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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Downs Chief

Articles in database from Downs Chief:    184

1885 (printed as 1884): By Topliff & Whitmore. In ...
November 20, 1885, Downs Chief (ID 2356)

1885 (printed as 1884)

By Topliff & Whitmore. In commencing the publication of the Chief at Downs we feel as it is customary for printers to feel, "that we are filling a long felt want." We mean that we have long felt that we wanted to publish a paper in this city.

The town is growing rapidly and has business for two papers. We shall endeavor to make the Chief a good local paper, but shall not devote any great amount of space to molding public opinion, because public opinion as it is suits us very well. Neither do we intend to publish any long editorials on political economy to harass our readers. But our aim shall be to make a note of matters pertaining to this locality and use every effort to put our country and the city of Downs in the most favorable light before our readers in the East. We hope our efforts will please you, and that you will give us a share of your patronage.

The Chief is receiving a warm welcome from the people of Downs. Thanks, we will soon make you a good paper as we have ordered a new press and the best job office we could buy, by selecting from three different type foundries.

The Chief is the cheapest paper in this part of the world, $1.00 per year in advance. Call and try it for a year or two; you will like it after you get used to it.

A third paper will soon be published in Oberlin. The Kirwin Republican lately suspended and will probably be removed to that point....

For deep stupidity, dense ignorance, and a grand fund of misinformation, the Record at Cawker City takes the lead. Its columns are filled with stuff which is never news because it is never reliable. There is scarcely a line in the paper that can be depended upon except the ads....The Record is not malicious but it often does people injustices without knowing it....

We have been asked since we have been in town if the Chief is to be an anti-Prohibition paper or a Prohibition paper. Once for all let us state that the question is settled by an amendment to the Constitution and by statutory provision for the enforcement of said amendment. Hence it is not now an open question....To the question we have this to say, we are not a saloon keeper hence we are not interested....

 

We are in receipt of a copy of the new paper publi ...
November 27, 1885, Downs Chief (ID 2358)

We are in receipt of a copy of the new paper published in Downs by C. M. Forline, druggist. It is called the Owl and is quoted at $1.50 per annum and a package of bile beans given away with each copy of the paper.

In compliance with a kind invitation from Superintendent Fagan to take a trip to Atchison over the Central Branch Division, Missouri Pacific, we joined the excurting editors at Downs, and in the care of Harry Nesbit, conductor, James McColgin, engineer, and E. M. Johnson, brakeman, we were taken to the city in a most hospitable manner. Our party was increased at each station by an editor or two until the crowd began to be so great that we boiled over from the smoker onto the tender, and from the sleeper into Mr. Fagan's special car which was attached to the excursion train.

Hulaniski of the Empire and Reed of the Salem Argus were the only editors who inflicted silk hats upon their entertainers at Atchison.

 

We must again offer our thanks to our friends, the ...
December 4, 1885, Downs Chief (ID 2362)

We must again offer our thanks to our friends, the newspaper men who have given the Downs Chief such favorable notices. Lack of space compels us to omit noticing them in detail.

Our contemporary is so rushed with work that he wants to put on another printer. As we have nothing to do at the Chief office, one of us might work for him for a while. He can't outdo us when it comes to plain, single-handed lying.

With this issue the old subscribers to the Harlan Chief are commencing their third year. Perhaps this announcement may suggest something to them. To our new subscribers in Downs, we must frankly say, your subscription is now due the Chief.

 

Last week the publisher of The Childs' paper on th ...
December 11, 1885, Downs Chief (ID 2365)

Last week the publisher of The Childs' paper on the other side of the street boasted in his issue of Thursday that he was having so much work to do that he would be compelled to put on another printer, and work night and day himself. Monday afternoon, a tramp printer came to our office and we sent him over to the busy place, and he was very promptly told that there was no work for him. We have drawn our conclusions; our readers can do the same.

 

The Osborne News man has been pregnant with a joke ...
December 18, 1885, Downs Chief (ID 2367)

The Osborne News man has been pregnant with a joke for some time past. Last week he was delivered of it. It was stillborn. If it had been able to stand it would have cast some reflection on the size of the feet of the editors of the Chief. Its parent is doing tolerably well. He would have been down to our skating carnival last week but he has to use flat cars for roller skates and the railroad company refused to rent him the cars because he is a monopolist. The Alton Empire had a hankering to get in on this rich joke and steal a little credit, as usual, so it copies the aforesaid stillborn and adds that he knows positively that the editors of the Chief never wash their feet. This is the first time we have ever seen it on record that the editor of the Empire knew anything for certain....

Columbus Borin of the Oberlin Eye has bought the Kirwin Chief. Borin once had a Truth Teller in this county at Osborne City.

 

This office has a few farms and a big stock ranch ...
February 5, 1886, Downs Chief (ID 2374)

This office has a few farms and a big stock ranch for sale, cheaper than any other agency in this part of Kansas.

The editor of the Downs Times has discovered that there is too much gambling in town. We wonder if he arrived at this conclusion by attending a church fair.

In the society notes of the Downs Times an account is given of a party at Mrs. Hale's residence last Sunday night. It seems that cutting and shooting was indulged in, much to the discomfort of the editor who regrets that Downs is cursed with such houses as Mrs. Hale is running. Keep away George and they won't bite you. You will learn how to be safe when you get older.

 

W. H. Henry, a printer from Oberlin, is pounding l ...
February 12, 1886, Downs Chief (ID 2378)

W. H. Henry, a printer from Oberlin, is pounding lead in this office. Hereafter we shall be out on time.

 

If you want to sell your farm call at the Chief of ...
February 19, 1886, Downs Chief (ID 2380)

If you want to sell your farm call at the Chief office. We will sell land for a less commission than any land firm in northwest Kansas.

Gentlemen, prepare your ballots for the city election April 5th. Let us hear about the candidates and know who desires to serve his country. Patriots stand forth. We nominate George Dougherty for police judge. This we do in order that Geo. may invoke the law when Mrs. Hale calls on him again with a club in her hand and vengeance in her eye, and not be compelled to crawl under a pile of old papers while the devil explains that the editor is out.

The Times said last week that the draw poker men had threatened to boycott the Times because it had seen fit to mention the fact that the business was carried on in this city. We sincerely hope the professional gentlemen will not withdraw their patronage because of a little free advertising they will get in either paper.

When the Times begins to speak favorably of a public man he is then in first actual danger.

 

Steve De Young, former publisher of the Cawker Cit ...
March 19, 1886, Downs Chief (ID 2382)

Steve De Young, former publisher of the Cawker City Free Press, dropped in to see us yesterday.

The Public Record at Cawker City has been enlarged. Mr. Alrich is putting lots of work on his paper and it is well filled with home advertising.

 

W. S. Gray, W. J. Harding and A. D. Gray publish t ...
March 26, 1886, Downs Chief (ID 2383)

W. S. Gray, W. J. Harding and A. D. Gray publish the Monitor at Lenora. It is a six-column folio. By adding one or two more men to its editorial staff the Monitor would be wholly worthless.

 

A Change. With this issue we assume full control o ...
April 2, 1886, Downs Chief (ID 2385)

A Change. With this issue we assume full control of the Chief. As heretofore the Chief will be devoted to the best interests of Downs and Osborne County. The business men of Downs have patronized the Chief very liberally, for which they have our thanks, and all we ask is a continuance of the same and we shall endeavor to give them a good local paper. -- W. H. Whitmore.

Farewell. With this issue of the Chief, I make my last appearance as one of its editors. The Chief will be continued by Mr. Whitmore, who will hereafter conduct it on its road to permanent prosperity, popularity and usefulness. My thanks go forth to the people of Downs for their liberal encouragement and patronage, and it is with a feeling of profound regret that I bid you farewell. -- A. L. Topliff.

Franz Drummond, late editor of the Burr Oak Herald, stopped in to see us Tuesday while on his way to Smith Center, where he has accepted a position on the Pioneer. Franz is a mighty good boy and will do good work on that paper.

 

Sol Rush, editor of the Simpson Siftings, was in t ...
April 16, 1886, Downs Chief (ID 2386)

Sol Rush, editor of the Simpson Siftings, was in town last Friday night and called on the Chief. Mr. Rush is giving the people of Simpson a good paper, for which he is receiving a mighty slim patronage.

 

Last week a cowardly cur named Green walked up beh ...
May 28, 1886, Downs Chief (ID 2391)

Last week a cowardly cur named Green walked up behind Geo. Anderson, local editor of the Beloit Democrat, and with a ball bat hit him a terrific blow on the head, breaking the bat and knocking Mr. Anderson down. The assault was caused through an item in the Democrat concerning Green, but was not of a nature that would cause one man to sneak up behind another and strike him. Only a coward would take the course that Green took, and we hope he will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law.

The Harlan Advocate comes to us this week under a new management, I. S. Drummond having purchased it. The first issue starts out well, being transformed from a sheet containing nothing but "Rum Power," "Kill Harlan," "Massacre Anti-Prohibitionists," etc., etc., to a first-class local paper, and Mr. Drummond will receive a good support from the business men of the town should he work for the best interests of Harlan.

We hope our readers who have not paid their subscription will bear in mind that it takes money to run a paper....We have several hundred names on our list who have never paid their subscription....

The City Printing Given to the High Bidder. Last Monday night the city council met in regular session. A hot fight was indulged in by the members over the city printing. Brown seemed determined that it should be given to the Times, intimating that the Chief was not an established paper here, that it was liable to vanish, and that it had not a circulation equal to the Times. Wells and Markert were in favor of giving it to the lowest bidder. Mr. Markert made a motion that it be let to the lowest bidder and it was voted down; Brown, Sample and Neff voting nay, and Wells and Markert voting aye. Brown then made the motion that the Times be declared the official paper of the city and it was carried, Brown, Sample and Neff voting aye and Wells and Markert voting nay. The action of Brown, Sample and Neff in this matter is nothing less than a high-handed steal....It is nothing short of robbery, and we wish to ask our city taxpayers what they think of the matter?...The action of these three men should, and will, receive the condemnation of all citizens who uphold honesty and justice. ...We propose to keep a watch of these three men while they are councilmen and their bulldozing and skullduggery will be shown up in the Chief. Mayor Dannenberg wished to see fair play in the matter, and on several occasions set down on their bulldozing scheme. He is a man that Brown cannot bulldoze.

Vol. 1, No. 1, of the Cedarville Globe comes to us this week asking for an "X." Mahin & Barren are its editors, and it presents a very neat appearance.

The Burr Oak Rustler, a five-column quarto, edited by C. E. Crippin, has just been started at Burr Oak....

 

Last week the editor of the Downs Times picks up t ...
June 25, 1886, Downs Chief (ID 2394)

Last week the editor of the Downs Times picks up the cudgel in behalf of his three pets, Brown, Neff, and Sample, members of the city council. It is not often that we stoop so low to combat with such a low, depraved being as Dougherty, but as he has taken up other people's fights, and stuck his nose in it, which is very characteristic in him, and too, made some false and very ludicrous statements, we will correct some of them. He says that all sensible people condemn the stand we have taken in regard to the city printing. If that be true, then three-fourths of our most prominent citizens must be classed as fools, as fully that number have told us personally that we did just right in showing up the contemptible proceedings....(We are) proud to state that we are now getting two-thirds of the newspaper and job patronage of the city. In the seven months that we have been here, we have been treated with respect by all good citizens of the city, but not by you. What an enterprising skunk you are....As to your statements concerning the city printing, they are false from beginning to end....And as for you, Dougherty, we consider you a low, contemptible, sneaking cur. You are a conceited and bigoted liar. Your hoggish actions has caused a majority of your friends to become disgusted with you. You are the laughing stock with the whole community. Your milk and water sheet is almost wholly used in water closets. You snarl and whine at everybody who do not happen to think and as you do. Your hoggish disposition is only one of your many failings. You claim that you have done more for Downs than any other man in the city, which shows plainly that you are a conceited ass. You have been a traitor to those who have done the most for you. In short, you are nothing, nobody, nincompoop.

Owing to a rush of job work, we are one day late with the Chief this week.

 

Mrs. McBride of the Cawker Journal this week takes ...
July 0, 1886, Downs Chief (ID 2395)

Mrs. McBride of the Cawker Journal this week takes Dougherty of the Times across her knee and gives him just such a spanking he justly deserves. Dougherty had no authority for saying what he did in last week's issue, as it did not speak the sentiments of the people of Downs. While our dramatic company received a very cool reception, and felt hurt, we do not believe the Cawker people should be unmercifully abused by anyone as they were by the thing up the street.

F. J. Hulaniski, late of the Alton Empire, passed through the city Wednesday on his way to Leavenworth, where he takes a position on the daily Times.

 

C. Borin has assumed full charge of the Kirwin Chi ...
August 13, 1886, Downs Chief (ID 2397)

C. Borin has assumed full charge of the Kirwin Chief and is making a much better paper of it. Mr. Borin is a first-class newspaper man....

Some person, either accidentally or with the purpose of filling us with cold lead, fired a bullet through our front window last Saturday, which just missed hitting two of our compositors who were at work near the window. We have purchased a Gatling gun and will exchange shots with some fellow if this thing is repeated.

 

W. H. Nelson, cashier of the First National Bank o ...
August 27, 1886, Downs Chief (ID 2399)

W. H. Nelson, cashier of the First National Bank of Smith Center, passed through this city Sunday last on his way to Pennsylvania on business....

The Reveille, published at Whatcom, Washington Territory, by Jenkins & Nicklin, occasionally reaches our table. The boys get up a very fine paper, but just how they make a success running a paper in a town of probably two hundred inhabitants, and containing not more than six or seven business houses, is a mystery to us.

 

Isaac R. Miller, who for the past months has been ...
September 3, 1886, Downs Chief (ID 2400)

Isaac R. Miller, who for the past months has been in our employ in the capacity of printer, left on Saturday last for Salina, where he expects to enter college....Chas. M. Fisher of Hicksville, Ohio, will take charge of the mechanical department of the office, and we hope, with combined efforts, to make the Chief a local paper of much value and second to none....

 

Over in Smith County they are still having a hot t ...
September 17, 1886, Downs Chief (ID 2401)

Over in Smith County they are still having a hot time over county matters. The Smith Center Pioneer, which is edited by W. H. Nelson and J. N. Beacom, two men who have been public teat suckers ever since they landed in the county, are endeavoring, by the lowest, dirtiest and most shameful means, to defeat J. Q. Royce, who has had the office of county attorney for two years and is now seeking the second nomination.

 

Removal. The Chief office has been moved under the ...
October 1, 1886, Downs Chief (ID 2402)

Removal. The Chief office has been moved under the Bank of Downs, where we have plenty of room to work in, and are better prepared than ever to do job printing....

Alrich, who was nominated by the Republicans for representative, is trying to show to the people, through his paper, what a nice man he is, what a simon pure Republican he has been, etc., but it will be no use. Any 10-year-old boy in Mitchell County is better qualified for that position than Alrich.

 

We are pleased to see that the Republicans have no ...
October 8, 1886, Downs Chief (ID 2403)

We are pleased to see that the Republicans have nominated Tom Nicklin for representative of his county out in Washington Territory. Tom Nicklin is a bright young man and would make an excellent representative....

 

The Smith Centre Bazoo has been enlarged and great ...
October 16, 1886, Downs Chief (ID 2405)

The Smith Centre Bazoo has been enlarged and greatly improved of late and is now one of the best papers in Smith County. We are pleased to see Jack Stewart prosper.

 

The Woodston Saw is the latest newspaper venture o ...
November 12, 1886, Downs Chief (ID 2406)

The Woodston Saw is the latest newspaper venture out in Rooks County, by C. C. Thompson. It is a credit to the town and its publisher.

 

Last Friday, Nov. 12, was the day set for the meet ...
November 19, 1886, Downs Chief (ID 2409)

Last Friday, Nov. 12, was the day set for the meeting of the Northwest Kansas Editorial Association to meet in this city. Thursday night the passenger train brought in a number of the quill drivers, and Friday morning several came in from the west. For some unknown reason, the full number did not turn out. At nine o'clock a.m. the members of the press association assembled at Grinnell's Hall. The meeting was called to order by C. Borin, president. President Borin then made a very neat and appropriate speech. The following members were present: W. H. Caldwell, Beloit Courier; John Q. Royce, Smith Center Bulletin; C. H. Topliff, Osborne News; J. W. Bliss, Greenleaf Independent; C. F. Knowlton, Osborne Journal; C. J. Lamb, Kirwin Independent; M. Hoyt, Portis Patriot; A. T. Filson, Concordia Times; Harry Root, Atchison Champion; W. C. Palmer, Jewell Republican; L. L. Alrich, Cawker City Record; C. Borin, Kirwin Chief; J. M. Podgett, Clifton News; Geo. E. Dougherty, Downs Times; W. H. Whitmore, Downs Chief. J. Q. Royce of the Smith Center Bulletin was elected president and T. C. Filson of the Concordia Times secretary; J. H. Simmonds, C. Borin and W. Palmer were elected vice-presidents; C. H. Topliff was elected assistant secretary....At two p.m. the meeting was called to order by the president and was then addressed by W. H. Caldwell of the Beloit Courier; subject,

"The requisites for success in the newspaper business." The subject was ably handled by Mr. Caldwell. ...The question was further discussed by all members present. Many other subjects were then discussed by the association, till six o'clock when all hands adjourned to the Presbyterian Church, where a supper was awaiting them....Supper over, the house was cleared of tables and F. W. Hiddleson made the welcome address...which was responded to by C. Borin....Then followed J. Q. Royce of the Smith Center Bulletin in a short speech. It being time for the ball at the Howell House to begin, all promenaded to that place....Bright and early Saturday morning a majority of the editors, accompanied by the Downs Cornet Band, boarded the passenger train for Concordia....

Ben Baker of Cawker City is now assisting us in getting out the Chief. Ben is a first-class young man and is an acquisition to any printing office.

The sausage cover who edits the Times, not content with his attempt to cause hard feelings between the Social Club and the young ladies Excelsior Society, snubbed the former club in fine style this week by giving them a very slight notice.

Vol. 1., No. 1, of the Osborne Journal, Knowlton & Prewitt, editors, put in an appearance at this office last week. It is a handsome six-column quarto and filled to overflowing with local news....

 

M. Hoyt has sold the Portis Patriot to S. C. Perry ...
January 14, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2414)

M. Hoyt has sold the Portis Patriot to S. C. Perry.

For pure and adulterated cheek, the Times man takes the lead of all competitors. Some time ago we gave notice that we would give a review of Downs about January 1st, whereupon the wise and enterprising young man of the Times conceived the idea of following our example, and did publish a garbled mess of slush that had no head nor tail. The Chief gave a correct account of the number of buildings erected and the cost of the same, which foots up to about $65,000. The Times man knows a thing when he sees it. He belongs to that class of unfortunates who are to be pitied, not abused.

 

The People's Friend of Salem comes to us this week ...
January 28, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2417)

The People's Friend of Salem comes to us this week asking for an exchange. The patent side of the paper presents a very neat appearance, but the "home side" is just what could be expected from any inexperienced crank who has rushed into the newspaper business with the expectation of reforming the world. It is a mangy looking thing. Its editor had better go to picking corn.

 

Dougherty of the Times says he is proud to be call ...
February 18, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2419)

Dougherty of the Times says he is proud to be called a stinker. Some people do have peculiar tastes.

The Chief has just received a large quantity of fine job type from the Cincinnati Type Foundry, and is better prepared than ever to do fine job printing.

 

Squelched. Last week the Times man borrowed a litt ...
February 25, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2420)

Squelched. Last week the Times man borrowed a little "sand" from some near friend and loudly proclaimed that "our people" are very indignant at the outrage that has been perpetrated upon our city by the so-called Downs Amusement Association, which is a law defying institution that should be "squelched." If you want it "squelched," why don't you "squelch" it, Mr. Times, you have the permission of the people of Downs to do it; nobody is holding you....We would suggest to the honorable mayor and city council that they request Mr. Dougherty to file an information, and at the same time suggest that he puts up a good and sufficient bond for costs in case he does not make a suit....

 

At the head of this column we place the name of J. ...
March 25, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2422)

At the head of this column we place the name of J. W. Huff for mayor....J. W. Huff is the Chief's candidate, and we hope to see him elected mayor of the city of Downs by the largest majority any man ever received here.

 

James Adams is the name of a dishonest skunk livin ...
March 31, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2424)

James Adams is the name of a dishonest skunk living out at Shibbolth, Decatur County, who has been taking the Chief for over three years, and is yet owing us $2.50 for the same. He has the postmaster at that place notify us that he "don't want it any longer," after our sending him a bill....

 

Newspaper bustles are now made of back numbers. It ...
April 1, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2425)

Newspaper bustles are now made of back numbers. It crushes all the glory out of the profession, and were it not that an editor can feel that he has not only brightened a woman's mind, but improved her shape, he might throw up the sponge in disgust and retire from this world of bustle and deception.

 

(Drawing of cannon and flag) The Citizens Ticket E ...
April 8, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2427)

(Drawing of cannon and flag) The Citizens Ticket Elected! (Drawing of rooster) Our rooster crowing for the Citizens' Ticket. (Drawing of sick chicken) Granny Dougherty of the Times as he was seen soon after the votes were counted. Good Bye, Eliza Jane! Huff, Baertsch, Kroetch, Grinnell, Rundle and Powell are elected by majorities ranging from 104 to 109. (Long story follows).

The Downs Times compares very favorably with the Chief's supplement.

The ticket that the Chief hoisted at the head of its column last week was the one elected. To say that we feel good would be putting it too mild. We are too full for utterance. We believe that the men on the ticket were the best timber that the city of Downs could produce, and the action of the intelligent voters has strengthened our belief.

 

Delinquents Pay Up. Do you owe us anything on subs ...
April 22, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2433)

Delinquents Pay Up. Do you owe us anything on subscription? If you do, you will greatly oblige us by kindly getting up and humping yourself and sending it to us, a part of it at least. There is a limit to even an editor's endurance. It costs money to print a paper. Hereafter, we shall issue from 1,000 to 1,200 copies of the Chief every week and advertisers should govern themselves accordingly.

 

We have placed a new press in our office, and will ...
April 29, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2436)

We have placed a new press in our office, and will soon enlarge the Chief to an eight-column folio. The cause of this improvement is due to the liberal patronage we are now receiving from our businessmen.

 

This week we have enlarged the Chief to an eight-c ...
May 6, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2439)

This week we have enlarged the Chief to an eight-column folio. Our motive in making the change is from the fact that our city has grown to the size and importance that demands a larger and better paper than we have been publishing in the past year and a half....

 

Printing Press for Sale. We have a good seven-colu ...
May 13, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2441)

Printing Press for Sale. We have a good seven-column Army Press for sale. If sold soon, can be had for $50 on board cars at Downs....

 

The Times will find that the dirty slurs that he i ...
June 16, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2447)

The Times will find that the dirty slurs that he is casting at the Anniversary Celebration will not have the effect that they are intended for....

On Monday James Garner, who has been publishing a paper at Harlan, moved his office to this place and will begin the publication of a paper next week. His office will be over the Exchange Bank. Mr. Garner is better known to the people of Downs than to us, as we have known him but a short time, but he appears to be a pleasant young man and will probably get out a good paper. Whether or not he is filling a long-felt want time will determine. We only hope that our city can support three papers, and we wish him success.

Both the Cawker papers of last week took us to task for our giving the Burnet House of that city a short notice the week before. When we need any of their advice as to how we shall conduct the Chief we will advise them in time and till that time we hope the tender little plants will keep their shirts on....

We were not surprised at the Times outburst last week. He is as cranky on temperance as ever, in fact, no matter what he attempts to write, he brings in the last city election and temperance. We have seen enough in the Times for the last three issues to thoroughly convince us that its editor is a lying hypocrite, who sails under false colors for the purpose of deceiving the people....

 

Franz Drummond is making a mighty fine local paper ...
June 23, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2450)

Franz Drummond is making a mighty fine local paper of the Portis Patriot....

Old Purity of the Times is grumbling because people are calling at his office for something to drink; we always did claim that Purity's nose gave him dead away.

A stranger walked into our office yesterday and addressed us as Dougherty. His clothes now adorn the walls of this office, and the friends of the deceased can have them by calling and proving property. A man may call us all of the vile names he chooses, and we will raise no objections. But when he addresses us as the editor of the W.C.T.U. up the street, it is more than we can stand. We do not care to be mistaken for the vile, hypocritical quadruped that wipes his nose on his shirt-tail in the Times office.

 

John Vogler, who has been employed in this office ...
June 30, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2453)

John Vogler, who has been employed in this office for the past six months, left for Kansas City, Monday, where he has a position in a large wholesale store....

Purity through his Times would like to make it appear that we are making sport of the W.C.T.U. organization. We have the greatest amount of respect for the members of that organization, but have none for a lying hypocrite who would like to sail under its protection.

 

Knocked Out. Considerable excitement was caused on ...
July 7, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2455)

Knocked Out. Considerable excitement was caused on Tuesday evening by a report that Dougherty of the Times, and W. C. Roberts had a racket in the office of the former about eight o'clock, and that Dougherty had got the worst of the encounter. As near as we can learn, the facts are about as follows: Tuesday's issue of the Times contained the statement in regard to the altercation of last week between Roberts and Johnson, which did not at all please Bob and he called at the Times office on Tuesday evening and asked Dougherty to retract his statement "that whisky was the cause of the difficulty." This Dougherty refused to do, and Roberts knocked him down. On Wednesday morning, Roberts was brought before B. M. Remy, J.P., and plead guilty to the charge against him and was fined $15 and cost, amounting to $19, which he paid. Thus endeth the second chapter.

 

Purity as a Kicker. Old Purity, of the Times, is y ...
July 21, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2459)

Purity as a Kicker. Old Purity, of the Times, is yet harping on the "citizens ticket" matter. The ticket that he supported which was defeated by an overwhelming majority does not seem to satisfy him, and he attempts to make it appear that the voters who elected the present city council are now disgusted with themselves. Purity is an ass and is making himself appear ridiculous in the eyes of the average citizen of Downs. The people are well satisfied with the present mayor and council....

Communicated. Mr. Editor: Will you please allow a short explanation of the item "disappointed," published in your last number. Three country ladies did visit the mayor as company for a lady of your own town, who carried personal grievance to his ear, and made a plea for the protection of her home. We were, one and all, treated with perfect courtesy; the complaint that liquor was sold in town, contrary to law, was listened to with attention and sympathy. The mayor made no denial, but regretted that such was the case. You mistake in impressing your readers that the "building" suspected had to be pointed out to his honor. He assured us before going to the place that he had ordered it emptied of its unlawful stores, and closed, on the Saturday previous; to assure us that his orders had been obeyed, he accompanied us to and through the "Star Restaurant."...

 

Last Sunday, T. G. Nicklin of Whatcom, Washington ...
July 28, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2463)

Last Sunday, T. G. Nicklin of Whatcom, Washington Territory, formerly of Downs, was married to Miss Flora Axton of that place, formerly of Smith Center....

 

A Chronic Kicker. The editor of the Jamestown Kans ...
August 4, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2466)

A Chronic Kicker. The editor of the Jamestown Kansan tore his shirt in writing up our Anniversary. He seems to have had a severe case of bellyache, and in his ravings he pitches into Downs, and all because the reception committee failed to find his little shriveled up carcass....

Cranky Barnhart Explodes. "The Downs celebration was a grand success. The free beer was only an incident but it was no credit to anybody. It simply puts Downs forward as a law-breaking, law-defying community. People may go to such a town to see the elephant and have a big time, but when it comes to choosing a home, the best elements of society are likely to give her the go-by." -- Osborne Journal. The above we clip from F. H. Barnhart's paper of Osborne....He is a dirty, lying hypocrite, and the truth is not, nor never has been, in him....He is only the scum taken from a stinking cesspool, and is shunned by the better element of society of Osborne.

 

The Osborne Farmer gets quite indignant over what ...
August 11, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2470)

The Osborne Farmer gets quite indignant over what we said of the Osborne Journal blackguard last week. It might possibly be as well for the double-faced stinker of the Farmer to keep his nose out of the affair. The Farmer is not noted for its truthfulness, nor its editor for any large amount of intellect.

Franz Drummond, in his last issue, gives our anniversary several slurs, and one would imagine by reading the article that he was a thorough-fledged prohibitionist, but to those best acquainted with his record, that of a beer vat, cannot help smiling at his temperance palaver. Because he got drunk, he should not kick our anniversary in revenge.

 

How He Squirms. Purity of the Times is a remarkabl ...
August 18, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2475)

How He Squirms. Purity of the Times is a remarkable fellow to be always hearing reports on the streets about the Chief. Last week he "heard" one person remark that if the Chief published some of its articles in some towns, it would be run out of town. The fact is the Times man never heard any such remark made. It was hatched out of his shallow brain. It does make the Times man squirm to see the Chief taking the lead in the city. Squirm, you pated, brainless idiot; the time may come when you will begin to realize that your war on the town will not pay.

We wish to ask the people of Downs what they think of a newspaper that is continually running down this town; that never lets an opportunity pass to publish all unfavorable notices that are at times made through the papers in rival towns about our city?...

 

Touched Him on a Tender Spot. Last week's Portis P ...
August 25, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2479)

Touched Him on a Tender Spot. Last week's Portis Patriot, which is edited by an illiterate being, published a column for our special benefit. We don't blame him for being angry, but we do for coming to our city and being entertained by our people to the best of their ability and then on reaching home giving our town particular fits for it....

We are a little late with this issue of the Chief on account of being away in Kansas City three or four days. While there, we purchased a large amount of new material, and are now better prepared than ever to do good job printing.

"Walt Whitmore, the genial, wholesouled editor of the Downs Chief, made a business trip to this city last Saturday. Walt is giving the people of Downs a good paper and they seem to appreciate the fact." -- Smith Center Pioneer.

 

The Luray Headlight, Vol. 1, No. 1, Garner Bros. p ...
September 1, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2483)

The Luray Headlight, Vol. 1, No. 1, Garner Bros. publishers, has arrived at this office. It starts out with a good advertising patronage and we believe that the boys will make it win.

 

Disgraceful Proceedings. Osborne City held its ann ...
September 22, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2488)

Disgraceful Proceedings. Osborne City held its annual fair last week. It passed off with a free fight, wherein one to two hundred men participated in one of the most disgraceful fights that was ever known in the history of the state. We cannot learn how it started but when it was under way the officers of the law could not or did not quiet it....There were several fights in the city, where highway robbers ruled supreme. We have heard of several who were robbed while at the hotels, and the town was filled with drunken men and whisky and beer was as plenty as water....One party informed us that the drunken mobs held full sway....

Ben T. Baker, who has been connected with the Chief for the past year, will in about two weeks begin the publication of a paper at Harlan....We are sorry to lose Ben, as he is one of the best men we ever had in our office. We wish him success with his new Enterprise.

 

How He Squirms. Barnhart of the Osborne Journal sq ...
September 29, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2492)

How He Squirms. Barnhart of the Osborne Journal squirms like a scorched maggot in his last issue over what we stated in last week's issue of the Chief, concerning the state of affairs in Osborne during the fair. We gave him back a dose of medicine from his own prescription. Two months ago there was nothing too mean and dirty for him to publish about our anniversary.

 

Not a Fair Deal. The worm that publishes the Alton ...
October 27, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2499)

Not a Fair Deal. The worm that publishes the Alton Empire claims that the Republican nominees were fairly and honorably placed in nomination. If bulldozing will make a ticket, we suppose he is right....

Vol. 1, No. 1 of the Harlan Enterprise is a neat six-column folio, Ben T. Baker editor, is one of the latest newspaper ventures in the west. It is well patronized by the business men of Harlan, and should they continue to do what is right by Ben the Enterprise will be a great benefit to that town.

 

Dougherty Cracks the Whip. The Times refers to us ...
November 10, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2501)

Dougherty Cracks the Whip. The Times refers to us as a "What is it" in politics. To enlighten the poor, little withered up mortal, we will inform him that the Chief is independent in politics, but it has always been a mystery to us what the politics of the Times is. From reading his paper one would be at a loss to know....

The Sale of the Times. The Times of this city has been sold to R. W. Norwood, a young man from Illinois, who has already taken charge of the same. Geo. E. Dougherty, its former publisher, will remove to Topeka, where he will go into the job printing business. Mr. Norwood is a very pleasant appearing young man and we hope he will make the Times a success.

 

The first issue of the Times under the new managem ...
November 17, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2503)

The first issue of the Times under the new management presents a very neat appearance. Mr. Norwood is a young man of ability and having had years of experience in the business will give the people of Downs a paper that will be a real benefit to our young city. For years the Times has needed a man at the helm that had brains, one that thoroughly understood the business, and Mr. Norwood seems to fill the bill.

As Others Viewed It. "Last week's Downs Times contains the announcement of Geo. E. Dougherty, who has edited that paper for the past six years, that hereafter Ralph W. Norwood of Sterling, Illinois, will assume control. Dougherty has tried to make a good paper, but has either listened to bad advice or been too much of the opinion that his way was right and all others wrong. Evidently he has allowed himself to be governed by those individuals, found in every town, who imagine they wear wings and are consequently better than their neighbors; but who in reality are neither a help to any community or their fellow man. We hope the Times under the new management will gain friends and that it will assist in giving to Downs a better name than it now has abroad and which it really deserves. Downs is as moral as any other town of its size but its bad qualities have been advertised while its good ones have been overlooked." -- Smith Centre Pioneer.

 

Two Years in Downs. With this issue we close Vol. ...
November 24, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2505)

Two Years in Downs. With this issue we close Vol. 4 -- two years in this city. The first two volumes of the Chief being published in Smith County. We started in this city with a small paper and a small circulation. We have enlarged the Chief to an eight column folio, and our circulation has been doubled till now we run off an edition we are proud of.

 

Since Geo. Reed disposed of the Salem Argus, that ...
December 29, 1887, Downs Chief (ID 2507)

Since Geo. Reed disposed of the Salem Argus, that paper has become next to nothing. The new editor seems to know nothing about newspaper work, and had better sell out and quit the business.

Miss Mary Crum is now a compositor in this office, and we shall hereafter be on time. Miss Crum is a fast compositor and is worth a dozen of the printers we have had here in the past two months.

 

Rotten Railway Mail Service. Last week our bundle ...
January 12, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2510)

Rotten Railway Mail Service. Last week our bundle of Chiefs for Harlan failed to reach that place. They were mailed at the post office in Downs, and Postmaster Gardiner informs us that they were sent out from his office. The railway mail service on the Central Branch is mighty rotten and unreliable....

 

The Smith Center Daily Pioneer has been enlarged t ...
January 19, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2512)

The Smith Center Daily Pioneer has been enlarged to an eight page paper. There are no flies on the Pioneer.

The Harlan Enterprise will be discontinued this week for a period of three months for the reason that its publisher, Ben T. Baker, is losing money. After it is too late the people of Harlan will realize the loss of the Enterprise. Ben was giving the people of Harlan a better paper than they were giving him patronage.

 

Lew Headley of the Gaylord Herald, Mark J. Kelley ...
January 26, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2513)

Lew Headley of the Gaylord Herald, Mark J. Kelley of the Edmond Times, and H. N. Boyd of the Logan Freeman passed east Monday night.

 

Ben Baker, our old printer, and late editor of the ...
February 2, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2514)

Ben Baker, our old printer, and late editor of the Harlan Enterprise, will be found in this office for the next three months. Ben has a host of friends here who are glad to see him back again.

 

J. W. Huff and a representative of the Chief of th ...
February 9, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2516)

J. W. Huff and a representative of the Chief of this city took in the Northwest Kansas Immigration Association at Beloit, Tuesday and Wednesday.

Harry Root of the Champion; John Royce of the Smith Center Bulletin; Mark Kelley of the Edmond Times, and Mr. Davidson of the Hoxie Democrat passed down the road Monday to attend the immigration meeting at Beloit.

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Whitmore died last Sunday and was buried on Monday.

 

Editor Ruede of the Osborne Farmer passed down the ...
February 16, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2517)

Editor Ruede of the Osborne Farmer passed down the road Sunday on his way to Abilene.

The publisher of a newspaper has one thing to sell and one thing to rent. He has the newspaper to sell and the space in the columns to rent. Can anyone inform us why he should be expected to give away either the one or the other?...

 

T. G. Nicklin has bought the Whatcom (Washington T ...
March 8, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2519)

T. G. Nicklin has bought the Whatcom (Washington Territory) Reveille from W. D. Jenkins. Tom Nicklin is a good newspaper man and has a bright future before him. He has many friends here who are glad to hear of his prosperity.

 

J. W. McBride, late of the Cawker Journal, is now ...
March 15, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2520)

J. W. McBride, late of the Cawker Journal, is now connected with the Oberlin Eye. John is a good newspaper man and will assist in making the Eye brighter than ever.

 

Ralph Norwood, who has been conducting the Times o ...
March 22, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2522)

Ralph Norwood, who has been conducting the Times of this place under the false impression of being the owner, suddenly departed for his former home in Illinois last Saturday, having been here during the past four or five months. Mr. Norwood is apparently a nice young man, although we cannot wholly endorse the way he did it, he wrought a great and much needed improvement in the Times during the time he had charge of it.

 

Another Change. E. D. Craft bought out the Times l ...
March 29, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2524)

Another Change. E. D. Craft bought out the Times last week, and it will now be conducted by E. D. Craft & Son. The senior member of the firm has been a farmer in this vicinity for a number of years and thoroughly understands how to conduct a newspaper. The junior member, a boy of twelve, has had much experience in the printing business, having worked at the trade for over two months. It is a strong team and will undoubtedly keep the Times up to its past and present standard of popularity. We understand that they get out the first paper this week with the assistance of Geo. E. Dougherty, who will probably remain in their employ. Geo. having been at one time the publisher of the Times, will be remembered by many of our business men. We wish the new firm success.

 

The Harlan Enterprise has again been resurrected. ...
April 12, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2526)

The Harlan Enterprise has again been resurrected. Ben Thompson is the new proprietor. The paper presents a very good appearance, and will undoubtedly live a few months.

 

Martin Hoyt of the Stockton Eagle was a caller Mon ...
April 19, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2528)

Martin Hoyt of the Stockton Eagle was a caller Monday morning while on his way to Portis to look after the Patriot that he recently purchased. He informs us that he intends remaining at Stockton.

Jim Hafer, a printer of much experience, and well known throughout northern Kansas, dropped in on us last Friday. Jim has been laid up with the rheumatism all winter, is now just so to be about again....

 

Ben Baker, who has been working in this office for ...
May 3, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2529)

Ben Baker, who has been working in this office for the past three months, has left for pastures new. Mr. John Vedder, an experienced newspaper man and practical printer, takes his place.

 

J. H. Wright of the Lenora Leader was knocked down ...
May 10, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2530)

J. H. Wright of the Lenora Leader was knocked down and beaten by a young fellow named Biggs one day last week.

Al Baker and Ben Baker were over at Lucas last Friday. Ben thinks some of starting a paper there. If he should, the people of Lucas can rest assured that they will have a good one, for Ben is capable of getting up a first-class paper.

 

W. H. Whitmore, the editor of this paper, started ...
May 17, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2531)

W. H. Whitmore, the editor of this paper, started east yesterday for the Northern Kansas Immigration Association, to distribute advertising matter and will be gone about four weeks.

 

The editors were about as thick as potato bugs in ...
May 24, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2532)

The editors were about as thick as potato bugs in June at the depot in Downs Wednesday morning.

Master Quinn Craft went to Stockton Wednesday to represent the Times at the editorial convention.

Mrs. L. C. Smalley of Harlan, and a sister of the editor of this paper, arrived Saturday evening to pay her relatives a short visit.

 

Last week's Portis Patriot came to us chock full o ...
May 31, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2535)

Last week's Portis Patriot came to us chock full of local news, and glancing at its masthead we saw "Hoyt & Baker, editors and proprietors." This accounts for its brightness.

 

Floyd B. Irish, representing the Kansas Newspaper ...
June 7, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2538)

Floyd B. Irish, representing the Kansas Newspaper Union of Topeka, gave us a call Wednesday morning.

The Chief office received last week several fonts of job type of the latest style and has a practical job printer to handle them.

In a few weeks, the Chief will devote three or four columns in booming Osborne County and about 1,500 extra copies will be printed. Bring us in statistics of the growing crops, and help us make it a "boom" edition.

 

The Cawker City Journal came out last week with an ...
June 14, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2539)

The Cawker City Journal came out last week with an entire new dress but in a diminutive size as far as pages are concerned. The proprietors are contemplating putting in a power press. Topliff and Briggs of the Cawker Journal were in this city on Sunday. They were out for a drive.

 

Mrs. W. H. Wahl, wife of the mechanical man in the ...
June 21, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2541)

Mrs. W. H. Wahl, wife of the mechanical man in the Times office, arrived last Saturday night.

With this issue, the sub-editor of this paper, J. Vedder, lays away the scissors, hangs up the paste-pot and goes back to his usual vocation -- job printing.

We see by the Atchison (paper) that Ben Baker contemplates starting a paper in this city at an early day. This is another instance where an over-zealous young man with little experience and less money will get his eye teeth cut. But then he expects to fill a long felt want, and nothing less than some good wholesome experience will ever satisfy the gnawing at his fertile brain.

 

Democratic. For the past five years the Chief has ...
June 28, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2542)

Democratic. For the past five years the Chief has been an independent paper. From this issue on it will be found working for the best interests of Democracy, believing that party to be the people's party. The stand that the Democratic party has now taken on the tariff question is right and just and should be indorsed by every western producer and consumer, and as it meets our views to a letter, we cannot do otherwise than to hoist the names of Cleveland and Thurman at the head of our columns and work for their election.

 

The Salem Argus outfit has been moved to Mankato, ...
July 12, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2543)

The Salem Argus outfit has been moved to Mankato, where it will be hereafter issued under a new name.

E. B. Robinson called Tuesday and ordered the Chief discontinued because it is Democratic. It will be observed that the Chief is yet published.

The manipulators of the boycott should remember that, that weapon is a two-edged tool and when a blow is struck with it, it sometimes rebounds with redoubled force.

Subscriptions are rolling in rapidly. Now is the time to subscribe, as the campaign is now getting mighty warm and everybody should keep posted. Our subscription price is but $1.25.

S. E. Ruede, who has been one of the editors of the Osborne Farmer for the past four years, has gone to Marceline, Mo., where in connection with Geo. Dodge of Beloit will start a new paper.

 

There are some very peculiar people in this world. ...
July 19, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2544)

There are some very peculiar people in this world. The editor of the Times is such a rank prohibitionist that he will not advertise whisky, cider or tobacco for any merchant, but he indorses the Republican platform that declares for free whisky and tobacco.

 

The Stockton Eagle has suspended publication, owin ...
July 26, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2546)

The Stockton Eagle has suspended publication, owing to the fact that the proprietor, M. H. Hoyt, has turned over the outfit to a Downs bank on a mortgage they held against it. The material was moved Monday to Downs where Ben Baker will run a new paper. Some of our type, sold to Hoyt in 1886, was also taken away, much to our sorrow. Several other Stockton victims were left in the lurch by Hoyt. -- Stockton Record.

Mark J. Kelley of the Edmond Times was a caller at this wigwam last Friday while on his way to Beloit.

"The Downs Chief is being 'boycotted' by a few Republicans of Downs because it dares to assert its right to freedom of speech. Wonder if those same men ask customers who come into their stores as to their political belief, and refuse to accept their patronage if they are Democrats? They should, to be consistent, but they doubtless do not, as consistency is not a Republican trait. The Democrats of Downs, and, by the way, it is said that their ranks are rapidly increasing, should see to it that the Chief gets two new subscribers for every one lost in this way." -- Stockton Democrat.

Hoyt & Baker have moved the material here for starting a new paper and will get the first issue out on Saturday. There is yet room for one or two more papers in this city, as there should be a paper for each advertiser, and we hope they will come.

 

There were quite a number of editors present the 2 ...
August 2, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2549)

There were quite a number of editors present the 27th, among whom we observed W. L. Chambers of the Stockton Record; W. J. Eckman, Osborne Journal; Landis, Osborne Farmer; F. W. Frasius, Clyde Argus; N. F. Hewitt, Glen Elder Herald; Evans and King, Webster Enterprise; W. D. Gerard, Osborne News; Harry Root, Atchison Champion; H. C. Miller, Rooks County Democrat; representatives of the Kirwin Chief, Gaylord Herald, Phillipsburg Democrat; H. Barons, Cedarville Globe; F. Thompson, Harlan Enterprise; Briggs, Cawker Journal; Parks, Scottsville Independent; and others.

 

R. I. Palmer, editor of the Kirwin Chief, was marr ...
August 9, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2551)

R. I. Palmer, editor of the Kirwin Chief, was married last week to Miss Nellie Yonge, daughter of Mr. H. A. Yonge of Beloit.

 

Editor Briggs of the Cawker Journal was in the cit ...
August 16, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2553)

Editor Briggs of the Cawker Journal was in the city Tuesday taking in the sights of a live town, and the whisky trial.

We see that A. L. Topliff of the Cawker Journal is a candidate for the nomination for representative on the Republican ticket in Mitchell County. It is getting so that most anyone can be a candidate.

"The Kansas Newspaper Union at Topeka publishes a long article about a one-armed man who can set type. This is nothing new to us. We have but one arm, and yet, while we learned the trade since we lost our arm, we make a hand at the case and believe we can stick as much type in a day as any printer in the state. We always make up our forms and do all kind of job printing, even to running job presses. We have never mentioned this fact before and do not do it now to boast, but simply to show what disadvantages poverty compel a man to overcome." -- Mankato Jacksonian.

 

Mark Kelley of the Edmond Times was a caller at th ...
August 23, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2556)

Mark Kelley of the Edmond Times was a caller at the Chief wigwam Tuesday night while on his way to the Washington reunion.

John Vedder, who has been employed on this paper for the past four months, left last Sunday for Colby, where he has a situation on the Tribune.

 

Some half-baked clam in a communication to the Tim ...
September 13, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2559)

Some half-baked clam in a communication to the Times exposes that part of his anatomy that is hidden under his coat-tail, in stating that there were but 350 people present to hear John Martin (...candidate for governor) last Friday night, and that half of that number left the hall before the speaker was half through. The balance of his communication was as utterly false, and he is branded by all, both Democrats and Republicans, a liar or an idiot.

 

Fred Hulaniski is now one of the proprietors of th ...
October 4, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2564)

Fred Hulaniski is now one of the proprietors of the Wichita Commercial Bulletin, a neat five column folio.

In elevating the sponge (quitting) at Gridley, D. K. Swearingen said: "This is the last issue of the Gridley Gazette. As it is our funeral, we take the liberty to preach the sermon to suit our own taste. For over four months we have run behind from $10 to $15 per month, and have run out. Our two cows and a female calf have faded away to pay our paper bills, and we are without milk and in the hole. Our branch office has drawn on us for $12.67, and our last remittance was borrowed money, which has not yet been paid back. That's hell but it is the truth. Our grocery and meat bills, etc., have grown beautifully and majestically larger week after week, and while our creditors have our sympathy, which is cheerfully given, we are honest enough to confess that is about all they will get at present. It may seem strange to some, and our appearance may not seem to indicate it, yet it is a fact that newspaper men eat the same as other people, hence the above explanation for the benefit of our numerous victims. We pride ourself on our honesty and simplicity. It is no fault of our patrons, who have been as liberal and generous as their means would permit, but the fact is the business of the town won't support a paper. If there is a man in Kansas who can beat us rustling he is a dandy. We are a rustler from way back, but we can't rustle out a paper four weeks in every month at an expense of $20 to $25 on an income of about $5. We are not built that way. If anybody else wants to try it, the field is open."

 

A communication received this week from a farmer a ...
October 11, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2567)

A communication received this week from a farmer and taxpayer, after being set up, was accidentally pied by the devil, who also upset considerable other matter at the same time. This is the cause of our being late this week. The communication will appear next week.

A Damnable Conspiracy. In the past few days, there has come to light a damnable conspiracy worked up by a few Republicans in this city to crush the Chief, and all on account of the position it has taken in politics. A few weeks ago, when we hoisted the names of Cleveland and Thurman at the head of our columns, three or four half baked clams withdrew their patronage from our paper. This we expected from the soft shells who did it, so we were not at all surprised. But since the Democratic convention met at Osborne last Saturday, we have been given to understand by a prominent Republican that if we made a fight on B. M. Remy, or did not support him for probate judge, he would, along with many more Republican business men, withdraw their patronage from the Chief, in other words, they proposed to starve us out of the town unless we supported the Republican candidate. How is this for the boasted free country where men are allowed free speech and a fair ballot?...

 

The Osborne News is issuing a daily through the ca ...
October 18, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2570)

The Osborne News is issuing a daily through the campaign. It is a very interesting little paper.

One of our prominent business men thinks in our last issue we misquoted statements that he made to us concerning the boycott business. He claims that he did not say that he would withdraw his patronage, nor that he knew of business men who would....

In this week's Times there appeared a communication from one P. W. Kenyon, who jumps on our emaciated form and attempts to pulverize us by a harangue that is quite characteristic of a man of his caliber. We believe he resides in about five miles of this city, but to read his garbled mess one would be led to believe that he was a resident of Downs and that he owned the whole townsite. He kicks and snorts because the Chief is Democratic. Just what business is it to him, or why he sticks his nose into matters that does not concern him, we have no means of knowing....

 

W. H. Wahl, who has been with the Times of this ci ...
October 25, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2572)

W. H. Wahl, who has been with the Times of this city for the past six months, left Tuesday for Smith Centre, where he has a position on the Bulletin. Mr. Wahl is a first-class young man and a good printer -- none better in the country.

Grannie Craft of the Times evidently had a passage this week, as he got up enough courage to fling some slurs at the Chief. He belongs to that class of unfortunate individuals who are to be pitied, not abused. Poor Grannie.

 

Vol. 6, No. 1. With this issue, the Chief enters u ...
November 29, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2577)

Vol. 6, No. 1. With this issue, the Chief enters upon its sixth year -- the fourth in Downs. In the three years that we have been in Downs, we have endeavored to give our patrons as good a paper as times and support would admit. A majority of the business men have stood by the Chief well, for which they have our best wishes....

There is a certain renegade in this city who has beat us out of a hundred dollars, and we propose to get after him with a sharp stick, and our readers may look for some mighty interesting reading one of these days....We are now waiting for evidence that will make it so decidedly interesting for the dirty skunk that he will want to leave town.

Will Powell is through working on the Times.

 

Notwithstanding the dull times, our subscription l ...
December 13, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2578)

Notwithstanding the dull times, our subscription list is growing rapidly.

"The Downs Chief celebrated its 6th birthday last week. We congratulate the people of Downs on having one of the best papers in the country...."

-- Stockton Democrat.

We received many compliments from our citizens last Saturday for the extra edition we published on that morning, giving the latest news on the accidental shooting of the Charter boy. There are no insects on the Chief when it comes to enterprise.

"The Downs Chief is six years old, and has been changed from an 8 column folio to a 5 column quarto, which is a big improvement in the paper. We rejoice in your newspaper success, Bro. Whitmore, as much as we do in your political defeat a few weeks ago." -- Greenleaf Journal.

 

No Foolishness. In looking over our subscription b ...
December 20, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2580)

No Foolishness. In looking over our subscription book, we find many of our subscribers back on their account from one to five years....We must have our pay, and all of those subscribers who are owing from one to five years subscription must chalk up at once or their accounts will be placed in hands that will collect them....This is positively the last warning.

Owe the Printer. The following named people have refused the Chief at the post office or left the country without settling their dues -- a good start toward a dead-beat career, viz: John Harding, Smith Centre, $5.50; J. H. Frith, Gaylord, $3; J. W. Collins, Gaylord, $2.50; J. B. Cobaugh, Warwick, $3.75.

 

Will Hoyt, son of the publisher of the Portis Patr ...
December 27, 1888, Downs Chief (ID 2581)

Will Hoyt, son of the publisher of the Portis Patriot, shot himself through the hand with a revolver one day last week.

Clarence Newman, a compositor in this office, spent Christmas at his home in Cedarville.

We wish to thank the many readers of the Chief who have came to our relief in the past week by paying up their subscription accounts. We have yet several hundred subscribers who we would like to hear from....

Just as things were beginning to look mighty blue at our home this week, our flour barrel having been empty for several days, our grocer having shut down on us, and our last month's butcher's bill staring us in the face, and without a dollar to buy more or to square up old accounts, the dray drove up to our 8x12 mansion and left a sack of flour on our doorstep. Pinned to one side of it was a paper on which was inscribed, "compliments of Keeler & Son, Eagle Roller Mills, Harlan, Kansas." It is needless to say that we at once proceeded to mix a good share of it up with other ingredients and bake it.

Through the courtesy of H. Meibergen, the Chief family feasted on turkey and mince pies Christmas. Having discovered our lank and emaciated form was growing weaker as the days rolled by, he took pity on us and gladdened our hearts with the above described.

 

It has been said that bad luck never comes singly. ...
January 3, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2582)

It has been said that bad luck never comes singly. It was true in our case last week. On Friday morning, just as we were making up our forms to go to press, we knocked into pi a column of type. It then took the balance of the day to reset it, and had just got the forms made up on Friday night, all ready to go to press early Saturday morning, when the bursting of the water pipe above us in the bank, our office was flooded with water and our forms soaked, which took us 'till Saturday afternoon to dry out so that we could print our paper.

 

Owe the Printer. The following-named people have r ...
January 17, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2587)

Owe the Printer. The following-named people have refused their Chief at the post office or left the country without settling their dues -- a good start toward a dead-beat career, viz: John Harding, Smith Centre, $5.50; J. H. Frith, Gaylord, $3.00; J. W. Collins, Gaylord, $2.50; J. B. Cobaugh, Warwick, $3.75.

 

That putrid old afterbirth that edits the Osborne ...
January 31, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2590)

That putrid old afterbirth that edits the Osborne Journal is again exposing to public view that part of his anatomy usually covered by his coat tail. Just why he should heap all of his abuse upon the good people of Downs is a mystery. The poor old creature dies hard.

This week we print 400 extra copies of the Chief and shall continue to for the next month.

 

Col. Mark J. Kelley, editor of the Edmond Times, i ...
February 14, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2592)

Col. Mark J. Kelley, editor of the Edmond Times, is out as a candidate for the position of junior vice-department commander of Kansas. He enlisted in 1861 and was mustered out in 1866, having suffered the tortures of Libby prison on part of the time. He has lived in northern and northwestern Kansas for 21 years and is an enthusiastic GAR man....Northwestern Kansas has had no recognition at the hands of the department and there seems to be no reason why Col. Kelley's election cannot be confidently predicted. -- Kansas City News.

A Pen Picture. Last week the Osborne News devotes much space to our credit and attempts to "do us up" by calling us all the vile names that is usually used in that office. Such pet names as "drunkard," "whisky soaked villain" and even intimated that we are a slave. It is hardly proper to pay any attention to the illiterate nonentity that pretends to publish that sheet and his man Friday who does the writing for the paper, as we have heretofore made it a practice that when meeting a skunk to always give him the right of way. It comes with poor grace from a man who is known to be a habitual drunkard, a lousy, dirty sneak and cut throat, to attack another man's character, as the thing that presides over the News has done oft times before....

 

Sam Rea of Cedarville, a typo, passed down the roa ...
February 21, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2593)

Sam Rea of Cedarville, a typo, passed down the road Monday night for Glen Elder, where he will pound pewter on the Herald.

 

Vol. 1, No. 1 of the Kansas City Sun, F. J. Hulani ...
March 14, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2596)

Vol. 1, No. 1 of the Kansas City Sun, F. J. Hulaniski, editor, is before us. It is a neat five column, eight page paper published in the interests of agriculture, religion and Hulaniski.

Ed Rust, who has been visiting his parents in this city...,took the train Sunday morning for Colorado, where he has a position on a paper at Ouray.

 

Our meek, and at present, very lowly friend Mr. Cr ...
April 4, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2598)

Our meek, and at present, very lowly friend Mr. Craft, made a speech nominating Andrew Jackson as chairman of the caucus on last Saturday evening which will probably go down to history as the greatest specimen of oratory ever expounded in Kansas. In that expressive falsetto voice of his which sounds like a cross between a screech owl and a belated cat, he informed the breathless multitude that "he was glad he didn't live in Osborne. He was glad he didn't live in Cawker, but he was glad that he lived in Downs." The good citizens of our neighboring towns are certainly heartily in accord with Mr. Craft in his declarations.

 

Phillips & Matthews have bought the Portis Patriot ...
April 11, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2600)

Phillips & Matthews have bought the Portis Patriot. Frank J. Mathew is editor....Mr. Hoyt, the former proprietor, goes to Hastings, Nebraska, to start a German paper.

Harry Root of the Atchison Champion was in the city Monday....He does more for northwest Kansas than all of the balance of the daily newspapers in the state.

 

D. E. Cole, editor of the Woodston Register, has s ...
April 25, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2601)

D. E. Cole, editor of the Woodston Register, has sold his paper to W. L. Mackentire....

From the National Journalist of Chicago, we see that Ralph Norwood, who was publisher of the Times in this city a year ago, is now a compositor and also a director of the National.

 

Fred Hulaniski, editor of the Kansas City Sun, was ...
May 9, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2609)

Fred Hulaniski, editor of the Kansas City Sun, was in the city Monday night. He at one time published the Saturday Evening Lamp in this city, and is well known to our people.

 

G. W. McNeice has resurrected the Salem Argus and ...
June 27, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2619)

G. W. McNeice has resurrected the Salem Argus and comes out last week in flying colors. Salem might be a good town to die in, but not a very good field for a newspaper.

 

H. T. Miller's Rooks County Democrat is no more. T ...
July 11, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2621)

H. T. Miller's Rooks County Democrat is no more. The last issue was published last week. H. T. Miller is a good newspaper man and made the Democrat one of the best papers in northern Kansas, but the partial failure of crops last year and the entire failure two years ago was the cause of the downfall of the Democrat. Mr. Miller will go to the Indian Territory with the material and open up in a new town.

 

The Gaylord Herald was awarded the county printing ...
July 18, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2622)

The Gaylord Herald was awarded the county printing of Smith county last week free of cost. Its editor gave $5 for the privilege.

 

The Agra Graphic will be moved to Kirwin this week ...
August 1, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2625)

The Agra Graphic will be moved to Kirwin this week. Kirwin is in need of a first-class paper but the present proprietors of the Graphic can never fill the bill.

The Gaylord Herald has been enlarged to a six-column quarto. The Herald is one of the best papers in Smith County, or for that matter in western Kansas, and its editor, Lew Headley, is a first-class man, and we are pleased to know that he is prospering.

 

The Times of this city issued a very creditable sh ...
August 8, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2626)

The Times of this city issued a very creditable sheet last week. It gave a good write-up of a majority of the business men of the city and a good sendoff for our town.

We are pleased to see the Cawker Times taking so much interest in our city. Last week the Times mentioned Downs in 14 different places.

The Territorial Topic of Purcell, Indian Territory, by Pierson & Miller, reached this office this week. It is an eight column folio....Miller...is the same Henry Miller that was the editor of the Stockton Democrat until recently.

"The Downs Anniversary....Editors Whitmore, Baker and Craft were at every train to receive the ever-present demander of past-due subscriptions and kindly furnished us with entertainment at the commodious Howell House, and otherwise made us feel that we were indeed the guests of the city...." -- Smith Centre Bulletin.

 

The Jacksonian of Mankato...is stirring the animal ...
August 15, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2628)

The Jacksonian of Mankato...is stirring the animals up in that county. The Jacksonian has been making charges of crookedness in the management of the county affairs by the Republicans of that county, and the commissioners appointed three men to investigate....Brother Reed is after them with a sharp stick.

 

We see by the Kirwin Chief that Billy Gray will so ...
August 29, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2631)

We see by the Kirwin Chief that Billy Gray will soon begin the publication of a newspaper in that town....

"Clarence Newman, a typo in the Downs Chief office,...will stay and enjoy the pleasures of the Farmers Reunion next Friday and Saturday." -- Wilson Echo.

 

Farmers Read This. To the farmer bringing us the b ...
October 17, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2638)

Farmers Read This. To the farmer bringing us the best bushel of potatoes we will give the Chief one year. For the best bushel of corn in ears the Chief six months. For the best 1/2 bushel winter wheat the Chief one year....

Clarence Newman, who has been a compositor in this office for the past year, left for Alton last Saturday, where he has a situation on the Empire....

C. Bogart, editor of the Lenora Record, was married a few days ago. It is to be hoped that his wife will give him a few pointers in the manner of conducting a paper, for instance how a "form" should properly be "adjusted," "locked up" and put on the "bed" to "press," the right "impression" to put on, and that the "roller" is not allowed to get hard and dry, nor the "sheets" to get too "wet" to "work," and hundreds of similar things about the Record print shop that has been neglected in the past. This gentle hint is gratis, but it is to be hoped that it will be heeded.

 

Fred Hulaniski has taken charge of the Glen Elder ...
October 24, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2640)

Fred Hulaniski has taken charge of the Glen Elder Herald, Hewitt, its former editor, on account of ill health, having to give it up. Fred will give the people of that place a good paper if they in turn give him the proper support.

M. H. Hoyt is again editor of the Portis Patriot. He says that he shall endeavor to treat all alike in his business transactions. We believe that is what he attempted to do last spring when the county seat removal racket was at its height.

 

The Cawker Times and Record are having it hot, wit ...
October 31, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2642)

The Cawker Times and Record are having it hot, with the Times about half way around the ring in advance. McBride is showing up that old heathen hypocrite in about the right shape. Go in Mc. and leave not one thing undone in showing him up in the right light.

We want chickens, turnips, cabbage, potatoes, corn, butter, and eggs on subscription. All these things we have to buy, and as there are from two to three hundred farmers owning us on subscription, we think it no more than right for them to bring us in some of the above articles.

 

T. Lutz brought us in 20 head of fine cabbage Tues ...
November 7, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2643)

T. Lutz brought us in 20 head of fine cabbage Tuesday. He is one of Osborne County's best farmers and always remembers the printer.

Vol. 1, No. 1 of the Formoso Times, Frank Coffey editor, reaches this office. It is a neat five-column folio, and well patronized.

W. E. Clark has the thanks of this office for a bushel of potatoes and some fine onions....G. H. Frush brought us in a nice lot of potatoes and onions Tuesday. Farmers find it an easy way to pay for their paper.

For the past month or more, we have been offering premiums....J. G. Goheen gets the Chief for one year for the finest bushel of potatoes and Daniel Shook the Chief for six months for the best bushel of corn.

 

Corn Wanted. At once, 1,000 bushels of corn at thi ...
November 14, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2645)

Corn Wanted. At once, 1,000 bushels of corn at this office. Farmers who are indebted to us on subscription can pay the same in corn, and we will allow them 17 cents per bushel for good corn if brought in at once.

Vol. 1, No. 1 of the Kirwin Independent is received. Gray, Landes & Son are the editors and publishers. It is a neat six column quarto, and is well patronized....

 

The Graphic and Chief of Kirwin have consolidated. ...
November 21, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2647)

The Graphic and Chief of Kirwin have consolidated. A very wise move for both papers as the two together will no more than make one good paper.

V. Hutchings has bought a half interest in the Pioneer. We understand that Mr. Hutchings is a newspaper man, and between the two they should make a good paper of the Pioneer.

 

The farmer who brings us in a good fat turkey for ...
November 28, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2649)

The farmer who brings us in a good fat turkey for Christmas can get the Chief one year.

J. N. Beacom, postmaster and editor of the Pioneer at Smith Centre, was in the city today....

Vol. 7, No. 1. With this issue the Chief enters upon its seventh year -- its fifth in Downs....We started in a small paper, a much smaller subscription list, and having an old established paper to combat with it was no small undertaking....Owing to the hard times, we have decided to put the price of the Chief down to $1 a year to those who pay in advance, otherwise it will be $1.25.

 

Harry Root of the Atchison Champion was in the cit ...
December 26, 1889, Downs Chief (ID 2652)

Harry Root of the Atchison Champion was in the city Tuesday in the interests of that paper. Harry is doing good work for the Champion and at the same time gives northwest Kansas some good write-ups.

The Journal, the new paper at Lebanon, reaches our office this week. It is a six column folio and presents a very good appearance. J. A. Wright is editor and proprietor. It is in favor of tariff reforms. We wish it success.

 

The day before Christmas, Joe Boomer, one of our p ...
January 2, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2655)

The day before Christmas, Joe Boomer, one of our prosperous farmer friends, brought us in a fine dressed turkey. Not to be outdone by her husband, Mrs. Boomer, on New Year's morning, presented us with a fine fat turkey. To Mr. and Mrs. Boomer we return our thanks.

 

H. A. Yonge has sold his Beloit Democrat to Parks ...
January 9, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2657)

H. A. Yonge has sold his Beloit Democrat to Parks & Son....

We wish to apologize to our readers for the horrible printing we have been doing on the Chief since cold weather set in. Our summer roller would not work in cold weather, but we have a new roller now, and as you see by this week's paper, the printing is clear and nice.

 

The earmarks of A. L. Topliff's writings is visibl ...
January 16, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2659)

The earmarks of A. L. Topliff's writings is visible in the Osborne News of late. He is bringing that paper out of the woods.

 

M. H. Hoyt has sold his Portis Patriot to E. R. Po ...
January 23, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2661)

M. H. Hoyt has sold his Portis Patriot to E. R. Powell of Osborne.

 

There appeared in the Chief of last week an articl ...
January 30, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2665)

There appeared in the Chief of last week an article that seemed to fit one J. B. Craney so nicely that he put it on and wore it. He even took the trouble to go into print, and came out in the Globe admitting the fact that he was the man that we were alluding to. Not content with that, he even accosted us on the street, using the vilest language that could emanate from a diseased brain, and pour forth from the lips of a foul mouthed man. We do not care to have much of a controversy with him as our space is too valuable to devote to such inferior beings, but inasmuch as he wants to force a quarrel with us we will try and accommodate him whenever we are not too busy turning out job work to people who believe in patronizing home, and in getting out the Chief, the only reliable Democratic paper in this neck of the woods....We wish to warn him right here that a repetition of his slander and blackguardism on us of last Saturday will cause him to appear before the proper magistrate of this city....

 

A Western editor announces that, unless delinquent ...
February 6, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2667)

A Western editor announces that, unless delinquent subscribers pay up more promptly, he will be obliged not only to run a "patent inside" but also secure patent insides for his wife and children.

 

C. E. Anderson is now sole proprietor of the Kirwi ...
February 13, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2668)

C. E. Anderson is now sole proprietor of the Kirwin Chief, having bought out his former partner's interests in the paper.

 

J. R. Lane, formerly of the Kirwin Chief, but now ...
February 20, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2671)

J. R. Lane, formerly of the Kirwin Chief, but now traveling agent for the Leavenworth Times, was in the city last Saturday.

 

C. D. Newman is now working on the Times in this c ...
March 6, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2674)

C. D. Newman is now working on the Times in this city.

Last Saturday, the Globe of this city changed hands, Ben Baker turning over the office to Martin Hoyt of Portis. About one year and a half ago, Ben Baker started the paper here for the avowed purpose of "downing the Chief," as he stated to his friends. For one year and a half he worked zealously to accomplish his object, but to no purpose, and with a gasp and a vigorous kick he threw up the sponge. No one persuaded him to come here with the paper and no one seemed to care when he left. He has probably learned some valuable things in his short career here, one of them being that he could not build himself up by attempting to tear others down. He has gone and we hope that wherever he goes he will have as good success as he has had in Downs.

Last Saturday, Martin Hoyt of Portis assumed charge of the Globe of this city. Mr. Hoyt is a well known newspaper man of this country and is no stranger to our people. If there was any call for a third paper here, we would wish him success, but as our city is far too small for three papers we believe that it is a poor business policy to attempt to run it here. Downs will support two papers, Republican and Democratic, and give the publishers a chance to prosper, but the third paper, from past experience, makes three poorly supported papers and holds their publishers down to bed rock, where none of them can ever expect to make a dollar. If there was a field here for a third paper, we would raise no objections.

 

J. A. Forline made us a present of a fine pocket-b ...
March 13, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2677)

J. A. Forline made us a present of a fine pocket-book this morning, and now if a host of delinquent subscribers will call and do what is square, we will have some use for it.

W. D. Gerard of the Osborne News was in the city Monday after his job printing press that Ben Baker had been using for the past year or more. He took the press home with him.

J. W. McBride, editor of the Cawker Times, was in the city yesterday and left his order with Hoheisel, the tailor, for a suit of clothes. The people of Cawker know where to go when they want a fine fitting suit of clothes....

 

The "temperance" ticket that was nominated in the ...
March 20, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2680)

The "temperance" ticket that was nominated in the Methodist church last week by a select few, headed by Rev. E. D. Craft of the Times, does not seem to thrive as a thrifty plant should. As we predicted, G. H. Skinner refuses to allow his name to be used in connection with it, as also John Pugh, John Jackson and Ace Dillon. Rev. Craft has heretofore been considered a very shrewd politician, along with his preaching and newspaper work, and we are somewhat grieved to know that his scheme to run the city affairs has turned out as it has....

 

At Osborne yesterday, the commissioners awarded th ...
April 10, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2686)

At Osborne yesterday, the commissioners awarded the county printing to the Downs Times and Osborne Farmer at half legal rates, and designating the Times as the official paper. The Osborne News, Downs Chief, Alton Empire, Portis Patriot and Downs Globe put in a bid to do the printing at legal rates but were defeated.

 

Fred Hulaniski, editor of the Glen Elder Herald,.. ...
April 16, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2688)

Fred Hulaniski, editor of the Glen Elder Herald,...is giving the people of Glen Elder a live paper.

The editor of the Portis Patriot has changed the name of his paper to the Whisperer.

W. D. Covington of the Phillipsburg Democrat, George Reed of the Mankato Jacksonian, John Parks of the Beloit Democratic, and W. D. Gerard of the Osborne News, all Democratic editors, were in the city Monday attending the Democratic congressional committee meeting.

 

Ferd Prince of Cawker was in the city Monday helpi ...
April 24, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2690)

Ferd Prince of Cawker was in the city Monday helping the Times people.

Arch Collins is now setting type in this office, having given up his trip to Denver.

 

The Kansas Herald of Glen Elder, the organ of the ...
May 1, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2693)

The Kansas Herald of Glen Elder, the organ of the Farmers' Alliance of Northwest Kansas, says in its last issue: Jewell County held a rousing big meeting at Mankato last week at which over 30 subordinate Alliances were represented....

 

The Portis Whisperer will be printed but twice a m ...
May 8, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2696)

The Portis Whisperer will be printed but twice a month hereafter. That is about two too many times.

 

While absent for a few days, we have left this off ...
May 15, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2698)

While absent for a few days, we have left this office in charge of our printer, Arch Collins. He will be the author of all the meanness found in the paper next week, will receive corn and bacon on subscriptions the same as we usually do....

The editor and proprietor of this paper put on a clean collar, packed his grip with an original package and left on this morning's train for Mankato to attend the meeting of the Northwest Kansas Editorial Association, and will go on the excursion over the Santa Fe to Galveston, Texas.

The Trade Journal is the new paper at Beloit. It is a seven column folio, full of local news....Owen & Houghton are its editors.

 

The Globe of this city failed to put in an appeara ...
May 22, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2700)

The Globe of this city failed to put in an appearance last week. It is rumored that there will be a private burial of that office soon.

 

The Kirwin Chief has again made its semi-annual ch ...
June 5, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2702)

The Kirwin Chief has again made its semi-annual change of proprietors. Anna E. Lane is the last victim to enter upon the difficult task of keeping it alive for the next six months, or less....

 

Tom Cordry has sold his Republican County Press to ...
June 12, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2704)

Tom Cordry has sold his Republican County Press to A. B. Wilder, a very able newspaper man.

The Kirwin Chief has again changed hands. C. Borin now claims to be proprietor, and C. E. Anderson manager.

Hulaniski is giving the people of Glen Elder a good paper and in return they are giving his Herald a liberal support.

Mart Hoyt came down from Portis Tuesday and moved the remains of the Globe to that place, where he will pack it away for future use.

The Downs Globe, after a hard struggle of nearly two years to keep afloat in this city, gave a long gasp and fell over and died last week. In that short period it had many editors, proprietors and hired help to keep it on its legs, but of no avail. The poor thing was never a healthy child, having been born in the wrong time of the moon and fathered by a diseased parent in the start and poorly nursed all through its short career....

 

W. H. Caldwell, editor of the Beloit Courier, has ...
June 19, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2706)

W. H. Caldwell, editor of the Beloit Courier, has been appointed receiver of the Kirwin land office. Glad to hear it.

The Farmers Advance of Norton has been made the official organ of the Farmers' Alliance of the sixth congressional district. This is Jim Garner's paper.

One of the most idiotic things that has come under our observation in a long time is a set of resolutions passed by Mount Ayer Alliance in Smith County recently, wherein they resolved to boycott the Smith Centre Bulletin....While that paper is a rank Republican sheet, we observe that it has spoken none but kind words for the Alliance people, and can be found every week in the year fighting for the rights of the farmer....

 

Al Sears, for many years connected with the Beloit ...
June 26, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2709)

Al Sears, for many years connected with the Beloit Gazette, is now a mail agent between Atchison and Stockton....

Mart Hoyt has started the second paper at Portis, called the Globe. It appears that people of Portis do not take kindly to the new enterprise, as we could not discover a Portis advertisement in it.

 

A Daily Paper. July 25th and 26th, this office wil ...
July 3, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2712)

A Daily Paper. July 25th and 26th, this office will issue a daily paper, The Downs Daily Chief. There will be several thousand copies issued, containing a history of our city, program, and news of the two days....

 

It is rumored that John Q. Royce, publisher of the ...
July 10, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2714)

It is rumored that John Q. Royce, publisher of the Smith Centre Bulletin, has sold his paper and bought an interest in the Arkansas City Traveler, a daily paper....The Bulletin will be consolidated with the Pioneer....

 

From the Gaylord Herald we learn that By. J. Thomp ...
July 17, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2717)

From the Gaylord Herald we learn that By. J. Thompson, editor of the Lebanon Criterion, died very suddenly last week from an overdose of morphine. He was one of the oldest newspaper men in northern Kansas, was a good man, and will be greatly missed by the fraternity.

 

We see by the daily papers that the Smith Centre B ...
July 24, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2718)

We see by the daily papers that the Smith Centre Bulletin and Pioneer have been consolidated. This we consider a wise move. Smith Centre has no use for two Republican papers.

Frank Thompson of Harlan is helping us out this week on the weekly Chief, and will on the daily Friday and Saturday.

 

To Our Subscribers. Having sold the Chief to the C ...
August 7, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2723)

To Our Subscribers. Having sold the Chief to the Chief Publishing Company, and having reserved the subscription books, I request every subscriber knowing himself indebted to us to call and settle his account at once, as we are in need of it....W. H. Whitmore.

W. D. Covington has sold his Phillipsburg Democrat to F. S. Brong. We are sorry to see Capt. Covington go out of the newspaper business....

 

The Clipper, the new Stockton paper, reaches our t ...
August 14, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2725)

The Clipper, the new Stockton paper, reaches our table this week. It is a five column quarto and presents a fair appearance. Stockton has about as much use for another paper as a farmer would have use for an elephant. If the new paper man can live on promises and sand dust, he will pull through.

 

We understand that both Portis papers, the Whisper ...
August 21, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2727)

We understand that both Portis papers, the Whisperer and the Globe, have ceased to exist.

The Beloit Trade Journal has been leased to Seward and Baker.

 

C. J. Lamb of Kirwin was in the city last Thursday ...
August 28, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2729)

C. J. Lamb of Kirwin was in the city last Thursday night. For several years he was editor of the Kirwin Independent, but is now interested in a colony down in Mexico....In November he takes a colony of people from this state to that country.

 

Dan Brown, mayor of Concordia, one day last week w ...
September 4, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2731)

Dan Brown, mayor of Concordia, one day last week walked into the Daylight newspaper office and with the aid of a shotgun compelled Mark Woodruff, the editor, to retract a certain article that appeared the week before. Mark has purchased a gun and proposes to use it if Brown ever makes his appearance in his office again.

Vol. 1, No. 1 of the Stockton Observer is before us. L. B. Powell is its editor, and it will be run in the interest of the Alliance of that county. It is a hummer, and make no mistake. Its editor bears the earmarks of an able writer....

 

The Beloit Democrat says in its last issue that Wa ...
September 11, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2733)

The Beloit Democrat says in its last issue that Walt Whitmore of the Downs Times was in the city, etc. Now look here, John Parks, what have we ever said about you that you should have it in for us? Call us a liar, hypocrite, horse thief or any other pet name, but never accuse us of being connected with the Downs Times.

The Beloit Trade Journal flies at us like a wet cat. This we could not at first understand, but in glancing at the head of the paper we discovered the name of "James T. Hicks, associate editor and business manager." Hicks will be remembered by our people as the very obnoxious whiffet that strutted about the streets of our city last spring and made himself the laughing stock of the town.

He attempted to form a singing class or something of the sort, and made a failure of it....

 

A. L. Topliff of Cawker and E. R. Powell of Portis ...
September 18, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2734)

A. L. Topliff of Cawker and E. R. Powell of Portis will leave this week for Payson, Utah, where they will begin the publication of a paper.

 

John Royce has sold his interest in the Smith Cent ...
September 25, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2736)

John Royce has sold his interest in the Smith Centre Pioneer to W. H. Nelson. Beacom & Nelson will give the people of Smith Centre a good live paper.

The Herndon Courant published a notice of the finding of a package containing a pint of alcohol, two cigars and some crackers, adding that the owner can have the crackers by applying at that office.

 

The Glen Elder Herald that pretended to be such a ...
October 2, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2738)

The Glen Elder Herald that pretended to be such a rampant Alliance paper the past summer has taken a flap and now hoists the Republican ticket. Anyone who is acquainted with its editor, Hulaniski, will not be at all surprised at this move.

 

H. N. Boyd, who has been editor and publisher of t ...
October 9, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2740)

H. N. Boyd, who has been editor and publisher of the Freeman at Logan for several years, has moved the paper to Belleville, where he will continue the publication of an Alliance paper....He is a first-class newspaper man and the Alliance of Republic County are to be congratulated upon securing so able a man....

 

Democratic Mass Meeting. The Democrats of Osborne ...
October 30, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2742)

Democratic Mass Meeting. The Democrats of Osborne County met in mass convention at Osborne Saturday, Oct. 25, 1890....J. H. Lipton was elected chairman, and George E. Cragin secretary. On motion, George E. Cragin was elected chairman of the county Central Committee and W. H. Whitmore secretary....

 

W. H. Caldwell, editor of the Beloit Courier, pass ...
November 13, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2745)

W. H. Caldwell, editor of the Beloit Courier, passed up the road Tuesday morning on his way for Kirwin, where he will take the position of receiver at the land office at that place.

 

Owing to the recent deaths in the editor's family, ...
November 20, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2747)

Owing to the recent deaths in the editor's family, the Chief office has been abandoned, thus making the paper late.

Died: In this city, Thursday, Nov. 20th, of heart disease, Mrs. Mary A. Whitmore, aged 72 years. The funeral took place at Harlan Friday, Nov. 21. Obituary next week.

Mrs. W. H. Whitmore, wife of the editor of the Chief, died at her home in this city on Wednesday, 19th inst., at 11:00 o'clock a.m. of consumption. Obituary will appear next week.

 

The Cedarville Globe has suspended. Mr. Barron was ...
December 4, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2750)

The Cedarville Globe has suspended. Mr. Barron was giving the Cedarville people a good paper, but the town is too small to support as able a man as Sandy Barron.

 

This office is under obligations to G. H. Frush fo ...
December 11, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2752)

This office is under obligations to G. H. Frush for a fine jack rabbit.

Wanted -- Lard, eggs, wood and cash on subscription. For further information as to how bad we need the same, call at this office.

 

It is reported that some lunatic is about to start ...
December 18, 1890, Downs Chief (ID 2753)

It is reported that some lunatic is about to start the third paper in Osborne. The only consolation we can offer the individual is that his life will be short, and his misery of a shorter duration.

A. L. Topliff of Cawker, who went out to Payson, Utah, with Powell of Portis, and started a paper, returned yesterday. He speaks in high terms of Utah, and will probably return to that country in the spring. He has a good situation in Lincoln, Nebraska, for the winter.

 

It is reported that W. D. Jenkins, for many years ...
January 1, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2756)

It is reported that W. D. Jenkins, for many years publisher of the Smith Centre Pioneer, but now of Whatcom, Washington, is a very rich man, as is also Tom Nicklin, formerly of this city.

 

Clarence Newman, our typo, is laid up this week wi ...
January 15, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2758)

Clarence Newman, our typo, is laid up this week with a good dose of mumps....

 

Removed. After this issue of the Chief, our custom ...
February 5, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2760)

Removed. After this issue of the Chief, our customers will find us in the building first door south of Rinehart's barber shop on South Morgan Avenue. Come in and see us in our new location. We will as ever be prepared to do all kinds of plain and ornamental job printing in first class shape and at the lowest living prices. "Drap" into our den.

Allen DeLay is learning to stick type in the Times office.

John McBride of the Cawker Times will leave soon for Boise City, Idaho, where he expects to begin the publication of a paper. John is a number one newspaper man and can give the people a pointer on getting up a paper.

 

We learn that A. L. Topliff is doing editorial wor ...
February 12, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2762)

We learn that A. L. Topliff is doing editorial work on a daily paper at Lincoln, Neb.

We no longer have to employ a man to wheel in sunshine, since we have moved the den, as our office room has a glass front.

 

W. H. Wahl is giving the people of Lebanon a good ...
February 19, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2764)

W. H. Wahl is giving the people of Lebanon a good paper. Wahl is a good printer and a good writer and the people of that city should give him a good support.

 

In any just view of a quarter of a century of jour ...
March 5, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2766)

In any just view of a quarter of a century of journalistic work, the most prominent feature, and one giving great satisfaction to respectable publishers, is that printing a newspaper has become recognized as a business and not a charity.

 

The Kirwin Chief, we learn, has been consolidated ...
March 19, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2767)

The Kirwin Chief, we learn, has been consolidated with the Independent. Kirwin has no use for two papers, and this was a wise move on the part of Lane. Landis & Son are publishing a first-class paper for the Kirwinites and the business men of that city should see that no other paper is started there for at least two years.

W. D. Covington has sold his interest in the Purcell (I.T.) Topic to his partner, H. T. Miller.

The editor of the Long Island (Kansas) Inter-ocean has suspended publication for three months in order that he may take a long-needed rest.

 

Lew Headley, editor of the Herald and postmaster o ...
April 16, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2770)

Lew Headley, editor of the Herald and postmaster of Gaylord, was elected mayor of that place last week. Lew contemplates running for justice of the peace and police judge. Without Lew Headley, Gaylord would be a very dreary place to spend one's time in.

 

Last week, the county commissioners awarded the co ...
April 23, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2772)

Last week, the county commissioners awarded the county printing to the Osborne Farmer, Downs Times and Alton Empire at half legal rates. The News put in a bid of 25 percent. In other counties the county clerk notifies publishers that bids will be received for county printing. In this county they do not.

 

At the temperance meeting Sunday night at the Meth ...
May 7, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2775)

At the temperance meeting Sunday night at the Methodist Church, E. D. Craft, editor of the Times and a milk dispenser, aired himself upon that question, and did not fail to grossly insult many of the ladies of Downs who had seen fit to sign a petition for handling liquors. He went so far as to say that some of the ladies who did sign the petition were there in church that night, and that some of them were so depraved they could not write their own names. It was a pity that there was not someone in the audience who had the nerve to have kicked him into the middle of the street. We know of many ladies in Downs who have signed druggists petitions who are far more respectable than brother Craft....

 

The Lebanon Criterion, under the editorial managem ...
May 14, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2776)

The Lebanon Criterion, under the editorial management of Geo. McNeice, has lost none of its former good qualities....

 

John Sullivan is at Glen Elder working on the Sent ...
June 11, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2779)

John Sullivan is at Glen Elder working on the Sentinel.

The Solomon Valley Democrat at Minneapolis will hereafter cease to visit its subscribers, the material having been sold.

 

Our Premiums. To the person bringing us the best p ...
June 25, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2782)

Our Premiums. To the person bringing us the best peck of winter wheat we will give the Chief for one year. For the best half bushel of potatoes, the Chief one year. For the best watermelon the Chief six months. To the boy getting us 25 cash subscribers for one year, a riding saddle worth $9. To the young girl getting us a club of 25 cash subscribers for one year each, a ladies riding saddle worth $9. To the person getting us a club of 100 cash subscribers for one year, a sewing machine worth $45. To the person getting us 50 cash yearly subscribers will give a saddle worth $15 or a harness worth the same, or a suit of clothes worth the same.

 

The Times this morning states a rank falsehood whe ...
July 16, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2787)

The Times this morning states a rank falsehood when it says we have sold the Chief, and the infant puppy knew it to be when he wrote it. However, as they do not pretend to speak the truth of late, but few will pay any attention to it.

 

Here is an item that ought to discourage newspaper ...
July 23, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2789)

Here is an item that ought to discourage newspaper starters. A few years ago there were 11 papers published in the north Solomon Valley, not including Downs. Today there are only three, those being at Gaylord, Kirwin, and Logan, the papers at Portis, Harlan, Cedarville, Marvin, Edmond and Lenora having suspended. -- Atchison Champion.

 

We are in receipt of The Farmers Alliance, a new p ...
July 30, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2791)

We are in receipt of The Farmers Alliance, a new publication by J. G. Poole of this city. It is devoted, to a great extent, to DeWitt's Little Early Risers patent medicines and his own drug store. Heretofore the doctor has been a rabid Republican and we are surprised to see him come out so sudden for the reform movement.

 

Clarence Newman, who has been working in this offi ...
August 27, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2794)

Clarence Newman, who has been working in this office for the past year, left Monday for Osborne to join the Burton Theatre Company.

 

Quinnie Craft took the train Sunday for St. Joseph ...
September 3, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2796)

Quinnie Craft took the train Sunday for St. Joseph, where he has received an appointment as mail agent on some road. In his absence, his father and Joe Cox will run the Times.

 

The Advocate, E. J. Garner, editor, came to us fro ...
September 10, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2797)

The Advocate, E. J. Garner, editor, came to us from Davis City, Iowa. It is a well-edited and clean sheet, and well-patronized. We are glad to know that Jim is prospering.

H. M. Fletcher of the Alton Empire was in town Monday.

 

In the Hands of Pirates This Week. This week the e ...
September 17, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2799)

In the Hands of Pirates This Week. This week the editor has gone away and your humble servants will endeavor to make a paper. Making a good paper under ordinary circumstances is a difficult thing, considering the many difficult desires and characteristics of our patrons, but in this case it is more difficult still because Forline is an old Republican and Cragin is an old Democrat....We shall endeavor to be Republican, Democratic and Alliance this week, and d----d be he who don't cry hold enough. Forline & Cragin.

Allen Delay returned Sunday. He left the Burton Theatre Company at Mankato.

Logan is now without a paper, the Republican having kicked its last kick last week. Five or six years ago, that town had one good paper -- the Freeman, published by H. N. Boyd. A few wanted to freeze out Boyd, and they did. Having accomplished their mission, the Republican has gone to the wall. Good enough.

 

The Logan Republican that died a week or so ago ha ...
September 24, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2801)

The Logan Republican that died a week or so ago has been resurrected by O. V. Wilkison.

 

The Globe, Sandy Barron's new paper at Kirwin, rea ...
October 15, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2804)

The Globe, Sandy Barron's new paper at Kirwin, reaches us this week. We wish the new venture success.

 

H. M. Fletcher, editor of the Alton Empire, was in ...
October 22, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2806)

H. M. Fletcher, editor of the Alton Empire, was in town last Friday and bought the Downs Times, and this week's issue comes out under the new management. The new editor we hope will have success in his new enterprise. It is fortunate for our people that the former proprietors have pulled out of the business, as no town can thrive when a paper takes the stand that the Times did.

Q. R. Craft Sundayed in this city with his parents and left Monday for Belleville to resume his duties in the mail service between that place and Phillipsburg.

 

The Editor Is Out. The old delinquent read the sig ...
October 29, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2808)

The Editor Is Out. The old delinquent read the sign, and straightaway turned about; but who its meaning can divine -- the editor is out? Out of money -- not one cent! Out of six months' office rent; Out of groceries -- bills have said it. Out of humor, out of credit; out of paper, out of ink; out of everything to drink; out of ideas, out of news; out of clothes and out of shoes; out of power to thrill the nation; out of church and free salvation; out of all things -- just out. Thanks to him who'll help him "out."

 

Ben T. Baker, who run the Globe in this place some ...
November 5, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2809)

Ben T. Baker, who run the Globe in this place some two years ago, is now on a paper in Leadville, Colorado.

Allen DeLay has ceased his laborious toil at Cornell's livery barn and "hied himself away to his father's house."

 

Another Volume Closed. With this issue closes Vol. ...
November 19, 1891, Downs Chief (ID 2810)

Another Volume Closed. With this issue closes Vol. 8, and next week we start out on Volume 9. Six years ago today we began the publication of the Chief in this city. We did not come here to fill a long-felt want, for it is doubtful if there were a half dozen in town who cared a continental whether we came or not. Be that as it may, we have been here that long, are here yet and are likely to stay here for a few more years if the good people of Downs will allow us to. We have not been perfection and are not now, nor never will be, but we have tried to publish as good a paper as our limited means would permit. -- Chief Publishing Co., W. H. Whitmore, editor.

This office will not refuse a small amount of cash on subscription about now.

Ed Raub, a printer on the Beloit Call, was in town Sunday.