensible to the responsibilities of the position....The Tribune's creed on the political questions of the day is well known, and meets my entire concurrence. I am for greenbacks being made a full legal tender, and issued by the government for value received. I do not believe that the exclusive gold basis...will meet with better success here.... -- L. D. Bailey.