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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Wichita City Eagle

Articles in database from Wichita City Eagle:    89

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto ...
April 12, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1125)

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprietor.

Salutatory. The first sentence of this new venture is complete in the respectful submission of the initial number of the paper herewith presented. To the interests of Wichita, the queen city of the Southwest, the prospective commercial metropolis of this grandly rich domain, the seat of empire and the political centre of what must soon become a densely settled portion of this young commonwealth; as, also, to the material interests and the development of every resource of the people of both county and city, the Eagle will be honestly and earnestly devoted. The ambition of its founder is, and will be, to make it the leading journal of the Great Southwest, of the Arkansas Valley of Kansas. In writing more we might say less. Ex pede herculem.

Editors of Kansas. To our editorial brethren throughout the state, who have so magnanimously and kindly evinced a spirit of good will in our behalf since disposing of the Burlingame Chronicle, we feel greatly indebted and we take this, the first opportunity, of making known our feelings of gratitude. Hand in hand with the older members of the Editorial Association, we have for years been cooperating for the upbuilding of our adopted state. As will be now seen, we have not deserted the good cause, or the fraternity; only changed our base of operations....We send to each of you a copy of the Eagle, folded and directed by our own hands, in the full assurance that a new name will be entered upon your respective exchange lists. The "make-up" of our paper differs, we know, from the great majority of country papers. It is the execution of an idea long entertained, touching the style of a country paper. Having personally selected the material and personally supervised the setting up and arrangement, the execution of the idea became a pleasant task. Besides, our new home, Wichita, is already a city of the second class. Hoping that occasionally, at least, the brainy men of the state may find an article or wing-feather in the Eagle worthy of note or comment, we take our flight.

 

"The first number of Marsh Murdock's new Wichita p ...
April 26, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1134)

"The first number of Marsh Murdock's new Wichita paper, the Eagle, has arrived, and it soars and screams like a first-class bird. It displays eight columns to the page, is printed on new type, and looks gay every way. We hope M.M.M. will make a two-story fortune out of it." -- Lawrence Journal.

"We have received the first number of Marsh Murdock's Wichita Eagle. It is a splendid paper, of eight columns to the page, printed on handsome type, and the best quality of paper. It is a live paper, and a proper representative of the booming metropolis of the growing Southwest." -- White Cloud Chief.

"The Wichita Eagle, Marsh Murdock's new paper, is a 'whalin' sheet -- eight columns to the page, new type, neat, clean and artistic in appearance. We have been so accustomed to look for daubs from Wichita that we could scarcely believe our eyes when we first beheld the Eagle. This new issue is a step towards the elevation of typography in our state, and we hope Murdock's reward financially may be what it ought to be." -- Junction City Union.

"We are in receipt of the first number of a new paper, the City Eagle, published at Wichita by Marsh Murdock, who has for many years published the Osage Chronicle at Burlingame. Marsh is a veteran of the profession and is moreover a first-class typo. His editorial abilities are of the first order...." -- Humboldt Union.

"We have received the first number of the Wichita Eagle, published by M. M. Murdock, editor and proprietor. Issuing from a town where three years since the buffalo roamed, it is a marvel of enterprise and typographical skill. It is among the best looking weeklies in the state, and is edited with painstaking and ability...." -- Leavenworth Commercial.

"...We knock under to the superior skill and taste of our elder brother and pronounce his paper much handsomer than ours. We wish the new paper a prosperous journey through life, and hope it may ever be found battling for liberty, truth, and the rights of the people." -- Walnut Valley Times.

"Wichita Eagle. We are in receipt of the first number of the above paper, published at Wichita, Sedgwick County. It is large in size, printed on new type, and of admirable 'make-up.' M. M. Murdock, a newspaper veteran, is editor and proprietor....Sedgwick is one of the new counties of Kansas, and two or three years ago it probably did not contain 100 families. Now it has a first class newspaper, a second-class city, and a population running up to many thousands...." -- Atchison Champion.

 

"Before us lies a copy of the Wichita City Eagle. ...
May 17, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1142)

"Before us lies a copy of the Wichita City Eagle. It is the new paper of Marsh Murdock. A little more than three years ago, where Wichita now stands, was a fort garrisoned by a company of the 5th U.S. Infantry. For hundreds of miles to the west and tens of miles to the north, east and south, no house was to be seen. Buffaloes, wolves, prairie dogs and various wild animals seemed to have a permanent lease on the surrounding territory. To the traveler through those parts, it seemed that the day of settlement was afar off. The Eagle clearly shows that Wichita now has both size and importance...." -- Border Sentinel.

 

The Sumner County Herald says: "The following publ ...
May 24, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1145)

The Sumner County Herald says: "The following public notice is clipped from the Wichita Vidette, the official paper of the U.S. Land Office...." This passes our understanding. A liberal and administration paper at one and the same time? We guess not. The Wichita Eagle is the official paper of the United States Land Office here.

 

The editorial excursionists overwhelmed us with br ...
May 31, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1148)

The editorial excursionists overwhelmed us with brains, tobacco and a slight sprinkling on their visit from Emporia here on Wednesday last....A fine band of music accompanied the tripodists and they were received amid the acclaims of our citizens....A superb dinner was provided them at the Empire House, and amid feasting, toasting and hilarity many a double right angle triangular meal went sousing into a grateful stomach long unused to epicurean diet. At four o'clock the excursionists took their departure....The benefit that will accrue to Wichita from this visit of the editorial fraternity of our state will be almost incalculable....

M. M. Murdock...came with them (the excursionists) Wednesday and flew off again and will continue to fly around excursioning a week or two, when things in the office will assume their proper level again. In the meantime, Fred A. Sowers will have charge of the editorial and business management of the big bird.

 

The Excursion to Wichita. The following is from th ...
June 7, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1153)

The Excursion to Wichita. The following is from the pen of T. Dwight Thacher, editor of the Lawrence Daily Journal...and who is president of the (editorial) association: The convention met at 2 o'clock on Tuesday in Bancroft's hall (Emporia)....In the absence of the president and secretary, M. M. Murdock was elected chairman and J. S. Wilson secretary pro tem.

The election of officers for the ensuing year then took place and resulted as follows: President, T. Dwight Thacher of the Lawrence Journal; vice-presidents, Albert Griffin of the Manhattan Nationalist, D. W. Wilder of the Fort Scott Monitor, and W. D. Walker of the Emporia Ledger; secretary, J. S. Wilson of the Garnett Plaindealer; treasurer, W. F. Chalfant of the Osage Chronicle; orator, I. S. Kalloch of the Kansas Spirit; alternate, Geo. W. Martin of the Junction Union; poet, Capt. J. W. Steele of the Topeka Commonwealth. The place of next year's meeting was fixed at Atchison on the third Tuesday of May.

In the evening, the convention and a large concourse of the people of the town listened to the annual address by D. W. Wilder. The production was just one hour and three minutes long. It was delightfully written, all about newspapers, full of sharp, bright and pleasant things.

...The association having received a kind invitation from Col. T. J. Peter, general manager of AT&SF RR to take a trip over that road as far as Wichita and return to Topeka, and placing an extra train at their disposal, the invitation was accepted and Wednesday was devoted to the excursion....Wichita is a smart, thriving town, two years old....Two weekly newspapers, the Vidette and Eagle, show the press is not slighted. A vast tide of immigration is pouring into this part of the state and Wichita is bound to be a town of importance....The people of Wichita received the excursion very kindly....A fine dinner was gotten up at the Empire House....

The following are the...parties making up the editorial party to this place last week: T. D. Thacher, Lawrence Republican Journal; D. W. Wilder, Fort Scott Monitor; R. B. Taylor, Wyandotte Gazette; John S. Wilson and wife, Garnett Plaindealer; A. Griffin, Manhattan Nationalist; M. M. Murdock and wife, Wichita Eagle; T. B. Murdock, Walnut Valley Times; Miss Ella Murdock, ElDorado; L. Walker, Neosho Valley Register; W. D. Walker, Emporia Leader;...S. D. McDonald and wife, Topeka Record;...A. W. Moore and wife, Holton News; S. H. Dodge, Burlington Patriot; W. A. Morgan and wife, Chase County Leader; W. H. Morgan, Shaft, Osage City; J. A. Smith, Altoona Union; B. W. Perkins, Osage Register; W. F. Chalfant, Osage Chronicle;...E. Barnes, Kansas Reporter;...and C. E. Lefebvre, Lawrence Tribune.

 

The Wichita Vidette has changed hands, last week's ...
June 28, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1162)

The Wichita Vidette has changed hands, last week's issue containing the valedictory of W. B. Hutchinson and the salutatory of W. Perkins. The Vidette was established in August 1870 as a partnership...under the firm name of Hutchinson & Sowers -- Mr. Sowers having first projected the paper here. It was published about nine months by the firm, when Mr. Hutchinson bought the office and has run it a little more than a year alone. Mr. Hutchinson is known as one of the spiciest writers in the state. Generous to a fault, he yet never spared a friend through any sickly sentimentality or an enemy through fear when in his judgment either needed a castigation in the prints. Without discussing the wisdom of such a policy, we have yet to hear the honesty of his motives ever being impugned. In his personal intercourse he is peculiarly warm and impulsive, as a writer original, and we shall miss his willing sarcasm and his double-edged wit. Mr. Perkins, the editor of the Vidette, comes to us highly recommended as to his native ability, experience and culture. He has a wide experience in the fields of literature, not only as a successful editor but as a lawyer and minister....

 

Web Wilder has resigned his position as editor of ...
July 5, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1167)

Web Wilder has resigned his position as editor of the Fort Scott Monitor, doing so frankly on the ground of his being a candidate for the nomination for auditor of state.

The White Cloud Chief will be removed the present week to Troy, in the same county. The move is a wise and proper one indeed, and our only wonder is that it was not made years ago. There is not one publisher in 500 that would have kept afloat a sheet of any size in White Cloud for a series of 15 years, but Sol Miller has for that time been publishing one of the leading papers of the state. As he has made out to more than live in a Rip Van Winkle village, we expect him to grow rich in Troy.

 

A Word with Our Patrons. The subscription list of ...
July 12, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1168)

A Word with Our Patrons. The subscription list of the Eagle has steadily increased from the first issue, and is still growing at a gratifying rate. We are now having a superior quality of paper manufactured to order, the first invoice of which arrived this week, and of which this issue is a specimen. Every dollar made over and above expenses will be expended in improving the Eagle until it shall be second to no paper in the state. As all our energies will be devoted to the upbuilding of our prosperous little city and this rich and beautiful country, we ask the hearty support and good will of every business man and property holder of Wichita, and the cooperation of every subscriber in the valley. When through reading your paper, hand it to a neighbor and ask him to drop in his mite, with the assurance that he will get his money back many fold. When you hear of a good item, or when something takes place on your farm or around your home worthy of note, do not be backward in dropping us a line. We will take care of all poor spelling and bad grammar. Any item of farm, growing crops or fine stock will interest a brother farmer. We want the Eagle to become a welcome visitor to every home and fireside for 50 miles around, for not till then will our ambition be satisfied. Friends, help us, and we'll do our best to help you. (Marshall Murdock)

 

Capt. F. Floyd, editor of the Sedgwick City Gazett ...
July 19, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1172)

Capt. F. Floyd, editor of the Sedgwick City Gazette, honored our sanctum with his presence on Tuesday. Mr. Gains has taken an interest in the Gazette and it is proposed to improve it....Sedgwick is growing and the country surrounding it is improving rapidly.

C. L. Albin, one of the editors and proprietors of the Belle Plain Herald, was up to town last Tuesday....Mr. A. was looking extremely well and hearty, having just returned from a buffalo hunt.

 

Ex-Senator E. G. Ross came down on a visit to this ...
July 26, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1174)

Ex-Senator E. G. Ross came down on a visit to this country last Wednesday. He is an old personal friend of the editor and, barring his late political estrangement, one of the soundest men "in the business." Mr. Ross is publishing a paper at Coffeyville at present. We first made his acquaintance in 1856 at Topeka, where he was publishing the Tribune in a little building covered with straw and innocent of a floor. He is a quiet, unassuming, pleasant gentleman who made his mark as a soldier, but kicked up a terrible breeze in the U.S. Senate and in the country by voting against the impeachment of Andy Johnson.

 

The Examiner, published by C. L. Goodrich at Elk F ...
August 16, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1178)

The Examiner, published by C. L. Goodrich at Elk Falls, Howard County, comes out with a vignette of the falls and surrounding scenery at its head. We admire such enterprise. In some particulars, Goodrich is an odd genius, nevertheless a genius. The Examiner is one of the neatest papers in the state.

 

In another column of this paper will be found the ...
August 30, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1180)

In another column of this paper will be found the valedictory of W. Perkins, the late editor and proprietor of the Wichita Vidette. The material upon which the above paper was printed has been sold to G. P. Garland, and will be removed to Wellington, the county seat of Sumner County. Friend Perkins attributes his want of success to a failure in not having supported certain named politicians. His conclusions may be correct, but our own experience has taught us that not only do politicians fail to render any legitimate support to a paper, but in nine cases out of ten they prove a burthen. Let a paper command the respect and good will of the people and the editor may not only ignore all politicians, but defy them. With the suspension of the Vidette, we expect to redouble our efforts to give Wichita a Wichita paper, and to send into every home in the Southwest, as far as may be, a readable, newsy journal. A single live, well-supported newspaper is a greater conservator of the interests and welfare of a community than two, or a half dozen, of sickly, half-supported sheets....If no other paper is started here, we shall feel warranted in putting in a power press and enlarging and improving the paper yet this fall, or as soon as we can dispose of our homestead in Osage County. With this much needed appliance, we can get out a paper in Wichita that will command attention, not only throughout the state, but wherever it may circulate. When Wichita shall have become older, larger and richer, we want other papers, but for the present let us pull...together to build up and encourage a permanent journal, one that will not prove a burthen, but an advantage and help in making Wichita the great metropolitan centre of these rich valleys. (Marshall Murdock)

The Eagle block has become one of the prominent landmarks of our city, a kind of metropolitan center, as it were, around and about which much will revolve affecting the future weal of the queen city. Of the carpenters who have so successfully completed its fair and imposing outline we want just a word; not that the work itself fails in advertising Reese & Sawyer sufficiently, but a deserving commendation should not be withheld for all that. The building is 80 x 90 feet on the ground, containing seven large rooms, our office, which is 55 x 24, and public hall 40 x 80 feet. The ground floor has four large business rooms, 22 x 80 feet each. All these rooms have been finished up in the best possible style by Reese & Sawyer. The windows are arched, and the sash, doors, mouldings, in fact, every piece of woodwork in the building, shows the traces of master mechanics....Fitzgerald, Wickery & Sweet had the contract for plastering, and they also have done a splendid job. Arment has the contract for painting and is doing a very creditable job.

The room on the corner in the Eagle block, being fitted up for the Wichita savings bank, is approaching completion and that institution will have possession in a few days. A very large vault, with hollow wall and foundation entering several feet into the ground, has been built. The vault is tied with heavy iron rods, will hold two safes and any amount of papers, and is considered entirely fire proof. Kohn and Hide are highly pleased with their location.

 

The Morris County Republican is a new paper that h ...
September 6, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1182)

The Morris County Republican is a new paper that has just commenced its career at Council Grove by J. T. Bradley. It is well filled with local matter.

 

The Cowley County Telegram is a new paper just iss ...
September 23, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1188)

The Cowley County Telegram is a new paper just issued by Will M. Allison at Tisdale. The new paper has seven columns to the page, is neatly gotten up, nicely printed, and well edited.

 

Wichita Newspapers. Wichita in the past has been s ...
October 3, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1190)

Wichita Newspapers. Wichita in the past has been somewhat unfortunate in her newspaper enterprises. The Tribune, after a short and fitful life, went out, leaving many subscriptions unfulfilled. The Vidette changed proprietorship or firm name three times the past spring and summer, and with each change, under the stimulus of fair promises, many persons were induced to become subscribers. Just after the last change and the reception of several campaign clubs of subscribers, it also ceased to appear. These misfortunes, or mismanagements, have put newspaper enterprises in Wichita in bad odor, and hardly a day passes that we do not feel the effect of these failures. Men come and say, "Well, I should like to subscribe for your paper very much, but I have been bit so badly two or three times in Wichita newspapers, I guess I'll only try your Eagle bird three months." Some will only risk it a few weeks. No one can deplore this state of things so much as ourself. It not only affects our pocket directly, but the usefulness and influence of this paper. We want to say to the people of Sedgwick County, especially to that portion of it who came here expecting to make this their home, that this is our home also, that we have too big, too costly a paper, too much money invested and that we are too well and soundly established to burst up or suspend. The Eagle is a bona fide institution in this valley, and will probably daily and weekly roll from a steam cylinder press after its founder shall have passed away. Then every subscriber may rest assured that he will get his full number of papers or his money refunded. (Marshall Murdock)

The first number of the Wellington Banner has made its appearance at the county seat of our sister county of Sumner. G. P. Garland, a lawyer and writer of ability, is editor and proprietor....The first number of his paper shows him to be wide awake to every important political and material interest of the great county of Sumner.

 

The Sedgwick City Gazette is among the things that ...
October 10, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1192)

The Sedgwick City Gazette is among the things that were. The editor of the Newton Kansan thus touchingly notices the untimely collapse. "The Sedgwick City Gazette has finally kicked the bucket -- dead. A man ought not to smile at the death of an old newspaper any more than to feel cheerful at the funeral of his grandmother, but the way we look at this demise is that if, as Shakespeare intimates, the evil that men do lives after them, the deeds of the Gazette will all live forever, for that sheet has done unjust injury, personal as well as public, to the people of this country enough to damn it eternally. Other parties have purchased the material and have removed it to Wichita, where they hope to find food for the aspiring mind as well as for the masticating body. They will find there a full feathered Eagle."

 

That Eagle. Few of the residents of our city, we p ...
October 17, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1195)

That Eagle. Few of the residents of our city, we presume, have failed to notice the beautiful golden bird that crowns the front of the Eagle block. It stands four feet and a half high and is ten feet from tip to tip, and can be seen for miles in every direction. Its breast and wings face Douglas avenue, and its head is turned gracefully to the west. The design is not only beautiful, but finely executed. To W. P. McClure was entrusted the duty of procuring the bird. It was manufactured in Topeka, and the following letter...tells who the artist is.... "Topeka, Kansas, Oct. 13, 1872. Col. M. M. Murdock. Dear sir: Your note of inquiry in regard to George Fulton, the manufacturer of the eagle that now stands upon the beautiful block of iron-front buildings know as the Eagle block, in your city, is at hand. He is a native of Russia; being a lover of free institutions and a republican form of government, emigrated to this country some time prior to the great rebellion and located in New Orleans and was engaged in making eagles and carving figureheads for ships. He was independent and outspoken, and said, as did Gen. Dix, that 'if any man attempted to tear down our flag, shoot him on the spot.' Our friend was ordered to leave, or hang. He preferred to leave, and did leave. He came to Topeka, and is now making eagles and pencils....W. P. McClure."

 

In the absence of the editor, we reproduce...some ...
October 24, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1198)

In the absence of the editor, we reproduce...some of the complimentary notices given the nominee of the republican party for state senator of the 25th district. Owing to sickness in his family, and to the large amount of labor on his hands, it will be impossible for him to visit every locality in the district previous to the day of election....

"M. M. Murdock has been nominated by the republicans of the 25th district for state senator. Marsh was in the state senate two terms from Coffey and Osage counties, and he is peculiarly fitted to serve in this important capacity." -- Neodesha Citizen.

"M. M. Murdock...was nominated by the republicans of his district for state senator on the 11th. His friends had good grit, as his nomination was not secured until the 47th ballot. Mr. Murdock has been a member of the state senate for the past four years and has ranked as one of the ablest and most useful men of that body." -- Salina Journal.

R. S. Waddell & Co. have purchased the Elk Falls Examiner. The Examiner, under Mr. Waddell's editorial control, will continue in the republican ranks....

The Wichita Daily Beacon is the name of a new daily which made its appearance in our city last week. The Beacon is neat, tidy and spicy, filled with interesting locals, judicious editorials and reliable news. Its proprietors, Millison & Sowers, are both practical men and enterprising, and will fill all their engagements to the letter. We are truly glad to have such men as contemporaries, and wish them full success.

 

Vol. 1, No. 1 of the Solomon City Newspaper comes ...
October 31, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1201)

Vol. 1, No. 1 of the Solomon City Newspaper comes to our office this week, published at Solomon City by H. N. and J. W. Farey. It is truly a newsy paper and the mechanical execution is splendid. H. N. and J. W. are both practical printers and good men.

 

Col. G. P. Smith, publisher of the Southwest, has ...
November 14, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1203)

Col. G. P. Smith, publisher of the Southwest, has bought a half interest in the Democratic Standard and will soon remove to Lawrence and take editorial control. He says it shall preach liberal republicanism, with no taint of democracy....

 

"Marsh Murdock of the Wichita Eagle, who is electe ...
November 28, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1210)

"Marsh Murdock of the Wichita Eagle, who is elected state senator from the 25th district by over 2,000 majority, has already served four years in that body. The term for which he has just been elected will make six successive years for Marsh in the state senate. No other man in the state has been thus elected for three successive terms...." -- Atchison Daily Champion.

That Daily Beacon has suspended. The proprietors promise to appear in a short time with a weekly. If there had been any possible show for the establishment of a permanent daily in Wichita this summer, none could have headed the Eagle in such an enterprise. The fate of the Daily Beacon is not an enviable one, but just the one we prognosticated to the editor of that paper himself. Whenever, in our judgment, Wichita has attained population and wealth enough to sustain or demand a live morning daily of fair proportions, containing all the Associated Press dispatches, the Daily City Eagle will be on hand every morning before breakfast, but not till then.

It is very gratifying to be able to announce to our advertising patrons, as well as to the citizens of Wichita and our readers generally, that since the election our subscription list has been increasing with greater rapidity than at any time since the first six weeks of the publication of the Eagle....We now especially desire that it may reach more homes in the country, more firesides among our farmers. We are not partisan in our makeup as a man, not a lover of details of scandals, murders, rows and indecencies. Instead of hunting up such horrors and sensations, we try rather to avoid them. We want the Eagle to be a welcome visitor to our hearthstones, among our children, wives and daughters....

 

George Hoover, editor and proprietor of the Lyndon ...
December 5, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1211)

George Hoover, editor and proprietor of the Lyndon Observer, spent a day with us. Mr. H. is going to wind up the Observer, as far as Lyndon is concerned, and any town in Kansas desiring a live newspaper man could not possibly do better than to secure George Hoover.

 

No town can ever obtain any importance without the ...
December 12, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1215)

No town can ever obtain any importance without the aid of a newspaper, and accordingly arrangements were perfected early in 1871 with W. B. Hutchinson and Fred A. Sowers, who started the pioneer paper of the Arkansas Valley and christened it the Wichita Vidette. Both...were practical printers and writers of no mean talent. But both talent and energy must succumb to fortune. An opposition sheet called the Tribune started in the spring of 1872, and both papers kept along with varied success until the summer of the same year, when Murdock's Eagle swept down on them, and the Vidette and Tribune are among the things that were. The Daily Beacon let its first rays of light fall upon the citizens of Wichita about the middle of October of the present year....Millison & Sowers deserve success for their enterprise....

The weekly Beacon made its appearance last week. It is a quarto in form, bright in appearance and in every other way worthy....Both Mr. Sowers and Mr. Millison are clear-headed, warm-hearted gentlemen....

 

Champ Vaughn, formerly of Kansas, has taken editor ...
December 26, 1872, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1219)

Champ Vaughn, formerly of Kansas, has taken editorial management of the Denver Tribune. He was recently associate editor of that paper.

 

The law-making power of this commonwealth convenes ...
January 9, 1873, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1220)

The law-making power of this commonwealth convenes at the state capital next Tuesday. Having been honored with the position of member in one of the coordinate branches of that assemblage, we take this opportunity to say goodbye to one and all for the next 50 days. The business and local departments of the Eagle will be conducted by R. P. Murdock, a younger brother....There are in this district (the 25th senatorial) 24 counties, organized and unorganized. The district contains 22,500 square miles, or about one-fourth of the entire state of Kansas. The 25th senatorial district has a population of upwards of 80,000 people, or over one-fifth of the entire population of Kansas. There are over 50 towns and villages within this limit, and 14 newspapers....

 

...Eagle block, a magnificent stone structure, bui ...
April 24, 1873, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1244)

...Eagle block, a magnificent stone structure, built by Greiffenstein and Hobson the past season, occupies the corner of Douglas avenue and Main street. It is 80 feet deep with 100 feet front, and two high stories. The first story is divided into four large store rooms, occupied by the post office and J. T. Holmes news depot, Caldwell & Titsworth wholesale and retail grocery and queensware store, Karatofsky's dry goods house, and the Wichita Savings bank. Eagle Hall, 50 x 80 feet, the Eagle office, and county offices occupy the second floor; and over Eagle block a gold-leafed eagle measuring 10 feet from tip to tip spreads its wings. The Eagle office occupies a space of 24 x 55 feet, and 12 feet in the clear, with a skylight.... -- R.A.H.

 

The Marion County Record comes to us enlarged from ...
May 29, 1873, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1256)

The Marion County Record comes to us enlarged from a five to a seven column paper, looking bright and filled brim full of live local matter. Chas. Triplett has shown more than ordinary enterprise and pluck. Despite discouragements, financial and otherwise, he has stuck right to the town....

 

E. L. Gross, an old newspaper man from Springfield ...
June 5, 1873, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1260)

E. L. Gross, an old newspaper man from Springfield, Ill., passed through our city last week, on horseback, for California. He left Springfield on the 3d of April, came by way of St. Louis, Little Rock, Fort Smith, Fort Gibson, Tahlequah in the Cherokee Nation, and on through the southern tier of counties of this state, to this point, making a distance of over 1,100 miles. He goes from here to Ellsworth, where he will be joined by his brother Charley, who will accompany him the rest of the way. Mr. G. is corresponding for the New York Tribune.

 

The Daily Argus is the name of a new evening paper ...
June 12, 1873, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1262)

The Daily Argus is the name of a new evening paper published at Leavenworth by W. S. Burke....Politically the Argus will be identified with the reform party, so called. It is ably edited, neatly printed.

 

Sol Miller. White Cloud has a new paper. The edito ...
June 19, 1873, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1264)

Sol Miller. White Cloud has a new paper. The editor of the venture is a stranger to us and, we believe, to the state. His first issues are devoted to the abuse of the man who has given to White Cloud all the notoriety and consequent prosperity ever enjoyed by that village whose boundaries are marked alone by the frowning bluffs of her sleepy hollow.

For 15 long years, in spite of the most niggardly local support,...did Sol Miller, by the severest economy and hardest labor, issue the Chief at White Cloud, never missing an issue in all that time, a thing unprecedented almost in the history of country newspapers. And his paper was...such an one as not only gave its editor a more than statewide reputation, but commanded the respect of every writer of the West. And in all that time the Chief has ever been found standing by the farmer and mechanic and the best interests of the laboring classes of Doniphan county. Sol Miller, like all men, has his failings no doubt, but as an editor and publisher, as one devoting his entire talents and time to the best interests of his people and the state, without hope of reward beyond his daily bread and butter, the ranks of journalism will show few peers today; and the want of good taste and judgment evinced by a stranger to either the trials or triumphs of the profession in trying to pull down and traduce one who is so far above him in everything that goes to make up a Kansas editor is, to say the least, amusing if not disgusting.

Personally we care no more for Sol Miller than for any other old editor in the state, but having with them labored, scrimped and worried for these dozen years with no prospect beyond a home for our wife and babies, we don't propose at this late day that popinjay adventurers shall come in from the east, or anywhere else, and commence pulling them down without our entering a protest....

"Old Newspapers. The Emporia News was 16 years old last Friday. It is the second oldest paper in the state, having been issued on the 6th of June 1857. Sol Miller's Kansas Chief is the oldest paper in the state, but ranks the News only a few weeks. The Leavenworth Times claims to be the oldest journal in Kansas, but as it is really a continuation of other papers that absorbed the Times and assumed the name, we do not consider it entitled to the claim." -- Fredonia Citizen.

 

(With line drawings of new printing equipment): Th ...
July 17, 1873, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1267)

(With line drawings of new printing equipment)

The patrons and friends of the Eagle will, we feel sure, pardon us the little weakness evinced this week in the illustration of the presses and machinery belonging and lately added to our establishment. Having full faith in the efficacy of judicious advertising, and knowing that we have set up here upon the confines of civilization one of the most complete and extensive printing establishments to be found in the state of Kansas, or even in the West, it is not altogether a little pardonable pride but a matter of business to post the people of this and surrounding counties as to the facilities within their reach for the execution in a workmanlike and artistic manner of all kinds of printing. That the facilities now offered by us are decidedly superior to those of any establishment south of the Kansas river, anyone can satisfy themselves on personal inspection.

Our newspaper power press (figure No. 1) is the Fairhaven country newspaper press, manufactured at Boston, Mass., and is designed for newspaper, book and job work. It can be run by either steam or hand power with great ease. Its capability with the hand is 1,000 impressions per hour. The cylinder makes two revolutions to one impression. The inking apparatus is under the control of the feeder, and the flow of ink can be stopped instantly by the feeder without moving from his place. The impression may be thrown off easily at any time at the will of the operator, thus saving the sheet. The space occupied by our press, which is the largest pattern made, when running, is 7 x 10 feet, and its weight is 4,200 pounds....The Eagle has been worked upon it the past three weeks.

Figure No. 2 is an illustration of our Liberty card and circular press, invented by Otto Degener. This machine has taken the first premium at the world's fairs at London in 1862 and Paris in 1867. It was manufactured in New York city, and its capacity is 2,000 impressions per hour, by foot pedal or steam. It has a special arrangement for printing cards, by means of which cards are dropped into a box below as fast as printed....

The Anson Hardy paper cutter is represented in No. 3. This is the best machine that can be obtained for the price. It cuts 36 inches, and is thoroughly braced and bolted in a manner which secures great strength and firmness. A paper cutter is indispensable in a first-class office.

We purchase all our cardboard,...which comes in large sheets embracing all colors. These boards are cut up by the machine represented in illustration No. 4, which is the well known Ruggles improvement, operating a rotary knife with cord on the back of it, having the front clear from all obstructions to see and handle the cardboard while being cut. This machine is superior to any other from the fact of it having both the rotary and straight knives, all steel.

Before galleys or columns of type can be made up into newspaper forms, it is necessary to take a proof of the composition, which proof is carefully read and all errors noted. Also all forms of jobs must be subjected to the same process. Illustration No. 5 shows our proof press....

We come now to a description of our Universal printing machine, (No. 6) conceded to be the strongest, most compact, thorough, durable, and finest machine yet invented for the execution of all kinds of job work, such as posters, blanks, programmes, etc. It weighs 2,200 pounds and with all its attachments cost us $635 set up in our office. It is one of the latest results of human ingenuity. Its form is so remarkably compact, and all the parts performing their functions with such unerring exactness, that nearly every visitor ejaculates, "How wonderful!" It is a combination of all the best qualities of all other job presses extant.

The last cut is that of a combined lead and rule cutter, which finds its uses every day in a well regulated office.

...In addition to this new machinery we have within three weeks added a large variety of late-style type, so that we are prepared to please the most fastidious, even up into the choice colors, fine gold and silver bronzes and high prices, as we employ none but first-class Union hands. Botch printers find no rest in the Eagle office.

We invite everybody to call and see our presses work. We will take pleasure in showing any or all of our subscribers and friends through and in answering all their questions. Ladies are especially invited to call on Monday or Thursday forenoons, when our power press is running.

In view of the many facilities which our completed office offers for the execution of all kinds of work with celerity and skill, we respectfully solicit orders from this and adjoining counties for every variety and description of job work, assuring all that it will be our aim to give satisfaction in prices as well as work....

The Enlarged Eagle. No one of our old readers will fail to observe, upon unfolding the Eagle this week, its enlarged proportions. The reasons that prompt the step, which involves no slight present outlay and increasing expense for the future, are many, the most urgent of which are that the living, recognized interests of this valley and city demand such a journal....

The Eagle office employs the labor of six men.

 

"The Wichita Eagle has been enlarged a column to t ...
July 31, 1873, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1270)

"The Wichita Eagle has been enlarged a column to the page. It came to hand last week illustrated with sundry cuts of new and first class printing machinery with which the office has recently been supplied. The Eagle must be doing a 'land office business.' R. P. Murdock, a long-time clerk in the store of our nursery friend, P. G. Hallberg, has become a co-partner in, and business manager of, the Eagle office. There is not a handsomer county paper in the United States." -- Emporia Ledger.

Outrageous. It has become fashionable -- it may be profitable -- for city papers to send out a class of deadbeats who scour the country in quest of subscriptions, and whose pay comes in the way of cold victuals at third class hotels, free railroad rides and a percent of all moneys bored out of their victims. Dozens of these irresponsible vagrants visit Wichita monthly, ostensibly to write up the town and valley, but really to beg our business men for a dollar or two, or for their job work. Their highest ambition is to write up something sensational, the more highly wrought and fuller of lies the better. As a specimen of the moral turpitude and total degeneracy of one of these ill-starred wretches, we quote one of them who writes to the St. Louis Democrat. The extract has been going the rounds so long that we feel it a duty to put in a protest:

"Wichita resembles a brevet hell after sundown. Brass bands whooping it up, harlots and hack drivers yelling and cursing; dogs yelping, pistols going off; bull whackers cracking their whips; saloons open wide their doors and gaily attired females thump and drum up pianos, and in dulcet tones and mocking smiles invite the boys in, and night is commenced in earnest."

No man, not even a Bohemian drummer, with any respect for the truth who had even been in Wichita could ever pen such infamous mouthings. As the effort of some gibbering idiot with brain afire and eyes askance, sitting with demonical grin and chewing a dangling straw that fell from his unkempt hair, such a mixture of whoops, harlots, yells, dogs, curses and pistols might be overlooked, but coming from the columns of a respectable paper with an extensive circulation, it is an outrage too great to be calmly borne. We are aware that outside of the corporate limits there are places which are said to be anything but virtuous or moral in their tendencies. It would seem that these treacherous traveling correspondents make such places their headquarters when they visit Wichita. We earnestly advise all of our better class of business men to systematically cut these pretended correspondents and defamers of our good town. They are proving an incubus too intolerable to be patiently borne. There has never been but one man killed in Wichita, and he was shot by U.S. soldiers....

 

The Topeka Blade is the name of a new evening dail ...
August 7, 1873, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1272)

The Topeka Blade is the name of a new evening daily which made its appearance at the capital a few days since....The Blade is very readable. Yet we should caution its nursers to beware of precociousness and the rickets. J. Clark Swayze, a gentleman who found the South too hot in which to publish a paper, is the editor. We hope he may not find Topeka too cold, nor forget that, although Judas Iscariot hung himself and Benedict Arnold is no more, we yet have Yorks in Kansas politics, and it might be well to go a little slow in redeeming the state until he gets better acquainted. Daily papers in Topeka have died of too much virtue, it is said.

 

The last newspaper venture coming with our exchang ...
August 21, 1873, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1275)

The last newspaper venture coming with our exchanges is the Junction City Tribune, published by H. M. Fery and T. Alvord. Mechanical execution could not be better if they would not use such large and heavy faced type in their advertisements. Editorially it is good. Both of these gentlemen have had large experience in newspaper publishing in this state.

 

Some paper...announces that S. S. Prouty has concl ...
September 11, 1873, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1277)

Some paper...announces that S. S. Prouty has concluded to settle in Colorado. We are extremely sorry to hear the news. We have intimately known the ex-state printer for ten years; in fact, he was a constituent of ours when elected to the position of state printer, a position he has so honorably and honestly filled for the past four years....During the four years that he did the state printing, we never heard a single fault found with his work....

 

Cedarville weekly News is the name of a new paper ...
September 18, 1873, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1278)

Cedarville weekly News is the name of a new paper that reaches us from Cedarville, Howard county. The News is edited by C. H. Lewis and published by A. B. Hicks....

 

Our Daily. The special reason for issuing this lit ...
October 3, 1873, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1280)

Our Daily. The special reason for issuing this little sheet is that we may give a daily morning report of the doings of our county fair. That is one object. A little matter of enterprise and pride is another. That our people may know something of the style and character of the permanent morning journal that will be issued some time in the future from this establishment is the last reason we shall assign....

 

Commonwealth Burned. A telegram was received Monda ...
October 23, 1873, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1281)

Commonwealth Burned. A telegram was received Monday morning announcing the destruction by fire of the Topeka Commonwealth printing establishment, together with the book bindery and building....What was our surprise and satisfaction to find in our post office box the next day the state paper, as bright, interesting and cheery as ever, although with a strange but not unpleasing face. "Baptized in fire," the editor said, but only scotched, not killed. We are glad of it. The amount of presses, type and material destroyed could not have fallen short of sixty or seventy thousand dollars....

 

Last evening's issue of the Beacon announces over ...
December 4, 1873, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1288)

Last evening's issue of the Beacon announces over the respective names of D. G. Millison and Fred A. Sowers the dissolution of the co-partnership....Mr. Millison takes the job department and Mr. Sowers the sole charge of the newspaper. We wish them both unlimited success. That Mr. Sowers will continue to make the Beacon an independent, lively, readable paper, no one who knows him...will doubt. Wichita and Sedgwick county will support two good papers, the more hearty the support the better their proprietors can afford to make them. Here's our hand, Fred.

 

Atchison, Dec. 13. The Atchison Globe, a daily pap ...
December 18, 1873, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1291)

Atchison, Dec. 13. The Atchison Globe, a daily paper started here about seven months ago, was today taken possession of by deputy U.S. Marshal B. B. Gale in a suit in bankruptcy. It is reported that the indebtedness of the establishment is from $12,000 to $15,000. The paper has lost a large sum of money since its publication was commenced, and this seizure has been expected for some months. The principal creditors are St. Louis and Chicago paper dealers and type founders, but there are also creditors in Cincinnati, Cleveland and other eastern cities. The city had two daily papers when the Globe started, and there was no demand for a third, or business to sustain it, and its failure was inevitable from the first.

 

That there are too many papers in Kansas is a fact ...
December 25, 1873, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1293)

That there are too many papers in Kansas is a fact known...by every practical journalist in the state, but it doesn't seem to deter those who imagine that they have a call to start new papers from embarking in such enterprises. The Topeka Blade, after copying the Champion's article noting the seizure of the Globe by the U.S. marshal, adds the following sensible comments:

"The newspaper business in Kansas is and always has been fearfully overdone. About every organized county in the state has at least one newspaper, and some have from four to a dozen. Within a radius of 50 miles, Leavenworth being the centre, 20 daily newspapers are published. Probably the population in that radius does not exceed 200,000 -- about enough to sustain four creditable newspapers. These 20 newspapers by no means obtain a legitimate living. Some are bolstered by corporations or aspiring politicians, some from the pockets of sacrificing public spirited stockholders, while others run on credit. Not one of these papers is making money....

"The people expect more of our daily papers than their conductors can afford. The conductors themselves are mainly to blame for this unreasonable expectancy. They have always overshot the mark and attempted more than their patronage and sound business sense would justify. In no business do people seem to be so reckless as in that of newspaper publishing....Your genuine newspaper enthusiast could not be mean if he tried. His paper is the pet and pride of his heart. He will sacrifice all for it. He aspires to see it grow in influence and power....His weakness lies in his intense affection for his paper. He is its slave...."

The writer of this piece has had an experience of 22 years in the newspaper business. He has seen it in all its phases....His advice to newspaper conductors is: "Don't allow your newspaper mistress to obtain control of your mind and purse. Hold her in check and allow her only such indulgences as sound business principles will warrant."

 

V. P. Wilson, one of the clearest reasoners and mo ...
January 8, 1874, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1299)

V. P. Wilson, one of the clearest reasoners and most terse writers of Kansas, has purchased the North Topeka Times....The Times has been an excellent weekly for some time, and Senator Willson will keep it fully up to its present standard.

I. S. Kalloch has returned to the church and to the ministry. He has renounced politics. He preached last Sabbath night in Lawrence to an immense audience. Hundreds went away unable to get a seat....

 

T. B. Murdock, editor of the Walnut Valley Times, ...
February 12, 1874, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1310)

T. B. Murdock, editor of the Walnut Valley Times, has returned to ElDorado from an extended trip east, bringing with him Mrs. Murdock.

 

"We have inadvertently omitted...to pay a deserved ...
February 19, 1874, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1312)

"We have inadvertently omitted...to pay a deserved compliment to Senator Murdock for the excellent manner in which he performed the difficult duties of president of the joint convention which elected Senator Harvey. The place was a very trying one,...but Col. Murdock filled it efficiently and impartially...." -- Commonwealth.

 

"What means that cross upon my Eagle?" It means, f ...
April 9, 1874, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1325)

"What means that cross upon my Eagle?" It means, friends, that we have many subscribers whose time has expired, but whose familiar names we desire to retain upon our subscription books; therefore this notification to each that, unless their subscription is renewed, or word sent us to that effect, that for self protection we will be compelled to drop their names, which we would be sorry to do in any case where a subscriber really desires the paper....

 

Kansas Editorial Association. The executive commit ...
May 7, 1874, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1336)

Kansas Editorial Association. The executive committee...have decided to hold the annual meeting at Fort Scott on the 26th of May at 3 p.m. They have further decided to take an excursion to St. Louis, each editor to pay his own hotel bills while in the city.

We well remember 10 or 12 years ago that a dozen of us country publishers together with two or three city editors met in Topeka to organize a society for mutual aid, benefit and protection. The idea of the organization was something practical. For the past few years, new men have been directing the association and it has degenerated into an annual big eat and a deadhead excursion somewhere. We got our fill of that style of pleasure last May, and for one beg to be excused. The companionship of editors and publishers of legitimate newspapers is a pleasant thing, but when the proprietors of real estate dodgers and the writers for patent shinplasters and nondescript sheets, together with a few professional deadbeat correspondents, constitutes the controlling voice, others may participate if they like it, but we will submit to a fine for contempt first.

 

The Great Bend Progress has woodbined and the Regi ...
May 21, 1874, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1343)

The Great Bend Progress has woodbined and the Register, published by a company and edited by W. H. Odell, takes its place. The new paper seems to be an improvement upon the old one.

 

Jacob Stotler, editor of the Emporia News, made ou ...
May 28, 1874, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1348)

Jacob Stotler, editor of the Emporia News, made our city a flying visit....We remember in the long years agone, in the days of stage coaches, and before a mile of the monopolist's iron track had pressed the virgin soil of Kansas...when the great Arkansas valley was classed as the boundary...to which the white man may venture in search of the mythical "jumping off place," Jake and the writer would semiannually take a hack for Leavenworth to rub against something of life, and to pick up metropolitan airs and a few ads. Those were halcyon days. Webb Wilder was then running the Leavenworth Conservative, and J. C. Vaughn the Times, the two great papers of the Missouri valley. Leavenworth then was like unto what Wichita is now, "red hot," as the boys would say. Emporia, 100 miles distant by stage via Lawrence, was the extreme southwestern town of the state. Now Jake comes 100 miles southwest of his home on a railroad to the former hunting grounds of the Wichitas and Osages to find a young city teeming with evidences of thrift and prosperity....(M. M. Murdock)

 

The genial, spicy and withal reliable agent and co ...
July 2, 1874, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1356)

The genial, spicy and withal reliable agent and correspondent of the Atchison Champion, R. A. Hoffman, was in the city Monday. The Champion was rightly named, for it has proved a champion of the political and national interests of Kansas ever since the state had a name.

 

Vale -- Salutatory. The last issue of our worthy c ...
July 16, 1874, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1363)

Vale -- Salutatory. The last issue of our worthy contemporary, the Beacon, announced the withdrawal of Fred A. Sowers as editor and the installation of Milton Gabel. Mr. Sowers possesses a warm heart, which throbs ever in the fullest sympathy with humanity and the weaker party.....As a writer he is brilliant, dashingly so, with a strong inclination to satire, which at times cuts like a sharpened iron tipped with caustic. In or out of a newspaper, he will have hosts of friends....Mr. Gable, the gentleman who has purchased the Beacon, is a lawyer by profession, a man of considerable means and a ready and pleasant writer....The editor of the Eagle wishes the new proprietor every success and hopes for a better and fuller acquaintance.

The Lawrence Tribune. One of the oldest, and for years one of the leading republican journals west of the Mississippi river, has been purchased by Snow, Melius & Bain, and will henceforth be run in the interest of the opposition party. It will be edited by Mr. Melius, who is a keen, racy writer....We helped to get out the first number of the old Tribune, and we would rather see it live, even in advocating strange principles, than not to live at all. Melius possesses a stiff upper lip and will make the Tribune the leading opposition paper of the state. (Marshall Murdock)

 

The following provision of the amended postage law ...
July 30, 1874, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1370)

The following provision of the amended postage law took effect July 1: "That newspapers, one copy to each actual subscriber residing within the county where the same are printed in whole or in part, and published, shall be free through the mails; but the same shall not be delivered at letter carrier offices or distributed by carriers unless postage is paid thereon as provided by law." Hereafter, therefore, newspapers will be circulated free of postage in the counties where printed; and in cases where postage has been paid in advance for the current quarter, it will be refunded upon application.

 

The editor of the Paola Spirit has been sued by Ju ...
September 10, 1874, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1378)

The editor of the Paola Spirit has been sued by Judge Stevens for libel in the sum of several thousand dollars. Sol Miller has had a suit pending at the hands of Geo. T. Anthony for slander for several thousand dollars. And now comes James Rogers of Burlingame, who made the affidavit that secured a change of venue in the Pomeroy case, and sues the Topeka Commonwealth for $20,000 damages. The Commonwealth, at the time the change of venue was granted, called Rogers the "ready affidavit maker," or something to that effect. We suggested through these columns that trouble would come of the assertion.

We heartily wish our state politics were different. There is too much personal abuse, and there always has been. The dead "grim chieftain," Jim Lane, was to blame for much of it. It is all a man's reputation is worth, almost, to run for a prominent office in this state. And the style of our political canvasses tends to draw corrupt and unprincipled men into the political arena rather than to keep them out. Shysters naturally conclude from what they read that politicians are all corrupt, office seeking a species of gambling in which high stakes are to be won, and so throw themselves, their baneful influence and money into the pool. In our own experience, we have been charged with things that, were they true, or did people believe them, no honest man would be justified in taking us by the hand. To those who know us best it was unnecessary to deny them, while those who did not know us it would be useless to deny anything. So it has been with hundreds in this state. To sue for character is a poor plan at best. There is little character or little money to be gained ordinarily. We have never sued or been sued either for character, money or anything else in our lives, and never expect to be the principal upon either side in such a suit. Anyhow, editors are the last men to sue for large amounts of money and we think our old friends Rogers, Stevens, Anthony, et al will be so convinced, even should they obtain judgments. (Marshall Murdock)

 

From the Emporia News (Jacob Stotler, editor):: "T ...
October 1, 1874, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1387)

From the Emporia News (Jacob Stotler, editor):

"The Old Press Guard. D. B. Emmert's Rural Kansan has given way to the ravages of hard times. To be frank, we may say it outlived the time allotted to it by newspaper men who had a knowledge of the situation. It was a monthly and there did not seem to be any room for it. We suspect it was Emmert's love for the business that pictured its prospects so brightly as to induce him to start it, rather than any real solid financial basis. Emmert's 'obituary' is so characteristic, and so full of good humor that we copy it, and make it the foundation of a few reflections:"

My Obituary. I have sold the material on which the Kansan is printed to J. S. and W. H. Emmert, who will remove it to Fort Scott. They will finish the volume and supply all subscribers. I have not learned what they will do after the volume is completed; but it is a part of the contract that they shall satisfactorily supply all subscribers for the unexpired subscriptions. Due notice of their action will be given in the next issue.

The disposal of the office will probably result, eventually, in a change of residence. No one can regret this more than I do. I have had some unpleasant experience, it is true; but during my seven years' residence in Humboldt I have found many warm, true-hearted friends. We have together struggled for the upbuilding of our city and county. I would like to stay and continue the struggle with them; but duty to family is of the first importance, and I cannot do justice to them by remaining. I expect to carry with me, into my new life, some valuable lessons, gathered from the experience of the past few years. One of the most valuable is that elephants are difficult animals to manage. Having never aspired to reach the top of the hill, I have not been disappointed that I did not get there. I think I got somewhere up along the side; but somehow I slipped, and now I find myself at the bottom. I shall commence my new life there and struggle with new impulses and undiminished hopes for a better life in the future. And now in the language of the celebrated A. Ward. "Adoo! Adoo!" -- D. B. Emmert.

"Emmert is one of the 'old press guard' of Kansas. Many years ago, he started a paper at Auburn, Shawnee county. From there he went to Marmaton, Bourbon county, and published a paper. Then he landed in Ft. Scott and founded the Monitor, and afterwards the daily. Had he stuck to the Monitor and exercised a reasonable care in business matters, he would have been far up 'the side of the hill' he alludes to. But this was not in store for him. And this leads us to remark that there is among the 'old press guard' half a dozen or more conspicuous illustrations of the 'free and easy' characteristic of newspaper fraternity in regard to financial matters. Emmert was at one time well fixed, just as several others of us have been, but there was the constitutional carelessness in regard to saving money, and the vaulting ambition to get on in the newspaper business, in politics, or in some other sphere. Look at Emmert, Root, Wilder, John Speer, Sol Miller, Marsh Murdock, D. R. Anthony, Prouty, and last and perhaps least the 'undersigned.' How many of them today ought to be rich men? Several of them have had splendid opportunities, and we are satisfied all could have been better fixed, financially. One man in the 'old guard' has kept a sensible and steady hand on his finances, and that is Col. John A. Martin of the Atchison Champion. He is said to be worth $60,000 or $70,000, all made out of the Champion. Sol Miller was tolerably fixed at White Cloud, owning a good building which he put up there, but he had to abandon it when he moved to Troy, and it is almost worthless. Sol, however, is hardly a specimen of the boys we started to write about. John Speer, today, ought to have been worth $100,000. He had a better opportunity than any of the 'old guard,' but carelessness in money matters ruined him. We once knew an office in Ohio and the paper was run under the high-sounding name of New Era, where all the money that came in was put in a drawer, and when anybody about the office wanted a quarter they went to that drawer and took it. That office had no foolish notions about bookkeeping. So it was in Speer's Tribune office. Too many fellows had access to his money drawer. Prouty has had good chances to make a fortune and let them slip through his fingers from sheer lack of appreciation of the value of money, and from a big newspaper ambition where there was not business enough to back it. George Martin has held fat offices most of the time and should have been rich. We learn he is 'salting down' a little out of the state printing. D. R. Anthony has lost lots of money on Leavenworth papers. Frank Root has worked for glory more than money. Marsh Murdock spent thousands in trying to build up a paper at Burlingame. But it is not slipping through his fingers like it used to. Some of the others mentioned have perhaps taken better care of their earnings, but have not made a fortune as they ought to have done. It is more particularly of the practical printers we speak. There is nothing about the 'art preservative' to teach a young man business ideas or habits or the value of money.

"We are glad to see that many of the 'old guard' are taking a new turn in this respect, and among the rest D. B. Emmert. He does not tell us what he will engage in, but we take his card to mean that in the 'new life' he speaks of, making and saving money is meant. That is right, Emmert. May you get back some of the money you have spent in building up towns. The whole lesson is in that word saving. We have got far enough along in life to find that out, and so far as finances are concerned, that's the most important lesson that we have learned. We are satisfied all the old fellows have 'turned a new leaf' and are going to get rich. May we all realize our fondest dreams in this line."

 

The law requiring the prepayment of postage on new ...
December 30, 1874, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1412)

The law requiring the prepayment of postage on newspapers goes into effect on the first Monday of next month, when the publisher, instead of the subscriber, will pay the postage. This is to be done by stamps made for that purpose, which will be affixed to thee package according to the weight -- the papers to be weighed at the post office and receipt given to the publisher for the stamp affixed....

 

We...the editor of the Eagle,...feel constrained t ...
January 28, 1875, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1421)

We...the editor of the Eagle,...feel constrained to say to our many friends and readers that, owing to a little local contest,...which contest resulted in adding P.M. (that means postmaster) to our name, we have been unable to furnish anything for these columns for several weeks.

 

"Watchman what of the Night?" is the motto, and St ...
March 11, 1875, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1423)

"Watchman what of the Night?" is the motto, and State Sentinel the name of a new paper just started at Leavenworth in the interests of temperance, morality and religion....N. H. Wood edits this part of it. Looking further, we find another editor, one B. Whiteley....

 

The Topeka Daily Commonwealth has always been a go ...
March 18, 1875, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1425)

The Topeka Daily Commonwealth has always been a good paper....But the Commonwealth has again changed hands....F. P. Baker, formerly proprietor of the State Record, has purchased the entire concern and will take charge of its business management, a thing that he is eminently qualified to do. Noble L. Prentis succeeds to the editorial chair. The best daily paper that even run...at the capital was the State Record as edited by Capt. H. King, and this same Noble Prentis. Mr. King afterward edited the Kansas Magazine, then the Commonwealth, but he is now out of the profession. For three years past, Mr. Prentis has been on the Lawrence Journal and Junction City Union. He is a good writer, sound and spicy, in judgment not liable to err, in good feeling...always overflowing....

 

Independent Newspapers. The editor of the Leavenwo ...
April 22, 1875, Wichita City Eagle (ID 1433)

Independent Newspapers. The editor of the Leavenworth Commercial, whose journalistic experience...is second to that of no writer in this state, gives his views of newspaper independence in the following terse paragraphs:

"This age is one peculiarly given to humbugs....People seem to have a mania for being gulled and deceived, and appear frequently to relish a 'sell.'...

"One of the phases in which we meet this thing is that of so-called independent journalism. We do not wish to be understood as disparaging the true article; but there is a spurious kind which struts forth in the 'fuss and fury' of its own boastful littleness, and proclaims itself the great mogul to which obeisance must be made. As a general thing, the greater the boaster the bigger coward, or the less worthy the person or thing that is vaunted. This rule holds good with the press that loudly blusters about independence.

"Take the papers of the country that claim to be independent and eliminate from them the personal portions that are vindictive and splenetic, and the remainder will scarcely make a respectable shadow if held up in the sunshine....Their venomous tirades are as far removed from just criticism as logic is from cant, or reason from dogmatism....They cut and slash like crazy loons, and strive to make the impression that, but for them, the country would go to 'eternal smash,' and independence 'die in the house of its pretended friends.' They have just one strong characteristic, and that is to vilify. Denunciation is their stock in trade. They can tear down with the violence of an army of Vandals, but they have less genius to build up than a band of Flatheads.

"We admire true independence everywhere. It is one of the essential attributes of good journalism. Without, it is unworthy of confidence and is never reliable. But independence of the genuine sort is manly, honest, fair. It is not governed by prejudice or swayed by passion. It criticizes, if need be, severely, but not captiously. It does not thrust self forward, but places facts, opinions, principles, argument in the foreground, and leaves self out of sight.

"...There is doubtless more independence in those many organs which dare to be manly and speak the truth with freedom than there is in the so-called independent press. There is less violence, less malice, less imbecility of passion, and more real, solid worth. We have no respect for a subservient party press. Its conductors are mere tools and sycophants, whose opinions are valueless because they are mere echoes of what the party says or does; but a paper which has a fixed basis of principle, and yet holds itself ready to point errors on the part of its associates or leaders of its party, is the highest type of political journalism we have yet reached."

W. H. Smallwood has purchased a half interest in the Waterville Telegraph, taking editorial charge of the same last week....

Rev. I. S. Kalloch. This man of wonderful gifts, this orator of almost transcendental powers, has been duly installed as pastor of two combined Baptist churches in San Francisco....

 

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May 6, 1875, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5878)

History of Sedgwick County Newspapers

...The first newspaper printed in this valley, within the boundary lines of Kansas, was the Wichita Vidette. The project was started at Leavenworth City by Joe Clarke, who had been written to by the town company here, and to whom an offer was made in the shape of a bonus. Mr. Clarke had a similar offer from Parsons. He was then publishing the Leavenworth Daily Call. Unwilling to divide his interests at such a distance, he made a proposition to Fred A. Sowers, formerly with him on the Daily Times of Leavenworth, to accept one of these propositions, Mr. Clarke to furnish the material and to receive the bonus money therefore. Wichita was selected, the paper named the Vidette, and Mr. Sowers took charge of the office. The material of the Vidette was hauled by one of Wm. Griffenstien's teams from Fort Hays. Wm. B. Hutchinson, after the contract had been made between Clarke and Sowers, was selected by Mr. Sowers and given a half interest in the office as publisher, he being a practical printer. Together they issued the paper as an independent journal, the first number appearing on the 15th of August, 1870. At the end of six months, Mr. Sowers sold out his interest to Mr. Hutchinson and returned to Leavenworth. The Vidette was sold by Mr. Hutchinson to Rev. Perkins in May 1872. Perkins took the Greeley shoot and succumbed early in the fall of the same year. The Vidette was then sold to parties in Wellington, where it was taken and issued for a short time under the name of the Wellington Banner.

The next paper, and for a while contemporaneous with the Vidette, was the Wichita Tribune, printed by Yale Bros. over the old store room of Hills & Kramer. It lasted about six months, was finally carted off to Sedgwick City and published there one summer as the Sedgwick City Gazette, edited by Doctor Floyd, who sold it to D. G. Millison and it is now a part of the material in the office of the Wichita Weekly Beacon.

In the fall of 1871, M. M. Murdock, then editing and publishing the Osage Chronicle, was written to by J. C. Fraker, J. R. Mead, W. C. Woodman and others, making him a splendid offer to come here and establish a Republican paper; he accepted, selling the Chronicle to Mr. Chalfant, the present owner, in January 1872. He immediately went to St. Louis, buying and shipping the material to Wichita, out of which the Eagle first unfolded its wings on the 13th day of April, 1872; grown to be the leading Republican organ of southwestern Kansas and now in its fourth volume.

During the summer of 1872, D. G. Millison, then of the Topeka Record, traded for the material owned by Doc. Floyd, the defunct Sedgwick City Gazette, added to the material, took in partnership Mr. Sowers, then returned to Wichita, who furnished the job office, and together they published the Daily Beacon, the first daily ever issued in the Arkansas Valley. It was run during that busy fall and until Dec. 10th, when it merged into a weekly, Mr. Millison as publisher and Mr. Sowers as editor. The paper was sold to M. Gable, the present owner, in the summer of 1874 and is at the present writing one of the sprightliest and most ably conducted weeklies in the state.

As newspaper interludes to the above brief history, we will name first the Daily Three Rivers Eagle, issued at this office during the three days holding of our first county fair in September 1873. The Oracle, a 12x18 four page, issued for a few weeks by the students of the Arkansas Valley Institute. Next the Wichita Baby first appearing during the winter of 1873 and designed as a job solicitor, conducted by D. G. Millison, at present one of the owners of the Beacon; afterwards its publication was made in the interests of the Ladies Aid Society of Wichita. The Grasshopper Times was the production of two little boys, Charley Davidson and Newton Stage, neither of them over 12 years of age. The little organ was ground at the heels of the grasshoppers in the fall of 1874, coming and disappearing as suddenly and surprisingly as did they, bringing us likewise as abruptly and suddenly to the end of our hastily written history of the newspapers of Sedgwick County, Kansas.

 

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June 10, 1875, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5881)

Col. Anthony still lives. It is 28 days now since he was shot; in all that time he has not changed his position in bed. It is said it will yet be a month before he gets up. We believe it is the opinion of the most eminent physicians who have examined him that he can never recover - that should he ever get around again, the first undue excitement will again rupture the slightly healed blood vessel, when death would follow in a few moments.

 

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June 24, 1875, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5883)

The Leavenworth Times contains the following interesting personal: "...Sunday morning we published an article from the Burlingame Chronicle headed 'A Soldier's Experience.' We neglected to mention at the time that the name of the editor of the Chronicle is W. L. Chalfant. It is but due to him as a Kansas journalist that more than a brief notice should be made of the suffering he has heroically endured in the sacred cause of freedom. He belonged to a Pennsylvania regiment and, as the article says, was severely and, it was thought by all the surgeons fatally, wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., in 1863 while charging on the enemy's battery. His sufferings were most intense and he has not yet fully recovered from the effects of the wound. Mr. Chalfant came to Kansas about three years ago and purchased the Chronicle from M. M. Murdock. He said at the time that he came to this state expecting to die, but since then has wonderfully recovered and now passes with everybody for a well man. We hope that his health will continue to improve and that he and his spicy paper will long remain in Kansas."

"On Thursday, the Champion received an invoice of paper manufactured by the new paper mill at Blue Rapids, it being the first lot of newsprint made by that mill. The issue of the Champion this Sunday morning is printed upon paper manufactured in Kansas. Our readers, therefore, can examine it for themselves and of its quality. We regard it as excellent. The Messrs. Green are experienced paper manufacturers, and their mills at Blue Rapids are supplied with the very best machinery. They have made for us before, at their mills in Iowa, and we regard that we are now using, manufactured at Blue Rapids, as equal to any we have used for years, no matter where manufactured." - Atchison Champion.

Our old friend, Rev. I. S. Kalloch, (is) now stationed in San Francisco on a salary of $5,000 per year....

 

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July 22, 1875, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5884)

Several Kansas newspapers have suspended in the last few weeks, others are cutting down in size or consolidating and pronouncing for a cash system hereafter. Newspapers have for three months past been fully realizing the effects of the grasshopper calamity. There is not one newspaper in ten in this state that has made both ends meet this summer, and many more must go by the board if their patrons fail to come to the rescue.

 

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August 5, 1875, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5885)

...We enlarged the News because it was a necessity and could not be helped. We may be mistaken in the demands of this county on a local paper, but there are no dead advertisements in the News, and we do not send to subscribers who have not paid in advance....The News is perfectly safe. - Hutchinson News.

Glad to hear it. The enlargement of the News in the face of the $8,000,000 newspaper loss of 1874-75, the 1,000 suspensions in the nation and 30-odd in our own state was a little startling. The News is a splendid paper, published for a busy people, and backed by one of the liveliest and sure-to-be cities of this valley....We are glad to know that "it is perfectly safe" for it is among the few that we don't want to see fail.

 

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August 12, 1875, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5887)

The Leavenworth Commercial has again changed hands, James F. Legate, Joseph Clark and Chas. Tillotson buy out Mr. Roberts. Ordinarily, rapid change in the proprietorship of a newspaper is an indication of its weakness, but no reader of the Commercial could be brought to admit that it had grown other than stronger, and politically and morally better, under Roberts' control. The new combination makes a strong team. There is no more successful newspaper manager in the state than Clark, while Legate as a writer and speaker is the Ben Butler of Kansas....If his inclination should equal his capability, the Commercial would soon take high rank as a daily political journal. In addition to his mental qualifications, as a dexterous and skillful politician James F. Legate has few peers. Experienced as a politician, drilled as a legislator and ground out and molded by a public life generally, the new editor of the Commercial ought now to settle down for a successful and profitable career and then, after we have had one governor from the southwest, why - but we mustn't anticipate.

 

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August 19, 1875, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5888)

From the Topeka Commonwealth:

Two "Old Residenters." Among the editors who have survived the friction of time, printer's poverty and the ferocity of foes are the Murdock boys. The writer first knew them in the pioneer age when Topeka's broad acres bloomed with vernal flowers and echoed to the howl of prowling wolves; when painted Indians shook their scalp-locks to the morning breeze, and sang of the happy hunting grounds; where beaver tails and whisky straight formed the staple diet. In those halcyon days Marsh and Bent were happy and had no dreams of future glory, nor thought to sit in legislative halls and spout out barrels upon barrels of soul-inspiring eloquence. No, sir! They were simple-minded in those days and like honest yeomen drove five yoke of oxen and turned over the green prairie sod to the tune of four dollars per acre.

But the spirit of unrest seized them; and an aspiration for something more lofty filled their souls with disgust at the idea of always driving after steers, and caused them to grasp at the shadowy form of greatness. Topeka ceased to vibrate to the musical cadence of their "Gee, Broad," "Whoa-haw, Lop Ear," "Git along Jo," and other standard expressions peculiar to the "Bullwhackers" Union. After their retirement from the plow and lash, they devoted themselves to the business of type-sticking, poetry, piety and editorials, with an occasional dive into the political frog pond in search of eels.

Shortly after their removal to Emporia, it was currently reported that the grass grew taller and the babies were larger than had ever been known before. It is hard to tell whether our friends had anything to do with these natural phenomena or not. The facts are presented, however, and the reader must be his own judge of their reliability. Emporia could not long restrain their progressive march; their star of destiny loomed up in the far southwest, thither they journeyed and there they found the promised land. Marsh now dwells near the identical spot where, in the mystic past, a beautiful Indian maid sang her farewell song ere she dove down into the treacherous quicksands of the Arkansas in quest of turtle's eggs, and Bent lives over in the Walnut Valley, where groves of stately sunflowers sip the morning dew.

Pluck and perseverance have won for them an enviable position among the leading journalists of the state. The Wichita Eagle, which is edited by Marsh, is the leading paper of the southwest. It is deservedly popular and the people of Wichita may well be proud of such a paper. Bent is running the Times over in Butler County. The traditionary ability of the family has not suffered at his hands and the man who attempts to wash Bent with a hair brush had better look "a little out" for fear of getting some of the bristles in his own eyes. May success attend the boys, and add other honors to those already won, and pay them for the years of vicissitudes which have already checkered the short span of their lives. - One Who Knows 'Em.

WE ARE in receipt of a new paper from our sister town of Newton with the name of Harvey County News. It is published by Duncan & Moore. There may be a demand for this new newspaper, called the News, in the new town of Newton, but we can hardly believe it. The paper is a nicely printed and well filled, patent inside sheet.

 

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August 26, 1875, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5891)

The Times says this is the hundredth day since Col. Anthony was wounded, and for the first time he was strong enough to dress himself and walk out upon the front piazza of his residence and breathe the pure, fresh air once again. The compression of the subclavian artery has now been continued nearly seven weeks with only three intervals of two days each. It will be kept up during the present week, when it is hoped that work can be partially dispensed with. The compression, during the day, is maintained by the Colonel himself, assisted by members of his family. At night a relay of two persons is required, who alternate hourly in the work. During the past week, Dr. Sinks has prescribed a more liberal diet, the result of which is that the Colonel has gained strength very rapidly. He can walk without assistance and hopes to be out within a week, but will not be able to do hard work for some time to come. The decrease in the size of the tumor has been tediously slow, but nevertheless it seems to have been correspondingly sure.

 

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September 23, 1875, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5894)

Col. Daniel R. Anthony of Leavenworth, Kansas, who was shot by Embry of the Appeal, has arrived here and is stopping at the residence of his sister, Miss Susan B. Anthony. He is accompanied by his wife and Captain J. Merritt Anthony. The Colonel says his complete recovery is a question of time. He and party will remain in Rochester until next week, when they will go to New York, where Colonel Anthony will consult Dr. Parker, the noted surgeon. From New York they will return to Leavenworth....He intends to assume the charge of his paper on his return. - Rochester (N.Y.) Express.

 

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October 21, 1875, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5895)

The Lawrence Standard, that very zealous if not particularly wise organ of political information in Kansas, changed hands last week. F. J. V. Skiff, former local on the Journal, becomes the proprietor and ex-Senator Edmund G. Ross editor. We have little idea of what will be the political future of the Standard or its financial success, but we do know that Ed. Ross is one of the best men, socially and morally, that ever mixed in Kansas politics, while as a writer is smooth, terse and logical. Therefore, whatever may be the fortunes of the Standard, its columns will never lack of interest or high-toned journalism.

 

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December 16, 1875, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5898)

The Atchison Patriot has changed hands, Nelson Abbott retiring and Park, Vandegrift and Peters succeeding. They promise to make the Patriot "uncompromisingly Democratic."

 

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December 23, 1875, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5900)

A Steam Printing office in the Arkansas Valley. Wichita Boasts That Honor Now.

Dear reader, the copy of the Eagle you hold in your hands was printed by steam. It was this way. We got to thinking about the importance that Wichita is assuming as a town in the state, the future of this valley and the Eagle's intimate connection with both, and we made up our mind that the time had come that the surroundings demanded that an institution so important as the Eagle should be put upon such a footing as would enable its patrons to refer to it with pride - to say that it is printed by a steam power press. So we examined our bank account, wrote to the editor of the Scientific American for references and concluded by ordering an engine from Geo. F. Shedd of Waltham, Mass., who put it upon order. It arrived last week and this week our edition was run off by its power. While it is the first steam printing press south and west of the capital, isn't our town the "first town" and our valley the "first valley" south and west of Topeka, or anywhere else?...But to the engine. It is the cutest and nicest little arrangement of the kind that we ever saw, rivaling in perfection of workmanship the famous...put up in that town....

 

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January 6, 1876, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5902)

The Emporia News in its last issue...says: "With this number we close volume 18 of the News and commence the centennial year with the first number of volume 19 next week." After giving a full history of the paper's career, closes with the following:

"The News office has turned out three successful editors, at least, to wit: John S. Gilmore of the Fredonia Citizen, T. B. Murdock of the Eldorado Times, and F. A. Lanstrum of the Knoxville (Ill.) Republican. Albert Phenix, another News graduate, holds a first-class position in the New York Herald office. Charles C. Marble holds a desk in the attorney's office of the Erie railroad in New York City. O! those who were at an early day connected with the office the picture is duly shadowed by the memory of a dear and only brother who gave his young life in defense of his country at the battle of Prairie Grove. This and the blotting out of the fond dream that his namesake, who learned type setting at the age of 10, would one day succeed us in our labors and give fresh vigor to the pages of the News, are the only dark lines upon the history of the paper."

 

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January 12, 1876, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5903)

**"Senator M. M. Murdock of the Wichita Eagle is in the city. He was one of the former journeyman printers on the Tribune and now gets up one of the best papers in the state. He has been a state senator for eight years. Mr. Murdock was in our office on the morning of the Lawrence massacre and escaped with two others into a dry well, dug for draining purposes in a cellar, and thus escaped." Lawrence Tribune.

We met Billy Speer, the son of the writer of the above, in Wichita last Friday. The night previous to that morning of horror we slept with John Speer Jr., a young man of the brightest promise. Another brother, Robert, who was younger than John, slept in T. Dwight Thacher's Republican office. Billy, the young man whom we met in Wichita last week, was then a small boy and on that night was at home with his parents on the outskirts of the town. When we found ourselves surrounded by three hundred demons who were shooting down and murdering citizens upon every hand, John, impelled by his noble nature, said he must go to the protection of those he loved most - his parents, brothers and sisters. He had gone but a few steps before he was shot down in cold blood and robbed. After the main body of the murderers had left the town, this boy, Billy, then ten or eleven years old, got hold of an old United States musket, which he was just able to carry, and sallied out. Seeing a man on horseback fleeing towards the south end of town, pursued by a dozen yelling Delaware Indians, boy as he was he took in the situation at once, raised his old musket and fired. The flying raider tumbled from his horse into the dust, dead enough. An examination disclosed the startling fact that the dead raider had upon his person the pocketbook, money and papers belonging to his eldest brother. Thus had a mere child become the avenger of his brother's death. The other brother, Robert, was never heard of after that fatal morning. In talking with Mr. Speer, on our late visit to Lawrence, he informed us that the mother of these noble boys has never been herself since that terrible morning...years ago - the last two or three years being a hopeless invalid. (M. M. Murdock)

 

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January 27, 1876, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5907)

The Osage Chronicle has been moved from Burlingame to Lyndon, the former having lost the county seat, which was gained by the latter. Mr. Chalfant says he is determined that the Chronicle shall remain the county paper no matter how often the county seat may be moved.

We are in receipt of a new seven-column paper hailing from Peace, bearing the name of Rice County Gazette....We wish Mr. Cowgill, the editor and proprietor, the largest measure of success.

 

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April 6, 1876, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5908)

If we do say it ourself, no town or its size and age, east or west, begets finer appearing newspapers than are published here, nor papers more heartily devoted to the interests of their readers. Mechanically perfect gems, and of spicy local news overflowing each week.

The Eagle speaks for itself this week. The Beacon, our contemporary, upon the other side of the fence politically, is a journal in typographical makeup, in solid editorials, aparkling locals and excellent miscellany, second to few weekly journals. To those who cannot brook the politics of the Eagle, we most kindly recommend them to subscribe for the Wichita Beacon.

The following table shows Wichita's printing offices:

Eagle, M. M. Murdock & Bro., capital $6,000; job office, capital $2,500.

Beacon, Smith & White, Capital $4,000; job office, D. G. Millison, capital $1,500.

In harmony with the objects of this issue, we offer a few words touching the status of the paper that bears so many good words for our young city and great valley, together with illustrations of its most important machinery. The Wichita Eagle is the leading Republican paper of the Great Arkansas Valley with a bonafide circulation second to few papers in the west, and a subscription list leading all county papers in the state of Kansas. From a small hand press four years ago, today it has grown to employ three fast presses driven by steam. While the politics of the paper is straight out Republican, the editor ignores all petty quarrels of whatever character, and aims with heart and brain to make a "home paper" in the truest sense.

...Mechanically, the Eagle office is one of the most complete in the west, and our pride in its superior facilities induces us to present pictures of its prominent features. The first engraving is an exact picture of our steam engine, manufactured to order by George F. Shedd of Waltham, Mass., weighing with boiler and all attachments only 500 pounds. Both engine and boiler are vertical, the former made almost wholly of fine steel mounted with brass, and the latter furnished with safety valves, water and steam gauges and 20 flues. As light as it is, it does its work noiselessly and effectually with a consumption of half a dozen buckets of water per day and a bushel of coal. In fine, it is the neatest, cleanest and most perfect small engine manufactured in America and all who desire a light, cheap power of from one to three horsepower should address the manufacturer.

The second cut is of our Fairhaven newspaper press, the largest size made. For the character of its work we refer to this paper. Its capacity is about one thousand per hour, and it runs lighter than any cylinder press manufactured.

The third engraving is of our card and billhead press, called the Liberty, eighth medium, invented by Otto Degener and said to be the fastest press made. The rivalry for fine work now seems to lie between the Liberty and the Gordon, both alike in the main features, with an advantage of strength conceded to the Liberty.

The fourth engraving represents a job press known as the Universal, used for large blanks, posters, deeded, mortgages, etc. It cost about $600 set up, is very complete and strong, with a capacity of two thousand an hour. In addition to the above, the Eagle office has its proof press, paper cutter, rotary card cutters, lead cutter, cabinets, etc....

 

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May 4, 1876, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5913)

John Campbell has sold his paper, the Osage City Free Press, to Mr. Morgan. Campbell goes to Neosho Falls, where he expects to engage in the dry goods business. Mr. Campbell had won quite a name and reputation as a writer in the state, and we are inclined to think he had missed it in selling out.

 

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May 11, 1876, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5916)

The Topeka Daily Times has succumbed. Its editor, S. S. Prouty, says other qualifications than "news" are necessary to the life of an evening paper in Topeka. Prouty is correct. One daily paper in a town the size of Topeka is enough. One daily for such towns as Lawrence, Leavenworth, et al, is all that the demands of such places require; when more than one, there is always a struggle for existence. No respectable daily can live in a town of less than ten thousand inhabitants. Prouty becomes connected with the Commonwealth. He is glad and so are we.

 

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May 25, 1876, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5919)

The Topeka Daily Commonwealth has been enlarged one column to the page. As a daily, in all that goes to make up a readable, newsy paper, the Commonwealth has few equals, while the importance of its location at the capital - the political center of the state - and the fact of its being the official organ for the state and supreme court makes it almost indispensable to those who take an interest in the affairs of the state. The Commonwealth will commence, on June 15th, the issue of its campaign weekly, running six months, for the low price of 50 cents. Clubs of 10, $4.50, and clubs of 20 to one address, $8, with an extra to the getter-up of the club. The daily will be furnished for the same time for $3, or clubs of 10 for $22.50.

 

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June 15, 1876, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5923)

The Paola Spirit is out in a new dress. But it is handsome though!...As to the contents, Leslie S. Perry's thoughts would sparkle through, printed with wagon dope or expressed in plastic mud. The Spirit is one of the few papers born to live, grow and have an influence. The boldness of its policy politically is only exceeded by the personal grit of its editor....

 

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August 3, 1876, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5935)

The Centennial Lawrence Tribune. John Speer, one of the oldest editors west of the Missouri River, and among the very first who took up both pen and sword in the cause of Kansas, publishes a splendid eight-page centennial issue of the Lawrence Tribune. He gives a very interesting and full history of the early days in that city, together with a valuable sketch of its present business and industries. The sketches of the old border troubles, the Quantrill massacre and other important events are vigorous and graphic....The paper is a most valuable contribution to the history of Kansas. The account of the Quantrill massacre is very full. Mr. Speer lost two sons at the hands of the murderers. Robert, the youngest, was a brilliant boy. John, the eldest, if he had lived, would have made his mark as a writer....

 

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March 8, 1877, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5946)

The closing days of the week bring to our table 40 or 50 exchanges from western Missouri and Kansas. Probably the latter state supports more newspapers to the population than any other state in the Union....Many of these papers are conducted by practical printers, who perform the duties of editor, compositor and pressman, in some instances transacting all business connected with the office....The county newspaper has been the school and college of many a poor man's child, who has in after life attained to honorable distinction in the world. Greeley and Weed had no other schooling than the printer's case, to speak of, and the best illustration of the efficiency of the newspaper as an instructor is presented in the fact that so many of our public men have begun their career in a printing office. The daily and hourly reading of the types has planted thoughts and ideas in the minds of the youthful compositor which in after years produced abundant fruit. No constant reader of the newspaper can otherwise than be benefited and instructed....The man who takes his county newspaper provides the best intellectual stimulus for his children, and can offer them no more wholesome textbook of the practical affairs of life. - Journal of Commerce.

 

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June 21, 1877, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5956)

At the closing session of the editorial convention in Leavenworth Thursday morning, before the excursionists left on their trip to the mountains, the following gentlemen were elected as officers for the ensuing year. President, Colonel John A. Martin of Atchison; vice-president, Captain B. J. F. Hanna of Salina; secretary, E. A. Wasser of Girard; treasurer, J. S. Collister of Newton. Orator for the next meeting, Hon. J. J. Ingalls of Atchison. Alternate, Senator P. B. Plumb of Emporia. Poet, Eugene Ware of Fort Scott....It was ordered that 1,000 copies of Captain Henry King's address be printed in pamphlet form.

 

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August 23, 1877, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5959)

The Commonwealth insists that a movement is on foot to have Captain Henry King, postmaster at Topeka, removed and that it is the work of politicians for political reasons entirely. It seems to us that the removal of Captain King would not be a healthy job for a Kansas politician. If any representatives of this state, senators or members of Congress are engaged in it, we think they had better stop a little, and make an estimate of its effect on public sentiment in the state. If they do this, we think they will come to the conclusion that the business won't pay one-half percent on the investment. - Champion.

 

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September 13, 1877, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5961)

The Topeka Daily Commonwealth made its appearance on Sunday morning last in an entire new dress, every letter shining. These are close times for such expenditures, but the Commonwealth has never lacked legitimate enterprise.

The Lawrence Daily Journal, one of the oldest papers in Kansas, has been enlarged and furnished with new type throughout. Lawrence ought to sustain a good daily, which the Journal has ever been. No writer in the state handles the current topic of the day more energetically and with more originality and freedom of thought than the editor of the Journal, T. Dwight Thacher.

 

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January 10, 1878, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5966)

Hon. S. N. Wood, the present speaker of the Kansas House of Representatives, favors the readers of the Eagle this week with some facts about silver and gold coin....No man in the state of Kansas is more widely known than Sam Wood, and whatever is said of him personally or politically, all concede that he is not only one of the brightest speakers, shrewdest lawyers and wiliest politicians in the West, but that he possesses a mind more fully stored with political facts pertaining to persons and parties than probably any man in the state of Kansas. He is a walking cyclopedia....

 

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January 31, 1878, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5967)

**"Mr. Seiler also spoke of being interested with others in starting the Chronicle, and recited Marsh Murdock's visit to Leavenworth with a pocket full of money to buy the material. Murdock got caught in Lawrence on the trip when Quantrill came in. Mr. Seiler was in Lawrence the same day, arriving about noon, just after Murdock had escaped from his hiding place down in a well. Quantrill didn't get Murdock or his money and the Chronicle, as a consequence, was established." - Burlingame Chronicle.

We plead guilty to being caught and to the hiding place, and to many other things not set forth in friend Seiler's indictment, who at that time was county superintendent, but the people of Burlingame will think that money charge a little attenuated. Truth compels the admission that we were never a millionaire. The whole cost of the Chronicle outfit when we first started was less than seven hundred dollars. That was a hot day in Lawrence though, and after seeing many shot down like dogs all around us on Massachusetts street, we escaped only by the skin of our teeth into that same well, our grip sack, clothes and other effects going up with the smoke of the Eastern Hotel. Quantrill and his outfit were the most inhuman butchers ever turned loose to murder a defenseless people, and we haven't got over being mad at Beecher yet for swearing that there is no hell.

 

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April 11, 1878, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5968)

The State Historical Society has purchased from Mrs. L. J. Eastin the files of the Leavenworth Herald, the first newspaper ever published in Kansas. The Herald was a pro-slavery paper and its first number was printed on the 15th of September, 1854, under an elm tree. William J. Osborn and William H. Adams were the publishers and General L. J. Eastin the editor. The negotiations for the purchase of these files, in which are embalmed a complete history of the early history of Kansas from the pro-slavery standpoint, were conducted by D. W. Wilder of the St. Joseph Herald....They embrace the first four volumes, ending August 28, 1858....

 

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September 12, 1878, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5969)

The management of the Evening Mail, Kansas City, has been transferred to new hands, Whipple, Haley and Bloss retiring. S. M. Ford takes the business management and Sam Williams, who left the Times, will do the editorial writing. Alex Lacy will also be on the staff.

Leavenworth City also has a new paper called the Hornet, a rather small affair. We don't discover anything very stinging about it.

 

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November 14, 1878, Wichita City Eagle (ID 5970)

The Eagle moved into and took possession of its new and permanent quarters last Friday and Saturday. We are still in reality in the Eagle Block, the new entrance being only four doors east of the old. Our new room is the finest for the purpose in the city,...being 80 feet deep, 25 feet wide and 12-foot ceiling, lighted by eight large and handsome windows, or just twice as large as our old quarters. Since the establishment of the Eagle, it has paid out upwards of $1,400 in rents for the composing and press rooms alone, a no very insignificant sum for these hard times. There is a space 25 feet square at the front which will be set apart and which will be furnished with a long table, chairs and plenty of newspapers, to which all our patrons and friends, of both the county and city, are most cordially invited whenever they feel inclined or find an hour hanging heavily. Here, in the future, 200 men can comfortably assemble for election returns, to hold caucuses or discuss whatever matters they choose without cost or hindrance....