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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Cawker City Ledger

Articles in database from Cawker City Ledger:    34

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July 13, 1900, Cawker City Ledger (ID 4704)

Persons wishing to enter a printing office at this season of the year should be governed by these rules: Advance to the inner door and give three distinct raps. The devil will attend to the alarm. You will give him your name, post office address and the number of years you are owing for the paper. He will admit you. You will advance to the center of the room and address the editor with the following countersign -- extend the right hand about two feet from the body with the thumb and index finger clasping a bank bill, which drop into the extended hand of the editor, at the same time saying, "Were you looking for me?" The editor will grasp your hand and the bill and, pressing it, will say "You bet! Thanks." -- Exchange.

 

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September 14, 1900, Cawker City Ledger (ID 4712)

To our patrons and friends: we would say that we have suddenly and somewhat unexpectedly become the editor and proprietor of this paper. Though somewhat inexperienced in work of this kind, we feel that we can appreciate and fully realize the importance and responsibilities of the position as that of an editor....We do not believe in what is called an independent paper, therefore this paper will be Republican in sentiment, but fair and honest to all.

 

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October 19, 1900, Cawker City Ledger (ID 4717)

G. L. Hudkins, proprietor

Prosperity -- About 20 years ago, Webb McNall was running the Gaylord paper, W. D. Jenkins was editor of the Smith County Pioneer, and politics used to boil in Smith County from one year's end to the other. Billy Jenkins used to wear a plug hat and he always looked as if he had just stepped out of a band box, and anyone who has ever seen Webb McNall knows that he could not look that way if he tried. They used to print each other's names in their papers this way -- billyjenkins -- webbmcnall. They came to this world with nothing, to Kansas the same way, and now look at them. Webb McNall has got 50 cows, a lot of young stock, a good farm, had out 150 acres of wheat that made a good crop because the GOP allowed it to rain at the proper time and in sufficient quantities, and got a fair price on account of the GOP running out of moisture, so that the farmers of Minnesota and the Dakotas did not raise much wheat, and the bullies of the earth were crushing two republics (at the same time this country had a little crushing job of its own), all of which took lots of men and they had to eat. He has been insurance commissioner of Kansas and he has a good show of filling the same position again. W. D. Jenkins is now secretary of the state of Washington. Moral: Come to Kansas, start a newspaper, raise cattle or do any old thing, and you will get rich and happy.

 

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May 31, 1901, Cawker City Ledger (ID 4737)

Mosher and Dancy, proprietors; J. S. Dancy, editor; Grace L. Snyder, associate.

"What has become of Sister Grace L. Snyder? We have seen nothing from her pen for a long time. Has she deserted the profession, or left the country, or what is the matter?..." -- Western News. She was never more alive than at present. As associate editor of the Ledger, she is doing all in her power to make a success of the editorial meeting here June 17-18.

 

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June 7, 1901, Cawker City Ledger (ID 4739)

Good night -- With this issue of the Ledger, A. W. Robinson assumes full control, having purchased it of us. We hope and trust that all our friends will continue to give the Ledger their patronage and good will, even more so, if possible, than they have done for us. -- Mosher and Dancy.

Personally, I am sorry to leave Cawker and my friends, but because I have sold my interest in the Ledger does it necessarily mean that I am quitting the newspaper business?... -- Jim Dancy.

Well friends, here we are, the new editor (the old printer and new editor). We are too fat to write a "salutatory," a long essay in which promises are made that can never be fulfilled. The most of you know us, and those of you who don't have missed something. Maybe you will like our style, maybe you won't. If you like us, "decorate and look pleasant;" if you don't like our style, complain to a policeman. -- The Editor....Politics? Have we any? You just bet we have, and are not ashamed to tell its complexion. We are a Republican with a big R, yet we flatter ourself that we are not a fool Republican, that is to say, we are not such a strong partisan that we would shield fraud and corruption because the doer of these wrong things is of the same political faith to which we cling....

 

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June 21, 1901, Cawker City Ledger (ID 4744)

Last Monday and Tuesday, Cawker City had more editors than any other town in the state, and they were all good looking ones, a few wore dresses, but that did not interfere with their beauty....Editors present: L. A. and A. M. King, Plainville; W. H. Nelson and wife, Smith County Pioneer; John Q. Royce, Phillipsburg Dispatch; H. G. Taylor, Almena Plaindealer; S. H. Dodge, Beloit Gazette; S. A. Jones, Beloit Call; Palmer B. Felt, Beloit Times; P. G. Chubbic, Beloit Royal Neighbor; Levin Hogue, Greenleaf Sentinel; W. C. Palmer, Jewell Republican; J. E. Novak, Cuba Daylight; Gomer Davies, Concordia Kansan; Fred E. Ross, Burr Oak Herald; C. M. White, Delphos Republican; H. C. Buffington and wife, Logan Republican; W. H. Smith, Downs Times; W. A. Huff, Clyde; Mrs. C. W. Landis, Osborne Farmer; L. L. Alrich, Cawker City Public Record; A. W. Robinson, Cawker City Ledger.

The business sessions were very interesting and profitable; the papers were all good. The drive to the Spring and about the city was appreciated. The reception at the library was a fine one and a nice program was there carried out. The Lambertz Band made splendid music. The luncheon Tuesday evening at the Opera House was the crowning feature; 100 plates were laid. Mr. Chubbic...was toastmaster and the talks were all good....After the banquet, a ball was enjoyed....The new officers of the association are: President, P. G. Chubbic, Beloit; secretary and treasurer, W. H. Nelson, Smith Center; vice-president, Mrs. L. A. King, Plainville. (This issue contains pictures of several editors.)

Mrs. Grace L. Snyder surprised the other members of the NCKEA by inviting them to stop a few minutes as they passed her home and refresh themselves with a glass of fruit ice....Mrs. Snyder has been a member of the association since 1895....

Compliments from some of our exchanges:

Alonzo W. Robinson, formerly editor of the Valley Falls New Era and later of the Nortonville Herald, is now editor and proprietor of the Cawker City ledger. Lon is a good newspaperman and we are glad to know that he is in the work where he belongs.... -- Nortonville News.

The Cawker City Ledger has changed ownership again, Mosher and Dancy having sold the plant to A. W. Robinson. Mr. Robinson has been connected with the paper more or less since it started three years ago and will no doubt make a success of the undertaking. -- Downs Times.

A. W. Robinson...is an old-time Kansas newspaperman, having established E. W. Hoch's paper at Marion. He was some years in Washington, D.C. -- Onaga Republican.

...Change in management of the ledger, J. M. Dancy retiring and A. W. Robinson succeeding him as editor and publisher. Clyde Robinson is typo. Mr. Robinson is an old hand in the business. -- Record.

 

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August 2, 1901, Cawker City Ledger (ID 4749)

Vol. 1, No. 1 of the Normal Arena, published at Downs by F. W. Gardner, has been received. It promises to be issued every month.

 

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August 9, 1901, Cawker City Ledger (ID 4751)

Fred Arnold, the new owner and editor of the Mankato Monitor, will make a better paper out of it than did his predecessor.

We learn that the Call office has lost the job of printing the Royal Neighbor. If this is true, it is quite a loss and we are sorry for the Call boys. They went to a great expense to do the work and will have altogether too expensive a plant on hand for a weekly paper.

 

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March 17, 1904, Cawker City Ledger (ID 4856)

Whether it rains or whether it snows, The season comes and the season goes. The crops get sick and the farmers blue, The storekeepers kick and the lawyers sue. The preachers preach and the sinners sin, And cares beset the souls of men. But through it all the printer prints. He saves and saves and stints and stints. The winds may rave and the floods may roll, And droughts break through from pole to pole. But the printer man he prints and prints, saves and saves and stints and stints. Happy, happy printer man, He does the very best he can. Sticking the type or twisting press, He trusts to luck and does his best. -- Exchange.

 

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August 11, 1904, Cawker City Ledger (ID 4892)

Notice: The Ledger office will move this week to the large and more centrally located room over the post office.

 

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October 28, 1904, Cawker City Ledger (ID 4900)

The Ledger and several of the best publications in the country have formed a subscription combination by which we are able to offer an unequalled clubbing program. Every one of our readers is entitled to take advantage of it. Here's the offer: Ledger $1, Topeka Mail and Breeze $1, Woman's World $.50, American Poultry Advocate $.50, Green's Fruit Grower $.50, Missouri Valley Farmer $.50. Regular price $4; our bargain price for all six publications, one year, only $1.75. Every publication in the above list is the best in its class.

 

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December 1, 1904, Cawker City Ledger (ID 4908)

"Muskogee Red," a printer known to every newspaper office in Kansas, is dead. He was found a corpse at Chickasha, I.T., recently and death was due to alcoholism. He was put in a rough pine box and hauled out to the potter's field and buried with no ceremony. Not a sorrowing relative or friend was there as the sexton began to shovel in the dirt. He left no legacy of sweet memory and his death was as surrounds the dumb animals in the forest wilds. One word explains his brutal ending: Whisky. The writer, even now that old "Muskogee" is dead, is ashamed to admit that he knew him. The old bum sought us out in Topeka and made life miserable until we gave him the price of a drink. Andy Redmond's (his real name) picture has been painted a thousand times and hung along the corridors of time. Boys see it every day. But they will go and do likewise. -- Bert Walker.

 

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December 22, 1904, Cawker City Ledger (ID 4914)

With this issue of the Ledger, we celebrate the seventh anniversary of the paper's birth. When the Ledger was started, it was predicted by some that it would struggle along for a few months and die. It has struggled along and now has the largest and best subscription list in the city; it has struggled along and has the largest advertising patronage in the town; it has struggled along and has the good will of all its patrons, and it has given Cawker City more and better advertising than any other enterprise ever started in the town....

 

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April 20, 1905, Cawker City Ledger (ID 4936)

Mrs. Margaret Hill McCarter of Topeka and Miss Helen Dodge of Mitchell County have started a club paper in Topeka for the club women of Kansas.

We are not in the habit of complimenting our contemporaries but we are going to say anyway, because it is true, that the Clay Center Times is the best looking weekly paper that comes to our exchange table.

 

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July 20, 1905, Cawker City Ledger (ID 4956)

Oh, it's jolly to have a printing office in a room of which they are tearing off the roof and putting on a new one. All kinds of dirt, plaster, &c., falling into the ink and type cases, and noises that cannot be made elsewhere.

 

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July 27, 1905, Cawker City Ledger (ID 4958)

The story is going the rounds that a country editor was dismissed from church for singing in a loud voice during the singing of a familiar hymn the following words: "Let every kindred, every tribe, on this terrestrial ball, put down their dollars and subscribe, and we'll receipt for all."

 

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July 26, 1906, Cawker City Ledger (ID 5019)

North Central Kansas Editorial Association, Chautauqua Park, Beloit, July 26-27. Program...Welcome. Response, Bert Walker. Address of president, Henry R. Honey. The Country Weekly, A. B. Adamson. The Editor as a Politician, E. A. Ross, A. W. Robinson. Discussion, the secret of success in the press room, S. H. Dodge, W. C. Palmer....The Local Editor's Opportunity, Walter Smith, Harry Houghton. Special Editions, S. C. Landes, J. W. McBride. Competition, W. R. Baker. The Country Editor and Literary Style, E. M. Harger....The Editor's Goal, Tom Charles. What to Print, Miss Anna Carlson. What Not to Print, Mrs. M. H. Bishop. The Woes of an Editor, W. H. Dannebarger. Successful Departments, Mrs. L. A. King....

 

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April 25, 1907, Cawker City Ledger (ID 5061)

Monday morning when Mr. Boyd was going to town..., as he passed Mrs. Alex Johnson's residence, Mrs. Johnson and Miss Folgelberg were trying to hitch a horse and buggy. The horse was very uneasy....He succeeded in getting the horse hitched to the buggy but it began to prance...and became unmanageable. Mr. Boyd held to the halter strap until the horse finally dragged him down and the buggy ran over his body, fracturing two ribs and bruising him up considerably. While his injuries are very painful, they are not serious.... Mr. Boyd edits the Republic County Democrat. He is a veteran newspaperman as well as a veteran of the Civil War. Until lately, he carried three bullets in his body which were planted there by the Johnnies. He had the one in his neck removed a few years ago; the other two he carries....

 

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May 9, 1907, Cawker City Ledger (ID 5066)

...There is seldom a week but what our exchanges tell of the price being raised....Here is what the Beloit Gazette says about it:

"Many newspaper men throughout Kansas have raised the price of their weekly publications from $1.00 to $1.50 per year on account of the increase in price of white paper. Most of the big daily papers have also raised the price, the last being W. R. Hearst's Sunday publications. He has raised the price from 5 to 7 cents per copy. As a rule, the newspapermen are the biggest fools on earth anyway. When groceries, dry goods, lumber, coal or any other articles raise in price on the wholesale market, the home dealer shoots up the price in accordance and no one blames him. For more than two years, paper of all kinds has advanced in price from 10 to 40 percent and still we are charging the same price for printing as we did two years ago. Newspapermen die poor because they like to be good fellows."

 

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May 16, 1907, Cawker City Ledger (ID 5069)

The first issue of J. R. Burton's paper, Home Rule, printed at Abilene, appeared last week. It is a 16-page, 4-column paper containing departments for women, agriculture, religious thought, boiled-down news, and editorials. He says editorially that he has no persons to punish, no wrongs to right, but that his paper will make its battle for principles...the old principles of a pure democracy. However, there is scarcely a paragraph relative to the political situation but what contains strong criticism of the president and his policy. Mr. Burton has had some unusual experiences and it is natural that he would take sides against the men who were instrumental in bringing him to account for his indiscretions. He is a very able man and will set people to thinking along lines which are new to them....The Burton Publishing Company, which owns Home Rule, has a complete newspaper outfit that was picked out in Chicago for Mr. Burton by T. Reid. The officers of the company are: President, J. R. Burton; treasurer, C. T. Estes; business manager, G. P. Miller....

 

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December 19, 1907, Cawker City Ledger (ID 5099)

This is No. 1, Volume X. We propose to make this volume better than any preceding one....During the holidays, the Ledger will be moved into its new home in the building we bought of J. Rothschild....

 

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February 20, 1908, Cawker City Ledger (ID 5113)

Peace! The following from the Mankato Monitor is self-explanatory....The intensity of the newspaper war in Mankato has been a matter of statewide recognition. The Monitor has said things that should have been left unsaid. He regrets, in the spirit of the following agreement, not only the article specifically mentioned, but he goes farther voluntarily...and deeply regrets the utterance of the dozens of particularly mean and cutting things said since the bringing of the suit....

In the District Court of Jewell County, Kansas. Henry R. Honey, plaintiff, vs. E. D. George, defendant. Stipulation. It is hereby stipulated and agreed: First, that the defendant fully and without reservation retracts the statement contained in the article set out in the petition of the plaintiff and expresses his regret that it was ever written or published; second,...the plaintiff regrets the publication of any article that may have injured the personal feeling of the defendant; third, it is further stipulated...that this settlement shall and does blot out all feelings of enmity...; fourth,...that this stipulation be filed in the above entitled court and published in the respective papers of the parties hereto; fifth, that this case be by the court dismissed and that the costs be equally divided. Done this 8th day of February, in the year of our Lord, 1908.

 

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March 19, 1908, Cawker City Ledger (ID 5118)

W. R. Baker has sold the Peoples' Sentinel of Glen Elder to F. W. Thompson and L. L. Humes. Mr. Baker has been in Glen Elder many years and has been giving the people there a splendid paper....Mr. Thompson was county superintendent two terms and is an ambitious, versatile young man....Mr. Hume is one of the successful teachers of the county.

 

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April 30, 1908, Cawker City Ledger (ID 5128)

When this week's issue is completed, we shall hand the editorial pen to our successor, Robert Good of Jamestown, a newspaperman of much ability and experience....It would be strange if we had not made any mistakes within the year and a half we have owned the Ledger. Our conscience is clear, however, for every line that was penned and every word spoken was intended to further the best interests of the people or to give them wholesome information....A. P. Gregory.

 

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May 7, 1908, Cawker City Ledger (ID 5131)

In the early days of newspaperdom, a new editor was supposed to write a "salutatory" to his readers which was anywhere from two to six columns in length, the object being to make them acquainted with all his beliefs and disbeliefs, likes and dislikes....This is not "the early days" but the writer believes in some of the good old-fashioned things....The fact of the matter is, Prof. Gregory wanted to sell out, and we thought it a good business proposition on our part....We come among you not as a stranger but as an old friend who has been in the habit of "dropping in" for a visit every once in a while. We have no axes to grind, no special interests to serve, no selfish desire to cater to. In fact, we are absolutely untrammeled by anything except the wish to make an honest living for ourself and family, and while doing so spread aboard the gospel of optimist and good cheer....It is popularly supposed that a newspaper must be an "organ" of some political party, but that is something the Ledger will never be under our management....This is "just a country newspaper," and if we can make it a model paper for a town of this size we'll be proud of it....Optimistically yours, Robert Good.

 

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August 0, 1908, Cawker City Ledger (ID 5149)

A. W. Robinson, editor of the LaCrosse Republican, came in Saturday night and visited over Sunday with old friends. Mr. Robinson was formerly editor of the Cawker Ledger.

 

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October 8, 1908, Cawker City Ledger (ID 5153)

Monday forenoon, Mrs. Alrich handed the editor a little card on which was written, "C.C.C.C., L. L. Alrich, Oct. 5, 1908, 8:30 p.m., Surprise, 68th birthday." Interpreted, this meant that the Cawker City Commercial Club was invited to a surprise party on the occasion of Bro. Alrich's birthday and, knowing the reputation of the hostess for entertaining, we accepted the invitation. At 8:30, about 45 members of the Commercial Club met at the secretary's office and marched in a body to the Alrich home, where Bro. Alrich was found interested in a talk over old times with L. S. Tucker, who had taken supper with him and been detailed to keep suspicion away from the object of the surprise....A more surprised person never lived than Mr. Alrich....After an hour or more spent in pleasant conversation and examination of the many souvenirs which are found in the Alrich home, during which time 20 more members of the club arrived, small tables were brought out and the company was treated to refreshments such as appeal to the night appetite of men. Just as the eatables were being set forth, the Cawker City Band arrived and serenaded the company, and they too were invited to join the festivities. Oyster stew followed the salads, and say but it was immense....When the tables were cleared, Mr. Alrich was gently maneuvered into the center of the parlor, and in an eloquent address J. W. Tucker on behalf of the guests presented him with an elegant leather rocking chair as a slight testimonial for his 30 years of labor in this city....L. L. Alrich is one of the pioneers of this county, coming to Cawker City 30 years ago, during 25 years of which time he has been identified with the newspaper business....At the outbreak of the war, he enlisted and on the conclusion of hostilities returned to his home in New Jersey, but the call of the West was too strong for him and he returned to Kansas in 1878, walking from Beloit to this city in a snowstorm January 6th, 1879....

 

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August 0, 1909, Cawker City Ledger (ID 5219)

...Owen Brice has bought the Glen Elder Sentinel....Mr. Brice is a Mitchell County boy but has been working at the printer's trade in Kansas City.

In Saturday's issue of the Beloit Daily Times, editor W. A. Huff bids his readers and patrons goodbye. Mr. Huff sold the Times to Mr. Swan of the Gazette, who will consolidate the two papers and call it the Daily Gazette-Times. We have always contended that Beloit was too small a town for two dailies and one weekly....

 

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December 9, 1909, Cawker City Ledger (ID 5236)

The Ledger appears this week in a new dress of body or "reading matter" type, which we hope will prove pleasing to our readers. We have selected this particular "face"...because it is somewhat darker and a little larger than our old type, hence is more easily read. At the same time, it is so "lean" that as many words will go into a column as would go in the old type. While we were buying...we bought a lot of new job and advertising type also, and some new "borders" and some more "leads" and brass "rules," and a lot of figures especially for advertising prices....The Ledger now has one of the best and most up-to-date offices in this state, size of town considered. The Ledger has...fully 50 percent more readers now than it had 18 months ago....

 

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July 0, 1911, Cawker City Ledger (ID 5339)

The Alton Empire has installed a gasoline engine and now prints with power furnished by gas instead of muscle.

This office is the proud owner of a gasoline engine which has been running for four years, and never gave a bit of trouble until Tuesday afternoon, when the whole four years of concentrated cussedness hidden in its seemingly innocent frame came to the surface at once. We removed its epidermis, performed tracheotomy on its thorax, put a new wedding ring on its cylinder, carefully bathed its extremities in oil, scraped crude diamonds in the form of carbon from its piston, made some nice new gaskets for its head to rest upon, re-cushioned the valve seats so it could rest easier, gave it electrical treatment, the devil disinfected it with sulphur fumes, Crosby gave it osteopathic treatment in its joints, allopathic doses of grease for its innards, and homeopathic doses of kindly coaxing but, at the time of this writing, Wednesday afternoon, it is still making up for the time it lost during its four years of faithful service.

 

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July 6, 1911, Cawker City Ledger (ID 5336)

The printing of the annual program books for the Lincoln Park Chautauqua would not be considered a big job in a large city, but it is a tremendous task for a small office. The size of the job can be better realized from a study of these figures: There are 6,000 of the completed books. If piled in one pile, they would reach a height of 70 feet or twice as high as the schoolhouse walls. The paper in the job weighs 1,200 pounds. Being a small office with limited press facilities, we could print but four pages of the book at a time. This means that we had to make 138,000 impressions to complete the book. Figuring 1,000 per hour, we had to keep the press running 8 hours a day for 17 days to print the job. The folding was all done by hand, and there were 72,000 pieces of paper to handle. Before being put together, the books are in 12 pieces or sections. To assemble these for the stapling machine, we have figured that we have to walk 18 miles, or from here to Beloit. The sheets of paper were 8 inches wide and 16 inches long before being trimmed, and the paper in the job would make a footpath 8 inches wide all the way from here to Osborne, and then there would be enough left to circle the town. And, just as we had finished the job, we received word that a report is being spread to the effect that there is to be no chautauqua at Lincoln Park this year. Over $50 will be spent for postage on part of these books to prove the report is groundless.

 

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August 10, 1911, Cawker City Ledger (ID 5340)

The Mankato Advocate was 21 years old last week and has been edited by H. R. Honey during the entire life of the paper.

 

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November 16, 1911, Cawker City Ledger (ID 5348)

For a long, long time it has been our ambition to have the neatest looking printing offices along the Central Branch and our ambition is about to be realized. We will not have the best shop as far as material is concerned, because the size of the town will not justify such a claim, but we will have the neatest and nicest looking shop inside. The old front door of our shack has been torn out and a new one put in, with a panel of "prism" glass across the top which makes the farthest corner of the room almost as light as the front of the shop. Then we had a new floor put in, and the old walls patched up and re-papered. The ceiling has been given a coat of buff paint, and will get another someday, and all the woodwork inside will be painted buff, trimmed with green. While we were in the "fixing up" mood, we bought a fine $75 solid-oak, glass-front display case which we use as a stock cabinet. New linen shades have been ordered for the front window, and everything is going to be "as neat as a pin," so that we need not be ashamed to have our friends pay us an afternoon call, and the ladies need not fear to wear their best clothes when they call to order visiting cards. And it goes without saying that we will be able to and want to do nicer work in such a nice office.

 

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February 27, 1913, Cawker City Ledger (ID 5411)

In 1896 and for a few years following, the editor (Robert Good) ran a Democratic paper in Valentine, Neb. There were two other papers in the town, one Populist and one Republican, and it was 45 miles east to another print shop, 90 miles west, and we never did know how far north or south we'd have to go to find a brother newspaper man. His paper had the distinction of being the only Democratic paper for a stretch of 300 miles along the Northwestern road -- it was the only Democratic paper between Norfolk, Neb., and the Black Hills.

Just about this time in the spring of 1897, the editor wrote a piece as a joke, calling upon all the Democratic editors in that territory to meet at Valentine and organize a Democratic editorial association. Some fellow who didn't see the joke wondered why it should be confined to Democrats. The upshot of it all was that we three newspaper men got our heads together, called a meeting for the first Saturday in June, and at that time was organized the Elkhorn Valley Editorial Association, which so far as we know still holds a meeting every summer, the first Saturday in June. It was in existence five years ago, at least. This little reminisce is published to show the sometimes far-reaching effect of a joking piece in the paper....