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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Western Home Journal

Articles in database from Western Home Journal:    34

Vol. 1, No. 1. I. S. Kalloch, editor and publisher ...
December 7, 1865, Western Home Journal (ID 575)

Vol. 1, No. 1. I. S. Kalloch, editor and publisher.

Our first desire is to make a paper which shall be gladly welcomed to THE HOME. The homes of our Republic are the centres of its influence and sources of its power. Here the education commences and here its principal work is done....We desire to assist parents in a work more important than any other, to the peace of the community and growth of the state. We ask room for a paper which, instead of being filled with angry discussions and political personalities, shall have reading for The Home, in which both old and young shall find instruction and delight.

To Our Friends. The first number of the Western Home Journal is now presented to the public. It would be useless to deny that we shall watch with anxiety for the reception it meets....We are not novices in the work we have undertaken. Each one of us has had more or less experience in the conduct of newspapers....We do not regard our enterprise in the light of an experiment. The Western Home Journal is an Institution. It is necessary to us and we must have it. Our aim will be to make it equally necessary to its patrons....Our type is new and purchased of the enterprising James & Rounds of Chicago....We have purchased a large stock of paper, and made arrangements for a continued supply of Clark & Co. of the same city, of a most superior and elegant kind....Charles T. Evans, who is responsible for the mechanical appearance of our paper, has a record as publisher in New York City....C. C. Hutchinson, generally known throughout the state, is materially interested in the prosperity of the paper and will give to it much of his time and energies....Under various headings...we shall endeavor to collect appropriate and suggestive reading matter, original and selected....Allusion is elsewhere made to Prof. S. T. Kelsey and the assistance that we may reasonably expect from him....Prof. Stimson, employed in the musical department of our school,...may be relied upon for a valuable column now and then....Rev. Isaac Sawyer, D.D., Rev. H. K. Stimson, the agent of our university, and the teachers in the school all promise such aid as they may be able to render....We have faith to believe that an independent paper can live. We belong to no sect, to no clique, to no party, to no politician. No demagogue owns stock in this concern. Neither can he.... -- I. S. Kalloch.

 

The Lawrence Daily Tribune comes to hand so much i ...
January 4, 1866, Western Home Journal (ID 586)

The Lawrence Daily Tribune comes to hand so much increased in size that it is now the largest paper west of St. Louis. It is otherwise much improved and under the able administration of Speer & Ross it cannot fail of a great success.

 

The Art of Printing. D'Israeli believes, and bring ...
February 15, 1866, Western Home Journal (ID 599)

The Art of Printing. D'Israeli believes, and brings up a mass of evidence to sustain him, that the art of printing was known to the Romans, but that they rejected it as unsuited to their civilization, and that the emperors were bitterly opposed to it, as in it they recognized a powerful enemy to their tyranny. They did, however, make use of it on a small scale. The Emperor Justinian had a stamp on which were engraved or carved the letters of his name, and he made constant use of this for signing documents. Theodoric did the same. The movable letters with which the Roman potters stamped their wares were similar to those used by the bookbinders of the present day for lettering, etc. The Romans were also perfectly familiar with printing ink, and their refusal to make use of the printing press must be attributed either to the opposition of the emperors, or the popular belief that it was not suited to such high civilization.

 

The editorial corps of the Lecompton New Era has b ...
June 7, 1866, Western Home Journal (ID 632)

The editorial corps of the Lecompton New Era has been strengthened by the addition of J. N. Weaver.

 

Gov. Crawford has appointed Edmund G. Ross to fill ...
July 26, 1866, Western Home Journal (ID 648)

Gov. Crawford has appointed Edmund G. Ross to fill the vacant U.S. Senatorship occasioned by the death of James H. Lane. The appointment is a good one. We have known Major Ross well and intimately for some time, and know whereof we speak when we say he is an honest man. We are surprised at the attack made on the governor in the Lawrence Tribune, in consequence of this appointment. Major Ross, before his appointment, was associate editor of that paper. John Speer is now the sole editor, and we looked for a hearty endorsement of the governor's action from him in this matter; but we confess we were not prepared for the gush of indignation which pervades the columns of the Tribune on the 21st....We know he (the governor) owed an obligation to the People of Kansas in this appointment, whether Lane's friends or enemies, which it was his duty to consult. And we believe he has fulfilled that obligation in the appointment he made. Maj. Ross' inflexible honesty, sterling political soundness, incorruptible character, spotless military record, and long and active identification with the interests of the state are facts well known....

 

We welcome to...our exchanges the Miami County Rep ...
August 23, 1866, Western Home Journal (ID 660)

We welcome to...our exchanges the Miami County Republican, which is a new paper just started at Paola by McReynolds and Simpson.

 

No Paper Next Week. Our readers have not failed to ...
November 29, 1866, Western Home Journal (ID 693)

No Paper Next Week. Our readers have not failed to notice that the typographical appearance of the Home Journal the last few weeks has not been up to our standard. Our foreman says he wants a week to repair his "rolling stock" and, that by having it, he can make the paper look as well as ever....But, in order that we may do so, our readers must indulge us a week....

 

The Paola Argus is now published by P. A. J. Russe ...
December 20, 1866, Western Home Journal (ID 697)

The Paola Argus is now published by P. A. J. Russell, formerly of Leavenworth. Maj. Colton is still editor.

 

We have received the initial number of a new paper ...
January 10, 1867, Western Home Journal (ID 703)

We have received the initial number of a new paper published at Iola by W. H. Johnson and called the Allen County Courant. The editorials are well written, locals spicy and typographical execution excellent.

 

We welcome to our exchanges The Salina Herald, a n ...
February 28, 1867, Western Home Journal (ID 717)

We welcome to our exchanges The Salina Herald, a new paper just started at Salina, in Salina County, with B. J. F. Hanna as editor. It is published from the remains of the office of the copperhead Council Grove Democrat, and we are glad to say comes out boldly as a champion of freedom and equal rights.

 

M. W. Reynolds, editor State Journal, delivered hi ...
March 21, 1867, Western Home Journal (ID 720)

M. W. Reynolds, editor State Journal, delivered his lecture, "Western Ideas for Western Men," before the Ottawa Lyceum on Tuesday evening to a highly interested audience. The lecture abounds in beautiful descriptions of Western scenery, and in just tributes to the indomitable energy and triumphant advances of the people of the prairie land. It was proven, however, that we must become to a far greater extent the producers of the simple manufactured articles if we are not always to remain in vassalage to Eastern capitalists. The chief purpose of the lecture, however, was to arouse to greater efforts toward a higher intellectual and moral life.

 

"Our office was lighted with the good-natured phiz ...
April 25, 1867, Western Home Journal (ID 731)

"Our office was lighted with the good-natured phiz of John H. Kitts of the Ottawa Home Journal on Friday last. John is running the typographical department of the Journal, and the excellent manner in which the paper is printed reflects great credit on him as a printer." -- Emporia News.

 

Mr. Graham, who has recently purchased and now pub ...
June 6, 1867, Western Home Journal (ID 742)

Mr. Graham, who has recently purchased and now publishes the Leroy Pioneer, called on us a few evenings since. Mr. G. is an experienced printer and the paper under his management gives evidence of his ability.

We have received the first number of the Leavenworth Medical Herald, a new monthly recently started...with Dr. C. A. Logan and Dr. T. Sinks as its editors. It presents a most excellent appearance typographically, and a large amount of reading matter very valuable to the profession and of interest also to the general reader.

 

A Partner. One of the most important things in thi ...
June 20, 1867, Western Home Journal (ID 747)

A Partner. One of the most important things in this world is a good partner....Our patrons have probably seen that one-half of the Home Journal (I. S. Kalloch) has been a sort of peripatetic institution, a little on the Methodist circuit order. Our first partner was C. T. Evans, now connected with the Bulletin office in Leavenworth....The next owner of the half interest was C. R. Prescott of Boston, who came to this new land to make his home. But Providence...called him back....Mr. Prescott's interest was purchased by C. C. Hutchinson, of whom we need not speak more particularly as our relations are generally well known. Mr. H. has been associated with us from the inception of the Ottawa enterprise....But, the confinement of the office not agreeing with his health, and other business pressing upon him, he has taken his hat in hand and left....During all these changes there has been one faithful pilot at the helm, on whom we have relied....He helped get out the first number of the Home Journal, and he has helped get them all out....He is a young man, an old Kansan, a faithful soldier, and a good printer....Brother printers, let us introduce to your better acquaintance our partner, John H. Kitts.

 

The Leavenworth Bulletin changed hands on Monday l ...
July 4, 1867, Western Home Journal (ID 750)

The Leavenworth Bulletin changed hands on Monday last, George T. Anthony as editor and D. R. Anthony as proprietor retiring. F. S. Pinckney of Leavenworth assumes the tripod editorial, while the proprietorship of the paper has passed into the hands of a company of 10 men, all but two of whom are practical printers.

 

"John H. Kitts, formerly a type-sticker on the Jou ...
July 18, 1867, Western Home Journal (ID 755)

"John H. Kitts, formerly a type-sticker on the Journal, and a clever young man as well as a good printer, has become a partner in the Home Journal, published at Ottawa, Kan....The senior partner is Rev. I. S. Kalloch, formerly of Boston, Mass...." -- Piqua (Ohio) Journal.

 

We are in receipt of the first number of the Potta ...
July 25, 1867, Western Home Journal (ID 760)

We are in receipt of the first number of the Pottawatomie Gazette, a new paper just started at Louisville, Kan., by A. Sellers, assisted by R. S. Hicks in the editorial department.

 

"I. S. Kalloch of Ottawa, editor of the Western Ho ...
August 1, 1867, Western Home Journal (ID 761)

"I. S. Kalloch of Ottawa, editor of the Western Home Journal, lighted up our sanctum yesterday with his genial countenance. We were delighted to see him as we are always delighted to see men of his stamp. He is the personification of energy. His liver is a steam engine and the balance of his planetary system galvanic batteries. He is always busy, always active, accomplishing much for his fellow men as well as himself. His paper we regard as one of the very best family newspapers in the country. No man has probably suffered as much abuse as Mr. K., and deserved it as little. Abuse, however, never ruffles him. He is independent, calm; does his own thinking; acts on his own impulses, and snaps his fingers at calumny...." -- Leavenworth Commercial.

 

The Clarion is the name of a new paper just starte ...
September 26, 1867, Western Home Journal (ID 775)

The Clarion is the name of a new paper just started in Lawrence. It is published by Whitney and Boughton and makes a very creditable appearance.

 

Basil M. Simpson has become the sole proprietor of ...
October 17, 1867, Western Home Journal (ID 781)

Basil M. Simpson has become the sole proprietor of the Paola Republican, Mr. McReynolds having disposed of his interest to him. In taking his leave, he thus bids his patrons "adoo": "This is perhaps the last ink we shall ever sling to the local readers of the Republican. Having concluded to retire to private life, cure our eyes and gain an honest living, we bid you a gentle 'adoo,' not having time to shed but few tears over the fact. If, for the small and precarious living we have enjoyed indicting locals, we have given weekly offense to many persons, we ask them to shed 'a tear or two, or perhaps three,' over the departed local."

 

Col. John T. Burris of Olathe has become associate ...
December 19, 1867, Western Home Journal (ID 796)

Col. John T. Burris of Olathe has become associated with W. F. Goble in the editorial management of the Kansas Central.

 

We have received the prospectus of a new paper abo ...
January 2, 1868, Western Home Journal (ID 801)

We have received the prospectus of a new paper about to be published at Baldwin City by Bryan and Corey. Mr. Corey is a first-rate practical printer, and Mr. Bryan is not new to the newspaper business and is an intelligent, vigorous and able writer. He has been one of the most highly valuable correspondents of the Home Journal. The paper is to be called the Kansas Family Visitor.

 

G. W. Larzelere is now sole editor and proprietor ...
January 9, 1868, Western Home Journal (ID 804)

G. W. Larzelere is now sole editor and proprietor of the Wathena Reporter, E. H. Snow having disposed of his interest in the paper to his partner.

 

Our nearest neighbor in the journal line is the Ka ...
January 30, 1868, Western Home Journal (ID 813)

Our nearest neighbor in the journal line is the Kansas Family Visitor, published at Baldwin City, the first number of which has made its appearance.....As it claims to be a religious paper, in the strictest sense, it fills a place as yet unfulfilled, supplies a want which ought to be felt. Very much will depend upon the people of Baldwin and vicinity in making the Visitor what it ought to be. The great need of the town is a paper....The general makeup of the paper is hardly as religious as the prospectus, but this is a matter which time will rectify. We believe that an unsectarian religious paper, meeting the demand of religious readers both in the selections and editorials, would be a success....

 

A very neat paper has made its appearance at our o ...
February 20, 1868, Western Home Journal (ID 823)

A very neat paper has made its appearance at our office, published by Mr. Gore of Paola and edited by W. R. Wagstaff and Geo. Kingsley....

The Emporia News. We had almost got tired waiting to see the cheerful face of the News in its new clothes. But we have seen it at last, and extend our hearty congratulations to Bro. Stotler for the handsome appearance of his paper.

 

Having bought out the entire job department of the ...
March 19, 1868, Western Home Journal (ID 831)

Having bought out the entire job department of the Home Journal, and added a large amount of new material, I am now prepared to do all kinds of plain and fancy job printing at Lawrence and Leavenworth prices. Office on Second Street, three doors east of Post Office. -- John H. Kitts.

 

Murder -- Almost. The Lawrence Republican is "a mi ...
April 30, 1868, Western Home Journal (ID 839)

Murder -- Almost. The Lawrence Republican is "a mite" threatening. In speaking of our friend Ross voting to sustain Johnson, it says, among other things:

"We can say to him, however, in all friendship, that he had better never show his face in Kansas again, if he shall now betray the trust the people have reposed in his hands. The air is full of rumors of corrupt influences at work to buy up enough Senators to defeat impeachment. The Senator who shall be thus prostituted would deserve death, as much as any criminal who ever stood upon the scaffold."

We shall not await the result, and if brother Ross should happen to vote Johnson-wise, we expect to see the editor of the Republican meet the Senator on the banks of the Kaw with a double-barreled shotgun loaded to the muzzle with slugs, nails and bullets, and deposit the contents of the two barrels into the unfortunate diaphragm of Senator Ross. Whew! -- Leavenworth Times.

We would suggest to the editor of the Times, who seems to have his "bowels of compassion" moved with extraordinary affectionateness towards "our friend Ross" and "brother Ross" in referring to the unimportant little circumstance of his "happening to vote Johnson-wise," that it may not be necessary for the editor of the Republican to visit punishment upon Mr. Ross, should he betray the trust reposed in him. It is too fresh in the memory of men that it took no "double-barreled shotgun" in the hands of an avenger to bring one Senator to his grave who had been false to his trust. That Mr. Ross, in case of the betrayal of his constituency, would encounter an equally indignant popular sentiment, we have no doubt. That he would have the grim courage of the old chieftain to put himself out of the way of it is a little more problematical. Gen. Lane was led astray by his ambition, "the last infirmity of noble minds;" Mr. Ross, we take it, is moved to his extraordinary and inexcusable course by motives of a different character. It would not be strange then if he should bear himself differently under the popular contempt, and perhaps have more material support for the trial.

 

The Oswego Register is the name of a new paper pub ...
June 11, 1868, Western Home Journal (ID 849)

The Oswego Register is the name of a new paper published at Oswego, Labette County, and edited by E. R. Trask....The names of Grant and Colfax at its masthead show that it is the right stripe.

 

Col. D. R. Anthony presided over the deliberations ...
September 17, 1868, Western Home Journal (ID 859)

Col. D. R. Anthony presided over the deliberations of the Republican State Convention. He is one of the best presiding officers we ever knew, states points of order and effects of motions with admirable clearness, and presides with ease, dignity and impartiality. Much of the good feeling which pervaded the convention was imparted by him, and its members separated with sentiments of universal esteem for, and appreciation of, their presiding officer.

 

The Standard. This is a new, neat and able paper, ...
October 1, 1868, Western Home Journal (ID 861)

The Standard. This is a new, neat and able paper, a combination of the Manhattan Radical and Independent, edited and published by L. R. Elliott, formerly of the Atchison Free Press.

 

Johnson County Democrat. The first number of this ...
October 29, 1868, Western Home Journal (ID 864)

Johnson County Democrat. The first number of this paper has reached us. Gates & Patrick are proprietors and publishers, and John M. Giffen editor. It requires grit as well as greenbacks to start a Democratic paper just as the party has meet its Waterloo in the October elections....

 

Fifteen good printers are wanted immediately at th ...
November 19, 1868, Western Home Journal (ID 866)

Fifteen good printers are wanted immediately at the Bulletin office in Leavenworth. It seems as though the Printers' Union is on a "strike."

 

The Visitor, heretofore published at Baldwin City, ...
December 10, 1868, Western Home Journal (ID 868)

The Visitor, heretofore published at Baldwin City, has been suspended, and the material has been purchased and carried to Chetopa by Col. W. L. Horner for his new paper, to be started there January 1st.

 

A Tight Place. Our readers have been informed that ...
December 24, 1868, Western Home Journal (ID 869)

A Tight Place. Our readers have been informed that we had made arrangements for the enlargement and improvement of the Home Journal for the ensuing year. Of course, our great anxiety was to commence with the commencement of the year. But the best laid schemes of mice and men often fail. Our press required a new building for it. Arrangements were made for the new room...in ample time....But we need not inform our readers that the last few weeks have not been very propitious for mason work, to say nothing of teaming. It has been quite impossible to haul the stone from the quarry, or to put it into the wall when hauled. The consequence is that our contemplated change must be deferred a little, but not long....We had sold our hand press to Talcott and Acers, proprietors of the Iola Register, and they had made all their arrangements for enlargement by the 1st of January and had so announced. In our distress, we addressed them a note, asking for an extension, if possible, but agreeing to "come to time" if they required us to keep our promise. Their answer, showing as it does both their own embarrassment as well as their gentlemanly and obliging disposition, is as follows: "Yours of the 7th concerning the tight place in which you unexpectedly find yourself, &c., was received, and in answer we would say that we have already announced to our readers that the 1st day of January would find our paper enlarged, that we have ordered a large quantity of paper for the enlarged size, that we have only about enough on hand of the present size to last until New Year's, and that many other circumstances will tend to make it quite a disappointment to us; but your appeal to our generosity is too much, and cannot be resisted. Therefore you may rest easy....We realize your situation...." -- Talcott & Acers. Both the readers of the Register and the Home Journal will, we trust, have patience with us in our delays and disappointments, and we will try to make matters square when we get squarely under way.