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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Chief (White Cloud)

Articles in database from Chief (White Cloud):    147

"White Cloud Kansas Chief. -- The above is the tit ...
July 23, 1857, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3275)

"White Cloud Kansas Chief. -- The above is the title of a new paper (the first No. of which we have received) just started in Kansas Territory by Sol. Miller, formerly of the Germantown (O.) Republican. It is generally known in this section that Sol. is a ready and racy writer, and always printed a spicy paper...." -- Eaton (O.) Democrat.

 

How They Do in Kansas. The office of the Weekly He ...
August 6, 1857, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3285)

How They Do in Kansas. The office of the Weekly Herald, published in Leavenworth, was recently visited by a correspondent of an Eastern paper, and is thus described by him: "A visit to the printing office afforded a rich treat. On entering the first room on the right hand, three law 'shingles' were on the door; on one side was a rich bed -- French blankets, sheets, tablecloths, shirts, cloaks and rugs, all together; on the wall hung hams, maps, venison and rich engravings, onion, portraits and boots; on the floor were a side of bacon, carved to the bone, corn and potatoes, stationery and books; on a nice dressing case stood a wooden tray half full of dough, while crockery occupied the professional desk. In the room on the left -- the sanctum -- the housewife, cook and editor lived in glorious unity -- one person. He was seated on a stool, with a paper before him on a plank, writing a vigorous knockdown to an article in the Kickapoo Pioneer, a paper of a rival city. The cooking stove was at his left, and tin kettles all 'round the corn cake was a doin' and instead of scratching his head for an idea, as editors often do, he turned the cake and went ahead."

 

We have received another new Kansas paper, publish ...
October 8, 1857, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3310)

We have received another new Kansas paper, published at Sumner, by Cone Brothers, called the Gazette....Terms, $2 a year. We have also received a copy of the Sumner Daily Gazette! We presume this latter is only to see how a daily paper in Sumner would look....

We have received a copy of the Young America, a paper recently started at Leavenworth by Gen. McLane. It appears to be an Old Line Whig paper, with Pro-Slavery proclivities, and pitches into the democracy with tooth and toenail....

The Leavenworth Times is after us to know our politics, although it is evident that he already knows. To satisfy the Times,...we will endeavor to define our politics, briefly and explicitly, personally, sympathetically, and newspaporially. -- Politically, we are a National American -- that horrible, Pro-Slavery, Border Ruffian party. Sympathetically, we are with the Free State party of Kansas, which we exhibited by voting the Free State Ticket, from top to bottom -- from delegate to Congress to constable -- on Monday last. Did the editor of the Times do more? Newspaporially, we hold to no party. We say just what we please, no matter where it hits....

 

We exchange with nearly all the papers in Kansas, ...
October 29, 1857, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3317)

We exchange with nearly all the papers in Kansas, yet about one-half of them arrive so seldom that they can hardly be called exchanges. We have not received the Leavenworth Times, Herald, Journal, Tecumseh Note Book, Lecompton Democrat, and Squatter Sovereign for about a month....We have received only the first number of the Sumner Gazette, daily and weekly....The Doniphan Constitutionalist still refuses to exchange....

 

Crusader of Freedom. We have received a prospectus ...
November 19, 1857, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3328)

Crusader of Freedom. We have received a prospectus of an illustrated Free State paper to bear the above name, which is to be started at Doniphan in this county,...by James Redpath, the Kansas correspondent of the St. Louis Democrat....

 

We have received a prospectus of a paper, the firs ...
December 3, 1857, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3336)

We have received a prospectus of a paper, the first number of which is to be issued on Saturday, the 9th inst., at Palmetto (recently Marysville), Marshall County, to be called the Palmetto Kansan....Price $2 a year, in advance. Address J. E. Clardy, Palmetto, Marysville P.O., K.T.

 

We learn from the Leavenworth Herald that the Jour ...
December 10, 1857, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3345)

We learn from the Leavenworth Herald that the Journal, of that city, has been purchased by a company who are going to make it a Free State Democratic paper, opposed to the constitution. Henderson, its late editor, has got married and gone to Pennsylvania....

 

The Geary City Era has again been received. It had ...
December 17, 1857, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3348)

The Geary City Era has again been received. It had suspended for a few weeks. Mr. Grant has retired from the paper, which is now under the control of Thompson and Marble.

 

The Kansas Settler is the name of a neat and well ...
March 4, 1858, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3379)

The Kansas Settler is the name of a neat and well conducted little Free State paper recently started at Tecumseh with the material, we judge, of the late Pro-Slavery Note Book. The publisher is Thomas R. Lord, late one of the publishers, we understand, of Lord's Counterfeit Detector at Cincinnati.

 

We have received the first number of the Iowa Poin ...
March 18, 1858, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3386)

We have received the first number of the Iowa Point Weekly Enquirer, published in our neighboring town by Thomas J. Key, late of the Doniphan Constitutionalist....The Enquirer is Democratic and Pro-Slavery in politics.

 

*The Ossawatomie Southern Herald incidentally give ...
April 8, 1858, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3395)

*The Ossawatomie Southern Herald incidentally gives a graphic history of its press, as follows:--

How much depends on the voice of the Kansas press! To forge the chains of thraldom, to bind the fetters of the slave; to crush the opening bud of civil liberty, you must first annihilate the press. Our own attests the fact; and here let us intrude a vestige of its history:

On the sacking of Ossawatomie, the type upon which this paper is now printed was concealed, and the press hidden in a pile of rails; the first inquiry of the Ruffians was for the printing press. It was not to be found; but that mysterious pile of rails must be investigated. A few short pieces extracted from the ends of the pile revealed to the eager gaze of the Ruffians the mighty lever of old Ben Franklin, improved by Taylor, as he reposed in all his eclipsed majesty in a rail pile! Just at this moment, another gang emerged from a neighboring dwelling, several of whom were bearing demijohns of the ardent as trophies of their devotion to the South. -- "Here is the press." "We have found it!" -- came in yells from the investigators as they vainly attempted to draw the attention of the other party, who were evidently inspirited with something. "D--n your presses!" "We have something better than all your presses!" and the obese portions of several demijohns were waved patronizingly at the other party while they made a beeline for the woods. The other party followed. Who ever knew a Ruffian who does not love his whiskey? He loves his cause of slavery much, but he loves his whiskey more! So the press was saved.

*At the burning of Ossawatomie, the press was boxed up and concealed in the woods, where it remained until it was resurrected to print this paper. It will thus be seen that the press is the enemy most dreaded by the foes of freedom in Kansas.

 

A Boy Wanted. At this office, to learn the printin ...
July 22, 1858, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3431)

A Boy Wanted. At this office, to learn the printing business. We want one who is neither afraid nor ashamed of work, nor too lazy to do it. He must also be of good disposition and habits. We do not want a Devil, although we want one to do the Devil's work. In short, we wish a good, industrious, steady, well-behaved boy, about 16 years of age. Such an one will find a situation by applying soon.

The Centropolis (or Minneola) Leader has been discontinued and a new paper called the Minneola Statesman has been started upon its ruins by O. A. Bassett & Co....Price $2 a year.

 

We have received the first number of the Commercia ...
September 9, 1858, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3450)

We have received the first number of the Commercial Gazette, a large, neat, well filled and ably conducted paper just started in Wyandotte in this Territory. It is Free State in politics....S. D. Macdonald, editor and publisher. Terms, $2 a year in advance.

The Junction Sentinel is a new paper, printed on old material, hailing from Junction City, Riley County, edited and published by Ben. H. Keyser. Price $2 a year. It says it will follow the Democracy....

The Kansas Zeitung has recently entered its second year. This is the oldest German paper in Kansas, is large, well filled, and conducted with ability....Published at Atchison by Soussman and Pfeiffner at $2 a year.

 

French Paper. -- We have received a copy of a Fren ...
September 16, 1858, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3454)

French Paper. -- We have received a copy of a French paper just started in Leavenworth called L'Estafette du Kansas, by Monsieur Frank F. Barclay. The price is $2.50 a year. As we cannot parlez vous, we are unable to judge of its merits, but the typographical execution is excellent. We believe it leans towards the Democracy.

 

Palermo Leader. We have received the first number ...
October 21, 1858, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3472)

Palermo Leader. We have received the first number of a paper bearing the above title, hailing from Palermo in this county, edited and published by Charles S. Perham and F. W. Emery at $2 a year. It is Free State in politics....This makes the fifth paper now published in Doniphan County. Getting rather thick, but we wish the newcomer success.

The Geary City Era has been suspended. Earl Marble retires and Mr. Thompson intends removing the office to Troy, where he will publish a Democratic paper to be called the Troy Democrat.

The Elwood Press has changed hands. Mr. Tompkins has retired from the editorial chair and is succeeded by Ed. Russell, formerly of the Elwood Advertiser. Mr. Merrick is publisher.

 

The last number of the Iowa Point Enquirer announc ...
November 18, 1858, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3485)

The last number of the Iowa Point Enquirer announces that the paper will be discontinued for the winter and the editor is going to Alabama.

 

The January number of The Printer has been receive ...
February 3, 1859, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3520)

The January number of The Printer has been received. It is truly a valuable work to the craft -- containing information relating to every branch of the art; and, not the least valuable part of it is the type specimens, advertisements, and lists of prices, which it contains every month. It is published by Henry Huntington & Co., No. 1, Spruce Street, New York, at $1 a year.

 

Advance Payments. When we commenced the publicatio ...
March 3, 1859, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3528)

Advance Payments. When we commenced the publication of the Chief, we did so with the determination of exacting advance payments of subscriptions; but from various causes we branched out into the credit system, little by little, until people appear to think it would be an insult to offer us pay in advance....We have asked for money until we are tired and ashamed. We have come to the conclusion that it is far safer to print 200 papers per week which are paid for than to print 600 and receive no pay for at least two-thirds of them....After the commencement of the new volume, three months hence, we will send no paper unless it is paid for in advance. The same rule will be observed in job work. Advertising cannot be conducted upon the same principle....It is far better to shut down than to work for nothing, and run ruinously in debt. We have done that thing for seven years -- this is the year of Jubilee and we are going to quit it. Jacob worked for seven years and got cheated out of the object for which he labored -- so have we....

 

The St. Joseph Gazette and Journal have both come ...
April 7, 1859, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3543)

The St. Joseph Gazette and Journal have both come out in complete new dress....

The Topeka Tribune also comes out in a new dress and in an enlarged form.

We have received the first number of a new six column paper, called the Linn County Herald, published at Mound City, Linn County, by Jonathan Lyman at $2 a year. It is Republican in politics.

 

Kansas Express. -- This is the name of a new paper ...
June 2, 1859, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3562)

Kansas Express. -- This is the name of a new paper, the first number of which has reached us from Manhattan, Riley County, edited by Charles F. De Vivaldi, and furnished to subscribers at...$2 a year. It is an out-and-out, thorough-going Free State paper....

 

This number closes the second volume of the Chief. ...
June 9, 1859, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3567)

This number closes the second volume of the Chief. We have the melancholy and disagreeable announcement to make to some persons who have prophesied that we would "peg out" that we do not intend to "peg."...We take this occasion to bid an affectionate farewell to a number of subscribers who will receive the paper no longer unless they fork over -- and may the Lord have mercy on their souls!

Atchison Union. We have received the first number of a large and neat Democratic paper bearing the above name, published at Atchison, in this Territory, by G. O. Chase.

The Leavenworth Herald has come out in a new dress and an enlarged form....A daily is also issued from the Herald office, making the fourth daily paper for Leavenworth.

 

We have received the first and second numbers of t ...
June 30, 1859, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3580)

We have received the first and second numbers of the Iowa Point Dispatch, published by Watrous & Biggers. It presents a much better appearance than the Enquirer did....It is Democratic.

 

The first number of the Elwood Free Press has been ...
July 7, 1859, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3583)

The first number of the Elwood Free Press has been received....Editorially, it has a strong team in the persons of Lee & Wilder....The Free Press is a thorough-going Republican paper and carries the flag of Seward and Lincoln....Price $2 a year.

We have received several numbers of the Western Spy, published at Sumner in Atchison County upon the material of the old Sumner Gazette establishment. Its editor and publisher is Henry Barter....

 

We have received No. 3 of a new paper called the D ...
August 18, 1859, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3599)

We have received No. 3 of a new paper called the Doniphan Post, published by George & William Rees at Doniphan in this county....This makes five papers now published in Doniphan County.

 

Calls. We received calls on Tuesday from three mem ...
September 22, 1859, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3614)

Calls. We received calls on Tuesday from three members of the press -- Conklin of the Forest City Monitor, Schmidt of the Leavenworth Zeitung, and Watrous of the Iowa Point Dispatch....Mr. Schmidt is on a tour through the Territory, soliciting subscribers for the Zeitung. It is a good paper, engaged in the Free State cause, and...it is the only German paper published in the Territory....Mr. Schmidt calls upon every German he can hear of, and also distributes copies of the Constitution among his countrymen....

The Leavenworth Ledger office has changed hands and a new daily called the Register has been started, edited by Jeff. L. Dugger. The Register is...one of the best dailies we receive. Price $8 a year.

 

We have received the first number of the Kansas St ...
September 29, 1859, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3619)

We have received the first number of the Kansas Statesman, published at Junction City, Riley County, upon the material of the defunct Sentinel. The editor is Sam A. Medary, son of Gov. Sam Medary. So it appears that the Medary family have transplanted themselves from the soil of Ohio to that of Kansas. Well, we saw the Medary dynasty, with its organ, the Statesman, overthrown in Ohio, and we expect soon to see the time when the same thing will come to pass in Kansas.

 

New Papers. A number of new faces have made their ...
October 20, 1859, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3633)

New Papers. A number of new faces have made their appearance upon our table. Said table consists of an empty type case placed bottom upward across a dilapidated flour barrel standing on end. And...some half a dozen of our old exchanges have come to us for some weeks past in half sheets.

The State Record is a fine sheet of eight pages, hailing from Topeka as an advocate of Republicanism, in place of the disaffected Tribune. It is published by E. G. & W. W. Ross at $2 a year.

The Olathe Herald appears from Olathe in Johnson County. It is Democratic in politics, but barring that is a neat paper....Published by Devenney & Giffen at $2 a year.

The Americus Sentinel comes to us from Americus in Breckenridge County. It claims to be independent, but we think its independence leans decidedly towards Democracy....It is the second paper in Breckenridge County. Published by T. C. Hill at $2 a year.

The Neosho Valley Register is an out-and-out little Republican sheet hailing from Burlington, Coffey County, published by S. S. Prouty, formerly of Prairie City....Price $2 a year....

 

Our readers will have to excuse our late appearanc ...
October 20, 1859, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3635)

Our readers will have to excuse our late appearance this week, and the meager amount of reading which we shall probably present to them for several weeks to come. Our expected help has not yet arrived, and we are compelled to act in the capacity of editor, publisher, foreman, compositor, proofreader, pressman, mailing clerk, and devil, besides being "hewer of wood and drawer of water," and chore-doer in general, for office and dwelling -- to say nothing of being half dead with toothache, neuralgia and piles. We haven't had time to shave in three weeks, and have to look over our exchanges between times. This may not sound poetical, but it is true!

 

A paper has again been established at Quindaro, in ...
December 1, 1859, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3657)

A paper has again been established at Quindaro, in this Territory, called the Kansas Tribune, published by J. Francis and J. P. W. Davis at $2 a year. It is of good proportions, neatly gotten up, ably edited, and advocates Republicanism.

 

We last week received a copy of the Leavenworth We ...
January 5, 1860, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3676)

We last week received a copy of the Leavenworth Weekly Times, the first we had seen for more than a year past, and scarcely knew it, it had grown so large. It is now one of the largest papers in the West; and a neater and better one does not exist, East or West....The Daily Times is one of the best dailies published, and we would scarcely know how to get along without it....The price of the Daily Times is $8 a year.

 

The Leavenworth Daily Dispatch has come out in an ...
January 12, 1860, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3681)

The Leavenworth Daily Dispatch has come out in an entire new dress, and is now one of the neatest, as it has heretofore been one of the sprightliest, papers we receive....In politics the Dispatch is a Douglas Democrat. Published by J. T. Hinton, G. Prescott, W. D. White and C. A. Prescott at $6 a year.

 

Leavenworth Register. -- We have several times, of ...
January 19, 1860, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3686)

Leavenworth Register. -- We have several times, of late, had occasion to speak of Leavenworth dailies. The Register deserves not to be slighted. It is a No. 1 daily, interesting and spicy, and Republican to the core. The editor and publisher is Jeff. L. Dugger....Price $8 a year.

 

The Old Franklin Press. -- The old press at which ...
February 9, 1860, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3695)

The Old Franklin Press. -- The old press at which Franklin worked in Boston, on the New England Courant, in 1720, has been preserved for more than a century in the printing office of the Newport Mercury. The Mercury was established by James Franklin, brother of the philosopher, who then owned and used the press. It has recently been sold, and is now the property of John B. Murray of the firm of John B. Murray & Co., Bankers, New York City. Mr. Murray is already the owner of one press at which Benjamin Franklin worked, in Watts' printing house, near Lincoln's Inn Fields, London, in 1725-6. This old press Mr. Murray procured in London in 1841, and deposited for safekeeping in the United States Patent office at Washington in 1842, where it still remains.... -- Boston Journal.

 

We have received several numbers of a new paper ca ...
March 8, 1860, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3708)

We have received several numbers of a new paper called the Paola Chief, published at Paola, Lykins County, Kansas, by Wm. R. Wagstaff at $2 a year. We believe the paper is Democratic -- at any rate, the editor is....

 

The Leavenworth Register has suspended for want of ...
March 15, 1860, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3713)

The Leavenworth Register has suspended for want of patronage. It was a Lane organ.

Champion Vaughn of the Leavenworth Times has recently been getting married, and is now East on a wedding tour. He has sold out his entire interest in the Times to his partner, J. Kemp Bartlett, who is now sole proprietor -- Vaughn continuing as principal editor.

 

We have received several numbers of a small but ne ...
June 14, 1860, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3740)

We have received several numbers of a small but neat paper called the Grasshopper Falls Gazette, published at Grasshopper Falls, Jefferson County, by Frank F. Barclay -- Azel W. Spalding editor. Price $1.50 a year. It is Republican in politics.

 

Suspended. The last number of the Iowa Point Dispa ...
June 21, 1860, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3745)

Suspended. The last number of the Iowa Point Dispatch announces that the publication of the paper henceforth ceases for want of adequate support.

 

We have received the first number of a new paper c ...
July 5, 1860, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3753)

We have received the first number of a new paper called the Auburn Docket, edited and published by D. B. Emmert at Auburn, Shawnee County, Kansas. It...carries at its masthead the banner of Lincoln and Hamlin.

 

Another new Kansas paper makes its appearance upon ...
July 26, 1860, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3764)

Another new Kansas paper makes its appearance upon our table. The Independent is published at Oskaloosa, Jefferson County, by J. W. Roberts at $2 a year.

 

The town of Marysville on the Big Blue was almost ...
August 9, 1860, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3777)

...The town of Marysville on the Big Blue was almost entirely destroyed by a tornado last week. The Platform printing office was totally demolished.

 

We are indebted to the proprietor of the Holt Coun ...
August 16, 1860, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3783)

We are indebted to the proprietor of the Holt County News for the loan of a supply of quads and figures, which helped us out of a tight place in the delinquent land list business.

 

Newspaper Changes &c. -- There appears to be an al ...
August 23, 1860, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3786)

Newspaper Changes &c. -- There appears to be an almost general change going on in the newspapers of Kansas.

The Leavenworth Dispatch...has changed hands and come out for Breckenridge.

Wm. H. Gill has retired from the Leavenworth Herald, having sold out to W. P. Fain.

Gideon O. Chase, the founder of the Atchison Union, has sold out the establishment to Adams & Stebbins.

Major Van Horn has disposed of his interest in the Kansas City (Mo.) Journal of Commerce and retired from the concern.

Sam A. Medary recently brought out the Junction City Statesman in an entire new dress and sold it out to Herbert & Cuddy.

Frank F. Barclay has sold the Grasshopper Falls Gazette to P. H. Hubbell -- Azel W. Spalding continuing as editor.

Mr. Lyman has suspended the publication of the Mound City (Linn County) Herald because of opposition to him arising out of the late difficulties in that county.

The Manhattan Express and the Paola Chief have suspended for a few weeks in order to raise the "sinews of war."

W. W. Ross of the Topeka Record has disposed of an interest in himself to a lady -- has been getting married.

 

Doniphan County Dispatch. The first number of this ...
September 6, 1860, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3792)

Doniphan County Dispatch. The first number of this paper (late Iowa Point Dispatch), published at Troy by J. W. Biggers, has been received. It is Democratic in politics, goes in for a union of its shivered party, and believes in Douglas....

The Wyandotte Gazette has been revived. Mr. Macdonald has associated with him in the editorial department the late editor of the Ellenville (N.Y.) Journal.

 

The Mound City Report is the name of a paper just ...
September 13, 1860, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3795)

The Mound City Report is the name of a paper just started at Mound City in place of the Herald, recently discontinued. It is a neat, well-filled, readable paper, Republican in politics. Its conductors are J. T. Snoddy, J. F. Broadhead, H. A. Smith and A. Danford.

 

Mr. Taylor, editor of the Wyandotte Gazette, was b ...
October 4, 1860, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3809)

Mr. Taylor, editor of the Wyandotte Gazette, was brutally assaulted in his office and beaten with a cane...by one Cox, who had been engaged in kidnapping a negro, which the Gazette had commented upon severely. Taylor fired a revolver at Cox but missed him ? a circumstance much to be regretted.

 

The publishers of the St. Joseph Gazette have been ...
October 15, 1860, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3816)

The publishers of the St. Joseph Gazette have been for a short time past favoring us with their daily. We find it a very useful institution as, by it, we receive later news than from any other source. It is the only daily in St. Joseph that pays for and publishes regular telegraphic reports. It is also the first to publish the Pony Express news from California and Pike's Peak. We don't like its Democracy but for news it is the paper of this "neck of the woods." Price $6 a year.

 

Rags! Rags! Rags! We will take any quantity of cle ...
October 18, 1860, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3814)

Rags! Rags! Rags! We will take any quantity of clean cotton or linen rags, at 1 cent per pound, in payment for subscription, advertising and job work. Save your rags and get something for them instead of casting them away. No other kind will be taken than such as are named above.

The Marysville Platform has again made its appearance, the first time since the office was capsized by a tornado during the past summer.

 

We want an honest and industrious boy to learn the ...
November 8, 1860, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3820)

We want an honest and industrious boy to learn the printing business. One from 14 to 17 years of age preferred, and must be able to read and write....

 

Hard times are again beginning to affect the newsp ...
November 29, 1860, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3829)

Hard times are again beginning to affect the newspapers. Since the election, quite a number have suspended and others have curtailed their dimensions. Of the latter class we observe, among our exchanges, the Louisville Courier, the Council Bluffs Nonpareil, and the Omaha Republican. The daily Omaha Nebraskian has been discontinued.

 

W. W. Herbert has retired from the Junction City S ...
December 6, 1860, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3833)

W. W. Herbert has retired from the Junction City Statesman. In taking his leave, he says he is a Southerner, did all he could to make Kansas a slave state; when that failed, tried to do the next best thing, make her Democratic; but, failing in that likewise, he cannot remain among such people any longer but is going back South. Hope more of the same stripe will follow him.

 

*Ex?Governor Medary has issued a prospectus for a ...
January 10, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3844)

*Ex?Governor Medary has issued a prospectus for a paper at Columbus, Ohio, to be started during the present month. It is to be called The Crisis, will be Democratic and Union, and promises to devote considerable space to Kansas affairs and interests. As the Governor did appear to take some interest in Kansas, aside from his official duties, he may be able to do her justice....

 

The Troy Dispatch has "kerflumixed." The issue of ...
January 17, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3850)

The Troy Dispatch has "kerflumixed." The issue of the sheriff contest did the business. Thus is fulfilled a prediction which we made when the Dispatch was first issued, that the Democracy of Doniphan County cannot and will not sustain a newspaper.

 

The Great Antiquity of Printing. When Warren Hasti ...
January 21, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3853)

The Great Antiquity of Printing. When Warren Hastings was governor general of India, Major Roebuck, making an excavation in the district of Benares, found a vault, and in it moveable types, placed as if for printing, evidently not of modern origin, and from all the Major could collect, it appeared probable that the place had remained in the state which it was found for at least 1,000 years. Paper we know to have been manufactured in the East many centuries before we had any knowledge of it; and we have many reasons to think that the Chinese had been acquainted with the mode of printing they now employ many centuries before Faust invented it in Europe.

 

*We have received the first number of The Conserva ...
January 31, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3859)

*We have received the first number of The Conservative, the new Leavenworth daily, published by D. R. Anthony and edited by D. W. Wilder. It is the same size as the Times, very neat, and well gotten up....

 

The Junction City Statesman has ceased to exist. T ...
February 7, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3864)

The Junction City Statesman has ceased to exist. This is probably the case with several more of our exchanges as we have not received them for several weeks. Besides this, over one-half of our Kansas and Nebraska exchanges have for some weeks past been coming to us in the shape of half sheets.

*We have received the first number of Ex-Governor Medary's paper, The Crisis, published at Columbus, Ohio....We were led to believe that the paper would strike heavy blows in defense of the Union but, if the number before us is any criterion, we must pronounce it an active aider and abettor of secession and treason....

 

Frequently we come across an item stating that a p ...
February 21, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3871)

Frequently we come across an item stating that a paper has been started here or there, or such and such a paper has changed hands for the purpose of becoming the organ of this man or that. Of late, several such enterprises have been announced in our state. Such papers never have more than a circumscribed influence and are always short lived. Their success depends upon the success of the men whose organs they are, and their editors are regarded as the property or tools of the men whose especial cause they advocate.

 

The Topeka Tribune has changed hands and politics ...
February 28, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3876)

The Topeka Tribune has changed hands and politics again. It is now edited by J. P. Greer and claims to be Republican, a fact which we could not appreciate did we not see the fact announced in the paper. Its whole aim seems to be warring upon prominent Republicans in Kansas with more bitterness than characterized the Democratic Tribune....The Tribune is the reputed organ of Gov. Robinson, and the Governor will get the credit for these favors. The result will be anything but favorable for Robinson.

 

P. Sidney Post has sold the Wyandotte Argus to Mr. ...
March 28, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3890)

P. Sidney Post has sold the Wyandotte Argus to Mr. Taylor, recently of the Gazette, which was destroyed by fire.

 

*Ah, ha! Our beloved ex-governor, Sammedary, has a ...
April 25, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3901)

*Ah, ha! Our beloved ex-governor, Sammedary, has almost been getting into hot water. In every number of his Crisis, he has been preaching the foulest treason, even going so far as to advise all the states to discard the good old Constitution and adopt that of the Confederate traitors. All this was tolerated until the war commenced, when, Sammedary being one day on the streets of Columbus, engaged in his favorite occupation of talking treason, a crowd surrounded him, and notified him that if he did not "dry up" forthwith, they would string up his foul carcass. Sam, being an old stager, considerably shut up and sloped. Those Satanic papers which have heretofore been justifying mobocracy in the South, in silencing free speech and a free press, are now having their chickens come home to roost.

 

The Mound City Report has been discontinued. The o ...
May 2, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3905)

The Mound City Report has been discontinued. The office has been removed to Mansfield, Linn County, and the publication of a Democratic paper commenced under the title of the Shield and Banner....The editors and publishers are R. B. Mitchell and B. M. Ayres.

The St. Joseph Free Democrat is suspended for the present in consequence of the treason furor in that city.

 

"Mr. Isaac Walton, not the celebrated trout fisher ...
May 9, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3910)

"Mr. Isaac Walton, not the celebrated trout fisher but a tramping 'jour' printer, came to this office a few days ago and begged a pair of pants and his dinner from one of the hands, and then started for Topeka on foot in search of a 'sit.' We presume he had a safe journey, as we learn from the Daily Record that he arrived at the capital but got on a 'drunk,' and was safely 'caged' by the authorities of that city. He was 'plumb strapped,' he said, and the fine of five dollars that was imposed upon him could not be obtained, and Isaac was permitted to 'go on his way rejoicing'." ? Atchison Champion.

Isaac called upon us, week before last, and we gave him employment. He bears the traces of having once been a man of good sense and fair intelligence and, when sober, a better type-sticker is not often met with. But Isaac has a "head for whiskey" ? in fact, he acknowledges the "corn," and says he drinks purely for revenge, that whiskey killed his father and he is bound to destroy it whenever he has opportunity!...In the evening of the second day, he began to get steam up....Isaac, although a Pennsylvanian, had a strong Southern feeling, which ran into secessionism as he got boozy. Queer enough, the drunker he got, the stronger secessionist he became. Isaac professed to be somewhat of a soothsayer and next morning was very tonguey about a vision he had had with regard to Fort Pickens. In fact, he did nothing but talk about his vision until, growing impatient, we requested him to "dry up" and permit others to work if he did not intend to work himself. He laid down his stick and went out, but presently returned, loaded with whiskey to the muzzle, and suggested that we had "better discharge Isaac." We received the suggestion favorably, paid him off and told him to toddle. Next we saw him on the street, mounted on a goods box, haranguing a crowd upon secession and the generous people of the South....Toward evening he came into the office again, requesting us to "measure his matter and settle," which we succeeded in convincing him that we had already done....The last we heard of Isaac, he was in Forest City with "snakes in his boots," the worst kind. Where he is now, we know not; but we recommend him to the tender mercies of all printers.

 

We learn that a paper is shortly to be started at ...
May 16, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3916)

We learn that a paper is shortly to be started at Hiawatha by a gentleman named Parker. The material of the late Troy Dispatch has been purchased and removed to Hiawatha for that purpose.

 

We have received the first number of the Brown Cou ...
May 30, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3926)

We have received the first number of the Brown County Union, published at Hiawatha by P. Gould Parker. It says it shall support Lincoln's administration.

 

The Bulletin is the name of a tri-weekly and weekl ...
June 27, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3945)

The Bulletin is the name of a tri-weekly and weekly paper just started at Atchison upon the material of the late Lecompton Democrat. The Bulletin is a secession paper of the lousiest kind. Its days will be "few and full of trouble." The people of Kansas have no use for such a paper nor its conductors.

 

If our patrons desire us to keep the paper going, ...
July 11, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3954)

If our patrons desire us to keep the paper going, we respectfully suggest that they speedily furnish us the means of buying some paper. When we said we had no need of money, a few weeks ago, we had forgotten this item. If the Rhino is not quickly forthcoming, we shall be compelled to suspend for a few weeks and go into the harvest field to earn enough money to buy paper....If our patrons compel us to the humiliating step of suspending, they will never see another Chief, if they live till their great-grandchildren have twins! This is not one of our jokes, but dead earnest.

 

The Leavenworth Conservative and the Lawrence Repu ...
August 8, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3960)

The Leavenworth Conservative and the Lawrence Republican have been selected to publish the laws of the United States in Kansas.

 

While newspapers are smashing all around us, it is ...
August 15, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3965)

While newspapers are smashing all around us, it is our determination to endeavor to make the old Chief weather the terrible times which are producing so much ruin. To this end, we want every man who wishes us success to become a subscriber. Let no one, either old patron or new one, be delicate about offering us money, for we need it and will gladly accept it; but if you can't possibly raise the money, don't stand back on that account. We will receive, on subscription, anything we can eat, use or sell. We will take flour, wheat, meat, lard, butter, eggs, chickens, wood, lumber, everything of the kind, provided it is delivered to us here and brought when we want it. Now, let no one say: "I would subscribe if I had any way to pay for the paper."

*There are three out-and-out traitor papers in Kansas ? the Atchison Bulletin, Marysville Platform, and Junction City Frontier. There are several others that would be just as bad, were it not for public opinion.

 

*In our list of traitor papers in Kansas, we shoul ...
August 22, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3970)

*In our list of traitor papers in Kansas, we should have included the Atchison Union. That was its "style" at the beginning of the rebellion; afterwards, it took the side of the Union; but latterly it seems to be striving to outdo the meanest in opposing the war for the preservation of the government.

 

We have been looking over our books and find that ...
August 29, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3973)

We have been looking over our books and find that we have over $1,500 due us on legal advertising alone, such as sheriffs' sales, orders of publication, administrators' notices, etc. ? embracing a period of only 18 months past, to say nothing of a considerable amount for advertising previously done. When we will receive our pay we know not; the greater part of it, perhaps never. One-half or even one-fourth the above amount would be of great service to us at this time; and we might have it, if the proper parties would attend to the matter....In some instances, lawyers, clerks, etc., collect the fees and pocket them, leaving the printer minus his dues; while, in other cases, the fees remain unpaid until the end of almost interminable lawsuits....Those who have collected and used our money must fork over, or take the consequences....To guard against serious loss, we shall soon be compelled to withhold the required affidavit to all legal advertisements until the charges are paid; or, if that fails to meet the case, then to refuse such advertisements unless they are accompanied by the fees.

 

*The Atchison Bulletin has suspended. Treason didn ...
September 12, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3976)

*The Atchison Bulletin has suspended. Treason didn't pay, even in Atchison. Since jayhawkers, home guards, and other military characters abound in that region, we observe that a remarkably loyal tone pervades the columns of the Atchison Union.

*The St. Joseph Gazette, daily and weekly, has suspended. Reason, Fremont's proclamation "put the screws" to newspaper treason and the Gazette takes the hint.

 

We have received a copy of a little paper called t ...
October 17, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 3994)

We have received a copy of a little paper called the Kansas First, gotten up by the printers of the 1st Kansas Regiment, now stationed at Chillicothe, Mo. The boys are full of fun and get up a spicy sheet.

 

The Elwood Free Press has suspended and its editor ...
November 7, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4002)

The Elwood Free Press has suspended and its editor has joined Jennison's regiment for the war. As we have done on a number of similar occasions of late, we commend this matter to the serious consideration of our patrons and of the people of Doniphan County. These are terrible times for newspapers. Doniphan County should have at least one newspaper. She can support one handsomely....The Chief is now the only one remaining and it is our determination, if we can possibly find a way to weather the storm, to keep going.....

 

The newspapers are suffering terribly from the har ...
December 26, 1861, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4020)

The newspapers are suffering terribly from the hard times. In Kansas, the havoc is dreadful. Within a short time past, the Elwood Free Press, Marysville Platform, Fort Scott Democrat, and Council Grove Press have suspended. The Oskaloosa Independent, Emporia News, Grasshopper Falls Gazette and Topeka Record are published at intervals. They Wyandotte Gazette has for a long time been coming in half sheets, and the Brown County Union has been reduced to a size scarcely perceptible to the naked eye....

 

During our absence (in the legislature), the mecha ...
January 9, 1862, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4026)

During our absence (in the legislature), the mechanical and business departments of the Chief will be under the control of J. D. Brown, an experienced printer....

 

*A new daily, called the Inquirer, has made its ap ...
March 6, 1862, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4047)

*A new daily, called the Inquirer, has made its appearance in Leavenworth and created no little excitement. It professes to be Democratic in politics. The Conservative and Times have both been pitching in and accusing its editor and proprietors of being Secesh.

 

*The office of the Frontier, published at Junction ...
March 27, 1862, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4058)

*The office of the Frontier, published at Junction City,...was entered by a mob about two weeks since and the concern utterly demolished. The Frontier was a vile traitor sheet, but mob law is not a proper method for the suppression of such nuisances, where public sentiment is so nearly unanimous for the Union as it is in the interior of Kansas.

 

*The Marysville Platform office has been purchased ...
April 24, 1862, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4073)

*The Marysville Platform office has been purchased by D. M. Swearingen and a Republican paper started called the Big Blue Union. John P. Cone, formerly of the Sumner Gazette, is editor. Verily, something good can come out of Nazareth.

 

*The Savannah (Mo.) Plaindealer has again made its ...
May 8, 1862, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4082)

*The Savannah (Mo.) Plaindealer has again made its appearance. The office was carried away last September by a large force of traitors under the lead of such miserable dogs as Tom Stevenson, Dr. Peter, and others; but the editor, with praiseworthy energy, has hunted up the fragments and is again battling for the Union. Although we formerly differed widely from Whitaker on the Douglas question, yet we rejoice to say that, like Douglas, he at the beginning took a decided and unequivocal stand for the Union.

The Leavenworth Times says it has received the first number of Grant's Brown County Republican, published at Hiawatha....Grant must be getting his hands full. It is as much as we can do to publish one paper.

 

*The best act that Gen. Blunt has yet performed ha ...
June 26, 1862, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4114)

*The best act that Gen. Blunt has yet performed has been the suppression of the traitor Leavenworth Inquirer, and the imprisonment of its editors and publishers. This should have been done long ago. The public could afford to put up with a reasonable number of blunders by Gen. Blunt after this religious act. The difficulty with Kansas military commanders heretofore has been, they have had but one idea. If they suppressed Jayhawkers, they protected traitors, and vice versa. But Blunt makes both traitors and Jayhawkers toe the mark. Since he took command, Cleveland, the Jayhawk chief, and Buffalo Taylor, the traitor chief, have had to knock under. The traitor institution, built up under the protection of Sturgis and Prince, and patronized by Missouri Secessionists, has met a deserved end. It is said that United States muskets, loaded and capped, were found in every part of the establishment, having been secretly furnished from the government arsenal at the fort by Sturgis and Prince; and that correspondence from the Southern army was found in the office. The editor of the Atchison Union should thank us for stirring him up and compelling him to come out a Union man. Had he not done so, he might have shared the fate of Buffalo Taylor. We only hope he won't backslide. There is now a paper in St. Joe, called the Gazette, which is of precisely the same stripe as the Inquirer. Gen. Loan would do a good deed, and strengthen confidence in himself, by closing up the Gazette institution.

 

The Westliches Volksblatt is a new German paper ju ...
July 3, 1862, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4122)

The Westliches Volksblatt is a new German paper just started in St. Joseph, Mo., edited by F. Rodman. It defends true and pure Republicanism and advocates emancipation of slavery, and is in favor of a better education of the laboring classes in the slaveholding states....Charles Thennert of Oregon, Holt County, Mo., is agent for it in that section of country.

 

This number of the Chief is the first of the sixth ...
July 10, 1862, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4124)

This number of the Chief is the first of the sixth volume. We issued the first number on the first day of June, 1857. During the five years past, we have missed five issues, thus throwing the beginning of the volume into July. However, these failures occurred during the first year or two, and we have not missed a single issue for almost three years....We have had much uphill work to get along, and at times have barely escaped going under....Now, we are happy to say, our patronage and prospects are better than at any previous period....Since our first issue, the Chief has outlived 13 newspapers in Doniphan County....When we came here, Doniphan County was in the hands of the Border Ruffians. Every county officer and member of the Legislature was a Border Ruffian. Since that time, the Free State and Republican parties have not been defeated in a single regular election. They have occasionally lost some of the offices, but have always elected a majority of their candidates; and now every county office is filled by a Republican or Union man. However, we do not claim that this has been our work, but that we were one of those who, at the beginning, enlisted for the war and have fought it through. But there is one point upon which we feel a self satisfaction. In all our ups and downs, struggles and hardships, we have always said just what we thought and have never in a single instance advocated for pay any measure, principle or policy of which we did not conscientiously approve....

 

*An Unlucky Machine. The Leavenworth Inquirer has ...
July 17, 1862, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4129)

*An Unlucky Machine. The Leavenworth Inquirer has a hard road to travel. Pratt, the temporary editor during Buffalo's indisposition, a sort of assistant sutler in a Wisconsin regiment, pretended to be thoroughly loyal. The sum total of his Unionism consisted in calling McClellan familiarly "Little Mac" about half a dozen times every day; otherwise, he made decidedly a worse paper than Buffalo, inasmuch as he was fully as great a traitor with not one-fourth the ability. On Thursday evening last, Gen. Blunt gave Pratt 24 hours to leave the state and he "skedaddled." We have not seen the Inquirer since. The establishment is ill-starred. It was the organ of the Buchanan despotism, and "pegged out" at Lecompton with Old Buck's administration. Then it was removed to Atchison, where a traitor sheet called the Bulletin was started; but it had a short life there. Lastly, it was taken to Leavenworth to disseminate treason, but within five months it has been twice squelched there.

 

*We have received several copies of a paper recent ...
July 24, 1862, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4134)

*We have received several copies of a paper recently started at Marysville...called the Constitutional Gazetteer, published by Peter H. Peters and edited by Peters and McGill. It is the best looking sheet that has ever hailed from Marysville. The Gazetteer is Democratic in politics but promises to stand by the Union and support the administration in the prosecution of the way. As long as it sticks to this platform, we say success to it....

We have received the first number of a neat and lively paper called the Bourbon County Monitor, published at Marmiton...by D. B. Emmert, late of the Auburn Docket.

 

*The office of the Marysville Gazetteer was mobbed ...
August 23, 1862, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4151)

*The office of the Marysville Gazetteer was mobbed last week by a party of soldiers and the material scattered over town. The cause was articles abusive of Gen. Lane and the government. We warned the editors, when they started the Gazetteer, not to let their Democracy run away with them and carry them into the traitor camp. Peters and Magill have both been arrested, we learn, by order of Judge Horton, for discouraging enlistments, and taken to Leavenworth.

E. G. Ross has disposed of the Topeka Record to Adams & McDonald.

 

*Kansas Invaded! On Saturday night, the bandit Qua ...
September 11, 1862, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4166)

*Kansas Invaded! On Saturday night, the bandit Quantrile, with a gang of from 500 to 1,000 men, entered Olathe, the county seat of Johnson County, murdered several citizens, robbed stores, destroyed the Mirror printing office, and captured about 50 recruits stationed there. He left the next morning, saying he was going to visit Paola. This settles the question whether or not Kansas is in danger....If the people do not everywhere organize, arm and drill for home defense, between the Indians and the Missouri bandits they are going to have a sorry time. Gov. Robinson has issued a proclamation calling upon the militia to at once organize and drill. Will the people obey the Governor's call? or will they wait until their homes are laid waste, or until Gen. Lane returns from Washington and again tells them to rally?

 

A new paper to be called the Bulletin is about bei ...
September 18, 1862, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4176)

A new paper to be called the Bulletin is about being started in Leavenworth by Buckingham, Hamilton & Prescott, all practical printers. It is to be thoroughly Union and Republican. Terms: daily $5 a year, tri-weekly $3, weekly $1.

 

The Atchison Union has changed hands, being now c ...
September 25, 1862, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4181)

The Atchison Union has changed hands, being now conducted by Leland, Marion & Jackson.

T. Dwight Thacher has again assumed control of the Lawrence Republican. He is one of the ablest writers in the state.

 

The Crusader is a paper started at Paola, Miami Co ...
October 23, 1862, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4211)

The Crusader is a paper started at Paola, Miami County, by Wagstaff's law partner to advocate his election. It will prove about as fruitless as the operations of the Crusaders of old.

 

We have just received a new Ruggles rotary press a ...
October 30, 1862, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4224)

We have just received a new Ruggles rotary press and have, during the past summer, purchased a large quantity of display and fancy type, scripts, borders, rule, etc., and are now prepared to execute the smaller descriptions of job work...in a superior style....We will receive county scrip, to a large extent, for work done for the counties of Doniphan, Brown and Nemaha.

It is useless to apologize for the appearance of our last week's paper....Everything was out of fix, including miserable inking rollers, cold weather, and the whole catalogue of printers' perplexities.

 

The crisis for newspaper men is approaching. In co ...
November 27, 1862, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4247)

The crisis for newspaper men is approaching. In consequence of the immense rise in all kinds of printing stock, especially in paper, very many papers are increasing their rates of subscription; many are cutting down their size, and many are suspending publication. We feel the pressure...but we propose neither to increase the price...,to decrease its size, nor to suspend publication. But one thing we have determined to do, and that speedily. We have quite a number of subscribers who have paid us nothing for two to four years....Most of them are good for it and intend to pay....We cannot afford to continue the credit any longer. We will mark the amounts of their indebtedness upon the margin of paper and, if not paid immediately, we shall erase their names from the book....

The Leavenworth Bulletin now issues a morning edition....The Bulletin and Conservative appear to be engaged in a war of rivalry which at times does not partake of the utmost good nature.

 

*The Atchison Union has gone under and a Secesh sh ...
December 4, 1862, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4255)

*The Atchison Union has gone under and a Secesh sheet, called the Democratic Standard, has been started upon its ruins by Wm. J. Marion. It carries at its masthead, as its candidates for the next president and vice-president, the names of George B. McClellan and Samuel Medary! Rather a hard joke on McClellan!

 

"Sol Miller, an old chum of our boyhood days and a ...
December 18, 1862, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4263)

"Sol Miller, an old chum of our boyhood days and at present editor of the Kansas Chief, published at White Cloud, has recently been elected to the state senate of Kansas. Sol, although peculiar in some of his notions, is a strong Union man, and will undoubtedly make a useful Senator. Last winter, Sol was a member of the lower house in that state. He is bound to rise, if pro-jayhawking and anti-conservatism will in the least elevate one of the genus homo." ? Perryville (O.) Journal.

Thank you for the compliment notwithstanding it contains the least bit of venom, for which we have never given cause. The writer of the above has been a constant reader of our paper...and knows perfectly well that we have opposed jayhawking ever since we have known what it really was....

 

This is the last number of the Chief that a great ...
December 25, 1862, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4267)

This is the last number of the Chief that a great many of our subscribers will receive, in pursuance of notice given about a month since. A very few of the delinquents have paid up, a few have made satisfactory arrangements, and another few have returned their papers indorsed "refused."...If they think they are going to escape the payment of just debt, they are fooling themselves. A large majority of the delinquents have paid no attention to our request. Their names will have to be dropped and their accounts placed in the proper hands for collection. The cutting down of our list will lighten the labors of press work and mailing, and be a very considerable saving in the way of stock....Paper which has hitherto cost us $7 per bundle now costs $12.40....

 

Before this number of the Chief is issued, we will ...
January 3, 1863, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4275)

Before this number of the Chief is issued, we will be off for Topeka. During our absence, E. A. Davis, a competent printer, will have charge of our office.

 

E. H. Grant of the Troy Patriot has received the a ...
January 8, 1863, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4279)

E. H. Grant of the Troy Patriot has received the appointment of examining surgeon in the army.

 

*We learn that John Francis of the Olathe Mirror i ...
May 7, 1863, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4345)

*We learn that John Francis of the Olathe Mirror is arranging his "pi," preparatory to issuing his paper again. Long may he live as a monument of Quantrell's mercy.

 

*D. R. Bailey, editor of the Leavenworth Times, wa ...
May 21, 1863, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4349)

*D. R. Bailey, editor of the Leavenworth Times, was arrested last week by order of Mayor Anthony for publishing an article severely censuring General Hooker. Anthony fined him $20 for disturbing the peace. He refused to pay it and was sent to jail, but was released upon a writ of habeas corpus. Anthony was undoubtedly a little too fast and was probably somewhat influenced by the opposition of the Times to himself; but the arrest was not much amiss. The Times is afflicted with (General) McClellan on the brain and frequently approaches so nearly to Copperheadism that a Simon Pure might prefer it to the genuine....

 

*The editor of the Leavenworth Times, since his re ...
June 4, 1863, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4351)

*The editor of the Leavenworth Times, since his release from limbo, has filled the columns of his paper with howlings over his martyrdom, and is exceedingly wolfish because every other paper in the state will not howl over it as loudly as he does....The mayor (Anthony) was hardly justified in his course, yet it was a stretch of authority designed to have a wholesome effect. Since the "mysterious decease" of the Leavenworth Inquirer, the Secesh of that locality have transferred their affections to the Times, which has endeavored, as far as it dare, to reciprocate the favor, by belittling everything but the Copperhead god, McClellan, and by going in heavy on lazy, lousy, musty Conservatism. Articles censuring Hooker and other generals who have tried to do something, although unsuccessfully, are intended to, and do, tickle Copperheads....

 

*We have received the first number of the Kansas J ...
July 2, 1863, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4360)

*We have received the first number of the Kansas Jeffersonian, published at Grasshopper Falls and edited by R. H. Crosby. The publisher is Peter H. Peters, formerly of Marysville, who makes a fine looking paper of it....Capt. Crosby, in addition to being constitutionally in favor of freedom and Union, was put through the mill severely enough in the dark days of Kansas to fasten his faith for all time to come.

 

*The Olathe Mirror has not...discontinued, but Fra ...
August 20, 1863, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4394)

*The Olathe Mirror has not...discontinued, but Francis has retired and gone to recruiting for the Kansas 15th. The paper has passed into the hands of Sam McKee, an industrious boy....Sam worked in Topeka last winter.

 

*...Friday was a fatal day for Lawrence, but still ...
August 27, 1863, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4405)

*...Friday was a fatal day for Lawrence, but still more fatal for the border counties of Missouri; for retaliation is the watchword, and those counties will be swept with fire and sword until not a rebel house is left standing, nor a living rebel permitted to show his face.

*The result of the policy recently inaugurated in Missouri has come to pass as had been predicted. For this murder and destruction, much of the responsibility rests with Ewing. Had he devoted less time to fighting Mayor Anthony and endeavoring to kill off Gen. Blunt, and more to protecting the loyal people of the border, this thing would not have happened. Ewing got it into his head that his sole province was to suppress thieving, and that the mayor of Leavenworth was the chief among the thieves; and, while engaged in this work, a rebel band collected under his very nose as securely as if done by his authority, invaded the state of his adoption, destroyed the fairest town within her bounds and murdered many of the most enterprising and valuable citizens, a large majority of whom were advocates of his policy, and who, by their very confidence in him, were lulled into a fatal sense of security....The people of Kansas are determined upon retaliation and all the Gen. Ewings in the world could not prevent it....The truth is, Gen. Ewing, in his political aspirations and intrigues, has overdone the business; and if he has not killed himself in Kansas forever, we are greatly mistaken in the temper and character of the people. So much for fighting Mayor Anthony instead of rebels. Had Anthony's policy prevailed, there would have been no bushwhackers to murder our best citizens.

*The pursuit of Quantrell's gang continues, although they have divided into small squads. At latest accounts, about 80 of them had been killed; over 300 of their horses taken; and most of the goods and money stolen at Lawrence recovered. Every house in which Lawrence goods are found is immediately burned. The residents of the border counties of Missouri are all fleeing from the wrath of the Kansas avengers.

 

The Emporia News proposes a meeting of Kansas edit ...
September 3, 1863, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4413)

The Emporia News proposes a meeting of Kansas editors during the state fair at Leavenworth. It might lead to good results....A similar meeting was called during the sitting of the Republican state convention at Topeka last fall; but when the time came, some were in the billiard saloons, some were in the drinking saloons, and some scattered all about town, and the project then and there blew out. It will be about the same, only more so, at Leavenworth.

 

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor ...
September 10, 1863, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4420)

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor (being a union of the Fort Scott Bulletin and Marmaton Monitor), which has been enlarged to mammoth size. Success to friends Emmert and Hayward.

 

*We were personally acquainted with but few of the ...
September 24, 1863, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4430)

*We were personally acquainted with but few of the victims of the Lawrence massacre. Of several of these we shall speak.

*We formed the acquaintance of Josiah C. Trask of the State Journal two winters since. He was a fine specimen of the perfect printer and splendid fellow. He was open-hearted and generous, as the true printer always is; understood his business thoroughly and took pride in it, which made him successful; and was at home in the social circle, which made him a general favorite. The Journal may be re-established with all its former popularity and more; but we doubt whether it will seem like the same old paper without Jo. Trask to superintend it...

 

We have received several copies of the St. Joseph ...
October 1, 1863, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4437)

We have received several copies of the St. Joseph Daily Tribune, a new paper just established in that city by D. K. Abeel, formerly of the Kansas City Journal of Commerce. The Tribune is Radical Union....

 

Col. John A. Martin of the Kansas 8th is said to h ...
October 8, 1863, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4444)

Col. John A. Martin of the Kansas 8th is said to have behaved with great gallantry at the battle of Chickamauga, and to have made several narrow escapes. Kansas will always do to bet on.

 

W. M. Delahay, Judge. This is a fruitful subject f ...
October 29, 1863, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4462)

W. M. Delahay, Judge. This is a fruitful subject for newspaper articles in Kansas. His appointment appears more like a burlesque than a reality, and has been denounced by the entire press of the state, with one or two exceptions...The opposition...does not arise from personal enmity, for Delahay has but few enemies, but from the true cause ? his fitness. A good lawyer and a man of deep learning takes pride in his profession and constantly applies himself to it. He earns his livelihood by it and endeavors to attain greater eminence. Delahay has not done this. He has done little, if anything, to earn a livelihood and a reputation by his profession, but has been a political speculator, grabbing at any passing office and living upon official crumbs....

 

We have received the first number of the Nemaha Co ...
November 19, 1863, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4475)

We have received the first number of the Nemaha Courier, published at Seneca by John P. Cone, formerly of the Sumner Gazette, but more recently of the Marysville Union....

 

We have this week removed our office to the buildi ...
December 3, 1863, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4488)

We have this week removed our office to the building formerly occupied as a store room, and may now be found at the sign of the "Squatters' Store." It was with regret that we left our old nest, which we had occupied for almost seven years; for it was there that we launched forth the first number of the Chief; there that we toiled night and day through the hard times in Kansas, in the struggle to keep the paper going, often fearing we should have to abandon the enterprise in despair; and there that we finally found it established upon a firm basis. But the place became too rickety and uncomfortable. The wind whistled through it on every side, and on cold days it was impossible to work with any sort of comfort. We therefore determined to change quarters, and are now established in a more comfortable room....

Frank M. Tracy publishes his valedictory in this week's Troy Patriot and the paper is again under the exclusive control of E. H. Grant. We are sorry to part with Tracy....But he will find that the duties of...county treasurer would have left him little time to devote to the conduct of a newspaper.

*We have received the first number of the Lawrence Daily Tribune. It speaks volumes for the enterprise of Lawrence. But a few days over three months since, the town was destroyed; now it is rapidly being rebuilt, has a telegraph, will soon have a railroad, and a daily paper makes its appearance, with a fair prospect for another in a short time.

 

I. E. Olney has retired from the Neosho Valley Reg ...
December 24, 1863, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4501)

I. E. Olney has retired from the Neosho Valley Register. This has been caused mainly by the economical streak of the last Legislature in cutting down printers' wages. In many localities, a paper cannot be sustained without the aid of country printing and, when this is reduced below living prices, it is no help at all.

 

Mayor Anthony of Leavenworth "has gone and done it ...
February 4, 1864, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4522)

Mayor Anthony of Leavenworth "has gone and done it."...On the 21st of January, 1864, he was married to the lovely Annie E. Osborn, sister of our lieutenant governor, at Martha's Vineyard, Mass.

We have received the first number of the Troy Weekly Investigator. It is a creditable looking newspaper....It is now owned by the Troy Printing Association....Doniphan County now rejoices in three weekly newspapers, the Chief, Patriot and Investigator.

 

We are frequently asked why we did not send copies ...
March 10, 1864, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4533)

We are frequently asked why we did not send copies of the governor's message and other state documents to our constituents while at Topeka. We reply, for the very best of reasons. John Speer had the contract to print the public documents. But, instead of executing the work, he went howling about the country, charging the Legislature with fraud, while that body was compelled to legislate without the aid of any of the important state papers which are so necessary to proper legislation. When but three or four days remained of the session, and the documents were not yet forthcoming, the Legislature countermanded the order to print them and inserted a clause in the appropriation bill against paying for the printing of such documents. This brought Mr. Speer "to his milk" and he divulged the fact that the documents were printed. He had been withholding them by taking advantage of the technicality of the law, and thus depriving the Legislature of their use, and preventing the people of the state from reading for themselves, and detecting the misrepresentations of him and his co-workers against the state government! Now he is calling the members swindlers for not paying him for his dishonorable transaction.

 

The Troy Patriot and Investigator have united thei ...
March 17, 1864, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4536)

The Troy Patriot and Investigator have united their fortunes and henceforth there will be but one paper published at the county seat.

 

We have received several numbers of the Grand Rive ...
March 31, 1864, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4542)

We have received several numbers of the Grand River News published at Albany, Gentry County, Mo., by E. A. Davis, formerly employed in this office.

J. F. Cummings, for some years principal conductor of the Topeka Tribune, has sold out his entire interest to Andrew Stark & Co. Mr. Cummings has been an enterprising and successful publisher and retires with "something for a rainy day."...

 

We have received several numbers of the Border Sen ...
April 21, 1864, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4554)

We have received several numbers of the Border Sentinel, published by the Messrs. Snoddy at Mound City, Linn County. It is a large and neat paper, most ably conducted.

 

Col. John T. Snoddy, editor of the Mound City Sent ...
April 28, 1864, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4559)

Col. John T. Snoddy, editor of the Mound City Sentinel, died on Thursday last after a short illness. He was a member of the territorial legislature, had lately been major of the Kansas 7th, and was one of the valuable men of the state.

 

The Leavenworth Conservative declares its intentio ...
May 5, 1864, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4562)

The Leavenworth Conservative declares its intention to eschew all gross personalities, and says it has always avoided indulging in them. We cheerfully bear testimony to the truth of this statement. The Conservative has ever been remarkable for its tender regard for the feelings of those against whom its opposition has been purchased. When reluctantly compelled to be personal, it never applies a harsher term to an opponent than "sneak," "fraud," "imbecile," "fool," "idiot," "corrupt," "perjured," "swindler," "usurper," "villain," etc. The Conservative is truly a model of dignity.

 

Printers' Union. Every branch of trade should adop ...
May 19, 1864, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4571)

Printers' Union. Every branch of trade should adopt means to protect itself and to secure just compensation for labor; but the printers' unions have long since got far ahead of this principal object of such unions and have become a downright tyrannical imposition. They not only exact the highest wages, whether employers can afford it or not, but they dictate how everything shall be conducted in the office. They prescribe the hours hands shall work, how copy shall be divided out, how many apprentices a publisher must employ, what sort of hands may work in the office, and choose or discharge the foreman in the office at pleasure. In short, they boss the office and the proprietor has only to submit to their arbitrary rules and pay their wages. The proprietor is a sort of underling to them, at the mercy of their caprices. They permit no man to work in an office who refuses to join their league; and if their rules are demurred to by the employers, they endeavor to stop his work by making a strike. If any printer refuses to go with them, frequently he is subjected to personal violence; and if their striking does not suspend the paper, they have in more than one instance been known to do some injury to the office and the machinery. The evil has become so unsufferable that the leading publishers have been compelled, in self defense, to organize for the purpose of effecting a remedy. Several meetings have been held and the prospect is something will be done to render publishers independent of the arbitrary monopoly called the Printers' Union.

 

*Old traitor Sam Medary was arrested at Columbus, ...
May 26, 1864, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4574)

*Old traitor Sam Medary was arrested at Columbus, Ohio, last week by military authority and taken to Cincinnati. The charges against him were not made public....

 

Editorial changes are becoming so frequent in Kans ...
July 7, 1864, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4591)

Editorial changes are becoming so frequent in Kansas that we have almost ceased to record them....H. A. Wilcox has become editor of the Manhattan Independent. W. Henry has terminated his connection with the Big Blue Union.

 

The Baldwin City Observer lately changed hands. Wa ...
July 14, 1864, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4597)

The Baldwin City Observer lately changed hands. Warren M. Mitchell has retired and Joseph Mount and G. W. Hollingsworth have entered upon the editorship of that journal. The present editors are mutes.

 

Subscribers. We have several clubs on our book who ...
August 18, 1864, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4622)

Subscribers. We have several clubs on our book whose subscriptions are about expiring; and we have been asked what inducements we intend offering for clubs for the next year. In reply, we must say that we cannot afford to offer any reductions whatever to clubs....Within the past two years, the price of paper has more than doubled and it is still advancing at a fearful rate. Two dollars now barely covers the cost for white paper....The price of labor and of everything else has advanced enormously, while we have not advanced our rates of subscription or advertising one cent from the time we issued the first number of the paper to the present....We can no longer afford to send the paper without the cash and slow-paying subscribers, although they may be good in the end, are a dead loss to us....

 

Col. J. C. Vaughn has retired from the editorial m ...
September 22, 1864, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4641)

Col. J. C. Vaughn has retired from the editorial management of the Leavenworth Times and is succeeded by W. W. Bloss, who has just been disgusted out of the same position on the Conservative. Col. Vaughn is one of the speakers employed to canvass the state.

The Leavenworth Bulletin has been sold to D. R. Anthony and will hereafter support the Lane state ticket and, it is said, advocate Anthony's election to the United States senate. It is still published by the Bulletin Company. The sale is probably another sham for political purposes. The Bulletin had for some time past been reported as anxious for a bid; and when the Conservative "flared up," leaving the Laneites without an organ in that city, there was a tempting opening for the Bulletin; an excuse was all that was wanting....

 

George W. Kingsbury, editor of the Dakota Union, w ...
September 29, 1864, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4651)

George W. Kingsbury, editor of the Dakota Union, was married at Lawrence last week to Lydia M. Stone, who distinguished herself by her courageous conduct during the Lawrence massacre.

Facts.

That party has sunken low in the scale of honesty which is supported only by persons bribed to do so. This is the situation of the Lane party in Kansas. Every leading man of the party, without a single exception, is under pay from Lane or some one of his deputies, or through their influence; and their followers are deluded and deceived by false statements. Let us take the Lane press, for example.

The Lawrence Tribune, edited by John Speer, collector of revenue, appointed by Lane.

The Topeka Record, edited by F. P. Baker, commissioner of enrollment, appointed by Lane and receives about $1,500 a year for doing Lane's dirty work.

The Atchison Free Press, edited by F. G. Adams, who has for three or four years been holding office under Lane and is now clerk of Lane's cob, Delahay.

The Leavenworth Bulletin, owned by D. R. Anthony, postmaster at Leavenworth, and Sid Clarke, candidate for Congress.

The Leavenworth Conservative, edited by D. W. Wilder, surveyor general of Kansas and Nebraska, appointed by Lane. Opposes Sid Clarke on personal reasons.

Grasshopper Falls Jeffersonian, the property of Lane, and edited by a factus who is owned by Lane, body and breeches.

The Nemaha Courier, edited by a man who is openly charged with having sold himself to Lane for $500, and whose brother holds some petty appointment at the hands of Lane.

The Big Blue Union, edited by a bought-up Border Ruffian and pupil of F. J. Marshall, named Edwin C. Manning, who receives some $1,200 a year as deputy provost marshal under Sid Clarke, with nothing to do but dirty political work.

The Junction Union, owned by a person who was recently a deputy provost marshal under Sid Clarke, and edited principally by R. McBratney, who holds a position in the land office, at the mercy of Lane.

The Emporia News, edited by J. H. Hunt, a detective under Sid Clarke.

The Osage Chronicle, edited by M. Marshall Murdock, a deputy provost marshal under Sid Clarke.

The Burlington Patriot, edited by S. S. Prouty, a commissary in one of the Indian regiments, appointed by Lane, and is now drawing pay from government while at home editing a Lane paper, purchased with Lane's money.

The Paola Herald, edited by G. A. Colton, a miserable scamp whom the dogs will not use when there is a mullen stalk handy, who is a sort of agent to rob the Indians, for which position he sold himself to Lane in the first senatorial election.

The Fort Scott Monitor, owned principally by M. H. Insley, quartermaster, but bolts Sid Clarke because he played a gouge game on Wilder, a partner of Insley's in speculating off of the government.

There they are, the entire Lane press of Kansas, the editor of every one directly or indirectly under the thumb of Lane. Every one holding office and drawing a heavy salary from government for duties which they are neglecting to work for Lane in order to save their positions.

...What confidence can the honest people of Kansas place in the statements of the Lane papers, the editor of every one of which is under pay from Lane to write and publish only such articles as are favorable to him and unfavorable to his opponents?

 

"Sloshin' Around." The Leavenworth Bulletin, since ...
October 13, 1864, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4659)

"Sloshin' Around." The Leavenworth Bulletin, since passing into the hands of Col. Anthony, is edited with a great deal of malignity. The Colonel, having been deprived, by the vote of the people, of the power to take revenge upon his personal enemies in a legal way, has invested five or ten thousand dollars in a newspaper to secure a vent for his pent-up wrath. Perhaps he will realize his money's worth with satisfaction. He will get it back in no other way.

He abuses Gen. Lee because he was more popular with the boys of the Kansas 7th and earned promotion faster than himself. That makes Lee a Copperhead.

He abuses Col. Jennison for a coward and do-nothing because they had some difficulty in the army and because Jennison took an active part in preventing him from carrying the last Leavenworth city election by violence and fraud.

He abuses Hiram Griswold because he prosecuted and convicted him in a case of false imprisonment of an editor for opposing him.

He denounces the anti-Lane Republicans of Leavenworth as Copperheads because they beat him for mayor by a vote that was almost unanimous....

 

The Troy Investigator has changed hands and is now ...
December 1, 1864, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4675)

The Troy Investigator has changed hands and is now called the Doniphan County Soldier. We believe that S. H. Dodge, late of the Grasshopper Falls Jeffersonian, is its present conductor.

 

Just five years ago today was the last time we mis ...
December 8, 1864, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 4676)

Just five years ago today was the last time we missed a regular issue of the Chief. Since the 8th of December 1859, we have issued a paper every week, full size. Not a single miss nor a half sheet.

 

F. G. Adams of the Atchison Free Press has been ap ...
April 6, 1865, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 497)

F. G. Adams of the Atchison Free Press has been appointed agent of the Kickapoo Indians in place of Abram Bennett, removed. Lane promised Adams the Atchison post office for services rendered last fall; but, finding it would not do to turn John A. Martin out, another teat had to be provided for Adams; and brother Bennett, being a good natured soul, was elbowed aside to make room for the new starveling....

 

The Paola Herald has ceased to exist and is succee ...
May 18, 1865, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 508)

The Paola Herald has ceased to exist and is succeeded by the Miami County Argus, published by McReynolds & Kane.

 

*Buffalo Taylor, formerly editor of the rebel Leav ...
June 27, 1865, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 520)

*Buffalo Taylor, formerly editor of the rebel Leavenworth Inquirer, visited that city a few days since for the purpose, it is said, of starting a Democratic paper; but he smelt something unwholesome in the air and incontinently left in the night. Kansas don't need any Democratic papers. Nearly all the party have been killed in the rebel army or in the brush.

 

We learn that the Leavenworth Bulletin changes han ...
August 17, 1865, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 536)

We learn that the Leavenworth Bulletin changes hands this week. D. R. Anthony retires and S. S. Ludlum, we believe, returns to the editorship.

 

The editor of the Hiawatha Sentinel, who paid our ...
September 7, 1865, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 541)

The editor of the Hiawatha Sentinel, who paid our town a visit,...gives his impressions of the place:..."The new brick erected by the proprietor of the Chief, with his residence attached, is a $4,000 monument to the industry and perseverance of Mr. Miller, who has toiled through many long years to benefit the place which his building now so conspicuously ornaments...."

 

We learn from the Burlington Patriot that the Leav ...
November 30, 1865, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 569)

We learn from the Burlington Patriot that the Leavenworth Daily Conservative has been discontinued and only the weekly issued.

 

"It is said that Sol Miller of the White Cloud Chi ...
December 7, 1865, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 574)

"It is said that Sol Miller of the White Cloud Chief, since his election to the senate, wears high-heeled boots and a three-story plug hat and smokes 25-cent cigars. Because he cleaned out Big Indian Bennett at the last election, he don't intend, hereafter, to recognize any of his old friends!" ? Leavenworth Times.

The difficulty with us is to know where to make a raise to get a respectable rig in which to appear at the capital. As to recognizing our friends, we would be glad to do so, to the amount of a couple of XX's; but they don't seem to know us.

 

George T. Isbell, late of the Leavenworth press, h ...
December 14, 1865, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 577)

George T. Isbell, late of the Leavenworth press, has taken charge of the Grasshopper Falls Jeffersonian.

 

New Papers. Not least among the results of returni ...
December 28, 1865, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 583)

New Papers. Not least among the results of returning peace and prosperity is the appearance of a large number of new and handsome papers in all parts of the country. Of these, Kansas has her full share.

We have received the first and second numbers of the Topeka Weekly Leader, published by J. F. Cummings & Co., and edited by Ward Burlingame, a well-known and talented newspaper writer. It is a large, eight-column paper....

The Western Home Journal comes to us from Ottawa, Franklin County. It is decidedly the handsomest paper in the state, containing six broad columns to the page, making it as large as an eight-column paper of the ordinary width. It is beautifully printed and the first number indicates it to be truly what its name implies, a home journal. Rev. I. S. Kalloch is its editor.

The Miami County Free Press has just been started at Paola by Smythe & Higgins. We think it is printed on the Crusaded material. It is a seven column paper, independent in politics....

 

The Big Blue Union has again been suspended until ...
January 18, 1866, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 589)

The Big Blue Union has again been suspended until the adjournment of the state senate, of which the editor is a member....

The Council Grove Press has changed hands and comes out an acknowledged Democratic paper. It is now called the Council Grove Democrat. The Democracy are preparing to organize once more in our stat4e and there are several other papers that will take that side when the sign is right.

There is at present a mania for enlarging newspapers in Kansas....The Leavenworth Times has been enlarged to a nine-column sheet and is now the largest paper in the state.

 

The publishers' convention met in the Senate Chamb ...
January 25, 1866, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 591)

The publishers' convention met in the Senate Chamber on the evening of the 17th. Quite a number of the representatives of the press were present. After appointing committees, &c., talking over matters of interest to the profession, and having a jovial time to close up with, they adjourned until this morning, when they met in the governor's office and adopted a constitution and by-laws for an Editors' and Publishers' Association, elected officers, and set the work in motion. It is hoped that all publishers in the state will unite themselves with the association; otherwise, some of the most important measures for the benefit of the profession cannot be carried out....

 

Dr. W. A. Cochran, formerly editor of the Atchison ...
March 22, 1866, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 605)

Dr. W. A. Cochran, formerly editor of the Atchison Union, died at a ranch kept by his sons about 100 miles west of Nebraska City on Saturday night, the 17th, of dropsy of the chest.

 

We briefly mentioned last week the accident to J. ...
May 10, 1866, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 615)

We briefly mentioned last week the accident to J. H. Hunt of the Troy Reporter and his death therefrom. He was on the top of his house, giving directions about putting on a new roof when, losing his footing, he fell 10 or 12 feet, falling astride of the sharp pickets of a gate leading to a narrow yard in front of the house....He received severe internal injuries...and lingered in the greatest agony until Thursday afternoon, when he died. His remains were interred in the St. Joseph Cemetery on Saturday. We believe his family consisted of a wife only, who daily assisted him in the printing office. Mr. Hunt was from Ashtabula County, Ohio, and was a brother of H. D. Hunt, formerly publisher of the Elwood Free Press. He took charge of the Reporter a little over a year ago....He was in his 28th year....

 

Robert Tracy has purchased the Troy Reporter. We a ...
May 24, 1866, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 626)

Robert Tracy has purchased the Troy Reporter. We already observe a decided improvement in its style and mechanical execution.

Our readers must excuse the "stuff" upon which the Chief is printed this week, and will be for a few weeks to come. Our paper men took us at advantage and ran a lot of the article called "straw paper" upon us. It is much cheaper than the rag paper, but we always hated the "truck" and have carefully avoided getting any of it....We would not accept the miserable stuff as a gift if we could possibly procure any other.

 

A. C. Wilder, formerly member of Congress from Kan ...
May 31, 1866, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 628)

A. C. Wilder, formerly member of Congress from Kansas, and D. W. Wilder, formerly editor of the Leavenworth Conservative, have become principal proprietors of the Rochester (N.Y.) Express. D. W. Wilder is chief editor.

 

The people of the state have been surprised, but n ...
July 26, 1866, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 646)

The people of the state have been surprised, but not unpleasantly so, by the appointment of Maj. Edmund G. Ross of the Lawrence Tribune to the vacancy in the United States Senate caused by the death of Gen. Lane. Maj. Ross was one of the pioneers of Kansas, has always been a Radical Republican, and served with credit in the army. He is quiet and unassuming, and will make no record in the Senate in the way of gab; but of one thing the people may rest assured ? that when the roll is called on important questions, Ed Ross' voice will always be heard answering on the right side....We confess, the governor has shown remarkable sharpness in this appointment. He has gone outside the scrambling politicians and committed himself to no faction; he has chosen a man whose record is clean all through; and he has made an appointment to which it is impossible for any reasonable man to take exception....

Of all the hard things written against Gov. Crawford, the Lawrence Tribune of the 21st contains the most venomous, brought out by the appointment of United States Senator, and written by John Speer, a partner of the new senator. Speer is said to have been an applicant for the place himself, and to have been promised it; but Governor Crawford "played off" on him. He calls the governor weak, imbecile, treacherous; says it was expected that he would have appointed a friend of the family of General Lane...but that he has appointed a political enemy of Lane's....

We have received the first number of the Kansas Radical, just started at Manhattan by E. C. Manning, late of the Big Blue Union. He declares his intention to sustain the wise policy of Congress and support Andrew Johnson as president of the United States. How oddly it would sound to hear a man say he was going to raise a flock of fine sheep, and was also going to keep a big, hungry wolf running around loose among them.

 

A Question. Mr. Speer of the Lawrence Tribune cont ...
August 2, 1866, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 652)

A Question. Mr. Speer of the Lawrence Tribune continues to harp upon the fact that Mr. Ross was a bitter political enemy of Gen. Lane and that, out of respect for Lane's memory, the governor should not have appointed Ross senator. He also says that, when Ross called upon Mrs. Lane before starting for Washington, she burst into tears and would not see him. Right here a question arises. Speer wishes to be considered, and perhaps justly, as the most constant and confidential friend Lane had in Kansas. He published Lane's home newspaper organ and was necessarily entrusted with all his plans and secret designs, and was at all times the possessor of confidential matters, the disclosure of which would have ruined Lane's plans, and perhaps damaged his personal reputation. Why, then, did Speer admit as a partner, and place in a position in which he must of necessity be let into many of those confidential matters, a man whom he knew to be a political enemy of Lane; whose appointment to Lane's vacancy was an outrage upon his memory; and the announcement of whose name even brought tears to the eyes of Lane's widow? Perhaps if Ross had not been connected with the Tribune, he would not have been appointed. It strikes us that Mr. Speer is about as deeply in the scrape as anyone else.

 

Last week's Hiawatha Sentinel appeared under charg ...
August 23, 1866, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 661)

Last week's Hiawatha Sentinel appeared under charge of Lacock & Oberholtzer. They are capable of getting up an interesting paper.

 

We have received the first number of the Leavenwor ...
October 11, 1866, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 678)

We have received the first number of the Leavenworth Daily Commercial, the new Johnson organ of that city. It is a large, well gotten up sheet,...and raises the hue and cry against negro equality.

 

The first number of the LeRoy (Coffey County) Pion ...
November 8, 1866, Chief (White Cloud) (ID 687)

The first number of the LeRoy (Coffey County) Pioneer is before us. It is a seven column sheet published by Kent & Higgins. We scarcely know what to say of the paper. When the editors studied grammar, they must have committed to memory the examples of false syntax and skipped the corrections....

Dailies. We have received a copy of the Topeka Daily Tribune....Topeka has been behind the times in this respect....Also several copies of the Junction City Daily Union, to which place the railroad and telegraph have recently been completed.