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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Downs News

Articles in database from Downs News:    259

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November 26, 1903, Downs News (ID 4836)

Volume 1, No. 51. We hope that all the papers receiving this copy of the News will see that we are placed on their exchange list.

Salutatory -- In presenting this, my first issue of The Downs News, to the public I wish to announce in a general way the future policy of this paper.

I have an ambition to do two things. One is to each week acquaint my readers with all the interesting happenings of the week in Downs and vicinity and furnish them with such other news as may be of local interest. The other is to help build up the fair city of Downs and the surrounding country....

The city's many beautiful homes and well kept lawns, its lighted streets, fine brick sidewalks and crossings, and its excellent system of water works, together with its comparative freedom from debt and its light taxes, all bespeak an enterprise and ability in its business men, of which the town may be justly proud and which many a town would be the better for having.

In politics the News will be independent. This does not mean that I will avoid or omit the discussion of political subjects. It means that I will not attach myself to any political party but will discuss public affairs as I understand them without regard to the position of any party on the subject discussed.

In entering the newspaper field in Downs I have nothing but the friendliest feelings for every resident of the city.... -- Respectfully, W. B. Gaumer

We are unavoidably a little late this week. There is a great deal of extra work in getting out the first issue of a paper. Be a little patient with us and we will try to do better hereafter.

"Theo. Lanman went to Downs last Friday morning to assist Mr. Gaumer in arranging his office and getting out the new paper at that place, the News. Theo is a good printer and a square young man, and if the work suits him he may remain permanently." -- Smith County Journal.

 

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December 3, 1903, Downs News (ID 4837)

For all kinds of job work call at the News office. We have a new force, a new line of type, new presses and new ideas. If you don't believe it come down and see us. We can show you better than we can tell you.

 

...
December 24, 1903, Downs News (ID 4839)

We are in receipt of the first number of the Downs News published by W. B. Gaumer, formerly with the Phillips County Post. It is a six column quarto and as is characteristic of all the papers handled by Mr. Gaumer it is chuck full of good reading matter, well put up, and the whole paper makes a very good appearance. It is to be an independent sheet and will work for the best interests of Downs and vicinity. We gladly X with the News and wish Mr. Gaumer success in his undertaking. -- Prairie View News.

W. G. Smith, editor of the Seiling (Okla.) Guide, is spending a few days in the neighborhood of Downs visiting his father-in-law Alfred Johnson. At one time Mr. Smith worked on the Downs World.

"Western Kansas has caught her second wind. Downs has her second paper; Logan a second paper, and new papers are dropping in everywhere. We have seen papers start in that country in towns of only a dozen people. Printers are a lively set of chumps out there. In settled communities it takes a town of 1,000 people to support a paper." -- Greenleaf Sentinel.

M. A. Pratt, traveling agent for the Appeal to Reason, was "exploiting" Downs last Monday. The Appeal has over a quarter of a million subscribers and is running up its list from one to five thousand a week. "What fools we mortals be." It seems that the Appeal is now published on the co-operative plan and all profits over expense of publication goes into the campaign fund of the National Socialist party. "Watch it grow." Terms 25 cents a year, in clubs of four. Single copy per year 50 cents.

Lew Headley, editor of the Ponca City (Okla.) Daily Courier, passed through Downs Monday evening on his way back to Oklahoma. He had been spending a few days with is son Bert, of the Gaylord Sentinel, and he also jollied up a lot of his old acquaintances while he was up in the "short grass" country.

 

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December 31, 1903, Downs News (ID 4841)

R. T. Weld, editor of the Times, is visiting with friends at Friend, Nebraska, this week. Walt Smith is the heavy man at that office while the boss is gone.

 

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January 7, 1904, Downs News (ID 4843)

Joe Wright, formerly of Lebanon, will this week issue his first issue of the Smith Center Messenger. Report has it that Wright is going to make his paper a regular Populist organ. He and the Republicans together will now probably put Smith in the list of safely Republican counties.

Bert Jones resigned his place on the News last Friday evening and that night went to Atchison. Bert is the best local man we ever had about our shop.

 

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January 28, 1904, Downs News (ID 4845)

To our subscribers -- The News has just completed its first year. It is a matter of which we very seldom speak but we wish to call the attention of our subscribers to the fact that those of them who subscribed for the paper at the beginning of its publication now have the right, privilege or duty of paying another year's subscription....We believe we need this money just as much as the majority of our readers and we will be very much pleased to receive a few of the dollars which we feel sure our subscribers have laying around loose.

One year old -- The Downs News is now one year old. While this is only the tenth issue which has been put out since we took charge of the paper yet its growth in this time has been very satisfactory. Our advertising and job work patronage has been all that we could ask and we have nearly doubled our subscription list. The News begins its second year with every prospect that it will be a prosperous year and that its list of patrons will be very largely increased. We will give you the best newspaper we can for the next twelve months as we have for the last ten weeks.

 

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February 4, 1904, Downs News (ID 4846)

You will notice that, at the last meeting of the city council, this paper was made the official city paper.

 

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February 18, 1904, Downs News (ID 4848)

Ed Hoch (editor at Marion) was here last Friday night and spoke in the opera house. The room was well filled, which was somewhat a surprise it being so early in the campaign (for governor) and there being so little political excitement. He spoke for about one and one-half hours and was well received....

The editor bought a new typewriter this week and is working with it like a little boy with his first knife.

 

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February 25, 1904, Downs News (ID 4850)

The editor is laid up with a severe case of grip this week so, if we are a little short on local news, you will have to excuse us. The present pencil pusher is playing editor, compositor, job man, fire builder and general flunky.

 

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March 10, 1904, Downs News (ID 4853)

Just received the finest line of sample calendars for 1905 that were ever brought to the city, and can furnish you the same in lots from one dozen to ten thousand at river prices. Come see them and get prices before buying. We guarantee our work.

We have been getting in a supply of horse cuts and are now prepared to get out excellent bills. Give us a call.

 

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March 17, 1904, Downs News (ID 4855)

Joe Wright is doing the Republicans of Smith County some good service. Last week he devoted his editorial page to the abuse of the Democrats but never said a word about the Republicans. If he only keeps up his present pace he will be worth much more to the Republicans than he would if he were a straight Republican.

 

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March 25, 1904, Downs News (ID 4859)

Much grief this week -- This office has been working under difficulties this week and if we are not quite up to the usual standard we will try to make up for it some other time. Mr. Lanman, our foreman and the only man about the shop who can set ads or do the mechanical work on the paper, has been sick in bed since Sunday. In addition to this two of our type setters have been kept away on account of sickness part of the week. We have been unable to change any of the ads and have had great difficulty in getting up the amount of type we have.

We have lived through it, however, and hope to be on our feet by next week.

"L. L. Alrich, editor of the Cawker City Record, has taken clips as to who published the first old soldier paper in Kansas. Alrich says he published the Camp Fire in 1882, and that he believes it was the first, the claim of Pat Coney, of Topeka, to the contrary notwithstanding." -- Atchison Globe's Central Branch items.

 

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May 26, 1904, Downs News (ID 4873)

The Downs News -- The growth of this newspaper has been a matter of interest in the history of Downs. Founded by a minister, almost without capital and with the crudest and most inexpensive outfit that ever marked the coming of a journalist, through many struggles and change of owners it has attained its present popularity. Ever on the alert for the advancement of Downs, it has always been a fair and jealous advocate of every measure beneficial to the people of our town, county or state. Enlarged in proportions with an increased circulation the Downs News has come to stay. Under the present enterprising and liberal management of Mr. Norton we bespeak for it a still greater patronage. The Ladies Aid Society is proud to be associated with The News.

Our bow -- Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Norton, owners and editors of the Downs News, have generously offered the Ladies Aid Society of the Congregational Church profits of this and perhaps succeeding issues. In assuming temporary charge of the editorial and other columns of the News, no effort will be made to present lengthy and profound articles or on topics social, religious or political....

This week the News is in complete charge of the Ladies Aid Society of the Congregational Church. They have appointed Mrs. G. B. White, Mrs. D. B. Harrison and Mrs. H. H. Welty as the editorial staff and these ladies assume the responsibility for the appearance of the paper, for the editorial and for the sentiments expressed.

 

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June 30, 1904, Downs News (ID 4882)

Extra copies of our illustrated edition can be had at this office already wrapped ready for mailing at 10c each. Advertise Downs and Osborne County by mailing out a few of our illustrated papers to your friends in eastern states. You can get as many as you want by calling at this office. They are wrapped up ready to mail.

 

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July 7, 1904, Downs News (ID 4884)

Words of praise:

The Downs News Lincoln Park Chautauqua edition last week was a hummer. There were 16 pages of fine cuts interspersed with reading matter about the chautauqua. -- Rooks County Record, reprinted in the News along with many other comments.

The Downs News was issued last week as a sixteen-page souvenir edition in the interest of Lincoln Park Chautauqua. The paper was brim full of portraits of representative business people of Downs and people who take part in the chautauqua, besides many landscape views and pictures of fine residences. It certainly was a very creditable issue and the News people have reason to feel proud of it. -- Stockton News.

R. T. Weld, editor of the Downs Times came in Tuesday evening with his bride from Lincoln, Nebraska. They were married at that city on Wednesday of last week. We wish them all the happiness they deserve and assure them a royal welcome among the good people of Downs.

 

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August 4, 1904, Downs News (ID 4891)

One of the most pleasing things that has happened in Osborne County for a long time was the editorial portion of the Osborne Farmer last week. We have always understood that Bert Walker was one of the most conservative, sensible men who has even been with that paper and from the tone of his "bow" last week we believe it. It was certainly good sense for him to let the fight strictly alone in this county and we don't believe he will be trampled upon.

 

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December 29, 1904, Downs News (ID 4916)

The Downs News has had a reasonably profitable year and it is our aim to make it a better and more readable paper for the coming year, and in order to do this we must raise some ready cash. Do not consider this a dun or a statement, for you may be paid in advance for your paper now. But if it is convenient for you to do so we would consider it a great favor to receive One Dollar from you at this time to apply on your subscription. We want to raise at least $300.00 to pay on our plant and add some much needed material. . . .

We have taken a unique position in the political field and shall continue to do as we believe to be right regardless of who it may offend or please. We shall hold the paper aloof from any and all parties, getting in and expressing our opinions where we believe they should be. The News has already won the reputation of being the only independent, fearless paper in the county, and is called by some the Iconoclast of Kansas. . . .

We will have several valuable communications from Miss L. Alma Ise, who is in Zurich University, Switzerland, and several other good writers have promised articles for our columns during the year. . . .

Wishing each and every one of you a happy prosperous New Year, we are, Yours truly, F. A. Norton, Chas. W. Norton.

 

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January 12, 1905, Downs News (ID 4919)

At last we have the News office comfortably located in the building recently purchased by I. N. Rogers of Mrs. Troth. Our office is in the rear and is easily found by those who are looking for us. We are somewhat straightened but we believe it will be all the room that is required. Come in and see us and let us place your name on our list.

Tom McNeal, the versatile editor of the Mail & Breeze, was elected state printer on Tuesday by the joint convention of the legislature. Tom received 136 votes out of 157. The selection suits everybody except Geo. W. Clark, the present incumbent.

 

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March 16, 1905, Downs News (ID 4925)

Next week we will tell you who our real friends are. Will we find your name in the list? Can't we count you as one who has stood by us when the shadow was the deepest? Can't we have your name on our roll of honor framed and placed on our desk? Can't we be able to look over the list and say there is Mr. So and So who helped us when we needed help and now that we are in easier circumstances, we are ready to help him? Can't we say of you, yes, Mr. ---- endorses the News and that too with a $5.00 or a $2.00 or a $1.00 endorsement? We hope so.

Did you ever have a real bad case of the "blues?" Did it ever seem to you that everything and everybody was wrong and directly opposed to you and your efforts? Editors as an usual thing are an optimistic bunch of fellows, but once in a while it is difficult to overcome the feeling that it is all of no use and that the burning of midnight oil would not avail anything. Yet there is always someone to encourage and invite you to greater efforts.

Don't fail us this week, as it means a change in the policy, in the management and in the principles of the paper if we do not meet our promise.

Where there is a will there is always a way, but it sometimes proves very difficult to find it. Next week, we will tell you of our efforts to procure help from the men who we always thought and have had reason to believe to be our best friends, yet we found the help and it will be our greatest pleasure in telling you who they were and how they have encouraged us during these trying days that have just passed.

The Downs News is now passing through one of those trying ordeals that is sometimes experienced by men of small means who undertake large things. We this week have asked the readers of this paper to stand by it in a financial way and have confidence and faith in their willingness to do it. Next week we are going to publish the names and the amount of every one who responds to our call, and we hope the list will be a long one for we have agreed to pay a certain amount of money and must have their help to do it.

It takes trying ordeals to develop a man's true qualities and we believe it also requires close relation between a newspaper and its readers to cause them to appreciate it in its true light. Every one who pays one dollar for the News one year becomes one of a band of loyal readers and in that degree becomes interested in the welfare of the paper....Consider this paper your paper and its editors your paid servants, and when you want to express an opinion on any subject the privilege is yours for the asking.

 

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March 23, 1905, Downs News (ID 4927)

A change in ownership -- On account of a combination of unfortunate circumstances and a defective title to some land I have been compelled to again assume charge of the Downs News. My connection with the News is only temporary, however, as I have sold it to W. H. Ransom and Chas. E. Mann of Phillipsburg, Kansas. The transfer will be made on April 1st, 1905. As these gentlemen cannot help themselves and cannot know anything about it until after it is done I will take this opportunity to say a few words about them. I have known Mr. Ransom for several years. When I established the Phillips County Post he helped me get out the first issue of that paper and he has remained in that office as foreman up to the present time. He has made the newspaper field his study and his life work. He is one of the best and most artistic printers in the states and has lately had a most flattering offer from a large printing establishment in Topeka but he has concluded that he wants to taste the joys and honors (the sorrows will come later) that come to the editor and proprietor of a newspaper. Mr. Mann for several years was in newspaper work at Phillipsburg but for the last four years he has had charge of a newspaper at Gering, Neb. He is a first class, practical printer and a good writer and can hold his own with the best in any department of newspaper work. Both of these young men have families and will move to Downs and make it their home. They are men of financial standing and are good business men and will begin their work on the News practically free from all debt. When they have assumed control this paper will be on as solid financial footing as any business in the city....As both of these young men are Republicans by heredity, environment and principle I presume the paper will lean that way....As to their high morals character and entire financial responsibility I give my unreserved recommendation and guarantee that they will be true and upright....Very truly, W. B. Gaumer.

 

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March 30, 1905, Downs News (ID 4929)

With this issue I again sever my connection with the News. The next issue will be in charge of the new owners. I wish again to recommend these young men to the people of Downs and vicinity....W. B. Gaumer

Buy a paper -- W. B. Gaumer, who established the Downs News and sold a few months ago, was compelled to take possession of it last week because of a default in payments by the purchasers. He has sold the paper again to W. H. Ransom, who has been the Post foreman, and C. E. Mann of Gering, Neb. The new owners are both expert printers and are active young men with genuine newspaper proclivities. They will make a Republican paper of the News and will take charge about the first of April. Mr. Mann will be here as soon as possible and will go to Downs and assume charge, and Mr. Ransom will follow as soon as a man is secured to fill his place in the Post office. Success to the new firm. -- Phillipsburg Herald, reprinted in the News.

 

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April 6, 1905, Downs News (ID 4932)

Salutatory -- Having purchased the printing plant, subscription list and good will of the News we assume complete control of the paper on and after April 1.

In coming among you we have no explanation or apology to make further than a desire to cast our lot in a thriving community, inhabited by a happy and progressive people. It will be our aim at all times to support those policies which, in our opinion, will bring about the greatest good to the greatest number, striving constantly for the moral and material advancement of Downs and Osborne county.

Politically the News will be Republican, believing that the principles of that party as enunciated in its platforms and interpreted by Theodore Roosevelt are those which will best promote the welfare and prosperity of our common country. Our greatest efforts, however, will be in the direction of furnishing our readers with the news -- all the news -- all the time. Trusting that our relations will be mutually pleasant and profitable, we are, Yours respectfully, W. H. Ransom, Chas. E. Mann

Chas. W. Norton, former editor of the News, has been assisting us this week. He is a mighty handy man around a print shop.

Chas. E. Mann was unable to come to Downs in time to assist with this issue of the News, but will arrive the latter part of the week to assume his share of the trials and tribulations of an editor.

 

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May 4, 1905, Downs News (ID 4941)

Chas. W. Norton, formerly publisher of the News, has purchased the Kirwin Argus, and took possession on Monday, May 1. Mr. Norton is a first-class printer, a good writer and ought to make a paper out of the Argus such as a town like Kirwin needs.

 

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May 18, 1905, Downs News (ID 4944)

The News has purchased the building that will be vacated by F. A. Baker & Co. as soon as their new building is completed. The building will be moved to the Kindley lots just north of the DeLay implement building, where the News will be pleased to meet its friends after June 1st.

 

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June 15, 1905, Downs News (ID 4949)

Our new home -- As stated some time ago, the News has purchased the building recently vacated by F. A. Baker & Co. and has moved it to the lots between DeLay's implement store and McCormic's carpenter shop. The office fixtures, type and machinery will be moved tomorrow, and the next issue of the News will be from our new home.

 

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August 17, 1905, Downs News (ID 4964)

The chautauqua graft -- One of the benevolent grafts being worked over Kansas is the Chautauqua. The sixth district has two or more of them and they are indeed rank. The Lincoln Park Chautauqua association, located between Downs and Cawker City, is in full blast this week and is reaping a handsome profit for its promoters....

The above is from the erratic pen of Chas. W. Norton, formerly editor of the News, but now guiding the destinies of the Argus at Kirwin. It seems unnecessary to enter into a lengthy defense of the Chautauquas, as those who have attended know that the above article is ridiculously false from beginning to end....Norton will be remembered here as the man who imagines himself possessed of wonderful ability as a "roaster," and it is well known that he uses neither sense nor judgment when he feels called upon to roast somebody or something.

Most people say it is because "he thinks he is smart," but we have a theory that it is caused by his liver which has never properly performed its functions in throwing off the excessive accumulation of bile; the result is that his system becomes permeated with the vile poison, producing a disease known to the medical profession as damcussedness....

 

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September 7, 1905, Downs News (ID 4968)

The Ponca City (Okla.) Courier, edited by L. C. Headley, is on our exchange table. "Lew" Headley will be remembered by all the old time newspaper men, having edited the Gaylord Herald for many years. He was considered one of the strongest and best writers among the country editors in his palmy days in Kansas, and a perusal of the Courier columns proves that he has lost none of his vigor and ability as a writer. We might add that his son, Bert Headley, who is now editor of the Gaylord Sentinel, is proving himself a worthy successor to his father.

 

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November 16, 1905, Downs News (ID 4975)

It is our desire to make The News the most readable paper in north-central Kansas. We are doing our best now to print all the news and local happenings and will continue to do so, but as Sharps and Flats says "variety is the life of spice," we have decided to open a new department and ask for a series of articles from old settlers concerning their experiences in the early settlement of northern and western Kansas. Any little or big experience which you have had or which may come under your observation and which you think would be interesting, write it up in your own language and send it in....

A fair and candid discussion of any public question will always be given in the columns of the News, and communications of that nature are not only welcome, but are solicited. Invective, scurrility or personal abuse have no place in decent journalism, and are rigidly barred from our columns. We neither resort to such weapons ourself nor permit others to do so.

 

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January 4, 1906, Downs News (ID 4985)

The Lenora News recently received a proposition from Shimeall & Son, a clothing firm at Norton, offering $85 a year for a page ad in the News, to be paid for in merchandise at their store in Norton. The regular price of the ad would be $612 a year, cash, and the News very properly turned him down flat. If all the country editors would use as much business sense in regard to advertising rates as is shown by the News editor, it would hasten the time when the newspaper business would take its proper place among the legitimate business enterprises of the town.

 

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January 11, 1906, Downs News (ID 4987)

The Osborne Farmer has rounded out 31 years of life....Its editor, B. P. Walker, briefly recounts its history which extends from the days of the buffalo and the Indian to the present time, and concludes that its present prosperity is due to the "unalterable law of compensation that time brings to all their just reward."...We would like to have it continue under the editorial management of Bert Walker with the shooting stick and other mechanical devices still under the supervision of Tom Skinner.

 

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February 1, 1906, Downs News (ID 4989)

A certain auburn-haired citizen of Downs who is known as a captain of several different kinds of industries stopped his paper this week, and the News is endeavoring as best it can to bear it bravely and struggle along without his patronage. Now if he will pay up the two years he owes us on subscription we will be positively happy over it.

 

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March 1, 1906, Downs News (ID 4994)

Gov. E. W. Hoch, in company with Mayor Welty, Reverend Brehm, R. R. Hays and Wm. Duden, made this office an appreciated call Tuesday morning. The governor is an old-time newspaper man, having served his time as devil, printer, editor and reporter all at once in the early days on the Marion County Record, and he simply can't pass a print shop without looking in. The career of the present governor of Kansas, who has worked himself up from an humble country editor to the highest office in the gift of the people of Kansas, ought to be inspiration to every young man in the state, and furnishes a striking example of what plodding industry coupled with sterling honesty and fixed purpose can accomplish. Ed Hoch realized early in life that there was "no excellence without great labor," and busied himself from day to day with his own humble duties until his fellow citizens all over the state came to know and appreciate his worth....

(From Carnegie Library dedication story) The governor spoke extemporaneously, and in his own inimitable way kept the audience laughing and cheering most of the time. His remarks covered a wide range of appropriate subjects, but the great central theme was loyalty to home, to city, to state, and to nation....He complimented the citizens of Downs upon the many evidences of town pride which showed on every hand, and paid a glowing tribute to the genius and thrift of our citizens in the matter of securing the generous donation from Mr. Carnegie, and in pledging the amount necessary for the maintenance of the library....Few

speakers in this state or in the entire country can equal Governor Hoch, and his speech was frequently interrupted by outbursts of applause.....

 

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March 8, 1906, Downs News (ID 4996)

George H. Dodge, editor of the Beloit Gazette, showed his faith in Osborne County land by purchasing another good farm. Last Monday he closed a deal through the Downs Realty Co. with Joe Carnes for his bottom quarter south of town. The consideration was $5,800....

 

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March 22, 1906, Downs News (ID 4999)

Chas. W. Norton has sold the Kirwin Argus to J. R. Green,...who for several years held the position of principal in the city schools there....Mr. Green is a highly educated man who wields a trenchant pen and, having the necessary capital to put the paper on a solid basis, ought to make the Argus a very interesting paper. Lacking a practical knowledge of the craft, however, is likely to be a handicap....

While running off last week's issue, we had the misfortune to break a large casting in our big press and for a while looked like we were up against it. Bill Ruth, the boss worker in iron, was called upon and, after a thorough diagnosis, started into work and the result is that the injured member is now stronger than ever. If it's anything in iron or steel and Bill Ruth can't fix it, it can't be fixed, that's all.

 

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April 19, 1906, Downs News (ID 5002)

Roy Henry, a young man from Randall, is the new compositor on the Times. R. F. Land has returned to Kirwin.

 

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May 24, 1906, Downs News (ID 5006)

Miss Veva Kennedy, who has been employed in the Times office for the past year, has resigned her position and will rest up a while. Miss Kennedy is one of he best compositors in this part of the state.

Vol. 1, No. 2 of the Waldron Argus, published by Mr. and Mrs. Chas. W. Norton, reached our exchange table this week. It is a five-column folio, all home print, and is a model of neatness in its typographical appearance....

 

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May 31, 1906, Downs News (ID 5008)

Chas. W. Norton is now located at Waldron, Kansas, where he has started a paper....Mrs. Norton is local editor. Waldron is a new town.

 

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June 7, 1906, Downs News (ID 5010)

The Beloit Times, which has been in the hands of a receiver for some months past because of a disagreement between J. W. McBride and Palmer B. Felt, the owners, has been sold to a syndicate, among whom are said to be W. H. Mitchell, A. G. Mead, F. T. Burnham, C. L. Kagey, Chan Perdue, and Mr. McBride. --

Concordia Kansan.

 

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July 19, 1906, Downs News (ID 5016)

A representative of the H. D. Lee Mercantile Co. of Salina was out this way recently contracting advertising space in the newspapers of this section for that firm. As they only pay 5 and 6 cents an inch to country newspapers, the News refused to contract with them. The Downs merchants pay 10 cents an inch for their advertising and it doesn't look like a square deal to let in foreign advertisers at half price, but several papers around here did it. When the News has any favors to bestow, they will be given to the home merchant.

 

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July 26, 1906, Downs News (ID 5018)

The Outlook is the name of a daily paper which will be published at the Lincoln Park Chautauqua by Robert Good of Jamestown and A. W. Robinson of Cawker....

 

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September 13, 1906, Downs News (ID 5024)

Miss Mertie Barry, the efficient typo in this office, left Friday morning in company with her aunt, Mrs. Frank Skinner, for the latter's home at Virginia, Neb., where Mertie will spend a vacation of two weeks.

 

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November 1, 1906, Downs News (ID 5031)

The Cawker City Ledger under the new management shows improvement in the way of local news. A. P. Gregory, the new editor, is principal of the Cawker City schools.

 

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January 3, 1907, Downs News (ID 5040)

From the Waldron Argus we learn that a 10-pound daughter has arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. W. Norton.

 

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January 24, 1907, Downs News (ID 5043)

The News last week contained 788 inches of display advertising, or nearly as much again as any paper in Osborne, Smith, Jewell or Mitchell counties, and the best of it all was that 780 inches of it was home advertising and only 8 inches "foreign" advertising. Not a patent medicine local in the entire 10 pages. We confess that we are proud of it, and accept it as proof that the people of this section recognize the News as the best advertising medium.

 

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February 7, 1907, Downs News (ID 5047)

The Woodston Echo has been sold by J. W. Shorthill to Merton L. Smith of Stockton, better known to the newspaper fraternity as "Snorky" Smith. Smith is a good newspaper man....

 

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February 28, 1907, Downs News (ID 5050)

Theo. Lanman of Smith Center was in the city....Mr. Lanman was formerly foreman of this paper under W. B. Gaumer, but later went to Smith Center, where he has been employed on the Journal for the past three years....

 

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March 7, 1907, Downs News (ID 5051)

According to the Lenora News, the first daily paper established in the Sixth District was in that town in 1887 when Will C. Thornton started the Daily Common People. The common people did not support it, however, and it soon winked out.

The News force has wasted much valuable time this week with a balky gasoline engine, and as a result we have been unable to get many interesting news items into type.

 

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March 14, 1907, Downs News (ID 5052)

Here is something that will interest the ladies: This office has just added a series of Tiffany Text, the swellest type for calling cards ever put out, and is right up to the minute in style. We are making a special price on calling cards of 50 cents for three dozen or less, printed in this handsome type and on the latest China Linen finish cards.

 

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April 11, 1907, Downs News (ID 5056)

Chas. W. Wells of Osborne, who has been employed for some time on the Council Grove Republican, has accepted a position with the News and began work Monday morning. With this reinforcement the News hopes to keep up with the rush of job work which has swamped us in the last year, and at the same time get out a better paper.

 

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May 2, 1907, Downs News (ID 5062)

According to the Smith Center Messenger, there are only five real Populist papers left in the state. They are the Wichita Commoner, the Minneapolis Better Way, Colby Free Press, Clay Center Dispatch, and the Messenger. We can remember when there was one at every fork in the road.

Mr. and Mrs. R. T. Weld returned from Kansas City Saturday morning, where Mr. Weld has been taking treatment for his hearing for the past month. The latter did not receive as much benefit from the treatment as his friends had hoped, but his hearing is some better....

 

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May 9, 1907, Downs News (ID 5065)

Gen. J. K. Hudson, one of the pioneer newspaper men of Kansas and founder of the Topeka Capital, died at his home in Topeka...aged 67 years. Through financial reverses he lost control of the Capital several years ago, and for the past few years has been editor of the Topeka Herald, published by his son-in-law, Del Kizer. He was a major in the Civil War and a brigadier general in the Spanish-American War.

The Osborne Farmer last week gave official notice that on and after July 1 the price of that paper would be $1.50 per year to everybody....The fact is all the home print papers are confronted with a crisis on account of the rapidly increasing price of paper, labor and printing materials....

 

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May 16, 1907, Downs News (ID 5068)

E. H. McFadden and J. A. Foster have purchased all the stock of the Osborne News and are now sole owners of the paper and control its editorial and business policy. Both are mighty fine young men....

 

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July 4, 1907, Downs News (ID 5073)

R. T. Weld went to Waconda Springs Monday to take treatment at the sanitarium for his hearing. We understand Dr. Abrahams is having good success in cases of partial deafness, and we sincerely hope Mr. Weld will be greatly benefited.

Chas. W. Wells, who has been employed in the News office for the past three months, left Monday morning for Cawker, where he has accepted a position as foreman in the office of the Cawker Ledger....

 

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August 1, 1907, Downs News (ID 5076)

Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Parker of the Alton Empire were guests of the News families and celebration visitors last Saturday.

This office was favored with a call from Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Foster of the Osborne News on Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. Foster were married in April and kept the secret from their friends until June. It must be hard work for a newspaper man to keep so good a news item that long.

 

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August 15, 1907, Downs News (ID 5078)

We are receiving a copy of the Lincoln Park Daily, which is published at the park by A. P. Gregory of the Cawker Ledger....Charley Wells, formerly of this office, handles the mechanical work.

 

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August 29, 1907, Downs News (ID 5080)

The Beloit Times has been sold by the McBrides to W. A. Huff, late editor and publisher of the Clyde Republican. Mr. Huff will enlarge the Times to an all home print and will install a water motor and put in a complete new dress of type....Beloit has two of the best papers in the Sixth District, the Gazette and Call.

 

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September 26, 1907, Downs News (ID 5084)

John Q. Royce of the Phillipsburg Dispatch has just finished a new office which he boasts is fireproof....

 

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October 10, 1907, Downs News (ID 5088)

The editors of this paper have received a contract for advertising for a year from the Missouri Pacific Railway Company, to be paid for in mileage good only in the state of Kansas. Since receiving this favor at the hands of the company, we notice a marked improvement in the condition of the track and are not now in the least afraid to ride over them. We are now inclined to coincide with the board of railroad commissioners in saying that the track is in pretty fair condition. The ties which looked so rotten to us a few weeks ago are really only slightly decayed, and as it has but recently rained the coaches and cushions are not nearly so dusty as we reported them some time ago. In fact, as we glide along over the joints and bumps in the track, closely hugging our mileage book to our breast, we imagine that the jolting which prior to this week seemed almost unbearable, as merely the soft billowy motion of nature's cradle as she gently lulls us into peaceful sleep. Great is the Central Branch, and may her gaudy red and green mileage slips never grow shorter.

The first number of the Smith County Messenger under the new management looks neat, and in his introductory the new editor speaks in no uncertain way of his political views, which are Republican with no strings in the hands of any boss. Alf Williamson is a mighty good boy, and we hope to see him prosper at

Smith Center along with the Journal and Pioneer, of which both are top notchers.

 

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October 17, 1907, Downs News (ID 5090)

The News has just let the contract for the immediate erection of a new office building on lots recently purchased from the Central Lumber Co. just east of the Lipton Hotel. The building will be of cement blocks, 25 x 60 in dimension. The present News building was sold Tuesday to Dr. S. M. Travis. We have been hampered for room for some time and a new and larger building is a necessity to accommodate our increasing business. We hope to be in the new building by December 15, when we will be pleased to meet all our friends and patrons. The contract for the building has been let to V. E. Lewis.

 

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October 24, 1907, Downs News (ID 5091)

...The subscription price of the Downs News will be raised to $1.50 per year beginning Jan. 1, 1908. For over a year, this move has been under consideration owing to the increasing prices of print paper and, in fact, every article the printer uses....White print paper which a year and a half ago we bought for $2.40 per hundred in any quantity is now quoted at $3.35 in ton lots only, or an increase in this one article alone of 33 percent....The mills are behind with orders and, as the whole concern is in the hands of a trust, the trade is completely at their mercy and must pay any price they are pleased to quote. The result is that they please to quote it a little higher all the time....Along with that, the price of type and printing material of all kinds have raised and are still raising....We believe the News is worth $1.50 a year and will use our best endeavors to increase its value....

 

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October 31, 1907, Downs News (ID 5093)

Every newspaper man has an abhorrence for cards of thanks, resolutions of condolence and school reports, but the real trial comes when the merchant comes in and asks to have his advertisement printed upside down "so it will attract attention."

 

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December 5, 1907, Downs News (ID 5096)

With this issue the News enters the seventh year of its existence....With a new and commodious building located in the heart of town and with an equipment and circulation second to no paper in the west half of Kansas, we enter upon our seventh year with feelings of optimism, and we trust with pardonably pride.

Sunday, Dec. 1, 1907, will long be remembered as "red letter" day in the minds of the printers and publishers of Osborne and Downs, for it was on that day they had the pleasure of responding to the kind invitation of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Parker of the Alton Empire to a Thanksgiving dinner....The spirit of hospitality which pervades the Parker home, coupled with the culinary knowledge of the hostess, made the occasion a most happy one for the assembled printers. All thoughts of money panics, increasing paper prices, sight drafts and other unpleasant nightmares were laid aside or forgotten under the benign influences which surrounded them....The guests were: B. P. Walker and Tom Skinner of the Osborne Farmer; E. H. McFadden and J. A. Foster of the Osborne News; W. H. Smith of the Downs Times; and W. H. Ransom and C. E. Mann of the Downs News.

 

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December 19, 1907, Downs News (ID 5098)

If the weather is favorable, the News will be issued next week from its new home just east of the Lipton Hotel, where we will move today. The building, which has just been completed by V. E. Lewis and his workmen, is of cement blocks and is 25 x 60 feet in dimensions, which will give us considerable more room....The continued increase in business made more room absolutely necessary and the hearty and liberal patronage of our advertisers and subscribers have made it possible for us to go to this expense....We extend a hearty invitation to all our patrons and friends to call on us -- not once, but often -- in our new building.

Col. Major Jeltz of the Topeka Ledger was in town between trains the other day in the interest of his paper. Probably no man in this country today has saved the government so many times as Col. Major Jeltz, who does it annually through the columns of the Ledger. Incidentally, the colonel is also doing his share toward keeping the distilleries of the country working full time, if reports are true.

Chas. W. Norton is offering his Waldron Argus for 50 cents a year. Of course, it is only a small five-column paper with four pages printed at home, but 50 cents isn't enough. The worst feature is that he is offering the paper for five years for $2.50 and will be compelled to send the paper at that price no matter where or how high the price of print paper goes. It is strange that some men never learn by experience that a newspaper is a legitimate business and can only be made to pay by running on a paying basis....

 

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December 26, 1907, Downs News (ID 5102)

In Our New Home. The News is now in its new home just east of the Lipton Hotel, where we expect to be able to attend to the wants of our patrons in a much better way than was possible in the crowded quarters formerly occupied. The publishers of this paper came to Downs two and a half years ago total strangers; we found the plant in a miserable room in the back end of an old shack nearly 50 feet from the street. The paper had a circulation of about 500 and all the machinery was run by hand. In two years and a half, we have more than doubled the circulation, added power and fixtures to the presses and placed the plant in its own building....

We will have to ask the indulgence of our readers this week for getting out a paper below the average. The extra work which always attends the holidays, together with the fact that we have moved the plant since our last issue, has nearly put us to the bad. All machinery has to be readjusted after moving, which takes up much time.

 

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January 2, 1908, Downs News (ID 5103)

Another Old Relic. Through the courtesy of Sam Zumwalt, we are privileged to peruse the columns of a copy of the Osborne Farmer, published on Friday, Sept. 3, 1875.

The paper is No. 33 of Vol. 1, and is now yellow with age. It is printed on a half sheet and the editor, F. H. Barnhart, explains that his "patent insides" failed to arrive. Even at that time, the Farmer was alive to the interests of the community, and the columns of the little paper bristle with news items and cheerful words regarding the future of "the great Solomon Valley."...

 

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January 23, 1908, Downs News (ID 5107)

Only two papers, so far as we have observed, are using the cheap, ready made editorial paragraphs sent out by an enterprising New York guy. They are the Portis Independent and the Norton County News, and they ought to cut them out.

 

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February 6, 1908, Downs News (ID 5109)

The News this week printed sale bills for F. H. Deck, Geo. W. Hettinger, D. O. Bancroft, and E. B. Rathbun....The News introduced the high grade rainproof manila cardboard in this section for printing sale bills and is the only office in this part of the country that uses the genuine. Most offices use a cheap grade of cardboard as a substitute.

 

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February 13, 1908, Downs News (ID 5110)

J. J. Parker of the Alton Empire has gone into partnership with D. J. Sparks of that city in the real estate business. Parker is as square a man as they make them....

 

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February 20, 1908, Downs News (ID 5112)

Chas. Newberry, the printer who has been employed at the Times office for several weeks, left Tuesday night for Jamestown, where he will take a position on the Optimist of that city.

R. T. Weld expects to leave in a short time for Chicago, where he will go under the care of a specialist in diseases of the ear in the hope of restoring his hearing....

 

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March 5, 1908, Downs News (ID 5114)

While in Downs Saturday evening, we called at the two newspaper offices of the town. Nothing of note about that fact, but when we expressed a desire to visit the printing offices, the proprietors of both the papers went to each of the offices with us. Wasn't that funny? Newspaper rivals going into each other's offices on friendly terms, just like the other businessmen do. We learned too that the newspapers in Downs actually exchange papers, just the same as they do with papers in neighboring towns. -- Gomer Davies in Concordia Kansan.

 

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March 12, 1908, Downs News (ID 5115)

Dick Utt handed us a card the other day which was gotten up in a humorous way by the late Harmon Wilson when he was employed as a printer in Downs many years ago. There is more of pathos than humor in the card and its quaint wording now when one reflects upon the sad and untimely death of its originator. The card was printed for Ed Janes, who was the Missouri Pacific freight agent here at the time, and who was a chum of Wilson. Wilson's writings were mostly in the Swedish dialect, so he gave Janes the sobriquet of "Round Timberson," and called himself "Tall Timberson." The card is printed in two colors and contains the picture of a raw Swede in the upper left hand corner, under which are these words: "Ay yoost coom ofer from da ol kontry." Wilson was a brilliant young man and was a great favorite with the newspaper men as well as everybody else....There could be but one Harmon Wilson.

 

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March 19, 1908, Downs News (ID 5117)

We are indebted to Mrs. C. D. Jones of this city for the loan of a copy of "The Troubles of a Worried Man and Other Sketches" by the late Harmon Wilson. The book was published from original manuscript by his many friends among the Kansas newspaper men after Mr. Wilson's death. The edition was limited to 1,000 copies. The book contains biographical sketches by William Allen White and J. Elmer House (Dodd Gaston) and is illustrated by Albert T. Reid. Mrs. Jones, who was then Miss F---- Newlon, was employed on the Downs Times when Harmon Wilson was foreman and was therefore well acquainted with him....

"...A deal has been put through at noon today whereby the Glen Elder Sentinel passes from the ownership of W. R. Baker into the hands of Frank W. Thompson of this city (Beloit) and L. L. Humes of Hayes Township. The Sentinel has always been recognized as of Democratic principles, but as both of the new proprietors are of the Republican Party we presume the paper's political policy will be changed. W. R. Baker has given the people of Glen Elder a newsy and meritorious paper and, while his policies aroused the animosity of some of the people in his neighborhood, has nevertheless been given good support. Frank Thompson was formerly county superintendent while Mr. Humes is a bright young Hayes Township gentleman...." -- Beloit Call.

 

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April 2, 1908, Downs News (ID 5121)

Miss Elsie Clark Allen is learning the art of printing in this office. She is a bright young lady....

 

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April 9, 1908, Downs News (ID 5123)

Mrs. J. J. Parker of Alton, wife of the editor of the Empire, was in the city last week attending the Congregational ministerial association and visiting with the News families. Mrs. Parker devotes most of her time to newspaper work and is one of the best local news gatherers in this section.

J. A. Foster, who recently sold his interest in the Osborne News, has accepted a position on the Clay Center Dispatch....

Charlie Wells, formerly of this office, but now with the Osborne News, had the misfortune to get his right thumb badly mashed last Thursday....

"Bill Huff, editor of the Beloit Times, was up to Osborne the other day attending the congressional convention, and the one thing that astonished him above all else was the fact that the editors of Osborne were on friendly terms and that they actually exchange papers with each other. They don't do that in Beloit." -- Concordia Kansan.

 

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April 23, 1908, Downs News (ID 5125)

W. H. Ransom of the News and W. H. Smith of the Times went to Emporia Sunday night to attend the state editorial association and to watch the workings of a new typesetting machine on exhibition there during the session.

 

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April 30, 1908, Downs News (ID 5127)

The proprietors of the News have just placed an order with the Unitype Co. of Brooklyn, N.Y., for a style two Simplex typesetting machine, same to be delivered on or about July 1st next.

The price of the machine alone costs more than the average print shop in towns the size of Downs. It is the aim of the publishers of this paper to make the News one of the best country weeklies in Kansas....The problem of help is a serious and uncertain one...while the price looks big to us, it will prove cheaper and faster in the long run. The machine is used by such periodicals as the Youth's Companion, The Ladies Home Journal, and other publications of a worldwide reputation, which is a guarantee of its merit. The Simplex sets the type ready to go into the forms and then distributes it after the printing is done. It will do the work of three men and one can operate it. Nearly every week we are obliged to leave out important matter because it is a physical impossibility to get it set up....

 

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May 7, 1908, Downs News (ID 5129)

...A. P. Gregory, who recently sold the Cawker City Ledge to Robert Good, has purchased the Frankfort Review of Mrs. Wheldon.... -- Beloit Times.

Miss Mertie Barry, who has been a faithful employee of this office for nearly three years, expects to leave tomorrow night for an extended visit with relatives and friends in Iowa and Nebraska.

 

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May 14, 1908, Downs News (ID 5133)

The Downs Times and the Downs News are going to be real up-to-date papers in the near future, having each contracted for a Simplex typesetting machine....The New Era has had a Simplex in operation for the last year and a half. They are a great machine and we wouldn't think of trying to get out a great moral guide like the New Era without one. -- Hill City New Era.

 

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July 16, 1908, Downs News (ID 5142)

The Concordia Kansan has its new Linotype installed and hereafter the "Dinky Daily" will come out with a new dress every day. All the newspaper boys along the line will congratulate Gomer Davies on his prosperity, and upon his enterprise in being the first Central Branch publisher to install a Linotype.

 

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July 30, 1908, Downs News (ID 5144)

Mrs. Geo. E. Dougherty and daughter Gladys of Topeka are here to spend a month or more with relatives....Her husband once published the Downs Times but now is conducting the Brief System of Shorthand, a school in Topeka. -- Glen Elder Sentinel.

Mrs. W. S. Tilton of Beatrice, Neb., is visiting Mrs. H. H. Welty. Captain Tilton formerly edited the Downs Times and is now proprietor of the Beatrice Weekly Times. Three of their sons are newspaper men. Ben and Tate Tilton are in Oklahoma City and are running a job printing office. Mac is the owner of the Anadarko (Okla.) Tribune....

 

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August 6, 1908, Downs News (ID 5147)

Miss Emma Nunn left Tuesday morning for Jamestown, where she has accepted a position as compositor on the Jamestown Optimist....

 

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September 3, 1908, Downs News (ID 5150)

The Democrats of this locality, having no organ of their own, have bought a page in the News which will be used by them in promulgating their doctrine until after the election. The page will be edited by one of their number and the management of this paper will have nothing to do with it except the mechanical work. They have bought the space and pay for it at regular rates, just the same as the merchants buy space....Our opinions are our own, and we shall continue in the future as in the past to run a straight Republican paper, regardless of the

money that the Democrats will pay us every week for that one page....

 

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October 15, 1908, Downs News (ID 5155)

R. T. Weld left for O'Neill, Neb., Sunday night to add his name to the long list of land seekers in the Rosebud reservation.

 

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October 22, 1908, Downs News (ID 5157)

The Osborne News has been sold to a syndicate of Democrats of this city and Osborne, and we understand the issue of this week will be Democratic. Mr. McFadden, who has been the editor, will remain with the paper for the present and look after the local news department while the Democratic editorials will be written by R. H. Towne and other Osborne Democrats. The Democrats have bought Mr. McFadden's interest, and we understand Bartley Yost owns the other half. The

sale of Mr. McFadden's interest, however, carries with it the policy of the paper....Readers of the paper may look for something to drop when Editor Towne turns loose his rhetorical guns on the GOP, for Towne can juggle the English language in a way that will shake the dictionary to its very foundation....

 

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October 29, 1908, Downs News (ID 5159)

The Democrats bought the other half of the Osborne news this week from B. F. Yost and we understand the issue this week will be red hot for the election of the "Peerless One" and the state and county tickets.

 

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November 12, 1908, Downs News (ID 5161)

???????????

 

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November 19, 1908, Downs News (ID 5162)

Warren White, editor of the Phillipsburg News, has purchased the Phillipsburg Dispatch plant and building of John Q. Royce, and will consolidate the two papers under the name of the News-Dispatch....We understand the purchase price was $6,000....

Chas. W. Norton, formerly publisher of this paper, but for the past three years publisher of the Waldron Argus, announces...that he will move to Ingersoll, Okla., where he will publish the Ingersoll Observer....He announces that his paper will be Democratic in politics....

 

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December 3, 1908, Downs News (ID 5163)

The Lebanon Argus has been leased by Julian Duvall of Norton and he will take charge of it in a few weeks. The owner, G. C. McNiece, will give his undivided attention to his farm. The writer used to stick type in Fred Duvall's Norton Courier office when Julian was just big enough to haul the papers to the post office in his little wagon.

The News has added a new typewriter to its equipment. We have discovered in the first week's use that the blamed thing can neither spell nor punctuate.

 

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December 17, 1908, Downs News (ID 5164)

News being a little scarce at Colby, the editors are writing long articles to prove each other liars. Both seem to have made a pretty good case too.

This will make Bert Walker mad. The Kansas City Star is printing some of his stuff and crediting it to Gomer Davies.

Sam Carroll, the eccentric editor of the Stockton News, has bought the Gove County Record, and will move to that place and take charge as soon as he can dispose of the News at Stockton....As the Democrats have the county commissioners in Gove County, Sam will fall heir to the county printing....We are glad to see Sam get where he can get a shot at the public crib for a while.

Rooks County is pretty "slim pickin" for a Democratic paper.

 

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December 24, 1908, Downs News (ID 5165)

The Beloit Gazette is installing a Style Two Simplex typesetting machine this week, so we are informed.

The Lincoln Sentinel has installed a junior Linotype in the office, which sounds the death knell of a number of typesetters. We seriously doubt, however, whether the junior is a money saving proposition in a country office.

Editor Robert Good of the Cawker Ledger announces the arrival of the sixth edition of the Good family last week. There are now three Good little boys and three Good little girls in this Good home. The Ledger editor is certainly there with the Goods.

 

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December 31, 1908, Downs News (ID 5167)

We claim distinction on this score: We went clear through the holiday season without once referring to it as "Xmas."

The Osborne News devoted a large share of its space last week to an attack on this paper and its editors. That is, many people took it that way, but no one is able to determine just what the editor of that sheet was trying to get through his hazy brain....If the News will furnish us with a diagram of its recent article so that we may know whether we have been insulted or complimented, we shall consider it a great favor. The present editor of the Osborne News enjoys such a clean and spotless reputation in this county that we can hardly bring ourselves to the belief that thoughts of evil in others could enter his pure and childlike mind.

 

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January 7, 1909, Downs News (ID 5168)

The Atchison Globe will soon issue a "Prosperity" edition of that paper, giving in detail the wonderful progress of the Central Branch territory in the past decade. W. H. Smith of Downs and B. P. Walker of Osborne will each contribute an article. The boys are both good writers, well acquainted with conditions then and now....The Globe is the new testament of the Central Branch editors and a favorite in the homes out this way.

Mrs. A. G. Van Haaften has kindly consented to help us out in the rush of work in this office. Mrs. Van Haaften was formerly a typesetter but has not worked at it for several years. Nevertheless her work indicates that she is thoroughly at home at the printer's case.

 

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January 14, 1909, Downs News (ID 5170)

Howard Ruede, who has been connected with the Osborne Farmer for 32 years, is writing some mighty interesting old-time articles for that paper. Last week he had an article entitled "The First Home of the Farmer" that was read with interest by every newspaper man in western Kansas. The experience of the Farmer's first editor was a repetition of that of every pioneer editor of the west. Ruede is an interesting writer and we hope he will keep it up.

William Charles and Miss Lottie Rudy of this city drove to Osborne last Saturday afternoon where they were married....For the past year she has been employed as a compositor at the Times office.

 

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January 21, 1909, Downs News (ID 5171)

A man always feels complimented when people guess him 20 pounds below what he really weighs. -- Osborne Farmer. That might be true of the fat editor of the Farmer, but this writer hasn't any 20 pounds to sacrifice to his vanity.

 

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January 28, 1909, Downs News (ID 5172)

Evangelist Oliver should go back to Mankato and straighten out those editors again. They are even writing poetry about one another.

 

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February 4, 1909, Downs News (ID 5174)

E. H. McFadden of Osborne was in town between trains yesterday morning. Mr. McFadden tells us that after this week he will not be connected with the Osborne News regularly, but will devote his entire time to his real estate work....

 

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February 11, 1909, Downs News (ID 5176)

Col. W. S. Tilton has sold his Beatrice (Neb.) Times to the Express of that place. He will remain with the paper for some time. -- Osborne Farmer.

Do not buy your supply of calendars for next year until you see the elegant sample line the News is showing. We not only do better work than the outside fellows, but we will save you about 25 percent on your calendar bill. A representative of this office will call on you in due time.

Gomer Davies of the Concordia Kansan has prospered in the newspaper business in the last few years, and he is not the kind to hoard his money up and let it rust, so he has lately bought a Linotype and an automobile. . . .

 

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February 18, 1909, Downs News (ID 5179)

Bert Headley and wife of Ponca City, Okla., were in town today on their way to Gaylord to visit old friends and relatives. Bert Headley is a son of Lew Headley of the Ponca City Daily Courier, and is a chip off the old block. The Headleys ran the Gaylord Herald for a hundred years or more, and about ten years ago moved to Ponca City and engaged in the daily newspaper work. They are making a barrel of money each year and we are glad of it. They are a great family of newspaper thoroughbreds. -- Concordia Blade.

J. J. Parker of Alton has sold his paper, the Alton Empire, to O. A. Schoonover of Oxford, Neb....

Writing back to the Messenger, a Smith County man who is visiting in Oklahoma says: "At Cestos, we met the Hoyts who used to run the Portis Patriot -- in fact, established it and later went to Downs. M. H. Hoyt, we believe, were the initials of the name of the old gentleman. The boy now weighs only 280 pounds and is still growing. The young man Hoyt is a banker and gets 10 percent for all the money he has to let on land...."

 

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February 25, 1909, Downs News (ID 5181)

The Atchison Globe's prosperity edition was issued on Wednesday of last week and contained much interesting matter in its 48 pages. There were many articles of interest to people along the Central Branch, including an article from the pen of W. H. Smith of this city and one written by B. P. Walker of Osborne. Both were well written articles and set forth the prosperity of the citizens of Osborne county in a very interesting way. The Globe, however, has made a mortal enemy of Walt Smith, and we are free to say that we do not blame him. They printed a picture and labeled it "W. H. Smith," but Walt declares that it is an old cut of Booker T. Washington that has been lying around the Globe office for the last twenty years.

J. J. Parker, who recently sold his Alton Empire to a Nebraska man, visited with the Downs newspaper men the latter part of last week. Mr. Parker is still undecided as to his future, and is in no hurry to re-invest, believing that he is entitled to a well-earned rest.

"One of the best ad writers in this section lives at Downs and does the advertising stunts for the Union Clothing Co. at that place. He figures out some dandy advertising schemes and they all watch for the Union Clothing Company ad." -- Gaylord Sentinel. The Sentinel is right! Mr. Carney is one of the most intelligent advertisers in this section of Kansas, and never fails to put something worthwhile in his space, something that will attract and keep the attention of his customers. And then as he follows it up by doing just what he says he will do, and that gives his advertising double value....

 

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March 4, 1909, Downs News (ID 5184)

The Times changes hands -- The Downs Times has been sold by Weld & Smith to J. J. Parker, formerly publisher of the Alton Empire, and the new proprietor takes charge of the plant on March 11. We understand the consideration is something like $4,000, exclusive of the building which has been sold to Dr. O. T. Gaston. The plant will be retained in the same location by Mr. Parker, we are told.

...The change is made on account of the fact that Mr. Weld's hearing has been failing for the past few years, and he is anxious to get into some other line of business....In the four years we have been in Downs we have found them to be first class men in every way and honorable competitors....The News takes pleasure in introducing Mr. and Mrs. Parker to the people of Downs as being in every way worthy of the support and confidence of our citizens. We have known them personally for a number of years and know whereof we speak....Weld & Smith retire from the management of the Times at noon today and J. J. Parker assumes control of the paper. W. H. Smith will probably remain with Mr. Parker for a short time until the new management gets started.

W. R. Baker, formerly of the Glen Elder Sentinel, has bought the Woodston You All's Doin's and took charge....Merton L. Smith, the former owner of the Doin's, will go to Oklahoma where he will be interested in a printing plant there.

We hope Baker will start in right by giving the paper a name that will relieve its readers of the tired feeling they have had for the past few years.

 

...
March 11, 1909, Downs News (ID 5186)

The Western News at Stockton has been leased by Herbert Baker, a young man from Russell....

 

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April 9, 1909, Downs News (ID 5193)

Harry Root, the well-known correspondent of the Topeka State Journal, who has made this territory as a newspaper correspondent for the past twenty-five years, was in town Monday night. Harry recently had a serious attack of sciatic rheumatism which laid him up for six weeks, the first sickness he had had in forty-five years. That six weeks of sickness made more change in Harry's looks than Father Time has accomplished in the pervious twenty-five years.

 

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April 15, 1909, Downs News (ID 5194)

W. H. Gray, one of the first settlers of Kirwin, and for many years a prominent newspaper man of that city, died last Wednesday at his home of diabetes. For several years, he has been connected with the Kirwin Argus, and for a long time wrote a series of interesting articles concerning the early days. He also conducted "Argus Eyes."

 

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April 22, 1909, Downs News (ID 5196)

The Kirwin Argus announces that it will move to Woodston in the near future. The new editor is F. M. Learned, who for a time worked for J. J. Parker in this city....This will leave Kirwin with but one paper and will fill the vacancy at Woodston.

"Al Sears, who recently resigned his position as mail clerk on the Central Branch, and went to Mt. Vernon, Wash., to engage in the newspaper business, was a printer on the old Cawker City Journal 28 years ago, the office then on the second floor of the present Dewey House with outside steps on the north. A terrific thunderstorm occurred one day and Al Sears and another printer were standing in the north doorway, a window on the south side being open, created a draft, and Sears' fellow workman was killed instantly by lightning. Sears soon afterward secured the position as mail clerk and continued in it over 25 years." -- Cawker Record.

 

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April 29, 1909, Downs News (ID 5198)

Martin H. Hoyt, at one time publisher of the Portis Patriot, was in town yesterday morning....Mr. Hoyt is now out of the newspaper business and lives at Cestos, Okla.

 

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May 13, 1909, Downs News (ID 5200)

The Lebanon Argus has suspended publication, and the owner announces that the plant will probably be used in establishing a Democratic paper. The Argus was a splendid paper when it was in the hands of G. C. McNiece....

 

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May 20, 1909, Downs News (ID 5201)

It Was a Hoodoo. Last week's issue of the News was the worst we ever got out. Things started wrong the very first day we began to work on the issue, but we did not know what the matter was. The printers pied type, the typewriter giggled in our face like a silly schoolgirl while we were writing an obituary; the press mashed the type, the rollers wouldn't take ink, and the gasoline engine gave a wild shriek like a Comanche Indian, kicked up its heels like a mule colt, gave a few grunts and refused to run. There was something wrong but we couldn't locate the trouble until after the paper had gone to press and we finally managed to get them all printed. Then we discovered the trouble. The issue was volume No. "23" and was issued on May "13." The mixture of 13 and 23 was too much and proved a disastrous hoodoo.

 

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May 27, 1909, Downs News (ID 5202)

Walter H. Smith, formerly editor and half owner of the Times of this city, has purchased the Herington Times, the leading newspaper in the town of Herington in Dickinson County, and will take complete control of it June 1. Herington is a town of about four thousand inhabitants and is a very important railroad center, being the headquarters of the Rock Island railroad for central Kansas.

 

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June 10, 1909, Downs News (ID 5204)

R. M. Coffelt, foreman at the Times office, had rather an unpleasant experience last Friday evening, being bitten by a snake. He heard something rustling among some papers, and lighting a match held it down to ascertain from whence came the noise. He discovered the snake, but just at that instant a puff of wind blew out the match, and in the momentary darkness the snake sprang and bit him on the middle finger of the right hand. Dr. Hodgson was called and dressed the hand, which was quite sore for a day or two. The snake evidently was not a poisonous one.

 

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June 17, 1909, Downs News (ID 5206)

Wm. Baker of Fort Scott, father of Ben T. Baker, editor of the Smith County Journal, and W. R. Baker, editor of the Stockton Review, died Sunday at the ripe age of 80 years. He was formerly a citizen of Beloit and late of Cawker, where he was engaged in the hotel business....

 

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June 24, 1909, Downs News (ID 5209)

Merton L. Smith, who gained notoriety in this section by the fool name he gave his Woodston paper -- You All's Doin's -- is now preparing to start a daily paper in Sapulpa, Okla., and its name will be still worse. It is proposed to call it The Sapulpa Hell Raiser. Mert Smith is so constituted that he would make a vaudeville performance out of his grandmother's funeral if he were placed in charge. There ought to be at least enough dignity about an editor to give his paper a decent name.

 

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July 15, 1909, Downs News (ID 5213)

Ralph M. Coffelt, who has been employed on the Times for several months, left for Plainville Saturday, where he will hereafter be employed on the Plainville Times.

 

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August 5, 1909, Downs News (ID 5217)

The Logan Republican has contracted for a Simplex typesetting machine which will be installed in a week or two, and the Stockton Review will probably install a Junior Linotype in the near future. The scarcity of competent printers and the demand for increased facilities is driving the Kansas publishers to this step. In a few years, machines will be found in practically all of the Kansas print shops.

 

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August 12, 1909, Downs News (ID 5218)

Last week's issue of the Osborne Farmer marked the beginning of the sixth year for that paper under the management of B. P. Walker. Next to the Farmer, the Downs News is the oldest under continuous management among the papers of the county. Every other paper in the county has changed hands within the past year. The News is now in its fifth year under the present management.

We received this week a copy of the Deweese Hustler, published at Deweese in Clay County, Neb. In looking at the editorial page, we find the name of Arthur C. Gardner as editor and publisher. Arthur is the son of Rev. and Mrs. F. W. Gardner, formerly well known and highly respected citizens of Downs. Mr. Gardner was a former pastor of the Congregational Church here. He was one of the founders of the Downs Business College and was the founder of the Downs News.

Among the newspaper men at the (Lincoln) park Sunday, exclusive of the Cawker and Downs editors, were Gomer Davies of the Concordia Kansan; E. W. Swan of the Beloit Gazette-Times; E. D. George of the Mankato Monitor; F. M. Cook of the Jamestown Optimist; Palmer B. Felt of the Beloit Gazette; W. R. Baker of the Stockton Review; W. L. Chambers of the Stockton Record; T. E. Skinner of the Osborne Farmer; Owen Brice of the Glen Elder Sentinel; O. A. Schoonover of the Alton Empire....

 

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August 19, 1909, Downs News (ID 5221)

Miss Emma Nunn, who has been employed on the Glen Elder Sentinel for a number of months, will succeed Miss Mitchell on the Times. Miss Nunn took her first lessons in the art preservative in this office.

Miss Clara Mitchell, who for the past two or three years has held a case in the Times office, will sever her connection with that office on Saturday of this week, and after a visit with the family of R. T. Weld in Saline County, will go to her home in Burr Oak for a well-earned rest. Miss Mitchell is one of the best typesetters in the west half of Kansas, and is also a local rustler of fine ability.

 

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September 9, 1909, Downs News (ID 5224)

The Plainville Gazette has installed a Simplex typesetting machine and the composition work on that paper is now all done by machine. A number of Sixth District papers are putting in machines of different kinds in order to handle the news of their respective localities quickly and at a reduced cost.

 

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September 23, 1909, Downs News (ID 5226)

Last week's issue of the News contained 819 inches of display advertising. Of this amount, only 75 inches represented outside interests, the balance -- 744 inches -- were advertisements of business firms in Downs. Not one line of foreign or medicine ads in the paper. If there was another paper in the Sixth Congressional District that approached this record, we failed to see it. We do not say this boastfully, but merely to show that Downs has the most enterprising set of merchants in this end of the state, and that they know a first-class advertising medium when they see it.

The fight between the two Norton papers, the News and Champion, became so bitter and the editors employed so many vicious names and vulgar phrases through their columns that a postal inspector was notified, who came and took copies of the two papers to Washington for examination. It is barely possible that both papers may be excluded from the mails. There is a limit beyond which Uncle Sam will not allow papers to go and still enjoy the privileges of the mails, and it seems that these two editors in venting their spleen on each other came near going the limit. It is the most disgusting newspaper fight the Sixth District has had in years.

 

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November 11, 1909, Downs News (ID 5233)

Bent Murdock Dead. Thomas Benton Murdock, editor of the ElDorado Republican, died in St. Mary's Hospital in Kansas City last night of a disease where the nerves of the body fail to do their work. He was 67 years of age. Mr. Murdock came to Kansas in 1855 with his father and brothers, and had often told Atchison friends how at one time he camped out on the present site of Trinity Church. The two boys, Marsh and Bent, worked at whatever they could find to do, both in Topeka and Emporia. Marsh and Bent broke the prairie with oxen and planted sod corn where the Santa Fe station in Topeka now stands. Bent carried the hod of the brick masons in building several of the first business houses in Topeka. Bent Murdock served through the Civil War, and in 1870 began publishing a newspaper in ElDorado. He was a Republican, and had many friends throughout the state who believed that both Stanley and Hoch treated him unjustly in not giving him office in return for what he had done for them. He was fish commissioner of the state at the time of his death, and a most enthusiastic one." -- Globe.

The News job department is getting out a large number of handsome calendars for the various businessmen of Downs. Heretofore, this is a branch of the business that has never been done here, it being necessary for the businessmen to send away for this work....Nearly every businessman in town using that class of advertising has taken the home product this year, and are well satisfied with the change.

 

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November 18, 1909, Downs News (ID 5234)

Speed is to have a newspaper. An old outfit that has been stored at Phillipsburg for several years has been moved over there for the purpose. Speed is experiencing something of a boom lately, and the people feel that they should have a paper....

 

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November 25, 1909, Downs News (ID 5235)

That Walt Smith of the Herington Times is prospering is evidenced by the fact that he has installed a Junior Linotype and an electric motor in his office. Walt has been in Herington less than a year, but in that time has greatly improved his plant in many ways....

Thomas W. Flory of Burlington, Kan., formerly publisher of the Burlington Democrat, arrived the latter part of last week and has accepted a position as foreman of the Times. Mr. Flory sold his paper at Burlington last week. The day he left Burlington he was married to Miss Florence Hudson of that city and brought his bride to Downs with him.

 

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December 16, 1909, Downs News (ID 5237)

Charley Wells, who was formerly employed in this office, but who for the past year or two has been in Colorado, came in last Friday morning on his way to Osborne, where he will spend the holidays with his parents and friends. Charley is now employed as a Linotype operator on a paper in Lamar, Colo., and has a good position. Up to the last two months, he has been employed as floor man on a daily paper there....

In a long-winded editorial, the Logan Herald asks "Who Has the Prosperity?" Well, the fellow who drags a little printing outfit all over the Sixth District trying to find a suitable location for a Democratic paper in these prosperous times surely won't find much of it.

 

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January 6, 1910, Downs News (ID 5240)

We understand that a corporation of Osborne businessmen has bought the Osborne News, and that Will Fisk of Plainville will have charge of the paper. The Osborne News, though an ancient enemy of ours, is a good newspaper property...." -- Plainville Gazette.

 

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January 20, 1910, Downs News (ID 5242)

New folding machine -- Next week the News will install a new folding machine in the office. The work of folding so large a list of papers as is now gotten out by hand is slow and causes a great loss of time, and the addition is found necessary in order to facilitate our work.

There was a time when our subscription list could be folded by hand in an hour or so, but that time has passed....A typesetting machine will also be installed as soon as the publishers have fully satisfied themselves as to the best and most practicable machine on the market.

A new editor is at the helm of the Osborne News. His name is Horace G. Goss, and he took charge last week. Besides being a writer of experience, Mr. Goss is also a practical printer, which is a very necessary qualification for the country editor....Mr. Goss, in his introductory, gave the impression that politics would be a secondary consideration....

 

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January 27, 1910, Downs News (ID 5244)

Will Palmer's Methodism was put to a fierce test this week. Two forms of the Jewell Republican were thrown from the press and pied just as the edition was on the last run. If Will went through the ordeal without sinning in thought or speech, than the argument in favor of the old-time religion is stronger than anything that Oliver or any other evangelist can put up. -- Concordia Kansan.

Donald Davis is putting in his extra hours out of school learning the printer's trade, and if his progress in the art continues as rapid as that of his first week, he will soon be a full-fledged printer.

 

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February 10, 1910, Downs News (ID 5246)

Horace G. Goss, the new editor of the Osborne News, was in town Monday

night....Mr. Goss tells us he will install a Linotype in the News office in a few weeks.

Dan B. Dyer, the old political warhorse of Smith County, has at last been substantially rewarded for his fidelity to the party organization by being appointed postmaster at Smith Center. "Billy" Nelson has held the position of postmaster there for the past 12 years, and has been one of the most satisfactory officials the town ever had....

 

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February 24, 1910, Downs News (ID 5248)

The third annual banquet of the Downs Commercial Club, held at the opera house on Tuesday evening, was without doubt the most brilliant social event held in Downs for many years....After the tables were cleared, the meeting was called to order by Toastmaster C. E. Mann, and the speaking began. The first speaker introduced was Robert Good, editor of the Cawker City Ledger, who spoke on the subject "Business Is Business." His talk was extremely interesting and practical and made a distinct hit with his hearers. Mr. Good is known as "Optimistic Bob," and his efforts on occasions like this are always characteristic and inspiring. W. L. Chambers of the Stockton Record, who was to have spoken on the subject "Stockton's Greeting," was unable to present, having missed his train....The next speaker was J. J. Parker, editor of the Downs Times and in spite of the fact that Mr. Parker had been sick at home for several weeks, and was therefore unable to prepare a set speech, he responded to the call and gave an excellent extemporaneous address. His subject was "Impressions," and his talk was full of practical and timely suggestions. It was well received by the club and guest....The principal speaker of the evening was Ben R. Vardeman, associate editor of the Merchant's Trade Journal of Des Moines, Iowa, who spoke upon the subject "The Philosophy of Commercial Progress."...He spoke for an hour and a half and held the attention of his hearers throughout....

 

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March 17, 1910, Downs News (ID 5250)

(With two-column picture of The Evans folder connected to press; made by Omaha Folding Machine Co.)

Our New Folder at Work. The above is a cut of the new folding machine recently installed in this office. The machine is attached to the press, as shown in the picture, and when the printing is finished the papers are all folded and trimmed and ready to mail. It is a great convenience and time saver.

T. W. Flory, who for several months has held the position of foreman at the Times office, left yesterday morning for Leavenworth, where he has been offered a good position with Samuel Dodsworth Printing Co.

 

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March 24, 1910, Downs News (ID 5252)

W. H. Ransom went down to Kansas City Friday evening to purchase a new job press to be added to the News equipment. The work of this office has increased to such an extent that additional machinery has become a necessity.

 

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March 31, 1910, Downs News (ID 5254)

Last week the News installed a new job press, one of the largest made. It takes a form 12x18 inches in size. On this press we can handle any kind of large work, and brings the equipment of the office up to the equal of any in this section of Kansas. It is a very expensive piece of machinery, but the increasing work of the office demanded it.

 

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May 5, 1910, Downs News (ID 5259)

Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Alrich, editors of the Cawker City Record, spent the day in Beloit taking in the GAR doings. This worthy couple have been affiliated with the GAR and WRC organizations of Mitchell County and the state of Kansas for the past 30 years, having been residents of Cawker for the past 31 years. They now hold the record of the oldest editors in the Sixth District in years of service, with the exception of +?Deacon' Chambers of the Stockton Record. Mr. Alrich is a past commander of the Reynolds Post No. 43 of Cawker City. Mrs. Alrich has been a very active woman of Kansas, having been in active newspaper work longer than any other woman in Kansas....Mrs. Alrich is also the only woman now living in Kansas who was one of the 40 charter members of the Woman's Relief Corps which was organized in Denver in 1883. Mrs. Alrich wears a beautiful gold pendant set with four diamonds, presented to her by the state WRC as a token of esteem when she was department president for Kansas in the term 1895-96....Mr. Alrich has been in poor health of late, but Mrs. Alrich can get out the paper in good form, and do anything from writing the locals to the last turn of the press when necessary. -- Beloit Gazette.

 

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May 12, 1910, Downs News (ID 5260)

...The office force has been at work on two high school annuals. The Portis annual was finished and delivered Monday and work is now being rapidly pushed on the Downs book....

 

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May 19, 1910, Downs News (ID 5262)

Charley Wells, who...has been employed on the Osborne News,...went to Concordia Tuesday evening, where he has accepted a position on the Daily Blade.

 

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May 26, 1910, Downs News (ID 5264)

C. C. Clardy, agent of the Missouri Pacific at Portis, has purchased a half interest in the Portis Independent, and will become an editor....

"We are very sorry to hear that Editor Schoonover of the Alton Empire has gone violently insane. He had been acting queerly for some weeks past, but Tuesday afternoon he became violent and seemed bent on self-destruction....Several people in this town, including the writer, are somewhat acquainted with the young man, and can testify that he was a fine young man who seemed to have a bright future." -- Stockton Review.

 

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June 9, 1910, Downs News (ID 5266)

The Alton Empire is now being published by two young ladies -- Misses Maude Schoonover and Margaret Herd -- and they are doing a good job of it. Last week the paper was particularly newsy and the makeup and mechanical work was very neat. Editor Schoonover, who has been ill for several weeks, is said to be improving and hopes to be able to return to Alton in a short time.

Charlie Wells, who for several weeks has been employed on the Concordia Blade, passed through Downs Monday morning on his way to Alton, where he takes temporary charge of the Empire....

 

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June 23, 1910, Downs News (ID 5268)

The Osborne News, which has changed hands several times in the past year or two, was sold again this week by H. G. Goss, the recent owner, to Warren McClellen of Massachusetts and Harry Clark, formerly with the Stockton Record....Mr. Clark has several times been employed here with J. J. Parker and has the appearance of being a fine young man. Mr. McClellen has been in the newspaper business all his life....Both young men are practical printers, and will be thus enabled to accomplish a lot of work with a small payroll, which is one of the secrets of success in country journalism....

 

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July 14, 1910, Downs News (ID 5273)

E. L. Whitmore of Purcell, Okla., was in town Tuesday....Mr. Whitmore is the son of Walt Whitmore, formerly publisher of the Downs Chief, and has been in the newspaper business with his father at Purcell for several years. They sold their paper about six weeks ago....

 

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July 21, 1910, Downs News (ID 5274)

Every decent newspaper publisher, regardless of who he is supporting for congress, will deplore the fact that there is an editor in the Sixth District who will stoop to the dirty mudslinging tactics adopted by the editor of the Mankato Monitor. His wanton attack on the editor of the Burr Oak Herald was the biggest piece of newspaper idiocy the present campaign has witnessed. It was entirely uncalled for and was easily proved to be false, which left the Monitor and its candidate for congress in a deplorable position....

W. C. Palmer, editor and publisher of the Jewell Republican, announces that he has passed his 50th birthday. He has been at Jewell City and at the helm of the old Republican for 29 years, going there a penniless young man and was in debt for his schooling and with no money to pay with. The old Republican had died for lack of support, but young Palmer revived it and buckled down to work in dead earnest. From the first issue he gave the people of Jewell a good paper, and since that time has improved with every number....Its editor is one of the most widely quoted men in the newspaper business in Kansas. He paid his debts and acquired a competence from that little newspaper, and at the same time built up a reputation for honesty and square dealing....Every week the paper is filled with bright paragraphs and every column teems with virility and optimism, radiating youth and happiness to a large circle of satisfied readers. Men like Palmer never grow old, no matter what the record in the old family Bible says.

 

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August 11, 1910, Downs News (ID 5279)

An enthusiastic editor wrote: "The battle is now opened." But alas, the compositor spelled battle with an "o" and his readers said they had suspected it right along.

 

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August 18, 1910, Downs News (ID 5280)

The misspelled word contest in last week's paper proved a winner, and a great deal of interest was shown in it....To advertisers we will say that these little ads cost but 30 cents an issue, and the fact was plainly demonstrated last week that everybody is reading them, thus making their value sure....

 

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August 25, 1910, Downs News (ID 5283)

Charlie Wells, who purchased the Alton Empire last week, was employed several months in this office in 1907....Alton is one of the best little towns in this part of Kansas and is deserving of a good paper....

 

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October 13, 1910, Downs News (ID 5289)

L. L. Alrich, editor of the Cawker City Public Record, passed the 70th anniversary of his birth last week. Mr. Alrich is one of the oldest editors in active service in the state, and has been connected with the Record at Cawker City for a generation. Mrs. Alrich is actively associated with her husband in the making of the Record, and both are hale and hearty, giving their time and labor every day to the work....

 

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November 17, 1910, Downs News (ID 5292)

Link Drummond, formerly a well-known printer in this section, and later a Christian minister, was elected probate judge of Norton County on the Republican ticket last week by a majority of 43.

The News force got out a hurry job last week that nearly broke the record. The copy for a 16-page catalog was brought to the office at noon Saturday. Two printers went to work on it, and in just eight hours it was completed and delivered to the customer.

"The Lebanon Argus of last week announces the sale of the subscription list of that paper to W. H. Wright, editor of the Lebanon Times. Mr. Root also announces that the material with which the paper has been printed for the last several years is for sale, as he has accepted a position with a paper at Fairbury, and will leave Lebanon in the hope of finding a place where his ability as a writer and a printer is better realized and more fully appreciated. This leaves our neighbor at the east with but one newspaper, the Times, which promises to be better than ever under the new order of things....We have three full-grown newspapers here." -- Smith Center Journal.

 

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November 24, 1910, Downs News (ID 5294)

Miss Mertie Berry, who for the past five and a half years has been employed in this office, has severed her connection with the News and on Dec. 1 will be married to Sabert R. Hampton....She is not only efficient in her work but she is also a clever writer, and her "West Side Notes" and "Truck Patch" were read and enjoyed by all our readers....

Geo. B. Munson announces that he will soon leave the Hill City New Era and will locate somewhere in the West....

 

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December 1, 1910, Downs News (ID 5295)

The Smith Center Messenger is no more, the equipment, subscription and good will having been sold to the Smith County Pioneer. Nelson and Hill have given the people of Smith County a bright little paper and, speaking for ourselves, the Messenger will be missed from our exchange table. But this is the age of fewer and better papers, and the editors of the Messenger wisely concluded that a third paper in a town the size of Smith Center was an unnecessary burden on the businessmen....Two papers can make a good living in Smith Center, and it will be a money saver to the merchants. The Pioneer will represent the policies of the Republican Party and the Journal the Democratic, and both are ably edited.

Two weeks ago we used two entire columns abusing the editor of the Osborne Farmer, in the course of which we used up the entire output of two dictionaries. The editor replied last week in a short article in which he poked fun at us between the lines, spread taffy on at intervals and wound up by inviting himself down to see us next 27th. There's no use trying to get a fight out of a fat man.

 

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December 8, 1910, Downs News (ID 5297)

In our ninth year -- With this issue The News enters its ninth year in the newspaper field. It is also the fifth year for the paper under the present management. The paper was started under great difficulties by its founder and the first few years of its life were full of troubles and uncertainties. That it has surmounted all these difficulties and is today recognized as one of the leading papers of this section is a matter of gratification to its publishers....

The worst newspaper fight in the Sixth District just now is going on between the two Mankato papers -- the Monitor and the Advocate. It is really a renewal of an old-time fight which lasted for years. The two editors have been bitter personal enemies for years, but a truce was patched up between them a few years ago during the progress of a great religious revival there....But lately the war has broken out between them again, and it is more bitter than before. They accuse each other of all manner of crimes, and indulge in personalities that must be very tiresome to their readers. And the worst part of it is that both are men of more than average ability in the newspaper field. The two papers rank with the best in the district, and the only unpleasant prospect is the miserable row between them. It is a real pity that two smart men will allow themselves to engage in such a warfare, when it cannot be otherwise than detrimental to both.

Miss Amy Brake is learning the printing art in this office.

 

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December 15, 1910, Downs News (ID 5299)

The Smith Center Journal and the Belleville Telescope each issued a 16-page Christmas edition last week. The Journal shows wonderful improvement since the installation of its Linotype a few weeks ago.

"The editor of the Downs News, who had been trying to pick a fuss ever since the election with the editor of the Osborne Farmer, quit last week and declared hostilities at an end. He said there was no use trying to row with a fat man. Bert Headley, now of this city, who is of immense physical proportions...,says if that last jibe does not stir the Farmer editor to action he himself is going to take a club and visit the Downs pencil pusher in his lair. Such covert stabs at the Honorable Fats must not go unchallenged." -- Smith Center Pioneer.

 

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December 22, 1910, Downs News (ID 5300)

Bert Walker, editor of the Osborne Farmer, is a lucky scamp. Besides being able to junket around over the country and spend a lot of shekels on a California trip, he has a bunch of printers in the office who can get out a better paper than he can.

We are in receipt of a postal card from Bert Walker written from Salt Lake City. The pictorial part of the card shows the interior of the Mormon Tabernacle, and below this he writes: "Dear Mann: I tried hard to land you a job here as a tenor singer, but was informed that they wanted nothing but basses." And thus our fond hope of being permitted to mingle our tuneful voice with that of some 75 fair young descendants of the late lamented Brigham Young has gone glimmering....

 

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December 29, 1910, Downs News (ID 5301)

Bob Good Celebrates. "The Ledger is celebrating a double birthday today -- the paper enters upon its 13th year this week, and its editor starts on the umpty-umpth year of his life. The paper and the editor have each had many ups and downs, have met with adversities, have been prosperous, hated and respected at times. The paper has a large family of subscribers and the editor has a large family of children....The paper used to be only five columns in size, and the editor used to have only five children. Now the paper is six columns in size and the editor has six children. We believe that a six-column paper is large enough for Cawker City. The editor's birthday comes so near Christmas that he never gets any birthday presents, but if the paper survives this 'hoodoo' year of its life, we're going to give it a new dress for a birthday present next year." -- Cawker Ledger.

The Topeka Capital, in a bold headline, calls it "11worth." The Leavenworth papers could retaliate by referring to the capital city as "2peka."

The News has lost two fine young ladies from its employ via the marriage route in the past month. We do not claim to be a matrimonial agency either.

 

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January 5, 1911, Downs News (ID 5304)

Miss Grace Gordon of Concordia is the new compositor in this office....

The Smith Center Pioneer is the latest paper in this section to install a Linotype in the office. The Linotype is a very expensive improvement, and the readers of the Pioneer should appreciate the enterprise of the publishers of that paper. It is getting so that the making of an up-to-date newspaper is a pretty expensive proposition all around.

E. W. Howe has sold the Atchison Globe to his son, Eugene Howe, and a syndicate of Atchison businessmen. The Globe is one of the most noted papers in the United States, made so by the individuality and brilliant intellect of Howe. He will be greatly missed by the people of Kansas, and especially by the editors along the Central Branch, where the Globe is the best reading matter that comes to their exchange table. Ill health is the cause of his retirement.

 

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January 19, 1911, Downs News (ID 5307)

The Hill City New Era has been sold to the owners of the Hill City Reveille, the Democratic paper of that city. This leaves Hill City with but two papers.

 

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January 26, 1911, Downs News (ID 5308)

Editor B. P. Walker of the Osborne Farmer is fat, good natured and slow to anger, but if he doesn't sue the Kansas City Star for 14 million dollars damages on that picture printed in last Sunday's issue, we miss our guess. He can summon all kind of evidence in his behalf.

 

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February 9, 1911, Downs News (ID 5310)

L. L. Alrich, editor of the Cawker City Record, is getting along in years, but he shows signs of being a fighter yet when aroused by what he believes to be just provocation. At a meeting of the city council one night last week, the mayor of Cawker made a bitter personal attack on Mr. Alrich in regard to the letting of the city printing last year. In his paper last week, Mr. Alrich replied in kind, and gave the mayor a roast that he will not soon forget.

The Henry (Ill.) Republican, where W. H. Ransom of this paper learned the rudiments of his trade, has the following to say of the News after a complimentary reference to their former employee: "Ransom & Mann, at Downs, Kan., send us copies of the News of January 19 and 26, which show thrift and a paper well filled with local advertisements...."

 

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March 2, 1911, Downs News (ID 5313)

Editor E. D. George of the Mankato Monitor has been appointed postmaster of that town to succeed Postmaster Woolen....

 

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March 9, 1911, Downs News (ID 5314)

The Logan Herald, which has been growing smaller from week to week until the last issue might easily be mistaken for a postage stamp, has finally suspended. This leaves an opening at Logan for another "long felt want."

 

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March 23, 1911, Downs News (ID 5315)

Fred W. Knapp of the Beloit Gazette has a sleepy name, but he is getting out a wide-awake paper just the same....

W. B. Gaumer, at one time editor of the News, is now located at Midfield,

Texas, where he is president of the Midfield State Bank....

 

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March 30, 1911, Downs News (ID 5316)

Charley Blakesley, author of the "Kansas Notes" and "Starbeams" in the Kansas City Star, was in town between trains Monday night on his way home from Osborne, where he had been spending the day with his old friend, B. P. Walker....

 

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April 13, 1911, Downs News (ID 5318)

Billy Wright, editor of the Lebanon Times, and at one time a popular ball player in this section, was married to Miss Nellie Roberts at Lebanon last Wednesday night.

Chas. F. Bassett, representing the Mergenthaler Linotype Co. of Chicago, was in town the latter part of last week interviewing the publishers of this paper in the interest of his company. It is probable that one of his machines will be installed in this office in the near future.

C. I. W. Smith, representing the Omaha Folding Machine Co. of that city, passed through here Monday. The News purchased one of their folders a little over a year ago, and it has proven one of the greatest time savers we have ever invested in. It is a fine machine and reasonable in price, and a valuable adjunct to the modern country print shop....They not only put out dependable goods, but their treatment of their customers is such that dealing with them is a pleasure....

 

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April 20, 1911, Downs News (ID 5320)

Will Install Linotype. The News last week closed a contract with the Mergenthaler Linotype Company of New York for one of their latest model Junior Linotypes to be installed in this office as soon as it can be shipped from the factory. The problem of help is getting to be a serious one with every publisher, and it is only a question of time when every country office will have to install one of these machines in order that the rapidly increasing demands upon a country paper for news and job work may be met and adequately handled....The type now in use in this office has been used continuously for about eight years, and is naturally getting badly worn. A new face would have to be purchased anyway, and we have finally decided to buy a machine, which gives the readers of the paper a new type every week in the year....

 

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May 11, 1911, Downs News (ID 5322)

The Downs News will install a Mergenthaler Linotype exactly like the one operated in the Journal office for the last six months.... The work and capacity of the Linotype is too well known to require comment. It is a fixture in all modern printing offices; to keep pace with the work we turn out every week and fight it through in the old way would be unbearable grief. But a neighbor suggests that we may meet up with more serious grief through depending on the machine than in depending on the old way. Something in that. To presume that inexperienced help can pick up the manipulation of an intricate machine such as the Linotype is, surely causes grief during the time the novice is learning the curves of the thing, but an apt student will pick it up in a hurry.... -- Smith Center Journal.

"The Belleville Telescope has added a new Junior typesetting machine to its office, and also the Downs News has given an order for one. This is the same kind of machine used in the Pioneer office...." -- Smith Center Pioneer.

 

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May 18, 1911, Downs News (ID 5323)

The new Mergenthaler Linotype purchased for this office...arrived Monday of this week and we hope to have it in use on next week's paper. An expert from the factory is expected the latter part of the week....It takes some little time to get onto all the ropes in connection with a Linotype, but we hope soon to be able to master it and give our readers a much better paper than we have been able to do under recent conditions.

The Belleville Telescope has installed a new Linotype, a new Babcock printing press and a new Eclipse folder. The Telescope is setting a pretty hot pace for the Fifth District papers to follow.

The Osborne Farmer boasts that the windows of that office have been washed this year and will be again washed in 1914. Somebody should tell the Farmer editor that constant rubbing of window glass with water will wear holes in the hardest pane of glass in time.

Natoma is a small town but it supports one of the best small-town newspapers in this section of the state. H. B. Brown, the publisher, is getting out a neat little paper....

 

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May 25, 1911, Downs News (ID 5325)

We will be obliged to go another week without the use of the Linotype which arrived last week. The type metal, which was ordered from Chicago, was delayed on the road and did not arrive in time for use this week.

 

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June 1, 1911, Downs News (ID 5328)

Chas. F. Bassett, special representative of the Mergenthaler Linotype Co., arrived Monday morning to install the new machine purchased for this office. Mr. Bassett knows every nook and crook around a Linotype and handles them as easily as the ordinary man does a typewriter.

 

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June 8, 1911, Downs News (ID 5330)

Last week we were able to show our readers the possibilities of the Linotype in the hands of an expert. The machine was used but two days on the paper. This week it is in the hands of novices who have not yet got next to its many intricacies....We hope, with perseverance and patience of our readers, to soon be able to make up for the deficiency.

Downs people without exception read with regret the announcement in last week's Downs Times that Paul C. Rankin, who for the past six months has been one of the editors and publishers of that paper, has accepted a position in Salina and would leave Downs on or about June 30. Mr. Rankin was selected by Senator J. L. Bristow to take charge of the editorial page of the Salina Journal to succeed Paul Lovewell, who will engage in business in Topeka....Mr. Rankin is a young man of fine ability and is well equipped, both as to education and experience, for the position....

Earl B. Morris, foreman of the Cawker City Ledger office, was in town Tuesday soliciting advertisements for the annual catalogue of the Lincoln Park Chautauqua.

 

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June 15, 1911, Downs News (ID 5331)

...The first week in last November, the Journal installed a Linotype and after the first week not a line of hand composition has been done in this office for the body of the paper.... -- Smith Center Journal.

 

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June 22, 1911, Downs News (ID 5333)

Charley Hillebrandt, at one time editor of the Osborne Farmer, but lately of the Council Grove Guard, was in town Friday morning....He has sold his paper at Council Grove and is now on the lookout for a good location.

 

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July 6, 1911, Downs News (ID 5335)

It is with sad heart and bowed head that we are compelled to chronicle the death of Mrs. W. H. Ransom, which occurred at her home in this city on Tuesday morning, July 4, at 3:30 o'clock.

For five long weeks she has bravely battled against the enemy and her anxious relatives and host of friends have hoped against hope and fought with her against the slow but sure approach of death....Just as the first rays of the morning threw their beams upon the treetops, her gentle spirit winged its flight to the arms of its maker....She was the ideal in all that go to make up the beautiful virtues of true womanhood....Ellen Wright was born near Canton, Ohio, November 21, 1882. When but two years of age, she came with her parents to Kansas, locating in Marvin. After a short residence there, the family moved to Phillipsburg, where she grew to womanhood....She spent practically her entire life in Phillipsburg until she came to Downs with her husband in the spring of 1905. On Nov. 11, 1900, she was married to Willard H. Ransom. Two little daughters were born to them -- Maxine, aged seven, and Mary Virginia, aged four....At the time of her death, she was aged 28 years, seven months and 13 days.

Our thanks are due to J. J. Parker of the Times, who kindly sent his foreman over last week to assist in getting out our issue, which bid fair to be late on account of sickness. The help came at a most opportune time and was highly appreciated.

 

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July 13, 1911, Downs News (ID 5337)

E. A. Ross, editor of the Burr Oak Herald, who has been quite sick for the past year, died at his home in that city last Saturday....The paper has for some time been under the management of his son, and will continue so.

 

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October 26, 1911, Downs News (ID 5346)

Wonders will never cease. Jay E. House, known all over the state of Kansas as "Dodd Gaston," by reason of his humorous column in the Topeka Capital, was married last week to Mrs. Julia Wikidal Wells of Massillon, Ohio. Mr. House has always been considered a confirmed old bachelor....

 

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November 23, 1911, Downs News (ID 5349)

One of the swiftest jobs of type composition ever pulled off in this part of Kansas was executed in the News office last Thursday. The Harlow Mercantile Company that day purchased the Crist, Hettinger stock of goods and about noon gave us an order for a two-page bill. The copy for the bill, which filled two full pages in the paper and quoted prices on more than 250 articles, was not handed in until 2:30 p.m. But in just five hours of actual working time after that the composition was completed and the bill ready for the press....It takes equipment and hard work to accomplish such a feat, and the News has the equipment. In five hours, two men, with the aid of the Linotype, accomplished what it would have taken four or five men with an unlimited type supply to have done....

The Osborne Farmer last week purchased a Standard Linotype and will discard the old handset method as soon as the machine is received and installed. After a Linotype has once been installed in a print shop, no amount of money would induce the publisher to go back to the old way. The Farmer will install the first Standard in the Sixth Congressional District.

 

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December 7, 1911, Downs News (ID 5351)

The Osborne News is now a daily paper, the first issue of the daily being sent out last Saturday, Dec. 1. The paper is called the Evening News. We would be glad to see Editor Hadley make a success of his venture, but it is a big undertaking in a town the size of Osborne, especially in a year like this. The

Downs agent for the paper is Harry Hoover. The first issue of the paper was a very creditable one.

 

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December 14, 1911, Downs News (ID 5352)

Frank Heath...was interested in knowing how the News was made, and was taken through the plant and shown how the type for the paper is cast by the new machine, how the paper is printed and folded by machinery, and at last stamped for mailing by machinery....

 

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December 21, 1911, Downs News (ID 5353)

The Jamestown Optimist has purchased a complete new printing outfit to take the place of the plant destroyed by fire....Bob Good, the owner of the paper, is one of the best fellows in the world, and deserves better luck than he has been having lately. Fred Cook, who is managing the paper, is one of the best newspaper men along the Central Branch....

 

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December 28, 1911, Downs News (ID 5355)

Linotype operators who want to come west and grow up with the country are getting numerous. Nearly every mail brings us a letter from some aspirant for the job in this office. They want all the way from $15 to $25 a week.

 

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January 18, 1912, Downs News (ID 5356)

Rev. H. P. Mann, father of Chas. E. Mann of the News, died at his home in Phillipsburg on Tuesday morning, aged 80 years, 5 months and 26 days. Rev. Mann was born in Lawrenceville, Ohio, entered the ministry when a young man, and continued in this good work until a few years ago....

 

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January 25, 1912, Downs News (ID 5357)

Again we would like to ask: Who is furnishing the money for the high priced plate matter booming Woodrow Wilson for president, which is being offered free, express paid, to publishers who will use it? Somebody with a lot of money is interested in electing Governor Wilson to the presidency. Who is it?

A. W. Robinson, formerly editor of the Cawker Ledger, but now running a paper at LaCrosse, was this week appointed postmaster at that place.

 

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February 1, 1912, Downs News (ID 5360)

The new standard Linotype purchased by the Osborne Farmer arrived the first of the week and is being installed by Harold Huycke of the Ellsworth Reporter.

 

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February 8, 1912, Downs News (ID 5362)

There are now type setting machines in the towns of Ellsworth, Mankato, Smith Center, Osborne, Downs, Stockton and perhaps other towns of the Sixth congressional district. In Osborne and Ellsworth the papers have installed standard Linotypes, like those found in the offices of the big city dailies. Nowhere else on earth will you find better papers than in the Sixth district of Kansas, and nothing is too good for them.

E. B. Morris, formerly with the Cawker City Ledger, but lately with the Osborne News, was in town Saturday morning....He has accepted a position as foreman on the Seneca Tribune....

 

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February 15, 1912, Downs News (ID 5364)

The Smith Center Pioneer...has been sold, according to the Journal of that city, by V. Hutchings, the present owner, to W. H. Nelson and son Arthur Nelson. The owners are to take charge March 1. Billie Nelson is an old-time newspaper man, having edited the Pioneer for many years before he became postmaster there....The Pioneer under the management of Mr. Hutchings has been a strong paper....

Chas. Perryman of Chicago, an expert of the Mergenthaler Linotype Co., was in the city Tuesday. Mr. Perryman is the inspector for the company and is examining all the machines of that company in the state. He certainly understands his business and straightened out several little kinks for the News force which were causing some annoyance.

 

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February 22, 1912, Downs News (ID 5365)

Chas. W. Norton, who at one time published The Downs News, is now at Sulphur, Okla., where he is running a rabid Socialist paper. It is an imitation of Appeal to Reason, or as near an imitation as it is possible for a man without brains and education to promulgate.

L. A. Smith, one of the editors of the Portis Independent, who is also a teacher in the Portis schools, was in attendance at the county teachers association....

 

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March 7, 1912, Downs News (ID 5367)

The Portis Independent had quite a struggle getting out last week. The "patent" used by the paper did not get any further than Downs on the freight (because of a severe blizzard). On Thursday, Jess Scott took the bundle of papers on a railroad velocipede and attempted to get through, but had to give it up. The train got through Friday, which enabled the paper to get out, but a day late.

Norton on the war path -- Chas. W. Norton, the erstwhile editor of The News, took exceptions to our reference to him a week ago, and comes back this week with a long tirade in his paper, The New Century, in which he refers to us as "high collared ingrates" and other choice epithets which he picked up in his youth among the hillbillies of Arkansaw. Ordinarily we would pay no attention to a man of such small caliber as Norton, but inasmuch as he took the trouble to send marked copies containing his tirade to a number of business men here, we will take him on.

As to his charge of "ingratitude" we cannot now recall any ungrateful act of ours unless it be that we refused to liquidate a number of his unpaid accounts that he left behind as a memento of his exit. He says his "work" made it possible for us to run this paper. He is mistaken. It was deep aversion to work that caused him to lose out here. We would advise him to cease fighting for the toiling masses in Oklahoma long enough to learn the lesson of common honesty -- a virtue which we are in a position to prove he sadly neglected while a resident of this city. To the toiling masses for whom Norton is fighting in Oklahoma we would say: let him fight if he wants to, but keep your hands on

your pocketbooks. If Norton cares to continue the controversy we are in a position to present several things of a more practical and convincing nature, all of which would make good reading, and we can furnish him with all the marked copies he may care to circulate....

 

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March 14, 1912, Downs News (ID 5369)

Ex-Senator Dan B. Harrison was at one time a country editor. He published the Downs World for a short time. He is now in the banking business, which is more profitable.

D. W. Harman of Larned arrived the first of the week and for the present will be employed in this office, being a Linotype operator.

 

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March 21, 1912, Downs News (ID 5371)

Bill Nye had the truth well told when he said: "A man may only use a wart on the back of his neck for a collar button, ride in the back coach of a railroad train to save interest on his money till the conductor gets around, stop his watch at night to save wear and tear...but a man of this sort is a gentleman and a scholar compared to the fellow that will take a newspaper two or three years and, when asked to settle for it, puts it into the post office and has it marked 'refused'."

One of the happiest moments of the country editor's life is when he can sit down and read his exchanges. It's like a visit with the boys. When the trains are tied up and the exchanges don't come, it makes a fellow feel lonesome.

 

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April 11, 1912, Downs News (ID 5373)

About two years ago, the poetic muse got busy in this office and a little skit called "Telephone Girl" was evolved. It went the rounds of the Kansas papers, sometimes being credited to this paper and sometimes not. Last week, it appeared in "Judge," the famous satirical paper of New York, marked "Anonymous." A year ago, this same poem appeared in the Kansas City telephone directory. It is strange how such things will travel.

 

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May 2, 1912, Downs News (ID 5375)

D. W. Harman, who has been with the News for several weeks taking instructions on the Linotype, left Saturday night for his home in Larned. Harman is badly crippled, and evidently came to the conclusion that he could not master the trade.

 

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May 9, 1912, Downs News (ID 5377)

Charlie Wells, editor of the Alton Empire, recently installed a Simplex typesetting machine in his office.

 

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May 30, 1912, Downs News (ID 5380)

Vol. 1, No. 1 of Braggs Bugle, published at Braggs, Okla., is on our desk. It is a four-page, four-column paper and is published by E. J. Garner, formerly a well known newspaper man of this section and a brother of Nora Garner.

Mr. Garner has started a number of papers in Kansas and Oklahoma, and is known as the best booster for his town in the new state. His motto, run at the head of his paper, is: "He that tooteth not his own horn, the same shall not be tooted."...The Bugle is Democratic in politics.

We are in receipt of a copy of the Herington Sun, now under the guidance of Mord Smith, a former Downs boy....Mord grew up in the print shop under the best kind of tutelage, and is a first-class printer as well as a first-class young man.

 

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June 20, 1912, Downs News (ID 5384)

It was just a year ago last week that the News installed a Linotype. Since the first week, not one line of type has been set by hand for the body of the paper and the machine has never been out of order for one day during the entire time, although it was set up by an expert from the factory and left in the hands of people who had never before touched a composing machine. The first year's experience with a Linotype has certainly proven it a success, and this paper would not return to the old way of setting type for twice the price of the machine.

 

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July 18, 1912, Downs News (ID 5386)

Tom Skinner of the Osborne Farmer, who has been laid up for several months with inflammatory rheumatism, passed through...on his way home from an extended visit with relatives near Topeka. His arm is still in a sling, but he believes Dr. Dillon can cure it, and is going to give him a trial.

 

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August 1, 1912, Downs News (ID 5387)

W. H. and Harvey Wright, editors of the Lebanon Times, were celebration visitors last week, and incidentally playing ball with the Lebanon team.

 

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August 15, 1912, Downs News (ID 5388)

Notice to delinquent subscribers: After this week every subscriber to the News who is more than one year in arrears on subscription will be cut off the list without further notice....The post office department has notified us that such action must be taken at once, or the publishers of this paper will be subject to a fine of $1,000, besides having the second class mailing privilege taken away from us....

Walt Pattee, the clever young writer who was formerly connected with the Smith Center Pioneer, is now employed on the Journal of that city. This writer is mighty glad to see Pattee get back into the harness in the Sixth District.

 

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August 22, 1912, Downs News (ID 5389)

In spite of the fact that the Democrats stand a good chance of electing a president this year, Ben T. Baker of the Smith Center Journal is not happy. He says he hasn't had a mess of roasting ears this summer.

 

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August 29, 1912, Downs News (ID 5390)

Another editor has entered the list of benedicts. Owen A. Brice, publisher of the Glen Elder Sentinel, was married last week to Miss Mabel Barrett of that city.

 

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September 5, 1912, Downs News (ID 5391)

A quiet wedding occurred at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Valentine Shearer, near Logan, on Thursday, Aug. 29, at noon, the contracting parties being Mrs. Daisy Shearer Sebelius and Mr. Willard H. Ransom of Downs....Mr. and Mrs. Ransom took the evening train for Superior, Neb., for a short visit with relatives, from which place they went to Kansas City for a short stay, returning to Downs Tuesday morning....

 

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October 3, 1912, Downs News (ID 5395)

Of the seven newspaper plants of Osborne County, the Downs News enjoys the distinction of having much the best building for its housing. Their fine cement block building was erected for their own use, and is conveniently located. -- Osborne Daily News.

E. C. Hadley, editor of the Osborne Daily News and the Portis Independent, was in town between trains Monday morning....

 

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October 17, 1912, Downs News (ID 5397)

Robert Good, editor of the Cawker City Ledger, is crowing over the arrival of a little nine-pound girl at his home Oct. 5. This is the seventh time the stork has visited the Good home....It is not often that an editor gets rich, but it must be admitted that Bob is accumulating a lot of this world's Goods.

 

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November 14, 1912, Downs News (ID 5398)

We are in receipt of a letter from our old friend and formers townsman R. T. Weld, formerly one of the publishers of the Downs Times. Mr. Weld sold out here a few years ago and went on a farm near Salina, but soon the longing for the smell of printer's ink took him back to his old trade, and he is now employed as foreman on the Russell Record, working for N. A. Turner, with whom he was employed a number of years before coming to Downs. Mr. Weld is one of the best printers in Kansas....

 

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December 5, 1912, Downs News (ID 5399)

Guy Cook overhauled the News' gasoline engine the other day and the force is now able to converse without shouting.

 

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December 19, 1912, Downs News (ID 5400)

Last Friday we enjoyed a very unexpected pleasure in the shape of a visit from Editor W. C. Palmer of the Jewell Republican....Mr. Palmer put in his time visiting at the Downs print shops. It was our first meeting with Mr. Palmer, although we have been greedily devouring the contents of his Jewell Republican every week for many years....The Jewell Republican is one of the best country weeklies in the West, and its editor, in our estimation, ranks right at the top among the bright newspaper men of Kansas....

 

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December 26, 1912, Downs News (ID 5402)

S. H. Dodge, founder of the Beloit Gazette...,died at his home at 2:00 o'clock Sunday morning. Mr. Dodge was at one time one of the leading Republican editors of the Sixth District, but retired from the newspaper business a number of years ago, since which time he has been associated with his son, George Dodge, in the

real estate business. He was 69 years of age and a prominent Mason....

 

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January 23, 1913, Downs News (ID 5405)

Mord Smith, who has published the Herington Sun for the past year or two, has sold the paper to P. W. Morgan and Miss Arlone Lyne....

 

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February 13, 1913, Downs News (ID 5407)

Editor L. L. Alrich of the Cawker City Record had the misfortune to get his hand caught in the press while running off last week's edition, with the result that he lost the end of one finger. Mr. Alrich went through the Civil War without receiving a wound and has run a paper over 40 years since that time without accident until his misfortune last week.

The Beloit Call has installed a No. 10 Standard Linotype and will do away with hand composition.

 

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February 20, 1913, Downs News (ID 5410)

Vete Hutchings, formerly editor of the Smith County Pioneer, is now in Palm Beach, Fla., and writes to his Smith Center friends that he is enjoying surf bathing and picking lemons. ...Hutchings ran a Republican paper in Smith County when the Populists had 800 majority and knows all about picking lemons.

 

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March 20, 1913, Downs News (ID 5414)

Governor Hodges has appointed Bert P. Walker, editor of the Osborne Farmer, as the Republican member of the state board of irrigation....It must make the Osborne County Democrats, who have been living on husks for the past 16 years, feel anything but amiable to see a Democratic governor hand a $2,000 a year plum to the man who has been their arch enemy all these years.

 

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March 27, 1913, Downs News (ID 5415)

A Nebraska printing office was burglarized one night last week. The thief did not find anything in the money drawer, but stole all the $ signs out of the type cases.

Miss Amy Brake will leave Saturday for Phillipsburg, where she has accepted a position as compositor in the office of the Phillips County Post....

 

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April 10, 1913, Downs News (ID 5418)

Having tired of cracking jokes at Gomer Davies' wooden leg, the newspaper boys are now jollying him about his big family. Paul Rankin of the Salina Journal says that an agent recently passed Gomer's residence in Concordia and, seeing the children playing in the yard, asked them if the "teacher" was in. The agent thought it was a school.

 

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April 24, 1913, Downs News (ID 5420)

The editor of the Times, who has been complaining for several years, last week removed the bandages and paraded all of his wounds before the gaze of the public. An article in the News of the week before was responsible for the outbreak, and in the course of a long article he made it appear that the editor of this paper was responsible for nearly all of the woes to which human flesh is heir. We wish to congratulate the editor of the Times, however, for at last coming out on the firing line and shooting straight at his imaginary enemy. For the past three or four years, he has carried on a sort of guerrilla warfare, constantly taking shots at somebody, and by innuendo and insinuation holding out the idea that somebody and something was very wrong....He says the people who attended the "harmony" caucus were "duped." How were they duped? The caucus was arranged by members of both factions, and, by the way, the first time the News editors knew of a harmony caucus was when Dan Harrison and S. H. Domoney called on us and invited us to attend. But as to the caucus: about 60 men responded to the invitation. There was no attempt on the part of anyone that we heard of to take advantage of anybody....The editor of the Times took part in the meeting and did not raise his voice once in protest. The meeting broke up and the great majority of the men who took part, regardless of who their candidates were before they went to the meeting, went away apparently well pleased with the ticket as endorsed....

The News gasoline engine was on a strike several days during the past week, with the result that much valuable time has been lost which may show up in our news columns.

 

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May 15, 1913, Downs News (ID 5423)

Chas. W. Wells has sold the Alton Empire to Harry Clark....

 

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June 19, 1913, Downs News (ID 5427)

The News Linotype suffered a breakdown today -- Wednesday -- making it necessary to leave out much interesting matter that we could not get into type.

"Bert P. Walker, editor of the Osborne Farmer and widely known in Kansas newspaper and political circles, and Miss Althea Closon, also of Osborne, were married in Kansas City tonight....Mr. and Mrs. Walker will live in Osborne, but will spend a few days in Kansas City and at the home of Mr. Walker's mother in Peabody. ...The marriage tonight is the culmination of a romance which began more than 15 years ago, when Mr. walker was employed on an Osborne newspaper and Mrs. Walker was a high school girl in the same town....Mr. Walker is one of the most widely read and frequently quoted of Kansas newspaper writers...." --Topeka Capital.

 

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June 26, 1913, Downs News (ID 5428)

Almost everything went wrong in this shop last Wednesday, but the climax of our troubles came when a small break occurred on the Linotype which, though innocent looking, was serious enough to tie up all the typesetting for the day. As a result, we were obliged to go to press without many matters of general interest appearing, and others in a short form that were sent to Osborne and set on the Farmer's Linotype....This was the first time in the two years that we have operated the Linotype that anything has happened to the machine to delay the work, and it may never happen again. The break was repaired in a very satisfactory manner by H. L. Hahnenkratt.

 

...
July 3, 1913, Downs News (ID 5429)

A. G. Alrich of Lawrence, commander of the Kansas division of the Sons of Veterans, was in town yesterday....Mr. Alrich is a son of Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Alrich of the Cawker City Record, and is up here looking after their paper while they are taking in the national reunion at Gettysburg.

 

...
October 2, 1913, Downs News (ID 5431)

...The Sunday Kansas City Star contained the following article from the pen of Charley Blakesley, the clever author of "Starbeams" and Kansas Notes: "No state in the union boasts of better country weekly newspapers than Kansas, and the backbone of the Sunflower papers is their country correspondence....Among the famous correspondents of Kansas is the famous Crosby, author of +?Smith County Smatterings+? in the Downs News. Crosby has chronicled the happenings and gossip of Oak Creek Valley for more than a quarter of a century and has become a parcel and part of journalism in northern Kansas. Everybody in ten counties round knows Crosby, but many of them do not know that his real name is Sedley E. Chapin....Crosby has a style peculiarly his own and has no imitators. His sayings have found their way to the eyes of the foremost Kansas editors and he counts most of these celebrities as his personal friends. When things are coming Crosby's way he has one set expression and never lays it aside for anything new.

'One by one the roses fall' from Crosby's pen means that as the old fellow sat and penned his items for next week's paper by the midnight lamp that his face was wreathed in smiles and all the world was at his feet. Crosby has written hundreds of feet of 'stuff,' but in all of it he never uttered a harsh word against a neighbor nor said a word that caused resentment in the most sensitive person. Crosby has a nickname for every man, woman and child in the valley and he christens each new arrival in like manner. When old friends are laid away to their last sleep, Crosby is there and next week's bunch of items shows the tearstain of a loyal friend and the memory is kept green throughout the passing years. 'Downs, famous Downs,' as Crosby calls it, would be lost in the wilds without his homely philosophy and quaint method of mentioning current events. So Oak Valley has become Crosbyized....In the hot days of the drought when news is scarce in town and the editor apologizes because 'there is nothing doing,' Crosby shows up with a column and the paper has an anchor to tie to for any dry and dreary work."

 

...
October 30, 1913, Downs News (ID 5434)

B. P. Walker of the Osborne Farmer has sold his "Village Deacon" column to the Kansas City Star, and hereafter it will appear as a regular feature in the Sunday edition of that paper, prior to its appearance in the Farmer. Mr. Walker's fame as a writer is continually spreading....

 

...
November 6, 1913, Downs News (ID 5435)

Harry Clark of the Alton Empire is the luckiest editor we know of. He has a new bride in his home and a new press in his office.

The News force this week printed 20,000 letterheads for the Lipton hotel. The Lipton House uses about 40,000 letterheads a year, this being the second order of 20,000 we have printed in the past 12 months.

 

...
January 22, 1914, Downs News (ID 5440)

Mrs. M. E. Ingram of Bartlesville, Okla., who has been here visiting her son, T. W. Ward, left Tuesday for Fowler, Colo., for an extended visit with her daughter, Mrs. Maud Whitney. The Whitneys are publishers of the Fowler Advertiser, the local newspaper. J. B. Whitney at one time lived in Downs and was employed as a printer in the office of the Downs Times.

 

...
April 9, 1914, Downs News (ID 5449)

This shop has been more crowded with work in the past month than ever before in its history. We have been unable to land a printer for sure yet, but have several on the string and still have hopes.

 

...
April 16, 1914, Downs News (ID 5451)

Calvin D. Walker, who recently sold his paper, the Logan Republican, came down from that city on Sunday night and has since been doing yeoman service in this office helping to take care of the immense amount of work that swamped us lately....

 

...
June 11, 1914, Downs News (ID 5457)

The News force sustained a serious shock Tuesday evening when a big casting on the office Linotype suddenly broke. It looked for a time as though it meant a visit from an expert from the factory to repair the break, but Bill Ruth tackled the job and had the machine in running order by noon Wednesday.

 

...
June 25, 1914, Downs News (ID 5458)

Henry R. Honey, editor of the Mankato Advocate, has been appointed postmaster at Mankato by President Wilson to succeed E. D. George, editor of the Monitor, the Republican paper. Mr. Honey has been a diligent laborer in the Democratic vineyard for lo these many years when the picking was poor, and is now about to reap the reward for his long years of fruitless faithfulness.

 

...
July 2, 1914, Downs News (ID 5460)

Robert Good of the Cawker City Ledger had a breakdown on his press last Thursday and found it necessary to bring the forms to Downs to be printed on the News press.

 

...
August 6, 1914, Downs News (ID 5462)

L. W. Mathews arrived Friday from Smith Center, where he has been employed on the Smith County Journal, and has accepted a position in the News office as job and ad man. Several years ago, Mr. Mathews published the Plaindealer at Almena.

 

...
August 20, 1914, Downs News (ID 5464)

The News was very fortunate in securing the services of Leon W. Mathews, who is an artistic printer of many years' experience. He likes to do job work for particular people. If you like artistic work, call and see him.

 

...
August 27, 1914, Downs News (ID 5465)

Ernest B. Smith of Smith Center has purchased a half interest in the Osborne Daily and Weekly News....The firm will be Hadley & Smith.

 

...
October 1, 1914, Downs News (ID 5468)

Leon W. Mathews, who has been employed in this office for several months, left Sunday morning for Russell, where he has accepted a position as foreman on the Russell Reformer.

 

...
October 8, 1914, Downs News (ID 5469)

Dr. Abrahams of Waconda and L. L. Alrich, editor of the Cawker City Record, were in town for a short time Monday afternoon....It was Mr. Alrich's 74th birthday, and in honor of the event Dr. Abrahams brought him to Downs to look over the new power plant....Mr. Alrich is just completing his 34th year as publisher of the Record, and he has the appearance of being in trim for many more years of good newspaper work. Mr. Alrich is the oldest newspaper man in active service in the Sixth congressional district, and with the exception of W. L. Chambers of the Stockton Record is the oldest in point of continuous ownership of his paper. He bought the Record in 1880. Ben T. Baker, now owner and publisher of the Smith Center Journal, was the first "devil" in Mr. Alrich's office.

 

...
October 29, 1914, Downs News (ID 5473)

Last week the News had to stop setting type by the breaking of a part on its Linotype on Wednesday. It was the first time in three years that a break had occurred that could not be remedied by local machinists. The part had to be ordered from the factory, and many news items were omitted by the accident. Linotypes, like self binders and other machinery, will break down occasionally.

 

...
November 12, 1914, Downs News (ID 5476)

Ernest B. Smith has bought the interest of his partner, Edwin C. Hadley, in the Osborne Daily and Weekly News, and is now the sole owner....Mr. Hadley has been in the business in Osborne for the past four years, and must have made it pay. At least, he has kept alive a very interesting little daily newspaper for several years, where nobody else believed it could be done for six months....

 

...
November 26, 1914, Downs News (ID 5479)

...Paul C. Rankin, who for the past three years has been connected with the editorial department of the Salina Journal, is to return to Downs and again take up active work on the Downs Times....Mr. Rankin has a statewide reputation as a newspaper man, and will be a valuable addition to the Osborne County newspaper fraternity.

 

...
December 17, 1914, Downs News (ID 5483)

The Downs Times has installed a Linotype and will do away with the old handset way of making a newspaper. It is a Model 3, Standard, and was purchased of the Salina Journal, which is replacing it with a new Model K. An expert came up from Salina and installed the machine last Saturday.

 

...
December 24, 1914, Downs News (ID 5485)

Donald Dwight Davis, who is a student in journalism at the Kansas University, is editing the News this week. All of the editorial and the greater part of the local matter is his....

 

...
December 31, 1914, Downs News (ID 5487)

Tom Skinner, the head mechanical man at the Osborne Farmer, was in town Monday morning....

 

...
February 4, 1915, Downs News (ID 5492)

The Osborne Daily News, which was founded by E. O. Hadley, Dec. 3, 1911, has suspended its daily form and will hereafter appear as a weekly publication only....Ernest Smith says he finds there is more work attached to getting out a daily in a town the size of Osborne than the patronage in these times of financial depression will justify....

The sheriff of Rooks County is advertising at sheriff's sale in the Stockton Record the undivided one-half interest of W. R. Baker in the plant of the Stockton Review to satisfy claims amounting to more than $2,400 held by the Mergenthaler Linotype Co., the Great Western Type Foundry, and other creditors of the plant. Baker quit the newspaper business a year or so ago and went into the hotel business in Missouri.

 

...
February 18, 1915, Downs News (ID 5493)

Here's a real news item: During the past week, the floor of this print shop has been swept and the windows washed. Next month we hope to have clean office towels.

 

...
February 25, 1915, Downs News (ID 5494)

Someone entered the office of the Cawker Ledger recently, and the Ledger is boasting of the fact that the intruder stole a silver dollar from the drawer.

 

...
March 11, 1915, Downs News (ID 5496)

Francis L. Smith came up from Beloit Sunday evening and has taken a position in this office. As long as the business men continue to treat us so liberally with their advertising and job work, it is necessary to keep extra help....

 

...
March 18, 1915, Downs News (ID 5497)

The Smith County Pioneer will install a new Model K Linotype of the latest pattern. This office will install one too -- if 1,500 subscribers will each pay a year's subscription next week.

The Cawker City Record entered upon its 33rd volume last week, and the 42nd of the old Tribune, with which it was merged. It is the proud boast of Editor Alrich that he still has some of the names on his subscription that began taking the paper with the first issue of the Tribune 42 years ago....

 

...
March 25, 1915, Downs News (ID 5498)

Leon W. Mathews, who last year was connected with the News for a few months, has leased the Rich Hill (Mo.) Western Empire....A copy of the paper has reached our exchange table, and looks like a good proposition....

 

...
April 8, 1915, Downs News (ID 5500)

A broken casting on the News Linotype caused considerable delay this week and prevented the getting into type of much interesting matter.

Downs people were shocked...when they read in the daily papers of the sudden and tragic death of Ray T. Weld, a former well known Downs newspaper man, which occurred at Russell on Thursday evening, April 1, at 8:25. Mr. Weld...was quite deaf, and his deafness was the indirect cause of his death, for...he failed to hear the noise of a coming fast freight train, and stepped on the track just in time to be struck by the engine....He was a resident of Downs about six years, coming here from Colby. He purchased the Downs Times of J. H. Smith and was its owner and proprietor for two or three years, when he sold a half interest to Walt Smith, who had been employed in the office for a number of years....Weld & Smith sold the Times to J. J. Parker in the spring of 1909 and Mr. Weld went on a farm in Saline County for a year. He then was employed in the printing offices of the Salina papers for a time, and about three years ago went to Russell and took the foremanship of the Russell Record, owned by N. A. Turner, for whom he worked at Colby before coming to Downs....Mr. Weld was one of the best printers this section of Kansas ever had and was a man of irreproachable character....

 

...
April 15, 1915, Downs News (ID 5501)

It is reported that a little trouble occurred at Cawker City last Saturday as an aftermath of the recent post office fight. Our informant says that Jim Higgins went to the office of Robt. Good and started something that he couldn't stop. It doesn't always pay to Go Too Far with an editor, and especially one that has lost out in a post office scrap.

Ten years ago the first day of April, the present publishers took charge of the News. The years have been very pleasant ones to us and the time has sped rapidly.

 

...
April 22, 1915, Downs News (ID 5503)

Miss Emma Nunn, who for five years has been employed in the office of the Glen Elder Sentinel,...has accepted a position in the office of the Osborne County News.

It is said that A. B. Adams, editor of the Beloit Call, has just fallen heir to a large estate in England. We hope it is true. An estate is a nice thing to have around for a newspaper man.

 

...
April 29, 1915, Downs News (ID 5505)

F. M. Learned, editor of the Woodston Argus, was among the big bunch of Odd Fellows who came down for the celebration Monday. Mr. Learned was at one time employed in the office of the Downs Times but went to Woodston about five years ago, where he has made good....Editor Harry Clark of the Alton Empire and A. E. Lamkin of the Stockton Record were attending the Odd Fellow celebration....

 

...
May 13, 1915, Downs News (ID 5508)

The Jamestown Optimist tells a story of an accident in the office of that paper last week. A stovepipe fell down, and in the mixup several galleys of type were "pied," a situation which every newspaper man can appreciate. But the Optimist spoils the story by saying that no cuss words were used, either by the editor or any member of the force. Of course, that part of the story is pure fiction, and is circulated for the purpose of helping Fred Cook's boom for United States senator.

 

...
May 27, 1915, Downs News (ID 5509)

John Q. Royce, once a well known editor and politician of the Sixth congressional district, but now interested in mining in Colorado, with headquarters in Denver, was in town Monday morning. Mr. Royce was for many years editor of the Phillipsburg Dispatch. He was later state bank commissioner under Governor Hoch, and at the conclusion of his term in that office he was elected secretary of the Aetna Building & Loan Association of Topeka.

 

...
June 17, 1915, Downs News (ID 5510)

Smith Bros. have sold the Glasco Sun to W. S. Wooster and Miss Faye Townsend of Minneapolis.

 

...
July 15, 1915, Downs News (ID 5513)

We are this week sending out 5,000 copies of the News to every person whose name we could secure in Ross, Corinth, Bloom, Penn and Bethany in Osborne County; also those in Garfield, Lincoln, Webster and Crystal Plains in Smith County; in Cawker, Carr Creek and Pittsburg, Mitchell County; and Irving Township in Jewell County....We ask these readers to carefully peruse the matter contained in this issue, and to give especial attention to the advertising found therein. Downs has almost every conceivable business represented within its borders....We want to impress upon you the fact that Downs is the best town in the west half of Kansas in which to do your trading....

 

...
August 5, 1915, Downs News (ID 5515)

The Beloit Gazette under J. H. Harrison is beginning to look more like it did in the days when the Dodge family owned it and S. H. Dodge, the old Republican warhorse of Mitchell County, was at the helm.

Lee Meadows, formerly of the Gaylord Sentinel but now editor of the Lincoln Republican, was in town all three days of the celebration last week. On Saturday, he played with the Gaylord band.

 

...
September 2, 1915, Downs News (ID 5517)

A printer who went out to work on a farm was telling his experience when he came back to town. He said: "They gave me a wrong font team -- a mule and a horse -- and they ran away with me and pied a load of wheat."

Benj. Musser, who was one time editor of the Jewell Republican, but who has lived at Excelsior Springs, Mo., for a number of years, died at the latter place last week, aged about 74. He is reputed to have been worth $150,000 when he died, although it is admitted by his friends that he did not make it all in the newspaper business.

 

...
September 9, 1915, Downs News (ID 5518)

Walt Whitmore, who 21 years ago published the Downs World (actually published the Chief), was in town greeting old friends Monday morning. His home is now at Lehigh, Okla., where he is publishing a weekly paper.

The Osborne Farmer in its 7-column form last week was about the prettiest country newspaper we have ever seen. It was the acme of perfection in newspaper making.

 

...
September 16, 1915, Downs News (ID 5519)

The Rooks County Record is the latest to install a Mergenthaler Linotype. The old hand set paper is fast going out of style.

 

...
September 30, 1915, Downs News (ID 5521)

Elsewhere in this issue will be found an article from the pen of "Count" Hulaniski, who founded the Alton Empire 35 years ago. It was published in the Thinkograph of San Francisco, and reprinted in the Osborne Farmer last week. We started in to reproduce a few paragraphs from it and found it all so good that we did not know where to stop -- and published all of it.

Bull City Legend

Note: This sketch of the early days in Alton is taken from the Thinkograph, a monthly magazine published at San Francisco, Calif. The editor is our old friend, Count Hulaniski, founder of the Alton Empire, who has had a varied experience in the Great West in the years since he first dropped into Osborne County.... -- Osborne Farmer.

The mails have just brought into this sanctum a newspaper I haven't seen for years -- the Alton Empire, published at Alton, in Osborne County, Kansas, and I have read every word in it, advertisements and all. That was the first newspaper I ever owned. I started it nearly 35 years ago as the Western Empire at Bull City, Kansas, but the name of the town and the paper have both been changed, as have the times and the people. Judging from the paper, the town is a peaceful, prosperous, quiet, God-fearing and law-abiding community, raising wheat, corn, hogs and cattle, attending divine services regularly and abiding by the prohibition enactment spread upon the statute books way back yonder when I was there and helped break it.

I do not know how many of the old-timers are there yet, but those who are will certainly agree with me when I say that the Alton of today and the Bull City of those times are two altogether different propositions. There wasn't anything on the plains of Kansas more "wild and woolly" than old "Bull town," nor anybody any bigger derned fool in the wild and woolly line than I was. Doubtless the present editor of the paper, H. L. Clark, goes about the town in search of news and delinquent subscribers in prefect tranquility and in not the slightest danger of being butchered in cold blood. But it was different when I started the paper there, and doubtless can hardly understand why, in those days for months at a time, during a political campaign, I never left the office to go home or around without slinging a double-barrel shotgun over my shoulder, loaded with six inches of powder and buckshot. And, no doubt, if I should go back there now and pull off that kind of a stunt the population would take to its cyclone cellars, thinking that a madman had escaped from the woozy house.

Three incendiary attempts were made to burn the newspaper plant and building while I edited it, and I will briefly mention one of them in passing, just to show how touchy some people used to be in those days. My office and residence were near each other and hearing a noise at the former late one night I stepped out to ascertain the cause. Two or three shadowy forms could be discerned crouching in the darkness of the night by the office building attempting to scratch matches and ignite a pile of shavings and kindling wood they had piled against the structure. There were no such things as street lights in those days and the night was dark, so all I had to go by was the flickering light of the match as it flared up a second and then went out in the wind that always was blowing more or less, and so I took a pot-shot at the match light with my six-gun. From the yell that went up and the hurrying away in the darkness of those who were engaged in building the bonfire, I judged that the aim was good, and a trail of blood across the sidewalk next morning corroborated this evidence, but I never learned who leaked it or from what particular portion of the anatomy it flowed. One fellow, though, by name Tom Conklin, showed next day on a crutch for no apparent reason, and went with a cane and a limp for a month or so afterwards, but possibly he might have rheumatism, or a coyote might have bitten him or something. Anyhow, it is hardly likely that it could have been him that got the bullet, for there had been nothing in the paper which he could have taken umbrage. That is, nothing that one would think anybody would get mad enough to want to burn down the whole establishment. Mr. Conklin had beaten his wife up a couple of times when he got too much prohibition brand of drug store elixir on board, and I had pleasantly remarked in a two-column editorial that a man who would beat up the gentle partner of his bosom like that was a low-down, white-livered cur who ought to be tarred and feathered and rode out of town on a rail, but that was about all -- honestly, I don't remember that there was anything worse or more radical than that said. But then, of course, you can't always tell. Some folks are very touchy about what is said about them in a newspaper, and it is barely possible that Mr. Conklin was a trifle nervous about such things.

Prohibition was a new law then, brought about by the voters of the eastern part of the state, and we of the western plains would have none of it, although we made a bluff at it and switched from saloons to drug stores and from ordinary fair brands to a new booze that would bring out whole armies of red-eyed jabberwoks riding through the night on pale silver colored moonbeams. The stuff came out of the soda fountain into an ordinary sized soda-water glass, which was half filled with water, then the carbonic gas shot into it with possibly some flavor, but usually straight, and after a man got outside of about six of those Kansas cyclones in liquid form he would as soon murder his grandmother as not, and a little rather. I think the only reason I did not murder any grandmother was because I didn't have any -- they were already dead.

Well, about this time, it will be remembered, James G. Blaine was nominated for the presidency and Kansas subsequently gave him 72,000 majority, and would have given him more only that was all there was. Did Bull City, Kansas, celebrate? It did; it sure did. Everything portable around the town was burned as a bonfire, and there were quite more portable things around then than now, as doubtless sewerage and sanitation is better. The store fountain was worked double shift and all night. One Hopwood Rhinehart was proprietor of the drug store, and prince of good fellows he was too, with a lot of good points, as well as some bad, which was true of all. At daylight, the soda fountain was a total wreck and on the floor of the drug store in a thousand pieces. Every showcase and bottle in the establishment was broken and the floor was inches thick in glass. Some of the prominent citizens are likely picking pieces of glass out of their feet yet.

So many small particles worked their passage up and down through my system that for years afterward I was afraid to sit down for fear of getting cut in a new place.

In those days, Bull City was the end of the Central Branch railway, and a terminal shipping point not only for cattle and farm products, but for the herds of ponies which roving bands of cowboys brought up from the Indian Nation, now Oklahoma. And they were a wild bunch of bronco busters. One day, a little circus was in town and they went in, filled the tent as full of bullet holes as a sieve or pepper box is of perforations, rode the trick mule all over town, into Pete Mitchell's hotel, and sent so many leaden pellets flying promiscuously that the only safe place was somewhere else. And any one of the horses they rode would buck a teacup full of blood from your nose and ears before you would have time to sock the spurs home and apply the quirt.

And now, having briefly shown you some of the weaknesses and wildish ways, let me also prove to you that hearts were big in those days, way out on the rolling prairies, where the buffalo grass, the sensitive rose, the coyote and the jackrabbit were undisturbed by the whir of auto wheels or the smell of gasoline.

Change the scene to midwinter, and come with me through the drifting snow over that little village into the general merchandise store kept by one Tom Walker, and next door into that same drug store kept by Hop Rhinehart -- you'll find the setting different, though the people the same.

Just east of town is a little cemetery, way out on the lonesome prairie, where the wind sweeps around in cold gusts and piles the snow up in great drifts, and then catches it up and carries it over to another place and piles it up again. It is a cold, lonesome, bleak little cemetery, the home of the dead -- old and young -- but all pioneers of western Kansas. My little boy sleeps there -- that's how I come to remember it so well -- he was the only little boy I ever had, and it almost broke my heart when the angels came down from somewhere and swept over those broad prairies and took him away, far away, somewhere, wherever God and heaven is. And even now after all these years, as I think of it and see in fancy that little cemetery way out there on the plains, the fog rolls in here off this San Francisco bay and sort of hides this old typewriter so I can hardly see it, and makes my glasses wet. The fogs are mean here, sometimes, in the springtime.

It was Christmas day, and being lonely I went out into the little town to see if I could find some other little boy to play Santa Claus for, and so the most likely place to fall into such a job I went into Tom Walker's store, where the farmers, the ranchers, and the squatters for miles around were wont to come. I had no sooner entered than I noticed a poorly dressed woman sitting on a box and trying to comfort a ragged little boy about five years old. He was a rosy-cheeked, bright-eyed little man, but he was patched and darned from head to foot and had no shoes on at all, in the place of which his little feet were wrapped in gunny sacks until they were the size of hams. H

 

...
October 14, 1915, Downs News (ID 5522)

Robert Good, editor of the Cawker City Ledger, was awarded judgment in the sum of $1,500 damages in his suit against J. W. Higgins, also of Cawker., in the district court at Beloit last week. The suit grew out of the recent post office fight in Cawker City, in which Mr. Good and Frank H. Higley were the candidates. Higgins favored Higley's candidacy, and in his zeal for his friend it is said that he circulated stories concerning Good that were very damaging to the latter's character. Good brought suit for damages in the sum of $9,250. The suit lasted four days and a large number of witnesses were placed on the stand. The jury was out four hours and brought in a verdict awarding Good $1,500 and taxing the costs of the suit to Higgins. The case will be appealed to the supreme court.

 

...
October 21, 1915, Downs News (ID 5524)

Robert Good, editor of the Cawker City Ledger, was out of own nearly all of last week attending court at Beloit, and as he expected to be able to go home most any time he made no preparation to have the paper gotten out. When he got home Saturday evening, he found that Robert Good, Jr., with the help of a lot of other young folks, had already printed and mailed a very creditable paper, although none of them had any previous knowledge of the workings of a printing press. The kids knew the paper had to get out in some way, and they proceeded to go ahead and do it....

 

...
November 11, 1915, Downs News (ID 5527)

W. H. Ransom of the News went to Smith Centre Monday, where he remained until Tuesday afternoon, helping the Smith Centre Journal force get out a big extra edition.

Cliff Stanley, Linotype operator at the Times office, went to Leavenworth County...for a visit with his parents.

Harry L. Clark of the Alton Empire has purchased the Woodston Argus of F. M. Learned, who has been its publisher for the past six years. Mr. Clark retains the Alton Empire and will continue the publication of both papers....

 

...
January 6, 1916, Downs News (ID 5536)

A. F. Walker, who for a number of years has edited the Prairie View News department of the Logan Republican, has sold his home in Prairie View and will move to Phillipsburg. John Van Wyck...will be the new editor of the Prairie View News.

 

Charles E. Mann, 87, former Kansas publisher and m ...
January 23, 1958, Downs News (ID 476)

Charles E. Mann, 87, former Kansas publisher and member of the legislature, died Sunday morning in a Topeka hospital.

Mr. Mann was born Feb. 9, 1870, in Blue Springs, Neb. He was editor of the Downs News from 1905 until 1920 and was editor of the Osborne County Farmer for 23 years.

He served 13 years in the Kansas Legislature, including four years in the senate. He was speaker of the House in 1923. He was supervisor of census in Kansas in 1930. During World War I he was active in Red Cross and Liberty Bond drives.

He moved to Topeka in 1948 and served on the public relations staff for Gov. Frank Carlson and Gov. Ed Arn before he retired.

He was a member of the Lowman Memorial Methodist Church of Topeka, and the Masonic Lodge and Order of the Eastern Star at Osborne.

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Laura Mann of the home, 1278 College; a son, Dick R. Mann, Topeka; a daughter, Mrs. Janice Newhouse of Denver; a step-son, Cyril G. Smith, Portland, Ore.; six grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren, and a sister, Mrs. Anna Ritter, Phillipsburg.

 

Editor Dan McKay passed away -- Daniel Burnett McK ...
February 27, 1958, Downs News (ID 477)

Editor Dan McKay passed away -- Daniel Burnett McKay was born Oct. 26, 1886, in America City, Kan., to Carl and Nora McKay. Several years later, the family moved to Woodston. Here at the age of 14 he became an apprentice printer, starting the profession which he was to follow the rest of his life.

He was united in marriage to Grace Stapp of Phillipsburg on May 22, 1907. To this marriage were born two daughters, Imogene, Mrs. Harry Ortel; and Patricia, Mrs. William Guerin.

In 1920, the family moved to Downs, where they have since lived. Mr. McKay was employed on the Downs News under the late W. H. Ransom. He had spent many happy years at the trade he loved. He leased the print shop in 1944, and in 1952 he became the owner.

He suffered a stroke on Tuesday evening, Feb. 18th, from which he never recovered. He passed away Saturday evening, Feb. 22. He leaves to mourn his passing the wife, the two daughters, Mrs. Harry Ortel and Mrs. William Guerin; grandchildren Kay Ortel, Mrs. Walter Orloff, and Michaelene Guerin, and one great-grandson, Thomas Daniel Orloff of Kansas City, Kan.; three sisters, Mrs. Charles Burr, Jr., Smith Center, Mrs. Gussie Barnhouse and Mrs. Ellen Jennings, Los Angeles, Calif.; one brother, Frank McKay, North Hollywood, Calif.; and several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services were held Tuesday, Feb. 25th, in the Christian Church with Kenneth Habig in charge. Interment was in the Downs Cemetery.

My tribute to C. E. Mann, by Mertie Berry Hampton:

A man who was always gentle. He listened respectfully to the younger generation as well as the old; to those who were inferior to him in position or intelligence, and those qualities made him a friend to everyone.

As representative from this district, his influence was keenly felt. His presence in the Kansas statehouse was a protection for Republicans and Democrats alike, and all were better for having shared his society. A clean man, body and soul. His kindly impulses came from a kind heart. He was brave because, with a conscience void of offense, he left family with nothing to fear. He was never embarrassed, for he respected himself; to preserve his self-respect he kept his honor unstained, and to retain the good opinion of others he neglected no civility.

He carried himself with grace in all places -- genteel to a fault. While in newspaper work with Charlie for several years, I never saw him out of patience. Always well informed and observant of events, but slow to form an opinion. He combined gentleness of manner with firmness of mind and spirit. Men with his type of intellect and wit are needed today. His passing has cast a shadow, and we are left to wonder why he could not have lived yet a little longer. All Kansans mourn.

 

We hope our subscribers and readers understand tha ...
March 20, 1958, Downs News (ID 478)

We hope our subscribers and readers understand that the News has been published the past few weeks under great difficulty and bear with the editor until conditions return to normal. Warren Lingg and son, Wayne, of the Cawker City Ledger have so generously given of their time and efforts in preparing and printing the News two weeks and preparing it the other two weeks, and the editor is deeply grateful to them for their help in time of need. Thanks are also due to Larry Wilcoxson and to Oran Thompson, foreman of the Osborne County Farmer, for help, and to the editors of the Smith County Pioneer, who also set type for the paper. The issue of March 27 will be published under new management and in as short time, no doubt, everything will be back on schedule.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Darrel Miller and two children, Randy ...
March 27, 1958, Downs News (ID 479)

Mr. and Mrs. Darrel Miller and two children, Randy and Michelle, arrived Saturday from East Lansing, Mich., and will take charge of the Downs News April 1. Darrel had been working on a master's degree at Michigan State University and has been on the staff there since September. They have rented an apartment above the Rogers Variety Store.

 

To our readers -- I have leased the Downs News and ...
April 3, 1958, Downs News (ID 480)

To our readers -- I have leased the Downs News and print shop to Mr. and Mrs. Darrel Miller, who took possession April 1. I wish to thank all who have supported the paper during the past 14 years. I will always cherish the friendships made while in business. I hope that you will continue your support of the paper and I assure citizens of the community that Mr. and Mrs. Miller will make every effort to publish a paper in a satisfactory manner. -- Mrs. Dan B. McKay.

Comments, wise and otherwise, by Darrel Miller -- What better way is there for a green new editor to start his first column than by thanking all of the people who have been so nice to him in the first few days he has been on the job? In the six or seven years I've been away from Downs while in the army and at college, I haven't met as many friendly people as I've talked to in the past week and a half....

For one terrifying moment when I first sat down at this Linotype, I thought it had forgotten me. We had built quite a friendship during the years when Dan McKay was teaching me most of what I know about printing, but it must have been a shock when I first sat down last week and tried clumsily to set some type.

Perhaps, though, it wasn't a case of the Linotype forgetting me -- maybe I had forgotten it. At any rate, we became re-acquainted and managed to get out the paper. It still gets a little angry at my clumsiness, though. Only Monday, it spat hot metal at me, then became so cold that all the fires went out and the type metal became hard as a rock. But we expect to iron out our differences.

 

When Max Goheen walked in the door of the News off ...
April 10, 1958, Downs News (ID 481)

When Max Goheen walked in the door of the News office Tuesday and said he was ready to go to work, yours truly leaped for the door and barred it shut before he could get away. Max always had a ready smile, but I've never seen him look better than he did right then. After chaining him to the Linotype, I settled down and went back to work on this week's paper -- which is the smallest Downs News you'll see for some time, I hope.

Max previously had worked in the News office more than two years, and is an especially good friend of the Linotype, which has a tendency to get sulky now and then. We hope he'll be here at least another two years, if not 20. From the way the Linotype is purring right now, it seems to hope so too. Max and I are fools for work and plan to print an 8-page paper about every week. We hope you won't mind.