Home

About

Newspapers

Communities

Search

Contact

Spotlight

First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Downs News and Times

Articles in database from Downs News and Times:    541

...
January 13, 1916, Downs News and Times (ID 5537)

News and Times consolidated -- A deal was completed last Friday whereby the Downs News and the Downs Times were consolidated under one management and ownership. The publishers of the News have taken over the Times, and hereafter but one paper will be issued to the subscribers of both papers, the issue being made from the office of the News. In the deal the News publishers secure the entire equipment, subscription list, business and good will of the Times.

The proposition has been under consideration for months and has been brought about by the logic of events. This is the age of consolidation. The demand of the people of the present day is for fewer and better papers. Along with this the constant rise in price of labor, paper, and in fact everything that enters into the making of a paper has created a condition unthought of a few years ago. Experience in the past few years has shown that under these conditions two papers in a town the size of Downs that is not a county seat cannot thrive as they did a few years ago under a cheaper method of production....

We make the exception above in the case of the county seat for the reason that there is an element of business accruing to the county seat paper that is not available to the strictly local paper, even though the town be as good or better as the county seat town of the same size. This fact is recognized by all newspaper men, as it has been proved in numberless occasions.

Downs is one of the best towns of its size in Kansas. There never was a time when it was any better than it is today. No town has supported its newspapers any more loyally, but there has been a feeling for some time that one strong newspaper with the combined subscription list would serve the purpose much better than two, both in economy of management and in the reduction of the cost of advertising space to the merchants. . . .

Parker & Rankin decided that, as each of them had other enterprises in view, they would consider the sale of the Times, and the negotiations were entered into. Mr. Parker had long desired to establish himself in the job printing business in the city, and Mr. Rankin has business interests elsewhere which take up much of his time and to which he is desirous of giving his entire attention....

There is no desire on the part of the publishers of this paper merely to secure a monopoly of the newspaper business in Downs; we assure our patrons that it is not our object to try to take advantage of the situation, or to abuse the privilege that has come to us. Our only desire is to be able to conduct our business so that it will be profitable to us and enable us to serve the public in a better way. We have no get-rich-quick dreams of avarice, and do not expect to levy one cent of tribute upon those with whom we may have business relations. There will, of course, be an increase in our advertising rates, because of the greatly increased subscription list, and because the change will necessitate an increased force, but the increase in the rates will only be commensurate with increased value of the advertising space to our advertisers.

The subscription price of the News and Times will remain the same -- $1.50 for the combined papers....The consolidation gives the News and Times a circulation second to none in Osborne county....Politically, the paper will be Republican, as heretofore, but politics will be a secondary consideration....Those in arrears on subscription with either or both papers will at once realize that in making this big investment we will be in need of every dollar that is due....

To readers of the Downs Times -- A deal was consummated Tuesday of this week whereby The Times passes to new ownership, the undersigned selling the plant, business and good will of the paper to Ransom & Mann....While, because of other interests which require more attention than we could give and remain in Downs, we thought the move noted above was for the best, yet it is not without a feeling of regret that we leave this field where there are so many loyal and staunch friends who have shown their kindness in so many ways....While the sale of a newspaper is a business affair, in the case of the transfer of a paper like The Times it is more than that; for The Times has preserved the history of the town and its progress from its birth. In the files of the paper are found recorded the various steps of advancement from the little town at the end of the railroad to the present business and residence city....Hundreds of clippings, yellowed with age, have been put away in scrapbooks, where they are cherished because of the stories they tell....During the years of our connection with The Times it has been our one aim to make the paper one that would stand for the best interests and highest development of the new community in every way....The Times has been for years The Old Home Paper to readers in various parts of the globe and it is our hope and belief that under the new arrangement it will live up to its best traditions and will tell the story of the advancement of Downs for years to come. -- Yours respectfully, Parker & Rankin.

The publishers of The News and Times extend a cordial invitation to the able correspondence staff of The Times, who have labored faithfully for that publication in the past, to continue their work under the new management....

 

...
January 20, 1916, Downs News and Times (ID 5538)

The editors of the News and Times are in receipt of a cordial letter of congratulation upon the recent consolidation from Walt Pattee, the brilliant and versatile writer on the Smith Center Pioneer. Walt's kind words on this occasion have completely blotted from our memory the scars received by us in the many bloodless wars we once engaged in with him over the respective merits of the Downs and Smith Center ball teams, and our forgiving spirit now receives him with open arms. Walt is a past master in the art of getting up breezy locals, and his work on the old Pioneer gained him a statewide reputation.

Del Cox, "Across the Raging Solomon" -- The consolidation of the two Downs newspapers was good news to us, as we believe it to be to all parties concerned....The outgoing editor, Paul Rankin, as well as Charlie Mann, informed us that we were transferred, along with the job presses, nonpareil slugs and other paraphernalia of The Times, and that we were now a part of The News and Times, same as the big Linotype....

...In the consolidation of the News and Times, the publishers of this paper took over the contract for publishing Our Messenger, the state organ of the WCTU, whose editor is Mrs. Alice G. Young of this city.

 

...
January 27, 1916, Downs News and Times (ID 5539)

Del Cox in "Across the Raging Solomon" -- I'd rather be an editor and ride upon a pass than be an old clodhopper and mow the sunburned grass; to flop into an easy chair and write the wedding notes is sweeter far than fixing fence to stay the billygoats. You bet it's easy money to get ten cents a line, while we keep hoeing 'taters till we ruinate our spine. The Reubens wait all season for the turkey wheat to ripe; but the printer's pay comes weekly through the speedy Linotype. And then to smoke Havanas with a pencil on the ear, beats floundering in nine foot of snow till you get plumb out of gear. Oh, how I wish some editor with life supremely gay, would swap his blooming business for my worthless clods of clay.

How the "Boys" View It (comments on the consolidation by other editors, mostly congratulatory):

J. E. Rank in Atchison Globe: ...J. J. Parker, formerly editor of the Times, and at one time a printer in Atchison, is now in the job printing business in Kansas City.

Harve Wright in Lebanon Times: ...The only regrettable part of the deal is the retirement of one of the brightest young newspaper men in the state from the ranks, Mr. Paul Rankin.

 

...
February 3, 1916, Downs News and Times (ID 5541)

Wardie White of the Phillipsburg Dispatch has purchased a new Model K Linotype and will hereafter set the type on his paper in the modern way. A first class country print shop without a Linotype nowadays is a curiosity.

 

...
February 17, 1916, Downs News and Times (ID 5542)

The News and Times publishers have received some complaints lately regarding some things said by one or two correspondents that appeared to be slurs. They may not have been intended that way, but the parties took them in that spirit, and we must ask correspondents to confine themselves to strictly news items that are legitimate, and cease referring to young men and young ladies in a way that is intended to cast reflections on them....All of these complaints have come from one locality where there are several writers, and we must ask it to stop at once....If there are any more complaints of this character we will proceed to give the author of the trouble a little publicity that he is not looking for.

Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Alrich of the Cawker City Record celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on Monday with a reception a their home....As a mark of respect, the school children marched to the Alrich home carrying flags and singing patriotic songs. In the evening a program was given at the Baptist Church which was largely attended....

 

...
February 24, 1916, Downs News and Times (ID 5543)

Will Build New Home -- Last week's Osborne Farmer announces that plans are being drawn for the erection of a modern office building for the Farmer plant. The Farmer says: Beginning the first week in April a new and modern fireproof building will be erected....The building will be heated by either hot water or steam and the radiation so arranged as to keep the machinery in perfect working order during the coldest weather. The building will contain furnace room, stock room, melting room, wash room, toilets, etc....Specially constructed foundations will be installed for the big ten-ton press, the Linotype, the job presses and all the other heavy machinery. A large motor will be installed to drive the big press, which is now pulled by a gasoline engine....Lots of new equipment will be added to the mechanical department of the office in the way of type, cabinets and machinery necessary in a modern printing office....

 

...
March 16, 1916, Downs News and Times (ID 5544)

The News and Times is now appearing printed on paper of a distinct yellow hue. You might think that this is a new and high priced paper we are using, but it is not. It is the same quality we have always used. The color is caused by the shortage of bleaching compound in the paper mills, due to the European war. (In 1995, it was apparent that this paper had not turned brown nor deteriorated as much as the other newspaper files.) It may be years before we can secure the pure white paper after the few reams we still have on hand are exhausted.

 

...
March 23, 1916, Downs News and Times (ID 5545)

The old Times office is being painted and papered this week. It will be occupied April 1 by Joe Rogers' second hand store.

A letter from Paul C. Rankin this week informs us that he is at present employed in the office of State Printer W. R. Smith at Topeka. Mr. Rankin worked with Mr. Smith on the Fort Scott Republican before he came to Downs in 1910....

 

...
April 27, 1916, Downs News and Times (ID 5546)

Prospects of a newspaper famine are looming upon the horizon as a result of the war in Europe. Importation of wood pulp from Norway and Sweden to make print paper as well as the chemicals from Germany to bleach the paper have been cut off through the embargo placed upon shipping by the warring nations....Within the last three months the cost of print paper has increased 6 percent....

Sedley Chapin, "Smith County Smatterings" -- Say, Mr. Gentry, you should have seen The News and Times force in action at the office last Saturday. We dropped in for a few minutes, and the clank and rattle and hum reminded us of the big printing houses we have had the pleasure of visiting in the big cities. The editors just now are extra busy on the Rooter for the high school boys and girls of Downs. Eight busy men and ladies were on duty when we were in.

 

...
May 25, 1916, Downs News and Times (ID 5548)

B. P. Walker, editor of the Osborne Farmer, who has enjoyed a real live boom for state senator, will not be a candidate. He let the boys talk until he saw it had reached serious proportions and then punctured the boom in last week's Farmer as follows: +?The state senator boom appears to have been nipped by a late frost. This layman has looked the ground over and fails to see how any laurels he might win in the senate would help support his family or keep his private business from getting into the clutches of the sheriff. The gentle buzzing of the political bee is soothing, all right, but you are taking no chances when you fail to heed it. Safety first. The legislature ruins a dozen men where it makes one.+?

Some Reminiscences

By George E. Dougherty

I dreamed the other night -- as I have done every once in a while for the past 25 years -- that I had to take back the Downs Times.

Now, you'll not understand that until I tell you the story. But I do not myself understand why this nightmare should follow me all the days of my life. Perhaps someone better versed in psychology may be able to do so, but I have not found him yet.

Well -- if you care to hear the story -- in 1887 I was making a mighty good thing financially out of the Downs Times in spite (or because) of the opposition paper. I was very well satisfied, too, until I came down to Topeka in the fall of that year to attend the grand lodge of Good Templars, of which I was Grand Marshal if you please. Mrs. Dougherty came along. We both fell in love with the capital city.

We visited the family of Rev. A. T. Riley, who was the first pastor of the Downs Methodist Church, and who married us. He was running a printing office here, with a good business. He was not a practical printer. He invited me to go in with him.

It seemed to me a providential opening. I had for some years been dreaming of sometime starting a magazine of inspiration for young people -- exactly such a periodical as Dr. Marden afterwards established in the "Success" magazine. It seemed to me that perhaps it would help me to make my dream a reality, to get into a larger place. Besides, both Mrs. Dougherty and I were delighted with

Topeka -- that had something to do with it.

I went home and wrote a letter to my school friend, Ralph W. Norwood, then employed in the government printing office in Washington -- and one of the original stockholders in the company that developed the Mergenthaler Linotype. I had been corresponding regularly with Ralph, and I suppose had been giving him pretty glowing accounts of the delights of a country newspaperman's life. At any rate, he had told me of his ambition to run a country newspaper, too.

I wrote him all about my opportunity and made him an offer on the paper. He accepted by wire, telling me just what he could do in the matter of payments. I agreed. December 1st I was in Topeka. Mrs. Dougherty followed two weeks later, and within two months -- as soon as the Missouri Pacific railway could get our household goods to Topeka, by way of Kansas City and Lomax -- we were settled in a new house overlooking Chesney park.

Everything moved along nicely at the Topeka end. Nothing to disturb our equanimity except the occasional but increasingly persistent rumblings of discontent at the other end of the line.

It seems that, in the first place, the boom which had been going on for several years decided to discontinue operations just about the time I left Downs. For some reason connected therewith, the advertising patronage began dropping off. Many subscribers who, it would seem, had been glued to the list by the fear of what it would do to their pocket books to pay up and quit, took advantage of the new start the paper was making (you see, I had reserved all the back accounts, and most of them I am reserving unto this day) to say goodbye to the Times.

Well, all this was pretty discouraging to my successor, I imagine, and I don't blame him if he rejoiced at the failure of the plans which would have enabled him to pay the price.

And that is how I went back. It was not with a proud mien, I assure you. I did not herald my arrival with trumpets. No mention of it ever stole into the columns of the Times. Ralph and his younger brother went east. I bade them goodbye at the train, and as I with melancholy heart watched them roll out of the union station I detected a performance on the part of Ralph's brother which made me suspect that he, at any rate, wished me not to miss any ill luck that might be coming my way. Later this suspicion was confirmed by a mysterious message I found set up in type, and stuck in an upper corner of the case.

The first thing I did was to clean up the ink roller and the Washington press. In some respects this office was different from the government printing office at Washington, and Ralph wasn't used to it. And if you've ever run a hand press you'll imagine what the paper was looking like each week, when the roller had been accumulating ink and dirt for four or five months. The change I made in the appearance of the paper caused people who had not heard of my return to express their surprise with the remark, "Well! Looks as if George had come back to the Times." And he had. But not for long. Four issues I got out, with Ralph Norwood's name still at the head. Then with a light heart I hied away again to Topeka, for I had sold the building and paper to E. D. Craft -- perhaps I have his initials wrong -- whose son Quincy had been learning the printing business in that office. The last time I saw Quincy was in Washington, D.C., where he had a fine position with the government, and the way he treated me indicated that if he ever had a grudge against me for getting him into the Times, he had forgiven and forgot.

When I walked unannounced into the Riley printing office in Topeka upon my return, I bumped up against a surprise that was keenly disappointing. When I had gone back to Downs, not knowing what the outcome would be, I told Mr. Riley to go ahead as though I were really out of it, taking in another partner if he had the opportunity. And he had taken me at my word. So I was out.

This is more of a story already than I had any idea I would make of it. So nothing more, except to say that after several years' interesting experiences I started a business college, in which for twenty-two years I have, in another -- perhaps better -- way, been working out the ambition of my youth, which has never left me, to help young people make the greatest possible success in life.

And if you could know the feelings of pride and gratification that come to me as I hear from my former students, now making good in all the walks of life, in all parts of the world, you would understand why I use the term "nightmare" in reference to the dream that I must leave my business college and my delightful young people to go back to the Times, even as it is now -- though in my dreams, while I am always leaving my present occupation as it is today, I am going back to the Times as it was twenty-eight years ago.

It made me feel like I had lost something to hear that the Times had been swallowed up by the News. But success to the union, and long may she wave!

 

...
June 15, 1916, Downs News and Times (ID 5549)

All over the country, papers are showing signs of distress. Some have discontinued publication, and others are reducing their size, and others are advancing prices and wondering what the end will be, and really and truly it is a problem. -- Mankato Monitor.

 

...
June 22, 1916, Downs News and Times (ID 5550)

A little trouble with the Linotype in this office made it necessary for us to use some hand set type this week for the first time in five years. It is a slow and unsatisfactory method, and we hope that it will not occur again in another five years.

 

...
June 29, 1916, Downs News and Times (ID 5551)

People who read newspapers, as well as advertisers, should know these facts: The price of printing inks has increased 400 percent in the past six months; rags, the raw material for paper making, are also used in making high explosives, and have ascended in price to a level with Eiffel Tower; French bleach, so necessary in the manufacture of paper, can hardly be had at any price; and a score of other necessary articles have jumped almost out of sight....The cost of getting out a paper like The Vedette, outside of the labor, is practically twice as much as it was a year ago....The newspapers, it appears, are going to have to do what the manufacturers, the merchants, the tradesmen in every line, have already done -- raise their prices.... -- Greenfield (Mo.) Vedette.

 

...
July 6, 1916, Downs News and Times (ID 5552)

Robert Good of the Cawker City Ledger is making some substantial improvements in his office which will greatly facilitate the press work on his paper. He this week purchased the big Potter Power Press of the News and Times, that in recent years was used in printing the Downs Times. He took it to Cawker City on Monday of this week and will have it set up by an expert from Kansas City. Along with the press Mr. Good gets an Omaha folder which attaches to his press so that he will hereafter print and fold his paper with the same power....

 

...
July 20, 1916, Downs News and Times (ID 5554)

Adding new machinery -- The News and Times publishers last week closed a deal with the Intertype Corporation of New York City for a Model C Intertype, the first of the kind ever sold in Kansas, which will be installed in this office early in August, or just as soon as the machine can get here from New York.

The Model C is the very latest thing in a composing machine and costs installed $3,200. It is a three-magazine machine and sets six different kinds of type any size from eight to fourteen point, and any length from four to thirty picas. The magazines can be shifted instantly into position by the mere pulling of a lever, which the operator does without leaving his seat. It will set the body as well as the medium sized display lines in advertisements, and all of the type used in the paper.

In installing this expensive machine the News and Times has in mind the future as well as the present. A smaller and cheaper machine would do for now, but we have confidence in the future growth of Downs....(This Intertype, much worn, was still used at the News and Times when Darrel Miller bought the newspaper in 1958.)

We have also purchased a new Babcock Reliance newspaper press which will be installed in a short time. It is fast and will greatly reduce the time usually given to press work, besides doing much better work than the press now employed in this office. (This press also was still in use in 1958.)

In making these improvements the News and Times is making an outlay of money between $4000 and $5000, believing that nothing is too good for our readers....

 

...
July 20, 1916, Downs News and Times (ID 5553)

Walker is "discovered" -- The blow has fallen, and at last the dark plot has been laid bare before the eyes of the "peepul." Bert Walker, the fat editor of the Osborne Farmer, is building a handsome and expensive new office, and some of the wise ones have discovered that Otis L. Benton of Oberlin is furnishing the money.

"Of course," they argue, "no honest editor could make a living for his family and build a fine office besides, so it must be that Benton, the man who is spending so much money to be elected to congress, is furnishing the money." But here is what is worrying us: The News and Times has purchased a new press, and we are on a deal for a new Linotype. Of course it was our intention to make the people believe that we were earning the money by working day and night to get these things, but now that the secret is out on Walker we might as well confess that Otis L. Benton is buying them, and while we are at it, we are going to try to get him to buy us a Hudson Six and two gallons of gasoline. While Benton is spending all this money the boys had just as well get some good out of it.

But laying all jokes aside, the money joke on Benton has lost its "pep." It was a fairly good talking point for a while, but like many other campaign yarns, it got overworked. People have been figuring a little, and they have discovered that if these stories are true, Benton has already spent enough money to build the Panama canal, besides paying a good slice of the national debt....

 

...
July 27, 1916, Downs News and Times (ID 5555)

The new press of the News and Times has arrived and we had hoped to use it with the first issue in August, but we were doomed to disappointment; for the people who are making the special motor with which it will be operated write the motor cannot be built and shipped before August 8. That seems to be the way of the world.

 

...
August 10, 1916, Downs News and Times (ID 5556)

The News and Times force has just completed the biggest job of printing ever undertaken by a Downs shop. We have issued a 25,000 edition of "Our Messenger," the official organ of the state WCTU. The regular edition, which is a big job in itself, usually averages about 10,000 copies. This month a special edition of 25,000 copies is issued, the object being to place a copy in the hands of every school teacher in the state, to encourage the observance of "Frances E. Willard Day" in the public schools....

The News and Times' new Model C Intertype was shipped from Brooklyn July 31, and ought to be here the latter part of this week....The machine will be operated by Elmer A. Tobias, who recently came from Bethany, Mo. Mr. Tobias is just now operating the Linotype in the office of the Osborne Farmer.

 

...
August 24, 1916, Downs News and Times (ID 5558)

The past six weeks have been a nightmare to this office and also to the office of the Osborne Farmer, where all the matter for both the Farmer and the News and Times has been set on the Farmer's Linotype. Our own machine got to the point where it could not be used any longer, and a rush at the factory caused a long wait before we could secure a new one and get it set up ready for business. This feature has now been remedied, and we hope by this time next week to have our new press installed, after which the difficulties under which we have labored will have been overcome....

Paul C. Rankin, formerly editor of the Downs Times is now permanently located in Topeka, where he has employment in the state printer's office....

 

...
October 12, 1916, Downs News and Times (ID 5560)

Many people noticed the big Winton Six automobile in town last Wednesday night and wondered whose it was. The following from the Atchison Globe of Thursday explains: "E. W. Howe's automobile party, headed for Colorado, spent last night in Downs, reaching there for supper. O. C. Miller, who was in Downs yesterday, met Mr. Howe at the Howell House before 7 o'clock. The distance from Atchison, 208 miles by rail, was covered yesterday, the party leaving Atchison at 7:45 yesterday morning. Mr. Miller says Mr. Howe told him they passed seventy cars on the road near Beloit, people returning home from the Beloit fair. The Howe Winton Six passed everything that got in its way, including a racing car that had performed at Beloit. Roads are perfect everywhere."

 

...
October 19, 1916, Downs News and Times (ID 5559)

The Osborne News was sold at sheriff's sale last week, the purchaser being J. F. Hale of Formoso.

 

...
December 21, 1916, Downs News and Times (ID 5563)

The Osborne Farmer has purchased a new Model 14 Linotype, one of the largest machines made by the Mergenthaler Linotype Company....It costs a lot of money to run an up-to-date print shop in these days of high prices and high living.

 

...
January 4, 1917, Downs News and Times (ID 5564)

F. H. Butler, who for the past five or six months has been employed as a job printer in this office, left Saturday night for his home in Eureka, where he has secured a permanent position with one of the papers.

 

...
January 11, 1917, Downs News and Times (ID 5566)

Just a year ago this week the News and Times was consolidated under one management. The year that has passed has been a very pleasant and prosperous one for the owners of the consolidated papers, the only distressing feature being the unlooked for and unprecedented rise in the price of all kinds of paper, which has naturally curtailed profits. ...The situation is very serious and cannot get much worse without bringing disaster to many publishers.....

"Col. W. H. Nelson of Smith Center was in Osborne briefly Tuesday morning on his way to Russell, where he has just bought the Russell Record. Mr. Nelson will assume charge at once and expects to move his family over there in the spring. He is one of the old-time newspaper men of the Sixth District, having for years been editor of the Smith County Pioneer. He has not been in the active work for the past dozen years. Col. Nelson is one of the real old-timers of this country, having landed in Smith County in the early seventies...." -- Osborne Farmer.

 

...
February 1, 1917, Downs News and Times (ID 5568)

Thoughts along the way -- Along with some two hundred other Kansas editors, the humble writer of these lines wended his way to Topeka last Thursday to attend the state editorial association...an organization of editors who meet annually for the purpose of bragging on each other's papers and kicking on the price of print paper.

There were many of the brilliant Kansas writers in attendance at the convention, among them being E. E. Kelley, Jess Napier, Tom Thompson, Jay House, Charley Sessions, Major John Conway, Herb Caveness, etc....

An inspection of the state printing plant from cellar to garret guided by that prince of good fellows, Paul C. Rankin, was a source of pleasure and wonder to us. The plant is one of the greatest of its kind in the country....

The best feature of the association is the opportunity it gives one of meeting many old friends. One of these met by the writer was W. W. Driggs, a former Phillipsburg man who now publishes the Bern Gazette. Another old-timer with whom we visited was John Q. Royce, a former Sixth District editor who in his day moved close to the throne in old Copeland county, but who is now a stockholder and promoter in a big tire factory located at Wichita. Last, but not least, was the meeting with Major Conway, from whom we gained our first knowledge of the art preservative and who in the old days shed quarts of perspiration and blood in reading proof after us. In spite of all the crimes we committed in the name of a printer in his office, the Major greeted us kindly....

While in Topeka last week, the writer had the pleasure of being entertained in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. Rankin, who are comfortably situated in Topeka, where Mr. Rankin is employed in the office of State Printer W. R. Smith.

The Osborne County News has contracted for a Model 14 Linotype. The day of the handset paper is fast becoming extinct....The News and Times was the first paper in the county to install a three-magazine machine but the two county-seat papers will soon be equipped with them.

 

...
March 8, 1917, Downs News and Times (ID 5569)

Edwin R. Powell is dead -- Edwin R. Powell, a former well known citizen of Downs, and one of the early settlers in this locality, died at his home in Simcoe, Ontario, on Saturday, February 24th, in the 80th year of his age. Ten years ago, Mr. Powell was one of the best known men in Downs....He passed away the time and amused himself by writing a column for the Downs News under the heading of "Sharps and Flats." He possessed a quaint humor that made his column interesting, but much of the time it was tainted with a touch of infidelity which made it unpopular with many....His daily life belied his un-Christian talk, for he was one of the kindest-hearted men in the world...He never used profane or indecent language. His life was clean and wholesome and he constantly cherished the spirit of charity....He was a man of unusually brilliant intellect, but the privation he underwent in his seven months in Andersonville prison during the Civil War cast a shadow over his life from which he never fully emerged. Later the untimely death of his beloved daughter served only to deepen his gloom....

Del Cox's "Across the Raging Solomon" -- We looked in on the Osborne Farmer's new home Wednesday afternoon with a deal of satisfaction....From the point of view of light, convenience and equipment it could hardly be improved upon. The news of the week was all in form and the big electric press was printing and folding at the rate of a quire a minute. What a contrast to business when

Editor B. P. Walker took charge some twenty years ago. Then the whole works was crowded into a narrow room between two store buildings with only an intimation of light. The type was picked from wooden cases and the papers folded by a couple of girls. About all Bert possessed in those days was a lot of debts, a fine physique and a fertile brain....

 

...
April 12, 1917, Downs News and Times (ID 5571)

A Relic Dismantled -- The News and Times office this week parts with a relic that has been standing in the office for several years. The old Junior Linotype installed in The News office in 1911, and which did service in the shop for nearly four years, was this week dismantled by G. W. Wildy, a representative of the Mergenthaler Linotype Company of New York, and the parts broken up and reduced to junk. When the machine was installed in this office it was then a great step in advance of the old hand set method, but the rapid development of the Linotype in the past few years soon put the Juniors far behind the procession....The old Junior did service, however, until The News and The Times were consolidated and the publishers took over an old Model 3 standard Linotype with The Times. It was also a back number and was traded in on a new and modern machine in a short time. The old Junior was sold to the Osborne County News, who merely bought it to trade in on a new Model 14 linotype....It doesn't take long for machinery to get out-of-date in this fast age.

 

...
July 12, 1917, Downs News and Times (ID 5572)

Ben T. Baker died -- Ben T. Baker, editor and publisher of the Smith County Journal, and one of the best known newspaper men in the west half of Kansas, died at his home in Smith Center on Sunday, July 8, 1917, following a brave but fruitless fight against the ravages of cancer of the stomach.

Ben T. Baker was born in Washington County, Iowa, August 3, 1865....Ben learned the printer's trade in the office of the Cawker City Record under the tutelage of the present publisher, Levi L. Alrich, in 1882. From Cawker he came to Downs and worked for Walt Whitmore. Later he went to Harlan and established the Harlan Enterprise, then back to Downs, where he established the Globe. In the latter 80's he went to Leadville, Colo., and worked on various newspapers in Colorado towns, part of the time as city editor of the Colorado Springs Evening Mail...going to Smith Center in 1892. For a time he worked for Scott Rice on the Smith County Journal, and a little later purchased the paper. He has been its editor for twenty-five years. His paper has always been clean and had a high moral tone. It was one of the leading Democratic papers in the west half of Kansas. He was married to Miss Hattie Cummings in 1898. She was a Smith Center girl, but they were married in Iowa. They had no children....

 

...
August 9, 1917, Downs News and Times (ID 5575)

George P. Leary, editor of the Gaylord Sentinel, is one of the western Kansas editors whose number was drawn in the draft. Mr. Leary has a crippled foot and will no doubt be exempted....

 

...
September 6, 1917, Downs News and Times (ID 5576)

E. A. Tobias, the faithful Linotype operator in the News and Times office, left Saturday night for Bethany, Mo., to join his wife in a visit with his parents at that place....His place in this office is being taken by Merle Cushing.

 

...
October 25, 1917, Downs News and Times (ID 5579)

A sudden death...was that of Levi L. Alrich, editor of the Cawker City Record, which occurred at his home...Wednesday morning....Mr. Alrich has always been a man of frail build and was never robust, but he was generally able to be at his office every day of the week....

Mr. and Mrs. Alrich came to Kansas in July 1878 and in January 1879 they came to Cawker City. Mr. Alrich began the publication of the Campfire, a soldier paper, in 1880. In 1883 he purchased the Cawker City Record, and for the past 34 years has been its publisher....He was the last charter member of Reynolds Post GAR of Cawker City, of which he has been either post commander or adjutant since 1882....Mr. Alrich was a quiet and unassuming man (with)...a scholarly and dignified appearance. He was a true gentleman of the old school....

 

...
December 20, 1917, Downs News and Times (ID 5581)

P. L. Beuistline, assisted by Chas. Bulick, has just finished the necessary to put steam heat into the News and Times office, and to say that it has worked a revolution in this shop is putting it mildly. For years we have struggled along with the heat proposition, but nothing has ever proved satisfactory until we installed the steam....

 

...
March 28, 1918, Downs News and Times (ID 5583)

The News and Times will issue a daily paper next week during the Methodist conference. ...The daily edition will not be sent to regular subscribers of the paper unless they become subscribers of the daily edition...containing all the reports of each session up to the hour of going to press every day. The management of the paper will be in the hands of Fred L. Farley of Salina, who will also look after all advertising contracts and subscriptions. The price of the paper for the week will be 35 cents....

 

...
April 25, 1918, Downs News and Times (ID 5584)

O. A. Brice of the Glen Elder Sentinel was a Downs visitor Friday evening to straighten out the News and Times Intertype, which had temporarily gone on a strike during the regular operator's absence....

The News and Times is late this week owning to numerous causes, but principally on account of the absence of our Intertype operator, A. E. Tobias, who was called to Missouri by the death of his mother and the serious illness of his sister. The place of an Intertype operator cannot be taken in a country print shop. The machinery is too complicated for the ordinary layman to handle.

 

...
June 27, 1918, Downs News and Times (ID 5586)

On and after the first day of July, 1918, the subscription price of the News and Times will be $2.00 a year. This is a move that is made necessary by the rapidly increasing price of all materials used in the printing of a paper....Added to the increased cost of all materials, the government has enacted a new law regarding the mailing of second-class matter, which materially raises the rate of postage....

 

...
August 15, 1918, Downs News and Times (ID 5587)

Owing to the fact that we have been unable to get power with which to operate our machinery a good share of the time this week, the News and Times is issuing but four pages. As a result, the soldiers' letters and much other interesting matter is necessarily crowded out.... (The local power plant was barely operating at times.)

 

...
October 10, 1918, Downs News and Times (ID 5588)

The News and Times force is using gasoline engines until the power plant is in running order. The noise they make when all are going at once is enough to raise the dead.

 

...
October 17, 1918, Downs News and Times (ID 5589)

E. A. Tobias, who has been with the News and Times force for the past two years or more, will leave this week for Emporia, where he will enter the Santa Fe shops as a machinist's helper....He starts in at 45 cents an hour for eight hours' work, working ten hours a day, with time and a half for overtime and Sundays, making his pay much better than he can earn on a Linotype. ...Mr. Tobias is one of the most competent and trustworthy men with whom we have ever come in contact, and his decision to leave is a serious blow to the News and Times. It is almost impossible to fill his place during times like this. (American troops were fighting in France during World War I.)....

 

...
October 31, 1918, Downs News and Times (ID 5590)

News and Times patrons no doubt get out of patience with us at times in trying to communicate with this office by telephone. There being no electric power, it is necessary for us to use gasoline engines, and the noise they make makes it impossible to hear anyone speaking over the phone. We regret it very much, but it cannot be helped until conditions at the power plant are adjusted....

 

...
November 7, 1918, Downs News and Times (ID 5591)

Some of the most important news of the community was unavoidably left out last week because of our inability to get it into type. Beside machine trouble we had sickness, no light and power except substitutes, and a new machine operator who proved to be no operator at all. Such is life in the wild west.

 

...
January 16, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5592)

C. W. Wells of Salina was in Downs Tuesday looking after insurance business. Mr. Wells established the Tipton Times a few years ago, but found there was more money in the insurance business and closed up shop several weeks ago.

Those having occasion to phone any news items to this paper will please call up Mrs. Mann until such time as we are able to throw out a few gasoline engines. When they are running, and that is most of the time during the day, it is very hard to hear over the phone. We hope to soon be able to operate our machinery with electric power....

 

...
February 20, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5593)

Robert Good, former editor of the Cawker City Ledger, but now a "Y" worker in France, writes a long letter to the Ledger, of which the following is part: "The boys of Co. G, 139th Infantry (a local company), are billeted with their battalion in Eauville, just a short distance from here on the other side of the river...."

 

...
March 13, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5594)

Mrs. Nellie E. Parker of Topeka, editor of Our messenger, the organ of the state WCTU, printed in this office, was in town last Saturday, the guest of Mrs. Alice G. Young.

 

...
March 27, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5595)

The Concordia Blade and Empire, which have been edited and published by Ray Greene for a number of years, have been sold by the latter to Drew McLoughlin of Hiawatha, who will take charge at once. McLoughlin is a nephew of Ewing Herbert and is a well-known newspaper man.

 

...
April 3, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5596)

C. Merle Cushing, who for the past six months has been employed in this office, has resigned and last Friday began work in The Downs National Bank....

 

...
April 10, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5597)

Francis Smith, who at one time was employed as a printer in this office, arrived home from France one day last week, having been discharged from the army. He was stationed in Paris for two months, where he had the honor of being on President Wilson's guard....

 

...
May 1, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5598)

A letter from Bob Good, Connerre, Sarthe, March 31st -- Dear Folks at Home: This is a rather momentous date in the history of the AEF, YMCA, because at 5:00 o'clock this evening the "Y" ceased to maintain "dry" canteens, and will no longer be the biggest "country store keeper" on earth, and thus a large number of men will be released for other activities than those of selling cigarettes, chewing gum, cookies, chocolate, etc., in the hundreds of "huts" maintained by this greatest of all philanthropic organizations....The above change will make the department in which I am working, that of entertainment, more important than ever before....The 35th Division is actually started for home....The LeMans headquarters today urged me to take a vacation at once so that I can be ready for a big job within the next two weeks....I still hope to go to Germany. They all seem to be well pleased with my work....

 

...
May 22, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5599)

The Concordia Daily Blade has purchased the subscription list of the Daily Kansan and hereafter there will be but one daily paper in Concordia. Gomer Davies will continue to issue the Weekly Kansan.

 

...
June 12, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5600)

The News and Times is in need of a first-class printer, one with machine experience preferred. The position pays $25 per week for the right man and is permanent.

 

...
June 19, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5601)

B. P. Walker, editor of the Osborne Farmer, was in town between trains Sunday night. He was on his way to Topeka to witness the ratifying of the woman suffrage amendment by the Kansas lawmakers.

Midwest Printer and Publisher -- "The life of an editor is, in truth, a bed of roses. If he criticizes he is called a knocker, and if he doesn't he is branded a coward and his paper is said to be a 'kept' journal. He has to suit everybody, including his wife, his banker, his pastor, and the boys he sees Saturday nights. He can do and say the right thing a million times without a word of approval, but if he makes one blunder it takes a lifetime to live it down. Except for those little things, it's a grand and glorious life."

 

...
June 26, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5602)

Louis Hixon, who is a printer and operator, has accepted a position in this office and began work Monday morning....He is a discharged soldier and has been employed in the office of the Glen Elder Sentinel since leaving the army.

 

...
July 24, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5603)

Advertising Rates Increased -- Owing to the increased cost of materials and all necessities, the advertising rates of The News and Times will be raised beginning with next week. The rates for local advertising will be 15 cents an inch, and rates for transient advertising will be 20 cents a single column inch....Papers all around us already are getting these rates....We must meet our honest bills and make a living for our families. The only way we can do it is by making an advertising rate that will be adequate to these needs. Hence the raise. -- Ransom & Mann.

 

...
July 31, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5604)

J. J. Parker, former editor of the Downs Times arrived here last Thursday morning to renew old acquaintances and take in the celebration. Mr. Parker has quit the printing business and is now on the road selling oil royalties and prospering.

 

...
August 7, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5605)

Fred Cook of the Jamestown Optimist has sold his paper to Walter A. Carlisle and will retire from the newspaper business for the present. Cook is postmaster at Jamestown and will probably hold onto that job until he finds something more to his liking....It is hinted that he may seek to become a story writer. Cook has ability, all right, but it is a dangerous thing to do if one expects to make his living that way. Major Conway of the Norton Champion, whose ability in that line cannot be questioned, has had poor luck in disposing of his writings. O. Henry, who was the cleverest short story writer in the past generation, had only indifferent luck in disposing of his wares, and it was not until after his death that his merit was really recognized.

 

...
September 25, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5606)

A breakdown in The News and Times Linotype caused a delay of nearly a whole day this week and made the paper a day late.

 

...
October 2, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5607)

W. H. Ransom of the News and Times, who has been in very poor health for several weeks, is gradually gaining in strength and hopes soon to return to his work in this office.

Louis Hixon, who has been employed in this office for the past few months, has accepted a position as Linotype operator in the office of the Beloit Gazette.

The News and Times this week is starting a series of advertising for the United States Navy Department. The government is contracting for the space and paying for it at the regular advertising rates....The advertisements will appear every week for four weeks, and in papers all over the country.

 

...
October 9, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5608)

Now there's another big shortage of print paper...and no relief is promised for a year or more or until additional mills are available.

During the storm yesterday afternoon, lightning struck the power plant in Downs. The bolt ran into the generator, burning out two coils. The News and Times was delayed until this morning as a consequence.

 

...
October 16, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5609)

Readers of the News and Times will simply have to be patient with us until we can secure a steady office force again....The proposition of securing help is a mighty bad one.

 

...
October 23, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5610)

John Wolters will enter this office on Monday of next week for the purpose of thoroughly equipping himself with a knowledge of the printing business and the operation of the Linotype....John is a fine young man with good ability, and along with this he is a soldier boy who was among the first to offer himself to his country in its time of need....

Owing to the scarcity of help and curtailed electric power, the News and Times is issuing but six pages this week.

 

...
October 30, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5611)

Lloyd Greenman has taken the position at Crum's Grocery formerly filled by John Wolters. The latter is now a member of the News and Times force, having started in Monday morning.

 

...
November 6, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5612)

(Below picture) Cecile Cross McClain. Our readers have heard considerably about our inability to get the paper out on time; of the shortage of help in this office and many other wails of woe. Gaze on the features of the good looking young woman above this item, and you will behold the origin of most of our troubles. She actually decided she would rather be the wife of a Jewell City druggist than to be "queen of the Intertype" in this office.

The Congregational Church of Downs celebrated its 40th anniversary last Sunday, Nov. 2, 1919....In 1901, the church called Rev. F. W. Gardner. The latter was much interested in civic matters, as well as religious, and is credited with having originated two Downs institutions, one of which is still in existence. He organized and instituted the Downs Business College, which flourished for a number of years, and helped secure funds for the erection of the college building, which has since been converted into a hospital. He also founded the Downs News in the early winter of 1903, setting the paper by hand and printing the forms, one-half at a time, on an old Jones Gordon press. The paper was afterwards acquired by W. B. Gaumer, who enlarged it, added some equipment, and sold it to the present publishers. Reverend Gardner now resides somewhere in Maine....

 

...
November 13, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5613)

Downs will lose one publication with the removal of Our Messenger, the state organ of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, to Wichita with the December issue. The paper has been published in Downs most of the time for the past eight years. The paper was originally published by the Downs Times and when the latter paper was purchased by the News, the publishers of this paper took over the Messenger contract. It has since been awarded to us annually until this year. For many years, Mrs. Alice G. Young of this city was editor of Our Messenger, and during her tenure of office it was very handy for her to have the paper published in her home town....Last year, Mrs. Young resigned as editor, and Mrs. Nellie Parker of Topeka was selected for that position....Our Messenger...has a circulation of about 12,000. It is issued on the first of each month and goes into practically every town in Kansas. It is no small job to set the type, do the press work, folding and mailing once each month on a paper with that large a circulation, but this office has handled it successfully for the past four years. Under present conditions, with the paper market a great uncertainty, the publishing business is a hazardous one, and while we regret to part with Our Messenger, it is probably a good thing for us, as it will relieve us of the worry of securing the large amount of paper necessary for its publication. The contract has never made us much money, but it has paid a small margin of profit, and it has brought us in touch with the many earnest and intelligent women of the organization all over the state....

Two years ago, this office installed steam radiation for the purpose of heating the building with steam from the power plant, which worked well while the plant was willing to furnish the steam. Last winter, this steam could not be procured, and we were obliged to go back to stoves. Now P. A. Beistline is installing for us an Arcola Heater, made by the American Radiator Company. It is an inside furnace and water heater combined, and by making a slight change in the steam radiation already in the building, hot water from the heater can be circulated all about the room.

Miss Ada Colson, the efficient local editor of the Cawker City Ledger, was a very pleasant caller at this office last Friday....Miss Colson is making a splendid local paper of the Ledger.

Possibly the most unique editorial ever written appeared on the front page of the Kansas City Star last Sunday. It was an urgent plea from the publishers of The Star to the merchants and businessmen of Kansas City to cut down their advertising space to the lowest possible amount consistent with good business. If anyone prior to that time doubted the great scarcity of white paper in the United States, this certainly must convince them. A newspaper lives on the advertising space it sells, just as a merchant lives on the goods he sells....The News and Times has about six months supply on hand, and when that is gone we have no idea where the next is coming from....

 

...
November 20, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5614)

The Sedgwick Pantagraph, of which Jim Garner is editor, says Harvey County was visited Saturday by a big rain....

 

...
November 27, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5615)

Joseph A. Wright, who a few years ago was one of the best known newspapermen in the west half of Kansas, died at his home in Lebanon on Thursday, Nov. 20, 1919, aged 64 years, 2 months and 29 days. Mr. Wright came to Smith County in 1877 as a young man, just starting out in life. He took a homestead north of where Lebanon now stands, but a farm life didn't appeal to Mr. Wright, who loved the rough and tumble life of the country editor of that early day, so he soon began the publication of a paper at Salem. Later he published the Lebanon Criterion, the Smith Center Messenger, the Smith Center Journal, finally returning to Lebanon, where he retired from active newspaper work some years ago, but until a few months ago he continued to write historical articles for the Lebanon Times, published by his son, H. L. Wright. He was among the first to join the Populist movement early in the 1890's, and stayed with that party as long as it retained an organization. He was fearless and outspoken in his manner of conducting a newspaper, and was scrupulously honest in his business, political and private life. It is with considerable regret that the newspaper boys of this section will chronicle his death, for he was always a clever writer, a fair and hard fighter, and a friend worthy of the name.

The News and Times is under obligations to Robert Good, who is with the YMCA at Brest, France, for a number of old flags presented to us and which arrived on Tuesday. They include the standards of the French, English and Belgian nations, and are relics which we prize very highly.

H. L. Clark, who for several years has been owner and publisher of the Alton Empire, recently sold that paper and has purchased the Logan Republican....

 

...
December 4, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5616)

The season for the regular Christmas advertising is at hand....The News and Times is anxious to have all the advertising Downs merchants care to give us, as that is the way we make our living. But our present condition, with a shortage of help, a coal shortage and other inconveniences we are suffering with, makes it imperative that we urge the merchants to cooperate with us in handling the advertising matter by preparing their advertising copy in advance....Unless this is done, we will be seriously handicapped and in consequence cannot render the merchants the service they expect....

Henry Hofer returned Sunday morning from Chicago, where he has been taking instruction on the Linotype at the Mergenthaler Linotype School. He has completed the mechanical course, and after December 15 will go to Jewell City, where he will have charge of the linotype in the office of the Jewell Republican.

 

...
December 11, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5617)

W. L. Chambers, editor and publisher of the Rooks County Record, celebrated his 40th anniversary as a publisher in Stockton last week. The entire front page of the paper was given over to the story of Mr. Chambers' struggles in trying to establish himself in the then wild and woolly West...(and) is oldest in continuous service in the Sixth Congressional District.

This office has a limited number of tulip and narcissus bulbs sent us for distribution by Congressman Hays B. White that will be handed out to any lady who cares to call for them, while they last.

 

...
December 18, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5618)

The News and Times did a thriving business in tulip and narcissus bulbs while they lasted this week. We could have disposed of two bushels of them and regret very much that we did not have that many to give out.

 

...
December 25, 1919, Downs News and Times (ID 5619)

The News and Times extends to its army of readers the best of good wishes for a very Merry Christmas and a Happy and Prosperous New Year. The year that has just passed has perhaps been one of the most trying in history, for many reasons, the country being in an unsettled condition as a result of the war....

 

...
January 1, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5620)

In looking back over our history in Downs we find we have done a little pioneering ourselves in various ways. The publishers of this paper installed the first International gasoline engine in town about 15 years ago; we installed the first Model C, 3-magazine Intertype in the state of Kansas; and have just installed the first Arcola heating system in this part of the country.

 

...
January 8, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5621)

C. E. Mann went to Topeka Sunday night to attend the special session of the legislature. Dan McKay of Phillipsburg is assisting in the News and Times office during his absence.

Geo. Leary, editor of the Gaylord Sentinel, went to Kansas City Sunday night to have a new artificial foot fitted. Part of his foot was cut off in an accident several years ago while he was braking on the Central Branch.

The Kansas City Post is another paper to feel the pinch of the high price of paper and printing materials. They announce an advance of 5 cents per week, the price now being 15 cents per week, to take effect January 17th....

 

...
January 22, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5622)

Dan McKay, who has been helping out with the work in this office during the absence of C. E. Mann, returned to Phillipsburg Sunday morning. McKay is a first-class printer and a mighty handy man around a print shop. We know of but one other man that can turn out the volume of work in a print shop that McKay can, and that is Warren White of the Phillipsburg News.

The Tipton Times has resumed publication after a suspension of about four months. Fred Kaplicky, the former publisher, had sold it to a Mr. Knight, who stopped the publication along in September. Kaplicky has again purchased the plant and last week got out his first number. Tipton is abundantly able to support a good newspaper and we believe the venture will be a success.

 

...
January 29, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5623)

High prices and war conditions are working havoc with many of the small newspapers of the country. Those located where the field is small and cannot be enlarged are being driven to the wall. Some are being consolidated, others just close the shop and call it a hopeless battle....There has been a heavy loss all over the land among the smaller newspapers. These little publications are of real importance in their communities and their passing will be a loss....There are few who toil who put in longer hours, who do more varied service and draw less in payment than the small-town editor of a weekly newspaper. As a rule, he is a booster, an optimist who helps every good movement, getting most of the small store of joy that comes to him from the knowledge that he helped push things along.

 

...
February 5, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5624)

H. L. Clark is making a real newspaper out of the Logan Republican. The present appearance of the paper reminds one of the time when Cal Walker presided over its destinies and got out one of the most readable papers in this section.

W. C. Palmer, editor of the Jewell Republican, announced last week that he would retire from the publication of the paper this week and that the name of his son, Everett T. Palmer, would go up as editor and publisher with the current issue. Mr. Palmer has published the Republican for the last 35 years, and in that time has acquired a reputation second to none in Kansas as a paragrapher and philosopher. He has the knack of putting his thoughts in a short, pithy paragraph and thus expressing more than many men can do in a column of space. Palmer may justly be said to be the master of epigrams among the Kansas newspaper men, and his wise and clever sayings will live long after their author has crumbled to dust. Palmer's retirement from the Republican will cause a pang of real pain in the breast of every Kansan who is a reader of the paper, and will be a matter of sincere regret to every newspaperman in the state.

 

...
February 26, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5625)

After 15 years in business together in Downs, the firm of Ransom & Mann is this week dissolved by mutual consent, and W. H. Ransom becomes sole owner of the paper. C. E. Mann has sold his interests to his partner. This move has been contemplated for some time because of conditions relating to the increasing cost of producing a paper, which makes a partnership with a division of profits impractical.

Ransom and Mann came to Downs in the spring of 1905 and purchased the News plant, then little more than a junk shop located in the rear of a building on South Morgan Avenue. They soon purchased a small building and moved the plant onto the main street. For several years, they had a hard struggle to make the plant a paying institution and it was by doing practically all the work themselves they made it succeed. At that time, the Downs Times was under the management of two of the best newspapermen this section has ever known, and was a proposition in competition that made a new venture in the hands of strangers a precarious undertaking.

In 1908, the publishers erected their present building and moved into it. The paper continued to grow in public favor and became a recognized institution of the town, but it was not until January 1916, when the publishers purchased the Downs Times plant and good will, that it really became a prosperous institution. Had conditions remained normal, it is not likely there would have been a change in ownership for many years, but the war, with its accompanying problems and increased costs, have made the newspaper business a very uncertain one, and it became necessary to simplify matters by one or the other of the publishers taking over the entire management.

Mr. Mann will hereafter be associated with B. P. Walker in the publication of the Osborne Farmer. The family will remain here until the close of school, when they will move to Osborne.

Salutatory -- In assuming the editorial reins of a newspaper, it is customary for the new editor to outline the policies he intends to pursue. In this case, however, since I have taken an active part with my partner in the management of the News and Times for the past 15 years, it is hardly to be expected that any radical changes be made in the paper under my personal management....While we may fall down miserably in keeping the paper up to the high standard of the past, we feel that after we get "lined out," and with the aid of our friends (among whom we include our faithful correspondents), we will be able to publish a paper of which you will not be ashamed....Our only regret in assuming full ownership of the News and Times is in parting company with Mr. Mann, whom we have looked upon as more than a partner.... -- W. H. Ransom.

Goodby -- With this issue, the News and Times passes to the complete control and ownership of W. H. Ransom, with whom I have been associated the past 15 years in Downs. These years have been very pleasant ones to me, and in that time I have tried to be of service to the town and community and to work for their best interests....Another pleasing feature is the fact that during all these years of our association the relations between Mr. Ransom and myself have been pleasant and harmonious....With the kindest feelings for all, and with the wish that the coming years may be rich in blessings for each and every one, I will say goodbye, and Godspeed. -- Chas. E. Mann.

W. H. Ransom was quite sick Tuesday, being threatened with pneumonia. He is somewhat improved at this writing.

Lew Headley, at one time one of the best-known editors in northwest Kansas, and for years the editor of the Gaylord Herald, died at his home in Ponca City, Okla., on Monday, aged 73 years. Mr. Headley was known to all the old-time citizens, and was a recognized political force in the early days of this section. He was the father of Bert Headley of the Smith Center Pioneer.

 

...
March 4, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5626)

W. H. Ransom, whose illness was mentioned last week, is now rapidly improving and will soon be able to return to his office. He is able to be out on the streets again when the weather is favorable.

 

...
March 11, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5627)

The following letter from Donald D. Davis, a former well-known Downs boy, now assistant director of sales and advertising for Montgomery Ward & Co. of Chicago, is much appreciated by the present and former publishers of this paper:

"I read with a great deal of surprise in this week's issue of the News that the life-long partnership of Ransom and Mann was to be dissolved, and that Bill would take over the paper while Charlie went to Osborne on the Farmer.

"As a boy who was raised in your office, and who learned to know you two men and looked to you for guidance during the formative period of his life, I want to write and tell you how sorry I am that the old relationship is to be broken up.

"...I will never forget the days when I used to sit up on a high stool and a type founders' catalog, ad stick type in your office. I was in the eighth grade then, and used to come down after school to work. I would sit there and set about half a stick of type every hour. Sometimes you all would sing while you worked -- that was before the days of the Linotype and there was not as much noise in the office as there is now.

"I remember more distinctly yet the thrill of press night, when Bill would cuss the engine and the folder alternately, and Charlie would stand at the press as solemn as a judge, feeding in the sheets. I remember the old Mustang mailer too, and my trips up the alley to the post office with armfuls of papers. When I look back at it all now, I realize that I was never happier than in those days when I first came in contact with printers' ink and began to know something of journalism and advertising.

"...You certainly gave me a 'running start' at the business, and if I ever amount to anything in the journalistic and advertising world it will be because you fostered in me a sincere love for printers' ink and the power it possesses...."

Chas. W. Wells, who formerly published the Alton Empire and later the Tipton Times, was in town Monday morning on his way up the branches, where he is working in the interest of the Kansas Petroleum Co. Mr. and Mrs. Wells now live in Salina.

 

...
March 18, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5628)

Mertie Berry Hampton's "East Bethany" column -- "Donald Davis' letter in the News and Times last week was read by the writer with a little more interest than lots of others as Donald was taking his apprenticeship at the same time we were employed in the same print shop. Donald didn't tell some of the important facts in the case in his letter to the editors. Possibly it was just an oversight on his part that he didn't tell how often he slid down from his stool and slipped into the Schneider Cafe and made from one to two pies look mighty sick. He, of course, at that time had so far mastered the art as to be drawing enough money to buy his own pie, and lost no time in taking advantage of this opportunity."

The Scottsville Advance and the Randall News, both bright little papers, have suspended publication. The cost of producing a newspaper under present conditions is causing havoc among the small-town papers, and hundreds of them all over the country have been forced to give up the struggle. When the small-town paper goes under, then the local merchant has no advertising medium, and the trade, now that the automobile is found in every family, gradually drifts to the larger towns. The tendency of the day will in time eliminate, not only the small country press, but the small country town itself. This is as certain as death and taxes unless conditions change.

Del Cox's "Gypsy Tales" -- Few men are naturally endowed with a mind and ever inflowing vocabulary to dash off with pen or tongue the pleasing and sympathetic words so much appreciated in time of great joy or sorrow. Editor Charles E. Mann is one of a thousand so cleverly gifted. His retirement from the old home paper will be most keenly felt as when the Nicklin brothers, Charlie and Tom, left Downs' journalistic field under advice of Horace Greeley; G. Dougherty removed to the state capitol; Ralph Norwood returned with increased experience to Chicago; Quincy R. Craft to assume charge of the payroll in the forestry department of agriculture; and Capt. W. S. Tilton stepped into his own among the daily newspapers. And so it is but natural that our splendid citizen of 15 years has earned a promotion to the Osborne Farmer, the greatest weekly newspaper in

Kansas. And so, while we with the great family of News and Times readers will miss the happy wit, humor, pathos and tender sadness of Mr. Mann's pen, we hasten to offer congratulations on his advent into a broader field of journalism.

The News and Times was crowded to the guards with advertising last week and, as a consequence, much reading matter had to be crowded out. We are sorry indeed that it was necessary to leave out such splendid correspondents as "Gypsy Tales," "Oak Dale," "Rose Valley," "Bloom" and "Corinth." At the present high price and scarcity of print paper, the printing of extra pages is not to be thought of, unless absolutely necessary.

 

...
April 1, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5629)

Mrs. Emma B. Alrich scored another first at the caucus Friday. When arriving in Cawker City in July 1879, she was the first woman in Mitchell County to take the highest grade teacher's certificate, and later on in 1881 became the first woman to be superintendent of the city public schools in Mitchell County. In 1883, she was the first woman to be placed on the Board of Teachers Examiners, and in 1917 the first woman in this county to own, edit and publish a newspaper. Her wish was granted that she might be one of the first women to be sent to a political convention as a delegate where she had heretofore been as a reporter." -- Cawker City Ledger.

J. F. Hale, editor of the Osborne News, was in town between trains Monday morning.

If you don't like the looks of the print paper the News and Times is being printed on, please don't blame the editor. It's the best we can buy and costs us over three times as much as we paid in the good old days.

 

...
April 8, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5630)

There was a man in our town, and he was wondrous wise; he swore it was his policy to never advertise. But one sad day he advertised, and thereby hangs a tale; the ad was set in quite small type, and headed "Sheriff's Sale." -- Exchange.

 

...
April 15, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5631)

The Osborne County News is no more, it having been purchased last week by B. P. Walker and consolidated with the Osborne County Farmer.

The News was established in May 1883 by C. Topliff and has had a varied career. Men of almost every political faith have been at its helm during its career and the efforts of most of them ended in failure. J. F. Hale, who acquired the paper several years ago, brought it out of the rut and made it a first-class Democratic paper and was making money. The high cost of producing a paper, together with the uncertainty of the print paper situation, makes the publishing of a paper a rather uphill business and the consolidation of the two papers there was a good thing for the publishers, as well as the patrons of the papers.

County papers are consolidating all over the country, as it is the logical thing to do.

Mr. Hale reserved some of the printing equipment and will move to Mankato to the plant of the Advocate, which he recently purchased, and which has been in charge of his son for several weeks.

As the consolidation leaves Osborne County without a Democratic paper, this paper invites members of that party to use its columns for political announcements, etc....It does not pay an editor to tear his shirt for any political party, and this editor does not propose to do it.

The Prairie View Wideawake, a paper published for several years by H. G. Vines, has suspended publication. Mr. Vines will move the printing plant to Cedar and reestablish the Cedar Enterprise.

 

...
April 22, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5632)

Printing was invented in China 1400 B.C. or something like that. I'll bet the first customer came into the shop and said: 'Get this job out for me tomorrow'. -- Pink Rag.

 

...
April 29, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5633)

George Leary, editor of the Gaylord Sentinel, bought the paper at Athol last week and will publish the two papers.

The paper famine is bringing acute distress to newspapers throughout the country and practically every publication is engaged in a desperate attempt to obtain a supply sufficient for its needs....The paper shortage seems very much like the sugar shortage except that the government does not permit more than a certain sum to be asked for sugar, while with the paper there is no such restraint and prices have soared to unbelievable figures. The cause for the shortage is in the enormous consumption by the great papers in the metropolitan cities which have been using vastly increased quantities the past year, while there has been no gain in manufacture, as the paper industry has been hard put since the war started to keep up to the normal figures of production.

The Mulvane News thus announces its editorial policy for the next 50 years: "As long as women make them so evident, so far as this paper is concerned, they will be legs rather than limbs."

 

...
May 6, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5634)

Heart-Throbs column by D.B.M. (probably Dan B. McKay) -- "For years we have cherished a desire to see Bert Walker's print shop at Osborne, and last Thursday that desire became a reality. Mr. Walker has not one of the best, but the best equipped shop in western Kansas and, for that matter, considering the size of town, in the Middle West. His building is elegantly arranged, has lots of light, fresh air, furnace and steam heat....His machinery and other equipment looks as clean and bright as any you see on display at the foundry....Mr. Walker right now is looking forward to the time when he will have a shop of larger proportions and dreams of the time when he will have the finest country shop in the whole of the United States."

 

...
May 13, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5635)

The editor of the Downs News tells the Democrats of that county that now that they are without a paper in Osborne County, they may expect perfectly fair treatment from that paper....In no other line of work would the owner put a political label on his product. In no other business would he smear political arguments gratuitously over the goods he sells to the public....The time is coming when newspapers will be newspapers and when politicians and political parties will have to acquire publicity at their own expense as businessmen do and not at the expense of the publisher. The day of the political newspaper in small towns is passing pretty rapidly. -- Smith County Journal.

"The Courant has secured enough newsprint to last a few months. It cost four times as much as it should cost, and is poor stuff -- yellow and flabby. But it will have to do....Many Kansas weeklies have already gone up to $2 a year, and some to $2.50, and even that will not put the subscriptions on a paying basis...." -- Howard Courant.

 

...
May 20, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5636)

The Journal at Smith Center changes hands this week. J. W. Morphy, who took charge of the paper about a year ago, has traded his interest in the Journal for Tell Peterson's interest in the Russell Reformer.

"The Osborne News, which was recently consolidated with the Farmer, was the 15th newspaper in the Sixth District of Kansas to cease publication since the high cost of all kinds of materials used in that work." -- Alton Empire.

 

...
June 10, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5637)

This item may sound stranger than fiction, but nevertheless it is true: Howard Ruede, for 43 years a resident of Osborne County and for the past 20 years a resident of Osborne City, made his first visit to Downs yesterday. Mr. Ruede, until recently, has been a printer and reporter on the Farmer during his residence in Osborne. He seemed to be bewildered by the hustle and bustle of the metropolis, which seemed strange to him, and called at this office to be directed to friends in the city....

B. P. Walker and family of Osborne will leave for San Diego, Calif., the last of this week. They have rented a home there and will remain for a year.

This office just received a ton of newsprint for which we must pay $258.50, an advance of nearly $200 over the good old days. At these prices, the printer cannot afford to send the paper to those who do not pay for it promptly.

R. C. Petty, editor of the Alton Empire,...visited Sunday.

"T. E. Skinner, who for nearly 30 years has been connected with the Farmer, will sever his connection July 3 and will go to Topeka, where he has accepted a position in the job office of Jones & Birch." -- Osborne Farmer.

 

...
June 17, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5638)

Dan McKay, the News and Times foreman, landed a nice nine-pound catfish Monday evening with pole and line. He was the envy of all the local fishermen that evening as he exhibited it on the streets.

"Capt. W. S. Tilton, who was editor of the Farmer from 1890 to 1896, was last week elected department commander of the GAR of Oklahoma at the state encampment at Blackwell. Captain Tilton was one of the most vigorous writers in Kansas in the days when he edited the Farmer, being then in his prime....Osborne County was a hotbed of Populism in the days when Captain Tilton ran the Farmer and feeling ran high in political campaigns in those days....Captain Tilton makes his home at Anadarko and publishes the Anadarko Tribune." -- Osborne Farmer.

 

...
June 24, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5639)

The Gaylord Sentinel announces this week that it will suspend publication with the issue of June 24 unless other arrangements are made by the people and businessmen of the town. The publisher says the patronage accorded the paper does not justify its continued publication....

 

...
July 1, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5640)

C. E. Mann, editor of the Osborne Farmer, will have no opposition in the primaries for (state) representative.

 

...
July 8, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5641)

Bob Good, former editor of the Cawker City Ledger, who has been in the "Y" service in Europe the past two years, landed in New York June 26 and arrived home July 4. He had just returned from Italy, where he had been on his first vacation since entering the service, when he was ordered to return to the United States.

 

...
July 22, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5642)

McKay's "Rube Band," which will be composed of the best musicians in Beloit, Smith Center, Tipton, Cawker City, Gaylord, Osborne and Downs, gives promise of being one of the best street bands that has ever played the celebration....

E. A. Tobias, a former employee of this office and who has been employed for some time by the Mergenthaler Linotype Co., with headquarters at New Orleans, has left the employ of that company. He is now working for the Illinois State Journal at Springfield, Ill., and has charge of ten Linotype machines in that office.

 

...
July 29, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5643)

We enjoyed a very pleasant visit from our old friend, Bob Good of Cawker City, who returned early this month from overseas, having spent two years in the YMCA service in France and later in Germany....Mr. Good, who has had his paper, the Ledger, leased for the past two years, will again resume charge of it in a short time....

 

...
August 12, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5644)

Mr. and Mrs. John Wolters left Saturday night on a vacation trip of several weeks....They will return home and leave immediately for Stockton, where Mr. Wolters has accepted a position as Linotype operator on the Record.

Miss Ada Colson, who has been editing the Cawker City Ledger for the past two years, has accepted a position on this paper and will report August 23.

D. B. McKay, who got the "Rube Band" together to play for the Downs celebration, is constantly receiving requests from towns in this part of the state for services of the band.

 

...
August 19, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5645)

The writer had the pleasure of listening to two mighty good speeches down at Lincoln park last Sunday, "Uncle" Bob Good giving a brief sketch of army life in Germany, and Judge Ruppenthal delivering a masterful address.

 

...
September 2, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5646)

W. L. Chambers, who has been editing the Rooks County Record for the past 40 years, announced last week that he had leased his paper for six months to Ira Anderson of Phillipsburg. Mr. Chambers will leave Stockton during that time and take a much needed rest.

 

...
September 16, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5647)

Gaylord is to again have a newspaper. Alfred Gledhill and son, George, will revive the defunct Sentinel. They have bought the plant and will publish the first issue on September 16.

"Fred Cook, postmaster at Jamestown and formerly editor of the Jamestown Optimist, has gone to Colorado to look over a few newspaper propositions that have been offered him." -- Cawker City Ledger.

 

...
October 21, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5648)

Fred M. Cook, Jamestown postmaster and former editor of the Optimist, has resigned his government position and...he will go to Sioux City, Iowa, to conduct a column and write editorials for the Sioux City Tribune. Mr. Cook was appointed postmaster in 1913 and then re-appointed....He sold the Optimist about a year ago to Walter Carlile. While editor of the Optimist, Mr. Cook was one of the best known paragraphers in Kansas and was widely quoted.

R. T. Lemons, a newspaperman from Richmond, Mo., was in town Saturday....Mr. Lemons has recently purchased the Logan Republican and was on his way out there to take charge of the paper.

We are in receipt of a copy of E. J. Garner's latest newspaper venture, the West Wichita Tribune. The local columns are as spicily gotten up as the Elm Creek lyceums 40 years ago when Jim Garner, George and Dan Shook were chief moguls on the program. -- Del Cox.

 

...
October 28, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5649)

The Paragrapher's Sprightly Art, by L. N. Flint, professor of journalism, is the first bulletin in the series for 1920-21 to be issued by the department of journalism in the University of Kansas. It will be followed by other publications, among which will be "The Newspaper's Family Tree," "Ten Tests of a Town," and "Charting Newspaper Facts."

A county association of Washington weekly newspaper publishers recently voted unanimously to increase the subscription price of their papers to $4 per year. Most of these papers were $1 a year before the war.

Donald Davis, a former Downs boy who has been working in the advertising department of Montgomery Ward & Co. at Chicago, has severed his connection with that firm and gone back to his old job with the Hugh Stevens Publishing House at Jefferson City, Mo.

 

...
November 4, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5650)

Alder Hewitt of Salt lake City is said to be the fastest Linotype operator in the United States. Last Sunday, he set 12,540 ems in one hour and 82,500 ems in 6 hours and 35 minutes. The setting was entirely in nonpareil and was in straight composition and not in competition.

 

...
November 25, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5651)

H. L. Clark, the senior member of the new bakery firm here, is an experienced newspaperman and last week had an opportunity to get back into the editorial harness temporarily. Editor Petty of the Alton empire was called to Tipton, Mo., by the illness of his mother and Mr. Clark had charge of the Empire during his absence.

 

...
December 2, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5652)

W. A. Hill of the Plainville Times bought the Plainville Gazette last week and consolidated the two papers.

Miss Ada Colson, who has been working on this paper as a reporter for several months, resigned her position last Saturday night. ...John Wolters, who has been working on the Record at Stockton, will again be a member of the News and Times force.

 

...
December 23, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5653)

We have been asked when we expect to reduce the price of newspaper advertising rates. We would answer that if we knew when there would be a reduction in printers' wages, print paper, and other material that enter into the making of a newspaper. The biggest item of expense in publishing a newspaper is that of labor....With printers' wages nearly three times as high as formerly, print paper four times as high, and other printing material in proportion, we see little chance for a reduction in advertising rates in the near future....

J. E. Kissell is about the whole town of Portis, and in addition to editing in a very creditable manner the Independent at that place, is high mogul in the Woodman lodge, serves the city as clerk, manages the Dynamos, the fast bunch of basketball players, teaches a Sunday school class, leads the band and does other duties that make for a better town.

The First Paper -- September 25th, this year, marked the 230th anniversary of the first newspaper published in America. This was the Publick Occurrences, edited by Benjamin Harris, a Boston printer, in 1690. Publick Occurrences, both Forreign and Domestick, as its full title was quaintly spelled, was a four-page sheet, seven and a half by eleven and one-half inches, containing two columns on a page, except for the fourth page, which was blank. It was to have been published once a month, "or oftener if any glut of occurrence happen." However, the second issue never appeared, for Vol. 1, No. 1 contained what the governor and council of the colony deemed "reflections of a very high nature," and the paper was promptly suppressed....

 

...
December 30, 1920, Downs News and Times (ID 5654)

The Old Home News

You may talk about the literature, Of ancient Greece and Rome, Of sages and philosophers, With Athens for their home; But these treasured works of ages, Do not half such joy impart, As the homely country phrases, Waking memories of the heart. And I live my boyhood over, As each item I peruse, In the weekly country paper, With its page of "Old Home News."

...I am free now to confess it, That no pleasure's so divine, As the hour I scan its pages, All alone in Memory's shrine. Tho that country correspondent, may not have been college bred, And the art of journalism, Was not drilled into his head. He's well-versed by Mother Nature, And he knows just how to choose, As he pens those weekly items, On that page of "Old Home News...."

 

...
February 3, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 1)

This office is deeply indebted to Mrs. Mason for a nice big sack of rags, which the good lady brought to the office last Thursday. If there is anything a printer likes in abundance around the office, it is a supply of nice clean rags.

 

The editor turned the paper over to the office for ...
February 10, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 2)

The editor turned the paper over to the office force last week and, accompanied by the Missus, attended the meeting of the Kansas State Editorial Association at Topeka on Jan. 28 and 29. At the close of the editorial meeting, we went down to Kansas City and just loafed until we felt pretty sure the paper was off the press....While in Topeka, we called at the statehouse and witnessed the lawmakers of the lower house in session....We were dined and shown many courtesies by Rep. C. E. Mann of Osborne, and A. Troupe of Phillips. Friday evening we attended the Native Sons reception at the statehouse.

 

Clyde M. Thuma, editor of the Lenora News, was in ...
March 17, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 3)

Clyde M. Thuma, editor of the Lenora News, was in town between trains. Mr. Thuma expects soon to buy a type-casting machine and came in to see our Intertype.

The National Editorial Association has found that a country weekly paper with a circulation of from 1,000 to 1,500 should charge 35 cents per column inch for its advertising in order to show a profit. If the News and Times could get that much and keep the present volume of advertising, we would be able to retire in a few years. We are making a profit at our present rate of 20 cents and are satisfied. Fred Kaplicky, who has been publishing the Tipton Times about a year and a half, announced in his issue last week that with that issue the paper would be discontinued. The lack of proper support is given as the reason for quitting. He complains that many of the merchants sent their job printing away from home. Tipton will always be without a paper if the merchants continue to pursue that course. It is becoming a hard matter for small town papers to exist. Over 2,000 have passed out of existence in this country the past year.

 

The businessmen have purchased the subscription li ...
March 24, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 4)

The businessmen have purchased the subscription list and plant of the Tipton Times and will publish it under the name of the Tipton Publishing Co. Fred Kaplicky, its former publisher, will be retained for the present as editor and manager.

 

B. P. Walker, owner of the Osborne Farmer, who wit ...
April 14, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 5)

B. P. Walker, owner of the Osborne Farmer, who with his family has been spending the past year at San Diego, Calif., has decided to remain in California until Sept. 1. They will move to Santa Ana or Los Angeles about May 1.

 

E. L. Whitmore, wife and daughter passed through t ...
May 5, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 6)

E. L. Whitmore, wife and daughter passed through town Tuesday in their car, en route from Chickasha, Okla., to Portis, where they will visit a brother, Frank Whitmore. They will continue their overland journey in about ten days, their ultimate destination being Moscow, Idaho, where Mr. Whitmore has purchased a job printing plant....E. L. is a son of Walt Whitmore, a former well-known Downs citizen and editor, now a resident of Moscow, Idaho.

Harve Wright, who has been publishing the Lebanon Times for the past nine years, sold the paper last week to M. J. Hibbs, A Christian preacher of that town.

 

Editor Bob Good of Cawker stopped at this office F ...
May 12, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 7)

Editor Bob Good of Cawker stopped at this office Friday for a short chat. He was on his way to Stockton to deliver his lecture and show his screen pictures of war scenes, for which he is becoming in great demand in this section of the state.

 

Quincy R. Craft, a former well-known Downs boy but ...
May 19, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 8)

Quincy R. Craft, a former well-known Downs boy but now one of the main cogs in the U.S. Forestry Department at Denver, is on a mission for his department in the Northern states. He stopped at Manhattan and sent us an interesting batch of news items from there about former Downs people.

 

Our sanctum was more than honored last Saturday af ...
May 26, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 9)

Our sanctum was more than honored last Saturday afternoon when two of our mainstay writers called for a few minutes' chat. The two writers, Messrs. Cox and Crosby, as it happened, jerked our latch string at about the same time and, coming into the office, pulled up a couple of chairs to our "mahogany" and proceeded to discuss farming activities in their respective neighborhoods....

This office enjoyed a pleasant visit Friday morning from Leslie Burkholder,

a printer on the Osborne Farmer.

Lawrence notes -- A. G. Alrich, formerly of Cawker City, has an unusually neat stationery store. Paul Rankin is advertising manager of the Lawrence Journal-World and grows wheat as a sideline on his farm near Ellis.

 

A. J. Asper has sold the building he recently purc ...
June 16, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 10)

A. J. Asper has sold the building he recently purchased from Del Cox to Charlie Bulick, who will move it early next week and add it to his residence in the west part of town....The old building was at one time the home of the Downs Times, it having been built in the early 1880's for George Dougherty, editor and

proprietor. The family lived in the rooms over the shop. The building was the home of the paper for a number of years....

A letter from B. P. Walker advises that he and his family are now located at 124 Buffalo Street, Santa Ana, Calif. He says they have no thought of locating out there and will return to Osborne on Sept. 1 or a little before.

Tom Skinner, who for many years has been foreman of the Osborne Farmer mechanical department, has accepted a position on a paper at Marysville.

 

Q. R. Craft of Denver, Colo., who stopped here a c ...
June 30, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 11)

Q. R. Craft of Denver, Colo., who stopped here a couple of days the latter part of last week for a visit with the family of his sister, Mrs. Del Cox, was a pleasant caller at this office Friday morning. Mr. Craft was at one time connected with the Times....His visit to this office was his first in about 15 years and he was surprised to note the improvement in equipment over the old days.

 

This office last week printed 15,000 papers that w ...
July 14, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 12)

This office last week printed 15,000 papers that will appear next week as supplements in 12 weekly papers in this section. The object of the papers is to advertise the Downs anniversary celebration to be held on July 28-29-30....The 15,000 papers will be used only in the local circulation of the various papers...so that they will be placed in a majority of the homes within a radius of over 50 miles of Downs....

Governor Allen has appointed B. P. Walker as state printer to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Emri Zumwalt. Mr. Walker, who is at present living with his family at Santa Ana, Calif., will take charge of the office Sept. 1....C. E. Mann will remain in charge of Mr. Walker's paper, the Osborne Farmer.

Del Cox's "Across the Raging Solomon" -- Thirty years ago, when Captain W. S. Tilton was editor of the Downs Times, young Walker was the all-around utility man. We hung around the office a good deal, because our fingers were stained with printers' ink and there was an attractive lady typo. On all occasions, the Captain would remove his cigar long enough to sing the praises of Bert, always winding up with "he will someday be one of the notables of the state." That day arrived last Thursday when he was appointed state printer....

 

So many people have expressed an interest in the " ...
July 21, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 13)

So many people have expressed an interest in the "Rube Band" that will be here during the three days of the celebration and have asked for the personnel of the band in its entirety....The director, D. B. McKay, is a resident of Downs. He was director of the Phillipsburg municipal band before locating here two years ago. He spent one year trooping with the American Amusement Company, one season with the Campbell Bros.' Circus, three years with the Nebraska State MW of A band, one season with the Norris & Rowe Circus, one season with the Fisher City Circus, and one season with the Gentry Bros.' Circus.

 

Charley Wells of Salina was in town Saturday morni ...
July 28, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 14)

Charley Wells of Salina was in town Saturday morning, leaving on the morning passenger for Osborne, where he will assist the Farmer force until a permanent printer can be secured. Charley got out of the printing game several years ago and has found the life insurance field more lucrative....

Volume 1, No. 1 of the Clayton Echo comes to our exchange table...edited by Miss Merle Butler and published by Clyde M. Thuma in connection with the Lenora News.

R. C. Petty has sold his interests in the Alton Empire to his partner, Harry M. Kurtz, who is now sole proprietor. For the present, Mr. Petty is giving the Osborne Farmer a lift in the mechanical department and will later go to Kansas City to take a business course.

Many old-timers will remember Curt Hoyt, who with his father published the old Downs Globe some 30 years ago....Mr. Hoyt was in Downs last Saturday to renew old acquaintances but failed to find many of the old fellows he knew in the old days. He is now engaged in the oil business and is interested in the outcome of the Delhi well and expected to remain in this vicinity until it was determined whether there is any oil in the hole. Mr. Hoyt is now rated a millionaire and lives in Wichita. The elder Hoyt died about 10 years ago.

 

Last week, we stated that the boss, W. H. Ransom, ...
August 18, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 15)

Last week, we stated that the boss, W. H. Ransom, had "hove" in from the East just as we were going to press, and immediately "hove" out again for Colorado.

Ex-Governor Edward W. Hoch, who spoke at the chautauqua Sunday evening, honored us with a pleasant social call Monday morning while waiting for his train....

The Agra Sentinel has again changed hands. The new owner is Vet Hassler.

 

Lee Meadows, formerly editor of the Gaylord Sentin ...
August 25, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 16)

Lee Meadows, formerly editor of the Gaylord Sentinel but now publisher of the Times at Oberlin, got out a whale of an edition last week. The edition carried 20 pages chock full of breezy writeups of Oberlin and carrying a large amount of ads.

F. M. May, foreman of the Jamestown Optimist, was in the city a few hours last Monday evening and a pleasant caller at this office.

Crosby's "Smith County Smatterings" -- Every member of the Crosby family was glad to meet the new man on the News and Times, Mr. McKay, that peculiar and very interesting writer who has been on the News force for some time. But last Friday, 8-19-21, was the first time the Mr. and Mrs. McKay and the baby and their 12-year-old daughter came out to the Corners. They, with the J. D. Cox family, in the latter's fine new Dodge. They all came by invitation to eat melons with us....

 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Ransom returned from their mont ...
September 1, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 17)

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Ransom returned from their month's vacation out in Colorado the first of the week....We have had one mighty tussle getting out the old home paper during Mr. Ransom's sojourn, and we rather imagine that the readers have gotten tired of the way we sling a pencil (the old Oliver).

 

Miss Lalah Magaw has accepted a position in this o ...
September 8, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 18)

Miss Lalah Magaw has accepted a position in this office, starting work last Monday morning. She will learn to operate the Intertype, do reporting and bookkeeping and otherwise make herself useful around the office. She has promised not to consider any proposals of marriage for -- well, until the right fellow shows up. So if we keep her a year we will be in luck.

Bert P. Walker, publisher of the Osborne Farmer, arrived in Downs with his family Friday, being on their way to Osborne after an absence in California of over a year. Mr. Walker was recently appointed to the position of state printer by Governor Allen and he stopped at Topeka last week to take the oath of office, since which time he has been on the payroll of the state....Mr. walker expressed himself as highly pleased with Charley Mann in the management of his paper during his absence, and stated that Charley would continue to pilot the destinies of the paper.

Harry L. Clark and family moved their household goods to Osborne last Wednesday, Harry having accepted a position on the Farmer as a printer....Harry came to Downs last year to assist his brother in getting established in the bakery business, and since that is accomplished is now free to "root" for himself.

Orrimel Heininger, a nephew of the editor, arrived from Henry, Ill., Tuesday evening and has joined the News and Times force to learn the "art preservative." Orrimel is...19 years of age and 6 feet in height.

 

(After the light plant burned in Downs.) For the f ...
October 13, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 19)

(After the light plant burned in Downs.) For the first time in many moons, the News and Times was a little late in getting into the mails last week. The delay was caused in taking time the first of the week to install a couple of gasoline engines to operate the Intertype and the big cylinder press....Now everything is running smoothly again, but the old-fashioned way does not compare to the modern way, and we will be mighty glad when we can throw the switch again and operate

the machinery with electricity.

Mrs. Emma B. Alrich of Cawker City was elected vice-president of the Woman's Relief Corps of the United States at the annual meeting in Indianapolis.

Frank McCormick, a young man who had been soliciting subscriptions for Editor H. B. Brown's three papers at Natoma, Waldo and Luray, disappeared recently with about $300 of funds belonging to the employer.

 

We enjoyed a call Tuesday afternoon from E. J. Gar ...
October 20, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 21)

We enjoyed a call Tuesday afternoon from E. J. Garner, a former newspaperman of many years experience, who is now working in the interests of the Kansas Wheat Growers' Association.

This paper is considering the plan of distributing the paper to Downs subscribers by special carrier....Uncle Sam's plan of distributing the paper to readers nearly 24 hours after it is printed is unthinkable in this progressive age....

 

An old-timer called -- This office received a very ...
October 27, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 22)

An old-timer called -- This office received a very pleasant call Monday from George E. Dougherty of Topeka and his brother, Frank Dougherty of Blue Hill.

George Dougherty was for several years editor of the Downs Times, and was the second editor of this paper. That was over 34 years ago but even in that period of early history of the town The Times was one of the best papers in the Sixth district and had few equals.

Mr. Dougherty compared the shop equipment of those early days with the paper's present modern equipment. An old Washington hand press was then in use and the job press was propelled by foot power. All the type was hand set and the papers folded by hand. Now practically all of the work is done with modern machines propelled by electric power.

For 27 years, Mr. Dougherty has been at the head of the Topeka Business College, which he founded, and has become authority on shorthand writing. He invented a system some years ago that has become very popular. While a resident here he married Miss Getty, a sister of Will and Ed Getty, and he and his brother were guests of the Getty families while here early this week. Mr. Dougherty will leave in a short time to spend the winter in California and join his wife, who has been out there for the past six months.

 

W. L. Chambers, who has been publishing the Rooks ...
November 17, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 25)

W. L. Chambers, who has been publishing the Rooks County Record for the past 40 years, with the exception of about a year when he retired from the management owing to poor health, has taken his son, W. L. Chambers, Jr., as a partner in the business. The "Deacon" intimates that he may soon withdraw from the paper and leave the management of it to his son.

The Russell Record last week purchased the Russell Informer, and Russell is now represented by one newspaper. This is the spirit of the age....

Smith County Pioneer -- "It is hard for the politicians to understand why Representative Charlie Mann, editor of the Osborne Farmer, did not take the job of state printer himself instead of recommending and urging Bert Walker for the place. He could have secured the office just as easily for himself as for another party, but he did not desire it. Mr. Mann has an ambition to be next speaker of the Kansas House of Representatives, and there are a multitude of good fellows over Kansas back of him for the important place. They are for him because he is square, honest, straightforward and never goes back on a friend...."

 

The Glen Elder Sentinel passed from the ownership ...
December 15, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 26)

The Glen Elder Sentinel passed from the ownership of A. O. Brice to that of Ray Breitweiser last week....Mr. Brice, who has been the owner and editor for 12 years, will seek an opening in a larger town, we understand. Miss Ada Colson, who has been connected with the paper for the past year, will continue as

reporter.

 

John Wolters, a former employee of this office who ...
December 29, 1921, Downs News and Times (ID 27)

John Wolters, a former employee of this office who is now employed on the Florence Bulletin, came home last Thursday for a Christmas visit.

 

The Phillips County Post, the newspaper at Phillip ...
January 19, 1922, Downs News and Times (ID 28)

The Phillips County Post, the newspaper at Phillipsburg purchased about one year ago by John M. Gray of Kirwin,...has been merged into the other two papers in that city....Warren White, editor of the News, gets the Post's subscription list which, by the way, is one of the largest in western Kansas. The News also gets a portion of the Post's equipment, while the Review, a paper launched by F. W. Boyd last October, falls heir to the remainder of the equipment....

 

John Gray of Kirwin, who recently got out of the n ...
February 2, 1922, Downs News and Times (ID 29)

John Gray of Kirwin, who recently got out of the newspaper game at Phillipsburg, was in town...on his way to Kansas City. In conversation with the News and Times man, he whispered in our ear that various persons were urging him to come out as a candidate for congress in this district. He asked the reporter what we thought of his chances in this vicinity and we frankly told him that, in our humble opinion, the present incumbent of that office, Hays B. White, was the candy kid in these parts....Mr. Gray is a very capable man....He has represented the counties of Norton, Phillips and Smith in the state senate the past two years and has served with distinction to himself and his district.

 

A few of the merchants...have shoved their garden ...
February 9, 1922, Downs News and Times (ID 30)

A few of the merchants...have shoved their garden seeds to the front and are offering them to the public. Can it be that they are jealous of our government display and are entering into competition with us?

 

John Wolters quit his job at Florence recently and ...
March 9, 1922, Downs News and Times (ID 31)

John Wolters quit his job at Florence recently and is now employed in a printing office in Kansas City, Mo.

 

Logan Smith, a printer on the Alton Empire,...was ...
March 16, 1922, Downs News and Times (ID 32)

Logan Smith, a printer on the Alton Empire,...was a visitor in Downs.

On last Monday, Bailey Atkinson completed two years of service as distributor of daily papers in this city....Although there are at times as high as 50 or more who get their paper at the depot when the train arrives, he seldom ever makes a mistake in delivery.

There i$ a $mall matter which $ome of our $ub$criber$ have $eemingly forgotten. To u$ it is nece$$ary in our bu$ine$$. We are mode$t and do not wi$h to $peak of it.

 

O. A. Brice, formerly editor of the Glen Elder Sen ...
April 6, 1922, Downs News and Times (ID 33)

O. A. Brice, formerly editor of the Glen Elder Sentinel, has purchased the Lincoln County Republican at Lincoln, Kan.

Tell Peterson, who for the past two years has been endeavoring to make a "go" of the Smith Center Journal, has given up the attempt as a bad job and last week turned the management over to Harve Wright, late editor of the Lebanon Times.

 

The Minneapolis Messenger has been sold for $9,000 ...
April 27, 1922, Downs News and Times (ID 34)

The Minneapolis Messenger has been sold for $9,000 to a farmer, who buys it for his son who is to graduate in June from the department of journalism at the state university.

 

A copy of the Berryville (Ark.) Democrat comes to ...
May 25, 1922, Downs News and Times (ID 35)

A copy of the Berryville (Ark.) Democrat comes to our exchange table this week. Our old-time friend, E. J. Garner, is editor and publisher, he having recently leased the paper.

The Kansas City Post, established about 12 years ago by F. G. Bonfils and H. H. Tamen of Denver, was purchased last week by Walter S. Dickey, owner and editor of the Kansas City Journal, a morning paper. Mr. Dickey will now be able to give his patrons a morning, afternoon and Sunday service, the same as the Star....The purchase price is said to have been $450,000. The owners of the Post are said to have lost about a million and a half dollars in the venture.

 

: After reading "Miscellaneous News Notes" last we ...
June 1, 1922, Downs News and Times (ID 36)

After reading "Miscellaneous News Notes" last week, written by Mertie Berry Hampton, we are at a loss to know when and how she found time to gather her items and write the column of interesting news. And what is true of her case is also true of all other country correspondents who so faithfully report the happenings of their localities to this paper each week. We wonder if our readers fully appreciate the sacrifices these correspondents are making....As a rule, the items are written by the housewives of the farms, and who will deny that

their time is pretty well taken up, especially at this season of the year? In addition to their usual household duties, they have the chickens to look after and in many cases the wives are called upon to milk the cows, feed the hogs and do countless other things about the farm while their busy husbands are putting in all possible time in the fields. Mrs. Hampton, for instance, says she "milks the cows twice a day, takes care of the chickens, prepares the meals, churns,

scrubs, bakes, washes, irons, sews, mends and goes to town as a sideline."...

 

Harry Ray has just completed a 10x16 addition to t ...
June 15, 1922, Downs News and Times (ID 37)

Harry Ray has just completed a 10x16 addition to the rear end of the News and Times building to replace the shed recently destroyed by fire. The construction is of cement slabs and is something new in these parts. The slabs, 2x4 feet, are

made on the ground and nailed to the building. The slabs are then cemented inside and out. This kind of construction is considered cheaper than cement blocks or other material and is fully as substantial....The building will be used to store coal and a re-melting room for the metal for the Intertype.

John Wolters came out from Kansas City Thursday morning, joining his wife and baby, who have been visiting here for several weeks. John has been operating a Linotype in a printing office down there for several months past, but work became slack in that line and he was laid off until August 1st, at which time he expects to return to Kansas City.

 

Mrs. Maria L. Mann died early Thursday morning of ...
June 22, 1922, Downs News and Times (ID 38)

Mrs. Maria L. Mann died early Thursday morning of last week at the home of her son, Harry A. Mann, at Concordia....Mrs. Mann was born in Indiana in 1834. In 1865, she married Harry P. Mann, and in 1886 came to Kansas to live, settling in Norton....She is survived by three sons: Rev. Grant Mann of Palco, Charles E. Mann of Osborne, and Harry A. Mann of Concordia; and by two daughters: Mrs. Julia Cummins of Prescott, and Mrs. Anna Eldred of Phillipsburg.

F. W. Boyd, editor of the Phillips County Review, filed nomination papers for the Democratic candidacy for congressman from the Sixth district yesterday. Dr. J. E. Hodgson of this city, who was figuring on entering the race, has withdrawn in favor of Mr. Boyd.

 

In this issue will be found the political announce ...
July 6, 1922, Downs News and Times (ID 39)

In this issue will be found the political announcement of F. W. Boyd of Phillipsburg, who is seeking the Democratic nomination to the office of congressman in the Sixth District....We were in his employ some 20 years ago when he was the directing genius of the old Phillips County Post, and we have known him intimately in the succeeding years. All the years we have known him, he has been fighting the battles of the Democratic party....He has been in the newspaper business at Phillipsburg for nearly 20 years and at the present time is editor of the Phillips County Review. He is a graduate of Kansas Sate Agricultural College, a brilliant writer and a good campaigner....

Orrimel Heininger, who has been employed in this office since last September, left last Friday for his home in Henry, Ill., for a visit with his parents. He probably will remain there if the right kind of an opening presents itself.

 

Leslie Burkholder, wife and two children, the form ...
July 13, 1922, Downs News and Times (ID 40)

Leslie Burkholder, wife and two children, the former a printer on the Osborne Farmer, have been visiting this week with Mrs. B's parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Nunn.

 

D. B. McKay is laying off from his work in this of ...
July 27, 1922, Downs News and Times (ID 41)

D. B. McKay is laying off from his work in this office this week to give his full time to his duties as secretary of the celebration committee, and to take charge of his band which has an engagement at the Waterville and Downs celebrations.

Emmett D. George, secretary to Governor Allen, who is seeking the nomination on the Republican ticket for superintendent of insurance, lived at Mankato a few years ago and published the Monitor. For several years past, he has been editor of the Council Grove Republican.

 

Miss Ada Colson, who at one time was employed as a ...
August 10, 1922, Downs News and Times (ID 42)

Miss Ada Colson, who at one time was employed as a reporter on this paper, was nominated for probate judge of Mitchell County at the primary election last week.

 

Harve Wright, age 40, was instantly killed at the ...
August 17, 1922, Downs News and Times (ID 43)

Harve Wright, age 40, was instantly killed at the Rock Island crossing in the southwest part of Lebanon Friday morning about 8:00 o'clock when his Dodge car was struck by a fast westbound train. For several months past, Mr. Wright has been editor of the Smith County Journal at Smith Center, but continued to reside at Lebanon, his old home....The body, which was horribly mutilated, was carried about 200 yards down the track and the remnants of the car were strewn along the track for nearly the same distance. For years, Wright was editor and publisher of the Lebanon Times. He sold the paper last year and went to Phillipsburg and worked a short time for the Phillips County Post. He was a son of the late Joe Wright, the veteran editor of Lebanon. For years, Harve Wright was a member of the Lebanon baseball team. He is survived by a wife and several children.

 

The Cawker City Ledger man is in a quandary as to ...
August 24, 1922, Downs News and Times (ID 44)

The Cawker City Ledger man is in a quandary as to which candidate to support for the office of probate judge of Mitchell County. Ada Colson, the Republican candidate, edited the paper for Bob Good when the latter was in France during the war, and Frank Mooney, the Democratic candidate, was one of the old standby country correspondents of the paper. So he gives each a nice writeup and lets it go at that.

 

Republican ticket includes: State printer, Bert P. ...
August 31, 1922, Downs News and Times (ID 45)

Republican ticket includes: State printer, Bert P. Walker; representative, 84th district, Chas. E. Mann.

 

Harry Clark, who has been employed on the Osborne ...
September 21, 1922, Downs News and Times (ID 46)

Harry Clark, who has been employed on the Osborne Farmer...,resigned his position last week and Tuesday came to Downs and during the absence of his brother, John, will take a hand at running the Clark Bakery.

 

Editor Kissell of the Portis Independent has issue ...
September 28, 1922, Downs News and Times (ID 47)

Editor Kissell of the Portis Independent has issued a call for all members of the famous Dynamo basketball team to congregate for practice.

 

Jonathan M. Davis, Democratic candidate for govern ...
October 19, 1922, Downs News and Times (ID 48)

Jonathan M. Davis, Democratic candidate for governor, and F. W. Boyd, Democratic candidate for congressman, visited Downs on their speaking tour....Mr. Boyd is just a plain newspaperman, but claims the distinction of having been born on a farm in Smith County 43 years ago. He is a very fluent speaker and made a very good impression with his audience.

 

Our old friend, V. Hutchings, for many years edito ...
December 7, 1922, Downs News and Times (ID 49)

Our old friend, V. Hutchings, for many years editor and manager of the Smith Center Pioneer, has...contracted the California fever and next week will yank up his anchor, shake the dust of the Kansas prairies from his cow-hide boots and pull out for the golden West. Mr. Hutchings announces that the change is being made in hopes that a milder climate will prove beneficial to his health....

 

We allowed ourselves to be talked into the notion ...
January 4, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 50)

We allowed ourselves to be talked into the notion of installing one of those Keeton Oil Company oil burners last week. Up to date, the burner has worked to perfection. We have tried almost every contraption under the sun to keep our office inhabitable during the winter months....

 

Charles Mann of Osborne, at a caucus today, was ch ...
January 11, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 51)

Charles Mann of Osborne, at a caucus today, was chosen Republican nominee for speaker of the Kansas House of Representatives. As the Republicans have more than a two-thirds majority in the House, Mr. Mann will be elected....Charles Mann served in the legislature in 1919 and 1921 and at the recent election won over his opponent by a handsome majority.

Earlier in the week, it was announced that Mrs. Emma Alrich of Cawker City had been appointed postmistress. However, a contest was later staged between Mrs. Alrich, Mrs. E. L. Couchman of Topeka, and Miss Inez Wilson of Iola. Mrs. Couchman was fortunate in securing the nomination.

The publisher of a newspaper has one thing to sell and one thing to rent. He has the newspaper to sell and the space in his columns to rent. Can anyone inform us why he should be expected to give away either one or the other?...

Never again, if we can help it, will we cut the size of our paper down to four pages, as we did last week. Too much work in the job department, coupled with a trifle too much celebrating on New Year's Day....We have found that it has taken up more of our time the past week explaining the circumstances to our readers than it would have taken us to print the whole regular eight pages.

 

D. V. Wible and wife arrived from Herington Sunday ...
January 18, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 52)

D. V. Wible and wife arrived from Herington Sunday evening and Mr. Wible has accepted a position on the News and Times force. Mr. Wible is an experienced machinist-operator and now...we hope to get back into our old stride and put out a bigger and better paper than ever before.

The News and Times, together with his host of friends among its readers, are particularly pleased at the signal success of its one-time editor for over 15 years in his election as speaker of the House of Representatives. Mr. Mann was one of six candidates for the speakership. Eventually four of them withdrew from the race, leaving K. M. Geddes of Butler County as Mr. Mann's only opponent....The first and only vote gave Mr. Mann 49 votes, while Mr. Geddes received but 43....

 

Editor V. Hutchings, 65, editor of the Smith Count ...
January 25, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 53)

Editor V. Hutchings, 65, editor of the Smith County Pioneer, died suddenly on January 17th at Hollywood, Calif., where he had gone a month ago on a vacation. For 25 years, Mr. Hutchings had been owner and publisher of the Smith County Pioneer....The newspaper boys throughout the entire district held the deceased in the greatest reverence.

 

The strange and vicious animal that had been terro ...
February 8, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 55)

The strange and vicious animal that had been terrorizing the citizens of the Portis vicinity for some time past was trailed to its lair last Friday night and killed by Editor J. E. Kissell of the Portis Independent. The animal is said to be a freak, weighing about 100 pounds and having a coat of hair like a Collie dog with legs and claws like a cougar. The ground around the den where the animal was killed was covered with bones of pigs, young calves and dogs. Tracks larger than the ones made by the slain animal were numerous around the den, and this leads to the belief that its mate is yet at large. Will Lattin of Portis, who was attacked a short time ago by one of the strange animals and severely bitten and clawed, is recovering rapidly. He says the animal that attacked him was much larger than the one killed by Kissell.

 

Mr. and Mrs. George Henderson and daughter arrived ...
February 15, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 56)

Mr. and Mrs. George Henderson and daughter arrived from Topeka last Friday evening and the following morning Mr. Henderson, who is an experienced machinist-operator and all-round newspaperman, accepted a position on the News and Times force. D. V. Wible, the young man who came up from Herington a couple of weeks ago to fill a vacancy in our office, decided that he preferred a larger city than Downs.

 

For the past several years, we have kept in our de ...
March 1, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 57)

For the past several years, we have kept in our desk a box into which we have tossed articles that have been picked up on the streets and brought to this office and advertised. The collection includes keys of all descriptions, rings, chains, lodge pins, button hooks, cork screws and pullers. If you have ever lost anything in this line...come in and look our collection over. If you find your missing article it will not cost you a penny. We want to get rid of the stuff.

This office has received a large quantity of government seeds from Congressman Hays B. White for distribution in this community. Each package contains beets, carrots, lettuce, onion and radish seeds. If you can use any of them, come in and get 'em.

 

At last Robert Good, editor of the Cawker City Led ...
March 8, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 58)

At last Robert Good, editor of the Cawker City Ledger, has found his way to the public crib and after the 15th of this month will be found in the state capitol sucking away at the public teat. Governor Davis has announced his appointment as second assistant state business manager, to succeed E. B. Cronemeyer. Seems to us that with all the boosting Bob has done...for the "mule party" he should have been able to have landed a plum with a larger seed in it....

 

Repeatedly we have been asked what our opinions we ...
April 12, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 59)

Repeatedly we have been asked what our opinions were on the Ku Klux Klan. Here they are: During our short sojourn upon this earth, we have found that the American people, generally speaking, crave for something new, something different, something either with a kick in it as strong as carbolic acid or something as mild as a drink of rain water. But, no matter what happens, they must have something out of the ordinary to pester their neighbors with....It's nothing more than right that the KKK's be given a clear field....However, it is about time the initial K's give place to something different -- our people will stand for one thing for just so long and desire a change.

 

M. J. Hibbs, present editor of the Lebanon Times, ...
May 10, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 61)

M. J. Hibbs, present editor of the Lebanon Times, has been appointed manager and caretaker of Lincoln Park and will move his family there in the near future....Mr. Hibbs will dispose of his newspaper at Lebanon.

 

We are now fully electrically equipped. The old ga ...
May 24, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 62)

We are now fully electrically equipped. The old gas engine that has done duty in this office for the past 18 years coughed her right lung loose last week and has been replaced by a new three-horsepower electric motor by Ray Zumwalt. This makes the fourth motor in the office, one on the Intertype, one on the newspaper press, one on a small job press, and the one installed this week is attached to the folding machine with a shaft connecting it with the big job press. All the manual labor now connected with the issuing of the paper each week is the stowing away of the cash taken in over the front desk and carting it away to the vaults in the banks. Surely the life of the editor is now but one sweet dream!

 

Volume 44, No. 1 of the Downs 44th anniversary cel ...
June 21, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 63)

Volume 44, No. 1 of the Downs 44th anniversary celebration newspaper is now off the press....The committee has had 5,000 of these little newspapers printed, and will distribute them broadcast over this section of the state... .

Mr. and Mrs. John Wolters and baby autoed up from Pratt....John is still employed on one of the Pratt newspapers as an operator....

 

Volume 1, No. 1 of the Thomas County Cat, a little ...
July 5, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 64)

Volume 1, No. 1 of the Thomas County Cat, a little four-page paper published by the Garvey Land Company at Colby, reached our desk last week. Mr. Thomas Cat does some mighty loud howling for Thomas County and for the Garvey land people.

 

Phil Senner, a salesman for the Kansas City Paper ...
July 12, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 65)

Phil Senner, a salesman for the Kansas City Paper Company, died in a hospital at Kansas City last week. Mr. Senner has been making Downs for several years and on each trip spent Sunday at the Hotel Lipton....He was about 40 years of age and unmarried.

 

E. L. Getty received a telegram from Ontario, Cali ...
August 2, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 66)

E. L. Getty received a telegram from Ontario, Calif., last Friday announcing the death of his sister, Mrs. George E. Dougherty. Mrs. Dougherty had been ailing for a long time....Mrs. Dougherty was well known in Downs, having come here in 1879 with the Getty family. In 1882, she was married to George E. Dougherty, at that time editor of the Downs Times. They moved to Topeka a few years later, where she lived until about two years ago, when they decided to make their home in California .

Carl McKay, foreman in the office of the Norton Courier for several years, was an interested spectator all three days of the celebration. He was a guest at the home of his son, D. B. McKay.

 

Mrs. Q. R. Craft, with her quartette of youth, Eno ...
August 9, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 67)

Mrs. Q. R. Craft, with her quartette of youth, Enoch, Ruth, Jesse and Dean, favored her relatives and friends with a four days' visit last week. The family is on the way to join Mr. Craft at Fairmont, Minn., where he is in the employ of George McKissen, a wholesale nursery and lumber man.

 

Next Monday a caravan will head north from Downs a ...
August 30, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 68)

Next Monday a caravan will head north from Downs and before a halt is made will pull up by the side of one of the thousands of lakes in Minnesota, where camp will be made for the next 30 days. There will be two autos in the caravan, the cars belonging to Jack Creamer and John Oliver of Glen Elder...In company with these gentlemen will be D. B. Harrison, A. P. Cotton and W. H. Ransom, the boss fishermen of this neck o' the woods. The gentlemen will carry a complete camping outfit, fishing tackle, supplies, etc., to last them during the entire 30 days.

 

Ray Breitweiser, editor of the Glen Elder Sentinel ...
September 20, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 69)

Ray Breitweiser, editor of the Glen Elder Sentinel, was a visitor in Downs....Ray is getting out a crackin' good paper for the Glen Elder folks and on the side is now publishing a paper for Tipton.

 

John Wolters, who has been employed on one of the ...
November 1, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 70)

John Wolters, who has been employed on one of the newspapers at Pratt for the past couple of years, arrived in Downs last week....About the middle of this month he will pull out for California, where he has a position waiting for him.

 

...A. B. Adamson, editor of the Beloit Daily Call, ...
November 8, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 71)

...A. B. Adamson, editor of the Beloit Daily Call, has decided to retire from the game...and expects to spend the winter in Florida. Harry K. Houghton, junior editor of the Call, has assumed full charge and will be assisted by Mrs. Rachel Butler, who becomes associate editor.

 

John Wolters...left Sunday evening for Richmond, C ...
November 15, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 72)

John Wolters...left Sunday evening for Richmond, Calif., where he has a position as operator on the Record-Herald, one of the Pacific coast newspapers.

 

Frank A. Hart, editor of the Lebanon Times, spent ...
December 13, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 73)

Frank A. Hart, editor of the Lebanon Times, spent a few hours in our city last Friday afternoon....Mr. Hart is a new man in the newspaper field in northwestern Kansas.

 

The Cedar Enterprise failed to come out last week ...
December 20, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 74)

The Cedar Enterprise failed to come out last week when the editor, J. M. Vines, suffered a stroke of paralysis. Mr. Vines was taken to the county farm Saturday, where proper attention could be given to him. -- Smith County Pioneer.

 

Reverend Hibbs...informed us he had leased the Gay ...
December 27, 1923, Downs News and Times (ID 75)

Reverend Hibbs...informed us he had leased the Gaylord Sentinel....Reverend Hibbs was formerly editor of the Lebanon Times and last summer was in charge of Lincoln Park....Young Gledhill, who has been getting out the paper for some time past, will attend college .

Sam Trumble, one of the energetic force of the Glen Elder Sentinel, doffed his shop apron and came up to Downs to spend Christmas.

 

Walt Smith, a former sleuth on the Downs Times, ha ...
January 3, 1924, Downs News and Times (ID 76)

Walt Smith, a former sleuth on the Downs Times, has been appointed ticket agent for the Missouri Pacific and Chicago Great Western railroads at their new passenger station at Kansas City, Kan....Walt has been ticket agent for the Rock Island and Union Pacific at Kansas City, Kan., for several years.

 

While cleaning out an accumulation of old files,.. ...
January 24, 1924, Downs News and Times (ID 78)

While cleaning out an accumulation of old files,...Postmaster Nixon recently unearthed a copy of the Downs News. The date on the paper was November 12, 1903. The Downs News in those days was just a trifle larger than a postage stamp. But four pages were printed. The pages were four columns wide and 13 inches long....Another item of interest is the announcement of Editor F. W. Gardner that he had sold the News plant to W. B. Gaumer of Phillipsburg....

 

The absence of the regular Linotype operator on th ...
April 10, 1924, Downs News and Times (ID 79)

The absence of the regular Linotype operator on the Glen Elder Sentinel last week caused Editor Breitweiser to resort to "patent insides." The Sentinel is usually a bang-up good paper, chock full of breezy news items and enough advertising matter to make it one of the best paying publications in these parts and the boiler plate last week looked very much out of place.

 

H. L. Clark, formerly of the Clark bakery in this ...
April 17, 1924, Downs News and Times (ID 80)

H. L. Clark, formerly of the Clark bakery in this city but for the past several months connected with the Osborne Farmer,...recently purchased a newspaper plant out in Idaho and will move to that state about the first of July.

 

G. D. Henderson, who has manipulated the keys on o ...
April 24, 1924, Downs News and Times (ID 81)

G. D. Henderson, who has manipulated the keys on our Linotype for the past two years, resigned his position last Saturday evening and Monday noon left for Eads, Colo., where he has a position on one of the newspapers....Richard Edwards of Kincaid has been employed for the position....He is a young man of considerable newspaper experience.

 

Charles E. Mann, who has served Osborne County as ...
May 1, 1924, Downs News and Times (ID 82)

Charles E. Mann, who has served Osborne County as a member of the legislature for the past six years, and who was speaker of the 1923 House of Representatives, has decided to again ask for the Republican nomination for that office....

 

Frank Boyd, editor of the Phillips County Review, ...
May 8, 1924, Downs News and Times (ID 83)

Frank Boyd, editor of the Phillips County Review, has decided to enter the race for the Democratic nomination for congress and contest strength with John Connelly of Colby. Boyd is well known over the district by reason of his race two years ago with Hays B. White.

 

J. E. Kissell, editor of the Portis Independent, c ...
June 26, 1924, Downs News and Times (ID 84)

J. E. Kissell, editor of the Portis Independent, claims the honor of having the nicest garden in his city. Among other things raised he mentions peanuts. It has always been a mystery to us where J. E. secured his supply of peanuts for the basketball season and we are right glad that he has volunteered this information.

 

Last week, the editor of this paper, in behalf of ...
July 24, 1924, Downs News and Times (ID 86)

Last week, the editor of this paper, in behalf of the Downs celebration committee, sent press notices of the celebration to very nearly 20 newspapers in the Sixth District, and in almost every instance the editors receiving these notices published them in their papers....

 

George E. Dougherty arrived from Ontario, Calif., ...
August 7, 1924, Downs News and Times (ID 87)

George E. Dougherty arrived from Ontario, Calif., the first of the week for a visit at the homes of Ed and Will Getty and to renew acquaintances with many old-time friends in these parts. Mr. Dougherty for six years edited the Downs Times, leaving here in 1887 and going to Topeka where he launched the Dougherty Business College, one of the best known colleges of its kind in the state. He was the executive of this institution until 1921, when he moved to California and where Mrs. Dougherty passed to her reward about a year ago. Last year, Mr. Dougherty sold his interests in the college and at present is conducting a branch office in Ontario for the Los Angeles Times and the San Bernardino Herald.

 

Richard Edwards, Linotype operator in this office, ...
August 14, 1924, Downs News and Times (ID 88)

Richard Edwards, Linotype operator in this office, was called to Glen Elder Tuesday evening by the death of a friend.

 

Time was when William Allen White was not only the ...
September 18, 1924, Downs News and Times (ID 89)

Time was when William Allen White was not only the champion Kansas optimist but a Republican. He made his first 'big hit' with his editorial, 'What's the Matter with Kansas?' which has become part of the journalistic history of Kansas. It was a hit because it did hit. It hit the political hysteria which swept over Kansas and transformed the traditional 80,000 Republican majority into first a negligible numerical victory and finally a triumph for Populism....Well, that was what was the matter with Kansas then and it seems to be what's the matter with Bill today. Bill is flirting with an independent ticket because he has seen a few 'hooded skulkers down in the cow pasture' or a few men marching in nighties and 'pillow cases' in the streets. The Klan hasn't 'captured' the Republican Party or any other party. The matter with Bill is that he can't see this....Bill ought to get out some of those old-time Republican registration certificates, possibly some sample ballots recalling the old days when he voted the Republican ticket and was happy and sound in his Republicanism and held his head proud and high. That's all there is the matter with Bill. He just has forgotten, as Kansas forgot and was so splendidly and effectively recalled to its senses by this same William Allen White. -- Kansas City Journal.

 

W. H. "Billy" Nelson, known from one end of the Si ...
October 23, 1924, Downs News and Times (ID 90)

W. H. "Billy" Nelson, known from one end of the Sixth District to the other, died at his home in Smith Center last Saturday following a stroke of paralysis. "Billy" Nelson had been a resident of Smith Center for the past half century.

During the Populist uprising in the nineties, he was editor of the Smith County Pioneer-Republican. He was a brilliant writer and his editorials, so it is claimed, had a great influence in overpowering the third party. At one time, he was assistant state treasurer.

 

Monday evening, Mrs. Del Cox received a telegram f ...
October 30, 1924, Downs News and Times (ID 91)

Monday evening, Mrs. Del Cox received a telegram from Los Angeles, Calif., bearing the sad news of the death of her father, E. D. Craft, who passed away a few minutes prior....The final summons came at his home in Inglewood, a suburb of Los Angeles. The immediate cause of death was apoplexy. Emery Dean Craft was born near Carmel, N.Y., on October 28, 1840....He entered the Baptist Theological Seminary of Colgate University, Hamilton, N.Y., and graduated therefrom in 1868. He was ordained a minister of the gospel the following year at Addison, Vermont. Mr. Craft was united in marriage to Ruth B. Woodmaan on October 19, 1869, and to this union were born one daughter and one son. He held pastorates in Addison, Vt.; Moriah, N.Y.; and also at Pine Plains, N.Y. In the fall of 1879, the family removed to Downs. Before leaving the Empire State, Mr. Craft bought a farm a mile south of Downs, the ownership of which still remains in the family, being the home of the daughter, Mrs. Del Cox. For nearly a quarter of a century, Mr. Craft was engaged in the dairy business and supplied the residents of Downs with milk twice a day. During all these years, he was active in Christian work, being superintendent of Downs Baptist Sunday school for 20 years, and was instrumental in organizing many rural schools, supplied pulpits here and there, and officiated at numerous marriages and funerals. Twenty years ago, Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Craft again moved westward, locating in Los Angeles. Mrs. Craft passed to the Great Beyond on October 20, 1914. Two years later, Mr. Craft and Mrs. Clara Pulliam were married at Solomonville, Ariz., where they resided for two years, again moving to California, where he remained until his death. For the past five years, the deceased had been conducting a successful grocery business in Inglewood, Calif....The immediate relatives...are the wife, the daughter Cornelia Cox of Downs, and son Quincy R. Craft of Albuquerque, N.M. -- Del Cox.

Mr. and Mrs. Warren White...motored to Downs last Sunday in their new Hudson coach....Mr. White, who is editor of the Phillipsburg News-Dispatch, is a brother of Old "Dad" White, the famous baseball pitcher of Smith Center....

 

H. K. Bruce,...who is editor of the Hunter Herald, ...
November 13, 1924, Downs News and Times (ID 93)

H. K. Bruce,...who is editor of the Hunter Herald, has recently been appointed postmaster of that hustling little city.

This office received a copy of Harry Clark's newspaper, the Cambridge (Idaho) News-Reporter, the first of the week. In addition to getting out a crackin' good newspaper, Harry is fast proving himself a marksman and under the heading "A Tenderfoot Goes Hunting," he tells about going out on a deer hunt and killing a three-pointed buck.

 

C. E. Mann, editor of the Osborne Farmer, and the ...
November 20, 1924, Downs News and Times (ID 94)

C. E. Mann, editor of the Osborne Farmer, and the News and Times editor were guests of the journalism department of the Kansas University at Lawrence last Friday and Saturday, with over one hundred other Kansas editors. Round-table discussions by the editors, divided into the daily and weekly classes, were very interesting and instructive features of the gathering....The editors were guests at the Oklahoma-KU football game....On the way home, the two Osborne County editors stopped at Manhattan Saturday evening to visit with their children attending KSAC and were delightfully entertained at the ATO fraternity house....

 

The back end of this news factory is up on its toe ...
November 27, 1924, Downs News and Times (ID 95)

The back end of this news factory is up on its toes this week handling the regular run of job work, getting out the "weekly astonisher" and printing (the Lord only knows how many) premium booklets for the big poultry show.

Dick Edwards, the News and Times Intertype operator, went to Kincaid...and spent the weekend with his parents.

 

We don't see why the Western Newspaper Union, the ...
December 18, 1924, Downs News and Times (ID 96)

We don't see why the Western Newspaper Union, the place where "boiler plate" is manufactured, does not get up a few columns of plate matter to be used by newspapers in districts where wildcat oil wells are being sunk....

 

Merle Cushing, secretary of the poultry associatio ...
December 25, 1924, Downs News and Times (ID 97)

Merle Cushing, secretary of the poultry association and community fair, missed his guess on the number of firsts and seconds that would be placed this year by several yards of blue and red ribbon. Merle came around to our printing establishment Friday morning with rolls of ribbon on which we were asked to print the title of the awards made down at the show. We used up one whole roll of blue ribbon (20 yards) in printing the firsts, and then lacked 10 yards of having enough ribbon. We also used up a roll of red ribbon printing seconds and then lacked 21 inches of having enough. Mr. Cushing scouted all over the city in an effort to find ribbon to finish the job, but was unable to do so.

 

W. H. Wright, one of the Wright boys who formerly ...
February 12, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 99)

W. H. Wright, one of the Wright boys who formerly edited the Lebanon Times, is getting himself into a mess of trouble over in Smith County. It is alleged that he deserted his wife and their five-year-old son....

According to...the Kirwin Kansan, Platt and Bush, who have been editing the paper for the past four years, will dissolve partnership on or about April 1st....

 

M. J. Hibbs, former pastor of the local Christian ...
February 19, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 101)

M. J. Hibbs, former pastor of the local Christian Church, but who left here to edit the Gaylord Sentinel, has announced his retirement from the newspaper field and has discontinued the publishing of the paper.

While standing in the post office last Saturday morning, we watched J. E. Cummings pull the wrapper off a newspaper and, turning to friends standing near, remark: "Here is the first and oldest newspaper published in the state of Kansas." The paper is the Kansas Chief, which is published at Troy. The paper was established in 1857....

 

The axe finally fell across the neck of Robert Goo ...
February 26, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 102)

The axe finally fell across the neck of Robert Good, editor of the Cawker City Ledger. Mr. Good has been assistant state business manager under the Davis administration, but Monday was disconnected from the public teat to make room for an appointee of Governor Paulen. Good will say farewell to his job April 1st.

 

Bob Good, according to last Sunday's Daily Capital ...
April 9, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 104)

Bob Good, according to last Sunday's Daily Capital, is hatching out a scheme to organize a Democratic publicity bureau, with headquarters at Topeka, the object of which will be to furnish the Democratic newspapers over the state with the low down on all things political. Of course, Bob will be in charge of the pencil pushing brigade -- at a comfortable salary....In order to keep Bob's paycheck making regular visits...the plan is to assess each county in the state on the basis of 3 cents for every vote cast for the Democratic candidate for secretary of state last year.

"Brother Q. R. Craft, at one time editor of the Downs Times, but for the past 24 years connected with the U.S. Forestry Department, underwent a surgical operation at Albuquerque...for the removal of gall stones...." -- Across the Raging Solomon.

 

Just because our printers adhere to one of the iro ...
April 30, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 107)

Just because our printers adhere to one of the iron-clad rules in every printing office in the United States, that of following copy even though it takes one out the back window, we caused the Ebnother Drug Company to say that April 10 was Mother's Day, when any 10-year-old school kid in town knows that the date is May 10th.

 

Charles W. Landis, formerly publisher of the Osbor ...
May 21, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 108)

Charles W. Landis, formerly publisher of the Osborne Farmer,...died May 11 at Prescott, Ariz., where he had recently gone in the hopes of benefiting his health. Mr. Landis suffered a breakdown in health about a year ago. He had been a resident of San Diego, Calif., but when his health began to fail he retired from business and moved to Arizona. Away back in 1887, Mr. Landis became one of the owners of the Osborne Farmer and in 1896 he obtained full ownership....

Another improvement: Bill and Dick, with shovel, hoe, rake and grabhook, attacked the rose bushes in front of the News and Times office last Thursday morning and dug out a couple of tons of old newspapers, weeds, grass, and other vermin and now our "front yard" looks as neat and clean as any in the city.

 

E. W. Hoch, former governor of Kansas, died unexpe ...
June 4, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 109)

E. W. Hoch, former governor of Kansas, died unexpectedly at his home in Marion on the night of June 1....Mr. Hoch was governor of Kansas for two terms, 1905-07, 1907-09. Later he served as a member of the state board of administration. He was 76 years old.

Maxine Ransom received her degree in industrial journalism from Kansas State Agricultural College last Thursday and is home for the summer vacation.

 

A postal card from Editor Kissell of the Portis In ...
June 11, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 110)

A postal card from Editor Kissell of the Portis Independent reached our desk....Editor Kissell is a member of the Shrine band from this state that is making the natives of California sit up and take notice. Mr. Kissell says that he has found many strange and unusual things...but what astonished him more than anything else was the fact that, when he reached the ocean, he found it full of water.

 

Walt Whitmore, one of the early day editors of Dow ...
June 18, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 111)

Walt Whitmore, one of the early day editors of Downs,...was in town between trains Friday morning on his way to Portis....Mr. Whitmore called on Billy Hardman, whom he had not seen for 31 years....

Al Schmiedeler, the "works" of the Glen Elder Sentinel, dropped in for a few minutes visit....

 

The many old friends in Downs and vicinity of Paul ...
July 2, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 112)

The many old friends in Downs and vicinity of Paul Rankin will be grieved to learn of his death, which occurred at his home in Lawrence on Tuesday evening. Mr. Rankin had been in ill health for over a year, suffering with anemia. About a year ago, he consulted Mayo Brothers at Rochester, Minn....He was about 43 years of age and is survived by his wife and one child, a son. Mr. and Mrs.

Rankin came to Downs in 1910, the former buying a half interest in the Downs Times from J. J. Parker. Except for a couple of years at Salina, where he was employed on the Salina Journal, Mr. Rankin remained here until 1916, when the Times was purchased by Ransom & Mann and consolidated with the News. Mr. Rankin then went to Lawrence, where he has since been employed as an editorial writer on the Journal-World. Mr. Rankin was a strong writer and under his guidance the Times reached the height of its popularity. He was a most affable young man, exceptionally well liked by all who knew him.

Lee Meadows, editor of the Oberlin Times and just recently appointed supervisor of the publicity department of the state fire marshal, was in the city a short time last Monday....It has been years since we last glimpsed Lee, and the only difference we see in him today and when he was director of the Gaylord band...is that he's a mite larger around the belt and carries himself with a trifle more dignity....

"Walt Whitman, old-time editor at Downs and known to many of our people during the Nineties, dropped into town Monday to look up a few friends still remaining here. His present location is Moscow, Idaho, where he is running a job printing office and doing well." -- Smith Center Pioneer.

 

Lee Meadows, editor of the Oberlin Times, and his ...
July 16, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 113)

Lee Meadows, editor of the Oberlin Times, and his wife and little daughter narrowly escaped death last Thursday evening when their auto stalled on a railroad crossing east of Glen Elder and was struck by a Missouri Pacific passenger train....Mrs. Meadows killed the motor and the car came to a standstill in the center of the tracks. Mr. Meadows advised his wife to jump and, turning in the seat, picked up their baby and with the little tot in his arms he succeeded in jumping from the car just as it was struck by the train....

While in Kirwin, we had the pleasure of meeting again our old friend and fellow quill pusher, F. L. Platt, editor of the Kansan. Mr. Platt was out in the park with his wheelchair and, although an invalid, had the happiest and most pleasant smile on his face we saw during the entire day....He's as full of pep and determination to keep his little city in the foreground as any of his citizens....

 

Editor Claude Breitweiser of the Glen Elder Sentin ...
August 6, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 114)

Editor Claude Breitweiser of the Glen Elder Sentinel has just completed the building of a new home in that city.

W. H. Ransom and family left for Monarch Lake, Colo., the latter part of last week in their new Chrysler sedan. They expect to spend practically the entire month of August breathing in gobs of mountain air and, of course, some fishing will be indulged in.

...The boss no sooner than packed his fishin' tackle and lit out for the mountain streams than calls began pouring in for job work....

 

Don't look for those extra two pages in the old ho ...
August 27, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 115)

Don't look for those extra two pages in the old hometown paper this week, 'cause you'll not find them. Six pages was an awful struggle.

Another good printer gone wrong! Al Schmiedeler, who has been working on the Glen Elder Sentinel since selling the Tipton paper, which he edited for several years, has purchased a suitatorium in Glen Elder and will operate same.

 

Miss Maxine Ransom left Monday morning for Junctio ...
September 3, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 116)

Miss Maxine Ransom left Monday morning for Junction City, where she has accepted a position on the Daily Union.

Dick Edwards, our Intertype operator, hopped into his Lincoln hound last Saturday evening and lit out for a month's vacation....

 

The News and Times "family" -- meaning our corps o ...
September 17, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 117)

The News and Times "family" -- meaning our corps of country correspondents -- held their first picnic and grand get-together meeting in the VanderGiesen grove on Thursday evening of last week....The sponsors for the big gathering were Mrs. Dora Getty and Mrs. Mertie Hampton....Owing to this being a very busy season among the farmers, it was decided to hold the picnic in the evening and it was 5:00 o'clock before the first auto load of pleasure seekers arrived on the scene, and it was 6:30 before all of the guests had arrived....First and foremost there was fried chicken. Chicken heaped up in huge platters until you could scarcely see over the top. Then, come to think of it, there was more fried chicken, and further down on the table was still more fried chicken....And then, when you walked around to the other side of the table -- there was more, and yet more, fried chicken....That chicken started melting off those platters like water running off a duck's back. Then there were salads of all kinds, and lots of it. There were four or five different kinds of bread, biscuits, buns, etc. Pickles, both sweet and sour, were in a half dozen jars. Cakes and pies strew the long table from end to end. Sandwiches, the variety being profuse. Watermelons, ice cream, ice tea, lemonade and -- oh, well, if that isn't enough to convince you that it was all that we claim for it -- REAL feed -- then there is no use of us taking up more space....There are ten correspondents listed in our corps of writers, and every one was present with the exception of Mrs. J. G. Goheen and Mrs. Nina Garey, both finding it impossible for them to be with us. Mrs. Huey and daughter, Miss Sophia, former writers, were honor guests and so were Editor J. E. Kissell of the Portis Independent, and his family....The correspondents who were present, together with members of their families, were: Mrs. M. H. McKeever, Harry Saunders, F. H. Gledhill, Del Cox, Mrs. Dora Getty, Mrs. T. T. Reddick, Mrs. Sabert Hampton, and John Koeteeuw.

A heart to heart talk with our merchants -- During the past few weeks, when calling upon the local merchants and businessmen, soliciting advertisements, we are often met with this rejoinder when we ask a merchant to advertise: "What's the use to advertise now? There is no business; nobody wants to buy anything. Business is simply too dull to advertise. Nope, I guess I don't want an ad this week. I'll wait until business picks up before I spend money to advertise." We have urged with might and main against such tactics, believing that any merchant who cuts down expenses during a "dull season" by refusing to advertise is not only doing so at the expense of his own business, but at the expense of the city as well....

 

If Walt Pattee, the jiggerup on the Smith County P ...
October 1, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 118)

If Walt Pattee, the jiggerup on the Smith County Pioneer, don't quit resorting to Edward K. Titus' funny squibs to take a poke at some of our articles we're going over to Smith Center one of these days and take a crack at him with a bean shooter.

Joseph L. Bristow, for 35 years principal owner of the Salina Evening Journal, announced through the columns of his paper last Friday that he had disposed of his interests in the paper to Robert J. Laubdengayer of Salina. In 1914, Mr. Bristow organized the Journal Publishing Company, and stock was sold to the employees on the paper, and at the time of the sale he held approximately two-thirds interest. Roy F. Bailey, who for the past 15 years has been the business manager, held about one-third interest, and this also has been sold to Mr. Laubdengayer. Under Mr. Bailey's management, the Journal has grown from the twentieth Kansas newspaper in circulation to the ninth. It now has a circulation of 7,500.

 

Friends in the city received announcements ...of t ...
October 8, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 119)

Friends in the city received announcements ...of the marriage of Mrs. May A. Parker, former wife of J. J. Parker, who will be remembered as editor of the Downs Times several years ago. Mrs. Parker was united in marriage to Charles Lyon Wenner on October 2....

 

Richard (Dick) Edwards, who has been employed as I ...
November 5, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 120)

Richard (Dick) Edwards, who has been employed as Intertype operator in this office for the past year and a half, has leased the Cawker City Ledger....Dick is a clean-cut, industrious young man....He is not only a first-class machinist-operator and printer, but throws a mean pencil when the notion strikes him.

Before coming to the News and Times, Dick was employed on the Glen Elder Sentinel, and previous to that time worked on numerous papers over the state....

 

For a long time, we have been receiving the Hunter ...
November 19, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 121)

For a long time, we have been receiving the Hunter Herald on our exchange table and have been a great admirer of the little paper, not because the editor, H. K. Bruce, sets the world afire with burning editorials or flaming scare heads across the front page, but because the paper is well gotten up in a mechanical sense and the columns are filled to the brim with news items pertaining to the home folks. Then, too, we admire the paper because we cannot understand how a town the size of Hunter supports a newspaper, whether good, bad or indifferent.

 

We made a mighty effort to get the old home paper ...
November 26, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 122)

We made a mighty effort to get the old home paper off the press Tuesday evening this week, but the chore proved a trifle too much for the two of us to get around. We are going to press Wednesday morning, however, and will be in perfect trim for Mr. Turk when he is set before us.

 

How foolishly some people waste money! Only last w ...
December 3, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 123)

How foolishly some people waste money! Only last week the Jones stores in Kansas City used eleven full pages of advertising space in Kansas City's leading daily newspaper to announce their annual sale. This was the largest advertisement ever placed in a newspaper in the Middle West....The merchant who thinks that in advertising he is throwing away his money must think that the members of the Jones firm are most certainly a bunch of nuts and should be carefully housed in a state institution for the feeble minded. Maybe you don't believe in advertising -- but the sheriff does.

 

An old-time "print" with all of the earmarks of "M ...
December 10, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 124)

An old-time "print" with all of the earmarks of "Muskogee Red" put in an appearance at this office Monday afternoon. It has been so long since we had seen one of the old boys of the old school that he was really a novelty, and we took a few minutes off to chat with him. His knowledge of print shops carried him across the continent.

 

Mrs. Emma B. Alrich, an outstanding personality of ...
December 24, 1925, Downs News and Times (ID 125)

Mrs. Emma B. Alrich, an outstanding personality of this section of Kansas, breathed her last Dec. 15...at the age of 80 years. One son, A. G. of Lawrence, survives his mother. Her husband, Levi Alrich, died several years ago. He was a pioneer editor of the section, owner and editor of the Cawker City Record, and in that enterprise had the active, able assistance of his wife....Patriotism was an absorbing interest in her life....She was a charter member of the national W.R.C. and was honored in election to the department presidency and as vice-president of the national organization. Her daughter, Miss Rae, whose death occurred a few years ago, was her mother's capable assistant in the department office and her son was elected state commander of the Sons of Veterans.... -- Beloit Daily Call.

 

It is apparent that this paper has given offence t ...
January 21, 1926, Downs News and Times (ID 127)

It is apparent that this paper has given offence to some of its Catholic friends by the publication, two weeks ago, of an advertisement for the Klan....Father Wahlmier, particularly, was incensed when the advertisement was brought to his notice, and called at this office to ask us to "retract" it. Father Wahlmeir, as well as his friends, should know that the editor is not responsible for the sentiments expressed in paid advertisements. He is responsible only for the unsigned articles appearing in the paper outside of the advertising columns. Had the offensive article appeared as an editorial or news story, it would be a different matter and we would then gladly and unhesitatingly make proper restitution. It is true that a newspaper is not obliged to accept everything brought to it for the advertising columns and, had the editor realized the true character of the copy in this case, he would not have accepted it for publication....This paper has no fight on the Catholics. Some of its most loyal friends, as well as personal friends of the editor, are members of that faith.... Henceforth it will be an iron-clad policy of this paper to refuse for publication any advertisement of that nature.

 

The old home paper, as you have possibly noticed, ...
February 4, 1926, Downs News and Times (ID 128)

The old home paper, as you have possibly noticed, is again back in the eight-page class this week. The office force has been exceptionally busy since the first of the year in the job department and, as a result, it has been impossible for us to give the newspaper the attention which it should have.

This week the News and Times enters its 47th year in the newspaper field in Downs....During those years, many names have appeared at the masthead, but none so long as the present publisher, who has been connected with the paper since April 5, 1905....

Looking backward 40 years, by Q. R. Craft -- Downs has many things to be thankful for, and among them a live newspaper, good schools, and good churches. Not lessening the credit due others, including men as brilliant as Harmon Wilson and Bert Walker, the standing of the printer in Downs was greatly strengthened by Herbert Fletcher, who effected the first combination and installed the first power press; and Colonel Tilton, than whom there was not a writer more fearless, dignified, and consecrated to his task....

 

Ray Breitweiser, editor of the Glen Elder Sentinel ...
February 18, 1926, Downs News and Times (ID 129)

Ray Breitweiser, editor of the Glen Elder Sentinel, is taking a month's vacation from the trials and tribulations of a country editor, having turned his paper over to other hands, and is chasing himself over the country absorbing gobs of atmosphere....

 

The News and Times goes to its readers in the form ...
February 25, 1926, Downs News and Times (ID 130)

The News and Times goes to its readers in the form of a "one-cylinder" working force this week. In fact, it very nearly appeared in that form last week. Tuesday noon, a week ago, Mr. Ransom commenced sneezing, coughing and blowing at the gills but finally announced that old man flu had the better of him....

Our Kind of Candidate -- Under the above caption, William Allen White writes in his Emporia Gazette: "Bert P. Walker, state printer of Kansas, is candidate for re-election. He wants a third term, and should have it, as any man should who has served as well on a purely technical job. Walker is a mean, corruscated, hide-bound, copper-riveted standpatter, with a steel hopper bottom, but nevertheless he is making one of the best state printers Kansas ever had....Because Bert Walker is a gentleman instinctively, habitually, in fee simple, fac simile and by rote, he should have the job....Since he has been there, he has absolutely taken it out of politics....So the Gazette is for him against all comers."

In letters to Democratic friends of this county, says the Beloit Daily Call, Robert Good announces his willingness to be a Democratic candidate for Congress from the Sixth District. And we don't doubt it a bit. Bob, as we have before mentioned, is willing to accept most any office that the "people" care to shove onto him. But, laying all jokes aside, Bob would make a splendid candidate for the Democratic Party -- and, too, would be a most acceptable candidate by the Republicans, as we cannot right now recall a man who would be more easily defeated.

 

Dick Edwards, the popular young man who worked as ...
April 8, 1926, Downs News and Times (ID 132)

Dick Edwards, the popular young man who worked as an Intertype operator on this paper...and for the past six months has been in charge of the Cawker City Ledger, will sever his connection with that paper at the end of this month. Dick intends to go to Florida....

 

The two Smith Center newspapers, the Smith County ...
May 6, 1926, Downs News and Times (ID 134)

The two Smith Center newspapers, the Smith County Journal and the Smith County Pioneer, last week announced that on May 1st they would be merged into one publication, the Pioneer having purchased the subscription list, the good will, and the entire equipment of the Journal plant....

Dick Edwards, who has been in charge of the Cawker City Ledger for the past few months, kicked his Ford into high last Friday morning and lit out for Florida.

 

Bob Good is again back in the saddle after several ...
May 13, 1926, Downs News and Times (ID 135)

Bob Good is again back in the saddle after several years' respite from the arduous task of publishing his newspaper at Cawker City, and last week gave his readers a right smart looking paper, even though he was compelled to do the editing and publishing of same on a three-day notice.

 

J. E. Kissell, editor of the Portis Independent, l ...
June 3, 1926, Downs News and Times (ID 137)

J. E. Kissell, editor of the Portis Independent, left Saturday to join the Isis band on their pilgrimage to Philadelphia to attend the Shriners' national convention....Last year, Kissell accompanied the band to Los Angeles....

 

...Ada Colson will be married soon to the propriet ...
June 10, 1926, Downs News and Times (ID 139)

...Ada Colson will be married soon to the proprietor of a printing office at Hays. She has been employed on the Lincoln Sentinel for several years. Miss Colson was employed on the News and Times several years ago.

 

Bob Good, editor of the Cawker City Ledger, is now ...
June 24, 1926, Downs News and Times (ID 141)

Bob Good, editor of the Cawker City Ledger, is now a full-fledged candidate for Congress on the Democratic ticket....

Harry L. Covert, editor of the Stockton Review, lost two cars in a garage fire at his home last week. He might have known something like that would happen. An editor has no business with two cars anyway.

 

From Across the Raging Solomon, by Del Cox:: We're ...
July 8, 1926, Downs News and Times (ID 142)

From Across the Raging Solomon, by Del Cox:

We're thinking now of Dora G., Across the dusty creek, Who sings the songs of Oakdale, In prose and limerick. The song birds and the sunsets, And a thousand things like these, Get tangled in her heart-strings, And she flings them to the breeze.

We like her composition, And so does everyone; She seasons up the sordid facts, With a sprinkling of fun. None of us are writers, We're just plain country folks. The thoughts we have and talk about, The learned call feeble jokes.

Her fame is not with pencil, Or in culinary feat, But that of Christian motherhood -- A forte that can't be beat.

 

Harry L. Clark, who for the past three years has b ...
July 15, 1926, Downs News and Times (ID 143)

Harry L. Clark, who for the past three years has been running a paper at Cambridge, Idaho, sold out his holdings there last week and, after a vacation trip to the Coast, will return to Osborne with his family. Mr. Clark will, of course, join the Farmer family and will resume his old place in this office. -- Osborne County Farmer.

 

Dick Edwards, former Intertype operator on this pa ...
July 22, 1926, Downs News and Times (ID 144)

Dick Edwards, former Intertype operator on this paper, dropped in last press day and kindly volunteered to feed the last run of the issue through the big press....He had recently returned from an extensive trip through the Southern states and did not bring back a very good impression of that part of the country....Dick has been engaged to edit a paper at Canton for several weeks, after which he may again locate out in this part of the state.

 

Wade Hibbs, former Linotype operator on the Topeka ...
September 9, 1926, Downs News and Times (ID 145)

Wade Hibbs, former Linotype operator on the Topeka Daily Capital, died at Herington....Hibbs was the son of the Rev. M. J. Hibbs, north-central Kansas newspaper publisher, and they had published papers at Lebanon and Gaylord and Cedar. He attended Kansas University and worked in Topeka about a year ago, and before that had been an employee of the Lincoln State Journal. Recently he had been an employee of the Lincoln State Journal.... -- Topeka Daily Capital.

B. P. Walker, state printer, came out from Topeka Tuesday morning to attend a meeting of the directors of the First National Bank at Osborne.

A week ago last Sunday, the News and Times force, and their families, were invited to attend a big picnic dinner at the Gaylord park. The affair was sponsored by Editor J. E. Kissell of the Portis Independent and his staff of correspondents. We regret that threatening weather kept us from attending.

Maude F. Burnett, editor and owner of the Hale (Mo.) Leader, sends remittance for a year's subscription. In her letter, she says: "It has been 12 years since I was in Downs and time has wrought many changes...." Mrs. Burnett was formerly Maude Franklin. She learned the "art preservative" on the Downs Times.

 

The following interesting notes were written by W. ...
November 4, 1926, Downs News and Times (ID 148)

The following interesting notes were written by W. H. Smith of Kansas City, Kan., while on a recent trip to Hoquiam, Wash., where he visited his brother, Mord Smith. While Walt has been out of the newspaper business for 15 years or more, he still retains the desire to write and occasionally must get it out of his system....

 

Harry Root is now bailiff for the Kansas Supreme C ...
December 9, 1926, Downs News and Times (ID 149)

Harry Root is now bailiff for the Kansas Supreme Court....Harry does not seem at home anywhere so much as when traveling northwest Kansas for the Atchison Champion or Topeka Journal.

....Bert Walker's state printery is progressive in new equipment, having (to us) a new monotype which casts individual letters from a perforated ribbon prepared on a machine somewhat similar to a typewriter and that can be operated by anyone who runs a typewriter....Bert is just installing a press that prints both sides in one operation on flat sheets. Stereotyped plates are mounted on cylinders between which the sheet passes vertically, so the machine resembles two presses telescoped -- a twin.

 

F. L. Platt, for the past 24 years editor of the K ...
December 16, 1926, Downs News and Times (ID 150)

F. L. Platt, for the past 24 years editor of the Kirwin Kansan, passed away...Dec. 2 following a long illness. Although unable to walk to his office for the past eight years, he has continued to direct the policies of the paper and contributed much to its columns.

 

Dick Edwards, a former employee of this office, ha ...
December 23, 1926, Downs News and Times (ID 151)

Dick Edwards, a former employee of this office, has landed a job with a publishing company way down in Mississippi and sends us a copy of one of the three papers published by the firm. Dick is located at Hernanda...and does field work for the firm.

Announcement is made through the columns of the Kirwin Kansan that the paper will be edited...by Mrs. F. L. Platt....

We take off our hat to J. W. Oliver, that prince of good fellows who represents the Central Topeka Paper Company in this territory. Mr. Oliver spreads good cheer every day of the year, but at Christmas time he becomes the daddy of Santa Claus. He remembered the force in this office this week in a handsome manner....

 

The Portis Independent came out last week printed ...
December 30, 1926, Downs News and Times (ID 152)

The Portis Independent came out last week printed on pink paper, but Editor Kissell refers to it as red. However, his readers should bear in mind that Kissell had just returned from Kansas City from a three days' jaunt with the Shriners, and perhaps was in no shape to distinguish between the two colors....

 

It is an amusing thing to the news writers, says J ...
January 13, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 153)

It is an amusing thing to the news writers, says Jess Napier, "when they hear somebody suggest that they would like an item or advertisement in the paper where 'people will see it.' The news writer knows that people see every item and every ad. People see a '2' when it should be a '5' and they see every wrong initial, every misspelled name, and every omission of items they expect to see. 'Where will people see it?' There is no place you can put anything in the newspaper that people will not see it.

"Which recalls John Rogers, a Toronto merchant, in years gone by. One week he brought in his ad copy so late that we felt it necessary to explain that he could not get a very good position for it. 'No difference,' said John. 'Stick it in anywhere. If I can't write an advertisement people will read wherever it is put in the paper, I'll quit advertising. It's what you say in the ad that brings the business, not its position in the paper." -- E. E. Kelley in Topeka Capital.

 

With this issue, the News and Times enters upon it ...
February 3, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 154)

With this issue, the News and Times enters upon its 48th year of service to this community. While the past year has not been as prosperous as other years, still the publisher has no reason to complain. We have been able to meet our obligations and keep the paper going, and we have a feeling that we will share in the prosperity that will abound in this country when the good crop period returns....

Mrs. W. H. Ransom invited a few couples in for dinner and a social evening last Sunday, the occasion being her husband's 50th birthday....

John Q. Royce, for many years editor of the Phillipsburg Dispatch and an outstanding Republican leader of the Sixth District, died at his home in Wichita January 27 after an illness of three months. He was 70. Mr. Royce was campaign manager for Congressman Reeder in all his campaigns and later served as the state bank commissioner under Governor Hoch.

 

Editor Harry Ross of the Burr Oak Herald...is sojo ...
April 21, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 156)

Editor Harry Ross of the Burr Oak Herald...is sojourning in Colorado Springs for his health....

 

Quincy Craft writes from New Mexico:...Tom Charles ...
April 28, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 157)

Quincy Craft writes from New Mexico:...Tom Charles, formerly of the Republican City News and of the Belleville Freeman, has resided here 20 years, and Mrs. Charles still engages in newspaper work, being the correspondent of the Albuquerque Morning Journal....

 

The Western Advocate, published at Mankato, instal ...
May 5, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 158)

The Western Advocate, published at Mankato, installed a new Linotype last week. Its editor, J. F. Hale, who sold the Osborne County News to B. P. Walker in 1920, is giving his readers and excellent paper.

 

With last week's issue, the Portis Independent clo ...
May 26, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 159)

With last week's issue, the Portis Independent closed its 23rd year. The paper was established in 1904 by Wm. Woolman. J. E. Kissell, the present editor, says he has been on deck since 1913, a period of 14 straight years.

Noting that the Republic City News has recently installed a new Linotype, Gomer Davies, veteran editor of the Concordia Kansan, is reminded that it was 44 years ago that he bought the News, paying $150 for the outfit "lock, stock and barrel," as he expresses it. That sum represented everything in the office, which at that time was about the average equipment to be found in the small-town weekly....The equipment in the Republic News today probably represents an investment of $8,000 or $10,000, the Linotype alone representing nearly half that sum. There has been a remarkable advance in the industry since the day Gomer took charge of the little Republic City News. Printers of that day would be at a complete loss in attempting to print a paper in the up-to-date country weekly of the present time with the slug-casting machine, fast-running cylinder presses, and other modern equipment....

By way of introduction to the young ladies of the city, we'll say that the name of that long-legged, hungry looking, sheikish young man that you've seen loitering around this office the past week is Frazier Brown of Smith Center...his father being that notorious Rarrus Brown, the auctioneer....Another handicap...that the boy has had to put up with for the past two years was the association with Bert Headley and Walt Pattee, two of the orneriest cusses ever harbored by any city....

"Ewing Herbert tells of a brother editor who got into hot water by putting a birth announcement under the general heading, 'Picked Up on the Street.' Which reminds us of the following explanation by a country editor: 'Owing to lack of space and the illness of the editor, several births and deaths have been postponed until next week'." -- Lyons Daily News.

 

There are 644 newspapers printed in Kansas, says C ...
June 2, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 160)

There are 644 newspapers printed in Kansas, says Clyde K. Gerard in the Kansas City Kansan, all striving to help the state and community in which they are printed....

R. E. (Dick) Edwards, a former employee of this office, was calling on old Downs friends last Saturday. Dick has been employed as business manager of a string of papers down in Mississippi the past year.

H. L. Clark, former owner of the Blue Ribbon Bakery in this city, has purchased The Press at Stratton, Colo. Harry, who is an old-timer in the newspaper game, having edited newspapers at Alton and Logan for a number of years, has been located at different points in the West during the past four years, where he has owned newspapers.

 

D. C. Young, the Dispatch merchant, accompanied by ...
June 9, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 161)

D. C. Young, the Dispatch merchant, accompanied by his son, Lindley Young of Billings, Mont., were pleasant callers. Lindley...is telegraph editor on the Billings Gazette.

 

...If one member of the force has a news item Wedn ...
June 23, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 162)

...If one member of the force has a news item Wednesday evening, it is called "seed" and the next week's paper contains an unusually large number of items. On the other hand, if no news is turned in Wednesday evening, we all lose heart and, no matter how hard the reporters work, the next issue is almost a fizzle, insofar as personal items are concerned. So strongly has this hunch taken hold of us that oftentimes a news item is held back intentionally....

 

We thoroughly enjoyed a visit last Friday morning ...
June 30, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 163)

We thoroughly enjoyed a visit last Friday morning with H. M. Broderick, editor of the Marysville Advocate-Democrat. He was en route to Osborne for a visit with his mother....Mr. Broderick stated that he had worked on every newspaper ever published in Osborne with the exception of one. "And speaking of Downs," he said, "I was here when the foundation was laid for the first depot the city every had."

 

To our knowledge, our Intertype operator, Frazier ...
July 7, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 164)

To our knowledge, our Intertype operator, Frazier Brown, was the only one from this city who attended the celebration at Bellaire on the Fourth. He managed to drag himself back to work the following morning, hollow-eyed, weary in body and limb, but still chock full of red lemonade and a half dozen unfired firecrackers and a couple of pinwheels in his pocket.

 

One of Arapahoe's early settlers and newspaper men ...
July 14, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 165)

One of Arapahoe's early settlers and newspaper men was greeting old friends here....Fred Boehner, who began publishing the Arapahoe Pioneer in 1882, came from his home at Downs, Kan., to celebrate the Fourth in Arapahoe.... -- Arapahoe (Neb.) Public Mirror.

 

State board of health opens war on filling station ...
July 28, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 166)

State board of health opens war on filling station towels, says a headline. Why pick on a little, insignificant filling station towel when any print shop in the state can supply a pair of battle-scarred towels that will stand up and fight like soldiers?...

While in Concordia last Thursday evening, the associate editor...and our Intertype editor visited the office of the Blade-Empire. We had the pleasure of meeting the city editor and also the publisher himself, Ray Green....Especially were we open-mouthed when permitted to see the new automatic receiving telegraph instruments just recently installed. The machines resemble, in some respects, a typewriter -- a typewriting machine being a part of each of the receiving sets. Messages sent out by the Associated Press over the wire are, as they come flashing in, put through the mechanism which operates the typewriter. A large roll of paper is connected with each machine and, whenever a message is sent over the wire, the machine automatically is thrown into operation and, without the aid of the human hand in the Blade-Empire office, the message is typewritten and ready for the copy hook...The machine is capable of handling 17,000 words from 8:00 o'clock in the morning until 4:00 o'clock in the evening, when the Blade-Empire goes to press.

 

The Newport (Tenn.) Herald comes to our desk this ...
August 18, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 167)

The Newport (Tenn.) Herald comes to our desk this week. At its masthead we note the name of R. D. Edwards as editor and one of the three owners of the paper.

Hoy Smith announced in his Greenleaf Sentinel last week that he had sold his newspaper, plant and equipment to Lloyd Griffis of Washington.

An item of more than passing interest appears in our "Downs in Olden Days" column: "P. F. Collier, publisher and manufacturer, New York, arrived in town yesterday to canvass for the sale of his large line of books." Today, P. F. Collier & Son are publishers of Collier's Weekly. Another thing that is of interest, a comparison of the manner compared with the present methods -- Mr. Collier, although at that time president and editor of his publication, was on the road soliciting business for his firm. Today, a man with a large concern such as the Collier publications sits in his mahogany office directing a score or more high-powered salesmen. We are wondering how many people in Downs remember Mr. Collier and how he acted when he climbed their front porch steps and solicited subscriptions to his magazine.

 

Irwin Kirkwood, editor of the Kansas City Star, di ...
September 1, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 168)

Irwin Kirkwood, editor of the Kansas City Star, died Monday morning following a brief illness. His death occurred at Saratoga Springs, N.Y.

 

The country correspondents of the News and Times, ...
September 8, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 169)

The country correspondents of the News and Times, with their families, and the editors and families had a grand time at the annual picnic, held at the farm home of John Yost Friday afternoon. When all had arrived shortly after the noon hour, dinner was served in cafeteria style under the beautiful trees in the Yost yard....It was a feast! Three long tables had been secured by Mr. Yost and upon these were spread the food for the 40 or more people present. Prominent among the edibles was chicken -- chicken fried, chicken roasted and chicken baked...in addition to pies, cakes, jellies, jams, ice cream, fruit and vegetable salads...not mentioning such common food as cold meats, potatoes, corn, bread and butter, etc., etc. We trust the mentioning of these good things to eat will give no offence to editors Chas. Mann and Emmett Kissell, both of whom have been present at the picnics the past two years but were unable to attend this time. Others who were unable to attend were Mrs. Goheen, writer of Rose Valley items; John Koeteeuw, the Dispatch writer; and Mrs. Fritchen, the Corinth correspondent. Present for the first time were S. E. Chapin, former writer of Smith County Smatterings, and Miss Worley, writer of Green Valley items....The afternoon was spent visiting...the ladies withdrawing to the house to talk over their household problems while the men gathered in the back yard under large shade trees for a quiet rest, while a few of the more ambitious passed the time in a horseshoe pitching contest....

 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Clark...have taken up their res ...
September 15, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 170)

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Clark...have taken up their residence in Osborne, Mr. Clark being employed in the Farmer office. They have been in the West for the past few years, just recently disposing of their newspaper at Stratton, Colo.

 

Bob Good of the Cawker City Ledger is trying to pr ...
September 22, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 171)

Bob Good of the Cawker City Ledger is trying to prove that Jack Harrison of the Beloit Gazette is a jackass, while Jack insists that Bob, dressed in his YMCA uniform, single-handed and alone whipped the German army and caused the Kaiser to abdicate. So far, it looks like Jack has the best of the argument, but Bob may produce more convincing proof of his contention this week.

Gomer T. Davies, editor of the Concordia Kansan, drove to Downs last Friday for a little pow-wow with C. M. Lessenden on the subject of roses. The growing of roses has long been a hobby with both of these gentlemen.

 

We acknowledge a pleasant call from Jack Harrison, ...
October 6, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 172)

We acknowledge a pleasant call from Jack Harrison, editor of the Beloit Gazette, yesterday morning. Mr. Harrison was en route to Smith Center to deliver an address at the old settlers' picnic.

 

Walt Pattee of the Smith County Pioneer takes deli ...
October 27, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 173)

Walt Pattee of the Smith County Pioneer takes delight...in ridiculing Editor Kissell of the Portis Independent. But Kissell, who never sleeps with both eyes shut, manages to keep a jump ahead of Walt. And not only that, but he also manages to keep Portis a jump ahead of Smith Center as a city. Just here of late, we have learned that Portis has something that Smith Center does not boast. It is a building permit. Kissell, who besides being an editor, a deacon in the church, city clerk, member of the school board, director of the town band, manager of the famous Dynamos basketball team, and what-not, is also supervisor of architecture...one of those fellows who goes out and designs skylines for rapidly growing cities. At Portis, he has caused an ordinance to be passed prohibiting the erection of buildings in the downtown districts unless said buildings conform with his skyline blueprints....

 

The Downs News still continues to try to edge a fi ...
November 3, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 174)

The Downs News still continues to try to edge a fight between the proprietor of the Independent and Walt Pattee, well-known Smith County journalist. However, it is quite noticeable that the News man does not challenge either one of us. He ought to get in and make it a three-cornered elimination affair for the championship of somewhere. -- Portis Independent. Ah, ha, now we have the Independent editor where the hair is short! Long have we cherished the thought of giving both of these fellows a sound drubbing, but never before has the opportunity presented itself. We've been too ashamed to pick on one of 'em, but now that Kissell suggests that we enter the ring against both of them, we accept the challenge with delight and await the pleasure of the gentlemen to name the time, place, and date. We are in our prime right now and are trained down to a feather edge, so come on with your battle royal.

Bert Headley, editor of the Smith County Pioneer, is being mentioned as a possible candidate for delegate from the Sixth District to the Republican convention in 1928....For many years, he has unselfishly helped to boost others into public office and has never asked for anything for himself....We are for Bert -- if he wants it -- first, last and all the time.

This office enjoyed a very pleasant call last Friday from Link Drummond, who came down from Norton to preach the funeral sermon of his old friend, E. E. Easterly. Mr. Drummond, who has been stung on one or more occasions by the congressional bee, informs us that he does not expect to be a candidate in the primary next year....He says he is too poor to make the race; "and anyway," he says, "I have arrived at that age when I can get more pleasure in feeding the chickens and puttering around the yard than I can in being congressman."

Hoy Smith, who recently sold the Greenleaf Sentinel, has purchased the Clyde Republican from W. C. Coates.

 

The Osborne Farmer appeared last week in a new typ ...
November 10, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 175)

The Osborne Farmer appeared last week in a new type face in the reading columns. The type was designed to relieve the eye strain and is said to be more easily read than any other face. The same face was recently installed by the Kansas City Star and other papers.

 

Kansas publishes 644 newspapers, according to the ...
November 17, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 177)

Kansas publishes 644 newspapers, according to the list of Kansas newspapers just issued by the Kansas State Historical Society. Of these, Kansas has 56 dailies, 480 weeklies, 12 semi-weeklies, 4 bi-weeklies, 63 monthlies, 12 semi-monthlies, 6 bi-monthlies, 7 quarterlies, and 4 occasionally. "These papers come from 105 counties of Kansas, recording the history of the people of all the communities and neighborhoods," said William E. Connelley, secretary of the society.

From the Cawker Ledger, we learn that Dick Edwards has sold his interest in the Newport (Tenn.) Herald and is headed back for sunny Kansas.

 

That notorious Bill Workman, another product of th ...
December 8, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 178)

That notorious Bill Workman, another product of the Smith Center Pioneer, landed behind the keyboard of our Intertype Monday morning to give us a lift with a mountain of work that has swamped us the past week.

 

...Finding ourselves almost completely snowed unde ...
December 15, 1927, Downs News and Times (ID 179)

...Finding ourselves almost completely snowed under with work in this office, we hung out the SOS sign last week and in response to our call now have back with us again Frazier Brown, a product of the Pioneer office at Smith Center....

 

Editors Must Be Born -- This boy's essay on editor ...
January 5, 1928, Downs News and Times (ID 180)

Editors Must Be Born -- This boy's essay on editors is cheerfully cribbed, because the periodical which published it had taken it from the famous anonymous source "Exchange" -- "I don't know how newspapers got into the world, and I don't think God does, for He ain't got nothing to say about them in the Bible.

I think the editor is the missing link we read of and stayed in the bushes after the flood and then came out and wrote the thing up and has kept it there ever since. If the editor makes mistakes, folks say he ought to be hung; but if the doctor makes mistakes, he buries them and people don't say nothing because they can't read and write Latin. When the editor makes mistakes, there is a big lawsuit and sweating and a big fuss, but when the doctor makes one there is a funeral, cut flowers, and a perfect silence. A doctor can use a word a yard long without him or anyone else knowing what it means, but if the editor uses one he has to spell it. If the doctor goes to see another man's wife, he charges the man for the visit, but if the editor does he gets a charge of buckshot. Any college can make doctors to order, but editors has to be born."

 

Bert Walker of Osborne announced in Sunday's Capit ...
January 12, 1928, Downs News and Times (ID 181)

Bert Walker of Osborne announced in Sunday's Capital that he would be a candidate for re-election to the office of state printer. Mr. Walker was appointed to the office in 1921 by Governor H. J. Allen to fill a vacancy and has been regularly nominated and elected and re-elected ever since....He won in a walkaway at the last election without having spent a cent on his campaign and without the solicitation of a single vote.

Walt Whitmore, age 68, an early day editor in Downs, passed away on Monday at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Edith Taylor, at Collinsville, Okla. Mr. Whitmore went to Moscow, Idaho, seven years ago and engaged in the job printing business with his son, Ernest. A little over a year ago, his health commenced to fail, so he quit the shop and came back east in the hope of recovering his health. During that time, he made his home with his daughter, Mrs. Taylor, at Collinsville, Okla., and Mrs. Bernice Morris of Kansas City. Mr. Whitmore was a genial, wholehearted gentleman who made friends easily and retained them. For several years he edited the Downs Chief, and was very popular with his readers and newspaper men of this part of the state....His wife died some years ago. Besides the children mentioned above, he is survived by two other sons, Vernon of Pittsburg, Kan., and Frank of Portis. A sister, Mrs. Zora Smalley, resides at Portis. The body passed through Downs Wednesday morning en route to Portis, where the funeral service was held at 2:30 at the home of his sister....The remains were interred in Garrett Cemetery.

 

Charles E. Mann, who for eight years represented O ...
January 19, 1928, Downs News and Times (ID 183)

Charles E. Mann, who for eight years represented Osborne County in the lower branch of the state legislature, and was speaker of the 1923 session, has announced his candidacy for the Republican nomination for senator from the 34th District, comprising Russell, Lincoln, Ellsworth and Osborne counties. Mr. Mann has been frequently mentioned as a possible candidate for Congress in the Sixth District to succeed Hays B. White, but has decided to run for the state senate instead....

Another good newspaperman gone wrong. Old Jack Harrison, the gifted editor of the Beloit Gazette, has let it be known that he is in a receptive mood regarding the nomination for state senator of the 33rd District. It looks like Jack is going to have plenty of opposition and that the fight will wax warm and furious. But fight is Jack's favorite dish....

The home of the News and Times now presents a more inviting appearance than for some time past. The cobwebs have all been swept down and the walls and ceiling decorated by those competent workmen, Glenn and John Cox. Yes, the windows have been washed. You need have no hesitancy about coming in to pay your subscription; in fact, it is worth $2 merely to see the transformation that has taken place.

 

The associate editor of this paper (Dan McKay), up ...
January 26, 1928, Downs News and Times (ID 185)

The associate editor of this paper (Dan McKay), upon reaching his home on the evening of last press day, deliberately walked in upon a little "surprise party" which was being staged by Dr. J. E. Hodgson and our county health officer....Their mission was to answer a call to diagnose the case of our youngest daughter, Patricia Zoe. A thorough examination resulted in the finding of indications of scarlet fever -- and the verdict was 35 days of quarantine for the family. Our oldest daughter, Imogene, and the only male member of the family were sent adrift to shift for ourselves, and wife and baby were left at home to fight the troublesome malady. After a week of quarantine, the little lady has developed no alarming symptoms, in fact has been up and around playing every hour of the day and, aside from a rash that covers a portion of her body, appears to be in the best of health. The scarlet fever epidemic is making itself manifest throughout the state.

 

This issue of the Downs News goes to its readers i ...
February 2, 1928, Downs News and Times (ID 186)

This issue of the Downs News goes to its readers in the form of an Automobile Show and Bargain Day edition. In addition to our regular list of readers, we are publishing 800 extra copies of the paper, which will be distributed throughout the territory adjacent to Downs....

With this issue, the News and Times enters its 49th year of service to the community....That the paper supplies a need and is appreciated in the community there can be little doubt. If this were not true, it could not continue to grow in strength and prosper....The 23 years of continuous service of the present publisher (Bill Ransom) has not been surpassed by many publishers in this district.

Owen Palmer, a young man from Portis, started to work in the office of the News and Times last week to learn the printing trade.

Gomer T. Davies, editor of the Concordia Kansan, celebrated his 73rd birthday at his home with a dinner party arranged by Mrs. Davies. We'll back Mr. Davies in a foot race against any one-legged editor in the Fifth District at any distance from 100 yards to a mile.

 

The News and Times first annual auto show filled t ...
February 9, 1928, Downs News and Times (ID 187)

The News and Times first annual auto show filled the city with record-breaking crowds. Hall would not hold cars. Dealers unanimous in declaring for show to be staged in 1929 -- everybody surprised at display of new models.

 

Bob Good, editor of the Cawker City Ledger, has se ...
March 29, 1928, Downs News and Times (ID 190)

Bob Good, editor of the Cawker City Ledger, has sent a letter to leaders of the Democratic faith over the district asking of they want him to seek the Democratic nomination for congress...and if they support him. Mr. Good made a good showing in the race two years ago and many believe that, had he been nominated instead of Clark, Hays B. White would have come much closer to losing his scalp than he did.

This office is in receipt of a late copy of The Pacific Poultry Breeder, published at San Jose, Calif. We note that L. S. Poisal, a son of the late John Poisal and former Downs citizen, is associate editor.

 

Bert Headley, editor of the Smith County Pioneer, ...
April 5, 1928, Downs News and Times (ID 191)

Bert Headley, editor of the Smith County Pioneer, and O. O. Osborne, a prominent attorney of Stockton, were chosen as delegates to the Republican national convention from the Sixth Congressional District at the convention in Smith Center.

 

Did you ever stop to realize how much harder it is ...
April 12, 1928, Downs News and Times (ID 192)

Did you ever stop to realize how much harder it is to fill the local page of the country paper now than it was 25 years ago? In those good old days, a mere visit to the county seat, or any neighboring town, was good for a local. But conditions are different today. Since the automobile has come into general use and people are constantly traveling about from one town to another, these items have lost their news value and are seldom used.

J. R. Gaumer of Claudell was a Downs visitor Thursday night....Mr. Gaumer...is the father of W. B. Gaumer, who revived the Downs News about a quarter of a century ago. The elder Gaumer was responsible for the Phillips County Post being "put on its feet" when it was being established by his son before coming to Downs. He spent a year driving over the county with a team of ponies, soliciting subscriptions for the Post and establishing country correspondents. The writer was foreman of the Post at the time and saw the paper take the lead of the papers of the county within a year after it was started (although this statement may be disputed by Wardie White, who was a competitor and is still in the newspaper business in that town). At any rate, J. R. Gaumer built up a subscription list of nearly 2,000 during his travels over the county during the year, which was considerably more than either of the three older papers of the town enjoyed at the time. And, in addition, he built up a corps of country correspondents that was the envy of the papers of the Sixth District.

 

The Oberlin Times was sold last week by Lee Meadow ...
May 17, 1928, Downs News and Times (ID 194)

The Oberlin Times was sold last week by Lee Meadows to E. R. Woodward of Topeka. Lee had owned the Times about eight years, and previous to that time owned the Gaylord Sentinel....Lee...has nothing in particular to do for the next several months except to spend the $3.98 he has succeeded in saving during his newspaper career....

 

Don't be surprised if Bob Good is returned the Dem ...
May 31, 1928, Downs News and Times (ID 195)

Don't be surprised if Bob Good is returned the Democratic nominee for congress at the August primary. He came very close to landing the nomination two years ago and his defeat by the successful candidate was really a disgrace to the party.

 

Bob Good says the editor of this paper is a "nice ...
June 14, 1928, Downs News and Times (ID 196)

Bob Good says the editor of this paper is a "nice fellow" and then turns in and lambasts us good and plenty for being Republican. This in indeed quite a distinction for, after reading "Bob's Budget" for a quarter of a century, this is the first time we have known him to speak of a nice fellow and a Republican in the same breath. The Democratic medicine is quite a bitter pill for Bob to swallow during this campaign. A pronounced "dry" himself, he is placed in a position where he must support a party whose leadership is notoriously "wet."...About the only breach between the two parties at this time is the wet and dry issue....This is a feature that Bob cleverly sidesteps in his long tirade against the Republican Party....

"The smaller newspapers of the country are the most important newspapers and, incidentally, in proportion to their circulation, their advertising results are the biggest, and their advertising rates are the smallest in the country. They are read through from end to end. Every copy of circulation means an entire family, not a family that lives in one room with a can opener, but a family that owns its own house, and land around it; a family that buys everything, from the roof on the house to the cement on the cellar floor; from the hat on mother's head to the shoes on the boys' feet. The service that their publishers render to the public is, in my opinion, the most important service rendered by any class of citizens in the United States. The country editors are distributors of information; they reach the minds of the boys that leave the farms, and they are the nation's mental police force." -- Arthur Brisbane.

 

Mrs. D. B. McKay, who submitted to an operation at ...
July 12, 1928, Downs News and Times (ID 197)

Mrs. D. B. McKay, who submitted to an operation at the Hodgson hospital two weeks ago Tuesday, was permitted to return to her home Sunday. Considering the nature of the operation, she has made rapid strides in regaining her health.

"In a history of printing in America, in the preparation of which I am now engaged, I should like to make an accurate statement regarding the beginnings of the press in Downs and I appeal to the older residents of the community to answer for me, as accurately as possible, the following questions....Apart from answers to those questions, I shall also be interested in any records or reminiscences regarding early local printers and their work. Anyone having such information will render a useful service by putting it in the form of a letter addressed to me at 2039 Lewis Street, Chicago, Ill...." -- Douglas McMurtrie.

"Taking them as they come, there are few better local newspapers coming to our desk than the Downs News....The one great fault with the News is that it can't see anything good in government that doesn't come out of the Republican Party." -- Cawker City Ledger.

 

John Poppen allowed a reporter to peek at a check ...
August 9, 1928, Downs News and Times (ID 198)

John Poppen allowed a reporter to peek at a check for over $1,400 he had received for his old corn, but he wouldn't let the reporter get his hands on it. It isn't often that a newspaperman has an opportunity to even look at a check of that size.

 

Charles E. Mann of Osborne won the senatorial nomi ...
August 16, 1928, Downs News and Times (ID 199)

Charles E. Mann of Osborne won the senatorial nomination for the 34th District over his opponent, Henry M. Laing of Russell, by three votes.

The News and Times is now equipped to make electrotypes from mats, having recently purchased from the Meyer Both Company, at great expense, a casting box, saw and trimmer. Along with this purchase, the paper also contracted for a three-year advertising mat service which we believe will be an improvement over the service used for several years. This advertising service covers all lines of merchandising, with mats for all purposes, from which we make the electros as needed. This service is free to advertisers, and it will aid them materially in their newspaper advertising.

 

The Smith County Pioneer last week installed a new ...
August 30, 1928, Downs News and Times (ID 200)

The Smith County Pioneer last week installed a new Babcock Optimist two-revolution press and announces that in the near future the paper will be enlarged to a seven-column paper.

 

The News and Times force is just about on its last ...
September 13, 1928, Downs News and Times (ID 201)

The News and Times force is just about on its last pins this week and, were it not for Frazier Brown of Smith Center, it is rather doubtful whether the old life-saver would have been able to pull out from the shore this week. Mr. Ransom has an infection of some sort that has affected one side of his face and, to some extent, impaired the sight of one eye....The associate end of the staff...joined the sniffler's brigade and doesn't care much whether school keeps or not....

 

The editor of the Portis Independent and his large ...
September 20, 1928, Downs News and Times (ID 202)

The editor of the Portis Independent and his large corps of correspondents will picnic at Lincoln Park next Sunday afternoon.

The Smith County Pioneer arrived on our desk last week decked out in a brand new makeup. The paper is now being printed on the Pioneer's new press...and comes out as a seven columner with the columns set 12 ems.

 

M. J. Hibbs, former editor of the Lebanon Times, a ...
October 18, 1928, Downs News and Times (ID 204)

M. J. Hibbs, former editor of the Lebanon Times, and at one time pastor of the Downs Christian Church, is located in West Palm Beach, Fla.

 

We had a very cheerful letter from State Printer B ...
November 1, 1928, Downs News and Times (ID 205)

We had a very cheerful letter from State Printer B. P. Walker...: "I do feel mighty sneaking about not jumping out of the car for a moment to say hello....I read the News every week as soon as it comes....I note in the old-time items you run every week that they have reached the years when I was hanging around Downs. It doesn't seem possible that it is now more than 30 years since I dropped in there and went to work for Captain W. S. Tilton on the old Times."

 

Owen "Jimmie" Palmer, the News and Times official ...
December 6, 1928, Downs News and Times (ID 206)

Owen "Jimmie" Palmer, the News and Times official "devil," gobbled goose on Turkey day at the parental home near Portis, and the next day found that he had made a glutton of himself (like all fellows connected with a newspaper do whenever invited out to dine) and was unable to report for duty.

 

Editor W. H. Ransom and wife left for Corpus Chris ...
January 3, 1929, Downs News and Times (ID 207)

Editor W. H. Ransom and wife left for Corpus Christi, Texas, and other points in the South on New Year's Day, leaving early in the morning in their auto....For several months past, Mr. Ransom's health has not been the very best, although he has been able to be up and around most of the time....Their present plans are for at least a two months' vacation at the very least.

New Year's Day, when almost everybody was enjoying a holiday, the News and Times force strolled down to work at about the usual hour, and pounded away at the task of getting out this week's issue unmindful of the fact that Father Time was rolling back a new page.

Harry Clark, former owner of the Blue Ribbon Bakery in this city but now foreman on the Osborne Farmer, seems to be having more than his share of bad luck. After leaving Downs, Harry moved to Colorado, where he purchased a newspaper. A bank in the town where Harry was located went to the wall and with it went most of Harry's ready cash. Mrs. Clark went through a siege of severe sickness and the family moved back to Kansas, and then Harry was taken ill and spent some time in the hospital. Later he moved to Osborne, where he accepted a position on the Farmer. A week ago Sunday, the fire demon visited his home and practically destroyed the entire building.

 

After having published the Cawker City Ledger for ...
January 10, 1929, Downs News and Times (ID 208)

After having published the Cawker City Ledger for more than 20 years, Robert Good last week announced the sale of the plant to Ray Breitweiser, editor of the Glen Elder Sentinel. We understand that Mr. Breitweiser, who is already publishing the Tipton Times in connection with the Sentinel, will not move the plant from Cawker City, but will continue the publication of the Ledger from that point.

The Glen Elder Sentinel is advertising for an editor-printer, someone who can handle work on the front office desk as well as back in the mechanical part of the shop.

With last week's issue of the Osborne County Farmer went the passing of another old-style 13-em, six-column newspaper, the Farmer changing over to a 12-em, seven-column paper....The Downs News and Times has seriously thought of making this change....

 

Miracles do happen in this realistic era and B. P. ...
January 31, 1929, Downs News and Times (ID 209)

Miracles do happen in this realistic era and B. P. Walker, state printer, is sponsor for the latest....The House ways and means committee thought Walker had made a serious mistake when his request for appropriations carried a voluntary reduction of $100,000....The ways and means committee was informed that the state printing plant can actually operate with $128,000 for 1930 and $153,000 for 1931. Walker explained that efficiency and a completely improved plant was the answer to the puzzle....In the past seven years, or since he became state printer, Walker has spent about $150,000 for necessary equipment, bringing the plant up to the very utmost in requirements for printing purposes. As an example, during the past year all high records for turning out school books was broken. The best previous record was 1,200,000 books during one year. Walker turned out slightly more than that and at a saving of about 40,000 hours working time.... -- Topeka Daily Capital.

The News and Times force has been working under a great handicap during the past two weeks. Heat for the office is supplied by a hot water system. Two weeks ago, one of the grates in the boiler cracked and the only heat we have been able to secure is that furnished by a small German heater....A new grate is now doing duty.

 

Athol B. Dunham, associate editor of the Beloit Ga ...
February 14, 1929, Downs News and Times (ID 211)

Athol B. Dunham, associate editor of the Beloit Gazette, will continue in charge of the paper for the present. Mr. Dunham has been associated with Sen. J. R. Harrison since 1915.

 

The Belleville Telescope came to our exchange tabl ...
March 7, 1929, Downs News and Times (ID 212)

The Belleville Telescope came to our exchange table last week printed on cornstalk paper. The texture of the paper, in our opinion, is quite inferior to the regular wood pulp paper used for newspaper work....The paper is very white and smooth, but is so thin that printing on the opposite page shows through....However, there may come a time when the manufacture of this new paper will overcome these drawbacks and produce a paper that will take the place of the present-day wood pulp and rag product. The cornstalk paper is manufactured at Danville, Ill. It is made altogether of chemical pulp, 65 to 70 percent cornstalk and 30 percent wood sulphite.

 

Chas. E. Mann, editor of the Osborne Farmer, has b ...
April 18, 1929, Downs News and Times (ID 213)

Chas. E. Mann, editor of the Osborne Farmer, has been appointed supervisor of the census for the eastern division of the Sixth Congressional District.

If you don't believe the News and Times practices what it preaches (sometimes), we dare you to come downtown and look at our "front yard." The rose bushes that have graced our front doorstep for all these years have been trimmed and pruned down to almost nothing, the parking scraped and cleaned as neat as a pin, and floral decorations placed along the curbing.

 

The Beloit Gazette...was sold last week by Mrs. J. ...
April 25, 1929, Downs News and Times (ID 214)

The Beloit Gazette...was sold last week by Mrs. J. R. Harrison...to Loren F. Brewer and Athol B. Dunham....Mr. Dunham is a whole newspaper force in himself. He has been employed on the Gazette for several years, holding down the position of associate editor.

"Jack" Boyd of Stockton has accepted a position in the mechanical department of the News and Times. Jack has had over four years of experience in newspaper work.

J. O. (Jimmie) Palmer, who has been employed on the News and Times for the past 14 months, has gone to Concordia, where he has a position on the Blade-Empire. Jimmie came down from Portis last year to learn the printing business, and feels that he has mastered the art of tickling the keys on the typesetting machine to the extent that he can hold down a "sit" on the Concordia daily.

 

Bob Good, who recently sold his Cawker City Ledger ...
May 30, 1929, Downs News and Times (ID 215)

Bob Good, who recently sold his Cawker City Ledger to accept a traveling job with the Western Newspaper Union, will move his family to Topeka to be more centrally located in his territory.

 

During the course of a year's time, a newspaper of ...
June 13, 1929, Downs News and Times (ID 216)

During the course of a year's time, a newspaper office uses a large amount of rags in washing presses, wiping off the typesetting machine, washing (?) windows, etc....We eventually learn to wear our wearing apparel, both outer and under, to a certain stage and then quietly shed it and convert the remnants into office use. Our greatest joy comes in early spring and late fall when we look about us and see the rag cupboard stuffed full of BVD's, or heavies, socks, neckties, shirts, and sometimes felt hats. This year, however, we have been caught....If you have a bundle of nice, dry, clean rags and want to cash in on them, we'll pay you three cents per pound for them, delivered at this office, and no questions asked.

Ray Breitweiser, editor of the Glen Elder Sentinel, has added another newspaper to his string. Last week he launched a new paper at Scottsville. He now owns the Glen Elder Sentinel, the Cawker City Ledger, the Tipton Times, and the new paper at Scottsville.

 

The Cawker City Ledger has installed a new typeset ...
June 20, 1929, Downs News and Times (ID 217)

The Cawker City Ledger has installed a new typesetting machine.

 

A. C. Gardner and W. E. Brooks of Elgin, Neb., wer ...
June 27, 1929, Downs News and Times (ID 218)

A. C. Gardner and W. E. Brooks of Elgin, Neb., were weekend visitors in Downs. Mr. Gardner is the son of Rev. F. W. Gardner, founder of the Downs News, and is now publishing a paper of his own at Elgin. He came here to visit the scenes of his childhood days....Mr. Gardner informs us that his parents are living on a small fruit farm near Wheatland, Mo., where they are both enjoying good health and contentment.

Mr. Gardner's visit to this office recalled the days when his father was publishing the News, at that time a four-page semiweekly. The shop was located in the building now occupied by the Downs Bottling Works, the family occupying the rooms overhead for living quarters. The writer (Wm. Ransom) visited the shop in company with W. B. Gaumer about the time the latter purchased the paper. Mr. Gaumer was not a printer, so he engaged us to examine the equipment to see what could be used in an up-to-date print shop.

Although Mr. Gardner had succeeded in getting out a very respectable looking paper, we remember that the only thing we recommended saving out of the entire equipment was but one single case of advertising type. All the rest was junked when Mr. Gaumer took over the paper and installed his new equipment.

We marveled at Mr. Gardner's ability to get out a paper with the material on hand. Certainly he was not a printer, for no printer would even attempt to set up a paper under the existing conditions. There was no type stand in the shop, the cases being piled on the floor and placed on a box when needed to set type from. Leads, slugs, quads, equipment so essential to the printer, were almost an unknown quantity.

But the most interesting detail of all was the method of printing the newspaper pages, the same size as the News and Times pages today. In order to do it, Mr. Gardner printed half of the page at a time, printing the six columns down to the fold and then turning and printing the other half. This operation was necessary on each of the four pages, twice a week. No one but a printer can realize the enormous task that confronted Mr. Gardner in printing the paper in this manner, and we doubt if there is a printer on earth that would attempt to do it.

The Cawker City Ledger took on considerable growth last week by coming out as an 8-page, all-home-print edition. Editor Breitweiser announces that he will endeavor to keep the paper in the 8-page class, if given sufficient encouragement from the home merchants.

 

As will be noted in the proceedings of the county ...
July 11, 1929, Downs News and Times (ID 219)

As will be noted in the proceedings of the county commissioners, the bid of the Downs News and Times was accepted and this paper was made the official county paper and given the contract for the county job printing for the ensuing year. The legal printing and the job work will be paid for at the same rate paid the Osborne County Farmer for several years past....

 

Now that the News and Times is the official newspa ...
July 18, 1929, Downs News and Times (ID 220)

Now that the News and Times is the official newspaper of Osborne County, every taxpayer in the county should have his name enrolled on our subscription books. During the coming year, everything of importance that transpires in the courthouse will be chronicled in these columns.

 

The News and Times is making arrangements to enlar ...
August 8, 1929, Downs News and Times (ID 221)

The News and Times is making arrangements to enlarge the present size of the paper from six to seven columns...by narrowing the columns from the old-fashioned 13 ems to 12 ems. A large number of weekly newspapers over the state have already made changes similar to this....

 

Jacob Small, who had been employed to assist in th ...
August 15, 1929, Downs News and Times (ID 222)

Jacob Small, who had been employed to assist in the mechanical department of this office, arrived from Glen Elder with his family Sunday morning....Sunday night he was compelled to summon a physician, who pronounced him the possessor of a right good case of the mumps. He was a mighty sick man all Sunday night and Monday, but is reported to be improved. In all probability, he will be able to report for duty the latter part of the week.

 

Harry L. Clark...,for the past year or so employed ...
August 29, 1929, Downs News and Times (ID 223)

Harry L. Clark...,for the past year or so employed on the Farmer at Osborne, has been compelled to resign his position and has decided to move with his family to California, where it is hoped the change in climate will be beneficial to his health, which has been very poorly for some time.

 

When the News and Times steps out of its twaddling ...
September 5, 1929, Downs News and Times (ID 224)

When the News and Times steps out of its twaddling clothes the later part of this month and goes to a seven-column, eight-page newspaper, we plan to celebrate by publishing at least a big double edition -- 16 pages, 112 columns.

Recently the Smith County Pioneer printed a long article giving their delinquent subscribers the very dickens. The Pioneer seemed to think that any person who let their subscription drag along year after year was a deadbeat. We don't look at the matter in that light. We blame the editor of any newspaper who allows his subscribers to get so far behind in their subscriptions that such an article is necessary to make them pay up....

Harry M. Kurtz, editor of the Alton Empire, was a brief but pleasant caller.

 

Aaron Driver, the young man who has been employed ...
September 12, 1929, Downs News and Times (ID 225)

Aaron Driver, the young man who has been employed in the mechanical department of this office during the summer months, left Friday evening to re-enter William Jewell College at Liberty, Mo.

 

It makes the editors of the News and Times feel mi ...
September 26, 1929, Downs News and Times (ID 226)

It makes the editors of the News and Times feel mighty good to hear so many complimentary remarks about the first issue of our new seven-column paper.

 

Major M. M. Beck, dean of Kansas editors, celebrat ...
November 28, 1929, Downs News and Times (ID 227)

Major M. M. Beck, dean of Kansas editors, celebrated his 92nd birthday last Friday by working at his desk in the Holton Recorder office. The nonagenarian steadfastly has refused to retire. He writes a column each week for the weekly newspaper he founded 54 years ago.

 

J. L. Seeger, the young man from Geary, Okla., who ...
December 5, 1929, Downs News and Times (ID 228)

J. L. Seeger, the young man from Geary, Okla., who has been employed in the mechanical department of this office during the past 15 months, has handed in his resignation and will return to his home state and enter college.

The News and Times has secured the services of Maurice T. Emmons, who for some time has been manager of his father's paper, the Hill City Republican. Mr. Emmons is a single man...at home in all departments of a newspaper.

 

I Am the Printing Press, by Robert H. Davis:: I am ...
January 1, 1930, Downs News and Times (ID 229)

I Am the Printing Press, by Robert H. Davis:

I am the printing press, born of the mother earth. My heart is of steel, my limbs are of iron, and my fingers are of brass.

I sing the songs of the world, the oratories of history, the symphonies of all time.

I am the voice of today, the herald of tomorrow. I weave into the warp of the past and the woof of the future. I tell the stories of peace and war alike.

I make the human heart beat with passion or tenderness. I stir the pulse of nations, and make brave men do brave deeds, and soldiers die.

I inspire the midnight toiler, weary of his loom, to lift his head again and gaze with fearlessness into the vast beyond, seeking the consolation of a hope eternal.

When I speak a myriad of people listen to my voice. The Anglo-Saxon, the Celt, the Hun, the Slav, the Hindu all comprehend me.

I am the tireless clarion of the news. I cry your joys and sorrows every hour. I fill the dullard's mind with thoughts uplifting.

I am light, knowledge, power. I epitomize the conquests of mind over matter.

I am the record of all things mankind has achieved. My offspring come to you in the candle's glow, amid the dim lights of poverty, the splendor of riches; at sunrise, at high noon, and in the waning evening.

I am the laughter and tears of the world, and I shall never die until all things return to the immutable dust.

I am the printing press.

 

While trimming an electro on our electric saw Wedn ...
January 16, 1930, Downs News and Times (ID 230)

While trimming an electro on our electric saw Wednesday afternoon, the senior editor misjudged by the fraction of an inch and allowed a thumb to come in contact with the saw. A very ugly and painful wound was the result.

The Burr Oak Herald celebrated its golden anniversary last week by publishing a special edition. The first newspaper published in Burr Oak made its appearance January 6, 1880, and was called the Reveille. For 36 years, the Herald has been operated by the same member of the Ross family, the present editor being Harry E. Ross. The edition was printed on goldenrod stock and its columns teemed over with interesting historical data covering the life of the newspaper.

 

Newspaper's 50th anniversary: The Times editors -- ...
January 30, 1930, Downs News and Times (ID 231)

Newspaper's 50th anniversary

The Times editors -- Since the establishment of The Downs Times in February, 1880, the paper has had many editors and proprietors. The files of the old issues of the Times are in such bad shape that it is impossible to give a true history of the men who have wielded the pen on the paper during its existence.

The paper was established by Tom C. and C. W. Nicklin and was published by them for about two years, the former being in charge most of the time. In 1882 the paper was purchased by Geo. E. Dougherty and Silas David. After a few months Mr. Dougherty purchased the interests of his partner and continued its publication for several years. Before the latter disposed of the paper he turned the editorial reins and management over to Ralph Norwood, who had charge of the paper until it was purchased by E. D. Craft and son, Quincy, in 1888. During the period of the ownership of the Crafts, Mr. and Mrs. Del Cox were employed on the paper as compositors, the latter then being Miss Cornelia Craft. In 1894 and 1895 we find H. M. Fletcher's name at the head of the paper, and in 1896 and 1897 that of Capt. W. S. Tilton. The latter, we are told, was an experienced writer and newspaper man and quickly gained the respect of his readers for his paper. Previously the paper had been supported, largely, as a matter of course, but Capt. Tilton demanded, and received, support of the paper on its merits as an advertising medium. B. P. Walker, state printer, then a young man, was employed on the paper by Capt. Tilton, and at that time displayed evidence of becoming a journalist of more than ordinary ability. Capt. Tilton had much respect for his ability, both as writer and printer, and remarked to Del Cox one day: "Keep your eyes on that man; he will get somewhere." Dick Ward was also employed on the paper for a short time as compositor during this period of its existence.

We are advised by Mr. Cox that C. L. Knotts had charge of the paper a short time following the departure of Capt. Tilton, but we are unable to locate him in the files of that period. J. H. Smith became editor and owner of the paper in 1898 and continued its publication until 1902. His son, W. H. Smith, was the local editor. In 1902 and until August, 1903, we find Allen J. DeLay's name on the flag of the paper as editor and owner. On the latter date R. T. Weld became the owner. He was a high-class printer, perhaps the best that ever worked on a Downs paper, and a fairly good writer. He had the assistance of W. H. Smith, a local writer of extraordinary ability. In 1906 Mr. Smith was taken in as a partner under the firm name of Weld & Smith. They continued the publication of the paper until March, 1908, when they sold it to Jesse James Parker, who sold his Alton Empire to enter a larger field. Parker had the able assistance of Mrs. Parker, a high-class newspaper woman and writer. In December, 1910, Paul Rankin, an experienced newspaper writer, purchased a half interest in the paper and took charge of its editorial columns. He remained with the paper about 18 months, when he secured a position on the Salina Journal, but retained his interests in the paper. Later, we believe, Rankin returned for a time while Parker took a position...elsewhere.

The Times was sold to C. E. Mann and W. H. Ransom in January 1916, and consolidated with The News, which had been published by Ransom & Mann since April 1, 1905. The first issue of the News and Times came off the press on January 13, 1916. On February 16, 1920, the present editor became the sole owner. He has experienced a newspaper service of very nearly a quarter of a century in Downs.

A. L. Drummond tells of early day happenings --

Your announcement in last week's issue that you will publish the fiftieth anniversary number of the News and Times on January 30th caught my eye this evening and started me thinking, or rather remembering.

Father located the Drummond family at Portis in September, 1881, having purchased the Patriot of Hi Bryant. I see the Times (now News and Times) was established in January (actually February), 1880. I remember having worked on the paper for a time in 1882, I think, under George Dougherty, editor. Frank, younger brother of George, also worked in the office at the time. Frank and I made a drive with team and buggy to the home of the Dougherty boys' parents in the hills over south of the Solomon Valley near Waconda Springs. That was years before the spring was fenced. After dinner, on the return trip, we fool-like took a notion to go down the face of the bluff directly through an old stone quarry. So down we went, he holding one rear wheel of the buggy, I holding the other, and the ponies sitting down and skidding mostly. As we were going down, we noticed, a mile or so to the north, the evening Central Branch passenger grain going from Cawker to Glen Elder.

Buggy, boys and team becoming tangled in a rather deep hole from which the rock had been blasted, we lost sight of the train for a few moment, and when we looked again could see nothing but a dense cloud of smoke and steam going up some distance to the east where we supposed the train had just passed. Continuing on our way north until we had crossed the railroad track, we met a long procession of vehicles of every kind, racing toward the east. Joining in, we traveled for about a mile, and came upon one of the saddest sights it has ever been my misfortune to witness, although we did not see it all. The train, instead of having passed on, as we supposed, had plunged through a broken bridge to the dry creek bed below. The engineer, I think it was, had been instantly killed by being caught in the rush of boiling water from the bursted pipes of the boiler, and the fireman had been flung a few yards up the creek, landing in what a few moments before had been a shallow dry hole; the baggage car had fallen through, one end remaining at the end of the broken track above, the other end pinning the unfortunate man in that hole, and the boiling water from the bursted pipes of the boiler filling the hole in which the doomed man was held, and from which he begged piteously for someone to kill him. We were a little late and did not actually see the victims, they having been removed a few moments before, but that was the story of those who actually arrived on the scene first.

I have seen that moving train, then the heavy column of smoke and steam, then the racing vehicles, horses and men, and all the rest, a thousand times since that day. No major accident or disaster afterward, not even when Rock Island train No. 5 went into the flood west of Norton near Clayton, years afterward, taking a toll of sixteen lives, has moved me like that terrible one 47 or 48 years ago.

How the memories come. In those days I was just a happy, go-lucky "kid," with a fleet pair of heels and a mind never burdened with a serious thought, unless it be the world-old boy's query, "When do we eat?" Working up and down the Central Branch railroad on various newspapers, at home in Portis between jobs. Ira Troup and I put up the type and pulled off the first issue of the Beloit Democrat (or was it the Times?) established by H. A. Yonge, then connected with the Kirwin land office; worked on the Osborne Farmer when edited by Mr. Barnhart; a number of times on the Gaylord Herald under good old L. C. Headley; (by the way, years afterward, when I was trying to become a preacher, Lew published his opinion of the event in his characteristic way, by stating that it was "a shame to spoil a ------- good printer by making a -------- poor preacher out of him.") From Gaylord to Bull City (now Alton) shortly after General Bull had been killed by the elk; at Smith Center on the Pioneer under R. D. Bowen, and so on, until in 1884 I came to Norton to work on the Champion for Lafe Thompson, who wished Major Conway onto me by selling him the paper and throwing me in.... -- A. L. Drummond, Norton

A dip into the past, by Mertie Berry Hampton --

My father, J. O. Berry, subscribed for the Times soon after coming to Kansas, 42 years ago, and has read its pages continuously. The family, as a whole, has never lost interest in it, even though it changed editors many times and at last consolidated with a newer sheet, the Downs News.

As far back as I can remember I was interested in newspapers. When the plant was housed in the old stone building in the south part of town, now the home of the Pastime theatre, I annoyed the editors by snooping around and picking up the type. All they gave me was what I picked up in the yard back of the shop. Even then, sometimes, they would decide it had been accidentally swept out and I would have to part with it.

During its 50 years of life the paper has attracted the pens and pencils of many artists in the newspaper business, and each new publication amazes and interests us all once again. . . .

AS THE READERS may have noted, the volume number...of this paper does not correspond in date with that of the first issue. Volume 1, Number 1, of the Times was published on Feb. 19, 1880, while...Number 1 of the year 1930 occurs on January 30....Undoubtedly, the number has been neglected to have been changed a couple of times during the 50 years it has been published.

 

From E. J. Garner, 1506 West Douglas, Wichita: : I ...
February 13, 1930, Downs News and Times (ID 232)

From E. J. Garner, 1506 West Douglas, Wichita:

In 1874, the writer, accompanied by his parents, three brothers and two sisters, came to Kansas from Iowa, locating two miles north and one-half east of where Downs now is....While in this district, the writer acted as one of the country correspondents to the old Downs Times and other neighborhood newspapers of that day and age.

In 1883, we left the corn field on the old farm to accept the "devilship" on the Times under the editorial management of George E. and Rose Dougherty....The writer had always had a longing to learn the art of typography and this opportunity was grasped eagerly even at the cost of a yearling mule that we had bought the previous spring and readily gave to our twin brother, John, if he would finish husking 40 acres of corn and let us go and learn this trade.

We worked a year and boarded ourself and a year for just our board before getting as much cash as a thin dime. At the termination of the apprenticeship of two years, we were paid the sum of $9 a week -- the highest wage paid at that time for typesetters on country weekly papers.

In six months after finishing the apprenticeship, we decided to embark in the newspaper business on our own initiative and, together with George Shook, we went to Almena, Norton County, and established the Almena Star.

From Almena, we moved our paper in 1889 to Norton and, under the name of the Farmer's Advance, we launched the first Populist paper in the big Sixth Congressional District and in 1890 we contributed to the defeat of one of the then well-known political prophets of that day, Hon. Webb McNall, who after seven days of political manipulation at Colby had won the nomination on the Republican ticket.

This was in the days when the mention of Wall Street was as distressing to the average farmer as the waving of a red rag in a bull's face....The big Sixth District had been conceded an average GOP majority of from 16,000 to 20,000 but that year the Populists, backed by the Farmers Alliance, elected Wm. Baker of Lincoln County to Congress by a majority of 8,664....

We have one brother living in that section -- nine miles northwest of Downs, on Twelve Mile Creek, T. N. Garner -- he has resided in that locality for more than 50 years and has made a success of the farming industry....

 

How we sigh for the old days! We can remember the ...
February 20, 1930, Downs News and Times (ID 233)

How we sigh for the old days! We can remember the time when, on Valentine's Day, every editor in the country had his mail box clogged with humorous valentines, sent by every person in the community who had, or thought he had, a grouch against him. And this year we didn't get a single valentine.

 

Lester Burkholder, foreman on the Belleville Teles ...
February 27, 1930, Downs News and Times (ID 234)

Lester Burkholder, foreman on the Belleville Telescope, was a pleasant visitor.

Everett Palmer, editor of the Jewell City Republican, has resigned as secretary of the state senate....A vote of the senate will be necessary to select another secretary.

 

The 34th Senatorial District, which includes Osbor ...
March 6, 1930, Downs News and Times (ID 235)

The 34th Senatorial District, which includes Osborne County, is not represented at the special session of the legislature....Senator Chas. E. Mann of Osborne...was informed that he was not eligible to serve due to the fact that he had accepted an appointment under the U.S. government as supervisor of the census....

As the result of an agreement reached last week between the owners of Oberlin's two newspapers, a consolidation of the two plants became effective March 1st. The consolidated plant will be known as the Herald Publishing Company.

 

Ray Breitweiser, editor of the Glen Elder Sentinel ...
March 20, 1930, Downs News and Times (ID 237)

Ray Breitweiser, editor of the Glen Elder Sentinel, completed a deal last week whereby he becomes the owner of the Clay Center Dispatch-Republican.

 

Frank Hall, formerly of the staff of the Concordia ...
March 27, 1930, Downs News and Times (ID 238)

Frank Hall, formerly of the staff of the Concordia Blade-Empire, has purchased the Hill City Reveille New Era and the Hill City Republican and will consolidate them into one weekly newspaper. The Hill City Republican was formerly edited by the father of Maurice Emmons, who until the past week had been employed on the Downs News and Times for the past two months.

Maurice Emmons, the very likeable young man who has been employed on this paper, left Sunday to take a position at Harper. His place will be filled here by Othel Gibbs of ElDorado Springs, Mo.

 

Perry Betz, coach at the Lebanon high school, is n ...
April 17, 1930, Downs News and Times (ID 239)

Perry Betz, coach at the Lebanon high school, is now owner of the Glen Elder Sentinel, purchasing same from Ray Breitweiser. The Tipton Times, formerly owned and published by Mr. Breitweiser, has been sold to the businessmen of Tipton, but will be printed in the Glen Elder office.

 

One year ago this coming July, the Downs News and ...
May 15, 1930, Downs News and Times (ID 240)

One year ago this coming July, the Downs News and times was awarded the county printing....Last week, the commissioners reversed their steps and gave the printing back to the Osborne Farmer....

 

Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Lessenden went to Concordia, wh ...
May 29, 1930, Downs News and Times (ID 241)

Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Lessenden went to Concordia, where they were guests at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Gomer Davies, and spent several delightful hours visiting the beautiful rose gardens that go make the Davies home one of the most beautiful in Concordia. Other guests at the Davies home were Editor and Mrs. Palmer of the Jewell City Republican. Messrs. Davies, Palmer and Lessenden are admirers of roses and every year they meet to compare notes and view the work each has done.

Mrs. Rachael H. Butler, city editor of the Beloit Daily Call since 1921, has severed her connections with that paper and announces that she will soon move to Chicago. Mrs. Butler is a brilliant writer and it has always given this editor great pleasure to read her sparkling thoughts.

 

Parties in Downs are in receipt of the announcemen ...
June 19, 1930, Downs News and Times (ID 242)

Parties in Downs are in receipt of the announcement of the marriage of George McDill Boyd, son of Editor Frank Boyd of the Phillipsburg Review, and Marie Kreikenbaum, which occurred June 11th. After graduating from Phillipsburg high school, McDill attended KSAC at Manhattan and later embarked into the newspaper business with his father.

James Seger, a former employee of this office who left the first of the year to enter college at Oklahoma City, is located in Guthrie, Okla., where he has a position in a printing office.

 

Last Monday a week ago, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Ransom ...
July 31, 1930, Downs News and Times (ID 243)

Last Monday a week ago, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Ransom returned from Minnesota, where they had spent the past seven weeks on a fishing trip, and where it was thought that Mr. Ransom would receive some benefit from outdoor life. When he returned home, he looked the picture of perfect health and stated that he felt better than he had in many months. Tuesday and Wednesday he rolled up his sleeves and helped the celebration committee get everything ready for the big public wedding Wednesday evening. Thursday afternoon he attended the baseball game and remarked to numerous friends how well he felt. That night he was stricken with that dread disease, erysipelas, and several days suffered untold tortures as the disease spread over one side of his face and head. He ran a very high fever Friday and Saturday, but Sunday appeared to be much improved, the greater portion of the fever having left him and the terrible pain somewhat subsiding. At present, he is very much improved, although very weak....

 

The Stockton Record came out last week in a new dr ...
August 21, 1930, Downs News and Times (ID 244)

The Stockton Record came out last week in a new dress. Recently, Editor Harry Covert ditched all of his old type and replaced it with one of the newest faces on the market, the Ideal News face. Makes your sheet look mighty good, Harry.

 

The News and Times this week introduces new faces ...
August 28, 1930, Downs News and Times (ID 245)

The News and Times this week introduces new faces to its readers, with the same old ugly mugs at the helm. Othel Gibbs, the "devil," left our employ a couple of weeks ago to go back into the hills of Old Missouri to hibernate for the wither. His place is being taken by Glenn Kendrick, who arrived Tuesday morning from St. Joseph, Mo. Glenn is somewhat older in years than Othel, and besides being a printer is a musician, who will be a great help to the local band. The associate editor, in the absence of Mr. Ransom, took it upon himself to attempt to better the mechanical force, and deemed it best to allow Mr. Gibbs to depart from our midst. We thought our worries were over....This dream, however, was soon shattered. Monday morning, Riley Smith, an expert machinist and Intertype operator, who has been with us the past five months, came to us and announced that he had accepted a much better position in Manhattan and desired to leave us this coming Saturday....Telegraph and telephone wires were literally burned up in an effort to assemble a working force....After this week, we feel that we will have gathered together a mechanical force that will be competent and capable....Ira Anderson, who has been employed on the Phillips County Review, Phillipsburg, for the past 12 years, comes to us as foreman of our plant....Besides being a high-class job printer, he is an all-around man, being capable of operating the typesetting machine, setting ads, running presses, etc. Mr. Anderson has promised to be with us next Monday, and if he does not fail us...then we'll be sitting right on top of the world and will be able to look the big boss square in the eye when he returns from his Colorado vacation.

Last week, an Associated Press dispatch...stated that among the things one had to "wear" this fall in order to keep up with Dame Fashion was colored fingernails....There never was a person, and never will be, who can dabble around a print shop and keep clean fingernails...and now that it's stylish to have black fingernails we boys in the print shops are stepping right out at the head of the long string of fall fashion setters. All our life our nails have been in deep mourning and, cut and trim and dig to our heart's content they've never been what one could call, with a clear conscience, exactly clean....

 

Riley Smith, who has been in our employ as Interty ...
September 4, 1930, Downs News and Times (ID 246)

Riley Smith, who has been in our employ as Intertype operator for the past eight months, has left us and this week begins work on the Manhattan Mercury. Smith is one of the best machinist operators we have ever had on our payroll, and that is the reason why we lost him. He was too good for this size office....Ira Anderson, who has been employed on the Phillips County Review for the past 12 years, takes Mr. Smith's place. Mr. Anderson...is an old hand in the newspaper game and is thoroughly familiar with the mechanical end of the office.

 

Ira Anderson...severed his connection with this pa ...
September 11, 1930, Downs News and Times (ID 247)

Ira Anderson...severed his connection with this paper last week and has located in Downs, where he has accepted a position as foreman of the Downs News, published by W. H. Ransom, a former Phillipsburg resident....Banker Gaumer, who established (actually bought) the News in Downs over 20 years ago, also started publication of the Phillips County Post in this city and for a short time was associated with this writer. Later Mr. Ransom, who was in our employ, bought an interest in the News and moved to Downs, only to be followed later by Dan McKay, who at the time was working for the writer on the Post. Now Ira has joined these high-class printers and excellent country newspapermen, and the three of them will get out a cracking good country weekly.... -- Phillips County Review.

 

Harry Kurtz, editor of the Alton Empire, has been ...
September 25, 1930, Downs News and Times (ID 249)

Harry Kurtz, editor of the Alton Empire, has been boosted from his pedestal. Last week he announced the arrival of a son and heir at his home, the youngster arriving in time to assist in publishing last week's issue of the Empire.

 

A new man is at the helm of the Cawker City ledger ...
October 16, 1930, Downs News and Times (ID 250)

A new man is at the helm of the Cawker City ledger, beginning this week. Don Barnes, who has been associated with Ray Breitweiser on the Clay Center Dispatch,...is the new editor and business manager for Mr. Breitweiser, the owner.

 

The News and Times force has been rather crippled ...
October 23, 1930, Downs News and Times (ID 251)

The News and Times force has been rather crippled this week....D. B. McKay, our associate editor, has been confined to his home since Friday with a severe cold and the senior editor, also suffering from a cold, has been working simply because there was no escape from it.

 

Harold Dwyer is assembling a printing plant in Tip ...
November 20, 1930, Downs News and Times (ID 252)

Harold Dwyer is assembling a printing plant in Tipton and expects before long to print his paper, the Times, at home. At present, it is being printed by the Cawker City Ledger.

 

The editors of this moral and family guide are dee ...
January 8, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 253)

The editors of this moral and family guide are deeply indebted to John Yost for a generous supply of spare ribs and home-made sausage. The gift came in the nick of time, for our cupboards were just about as bare as that of Mother Hubbard's.

 

Just as we had the forms on the press last Wednesd ...
January 15, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 254)

Just as we had the forms on the press last Wednesday evening and started grinding out the city list, one of the side arms on the press snapped in two. The broken parts were rushed to Bill Ruth and, in less time than it takes to tell it, he had them welded together. The break delayed us about one hour.

 

This paper marks another milestone in life's progr ...
January 29, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 255)

This paper marks another milestone in life's progress today....The Times, whose volume number was appropriated when the News and the Times were consolidated in 1916, completed its 51st year with its last issue....Starting with a hand-set paper and an old Army press, the paper has kept pace with the modern advancement...and today has an equipment that would be a credit to a community much larger than Downs....

 

G. F. (Brooklyn Joe) Roddy rolled into Downs at no ...
February 5, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 256)

G. F. (Brooklyn Joe) Roddy rolled into Downs at noon Saturday, hopping out of a tourist's big sedan. Brooklyn Joe is one of the few remaining old-time printers still out of captivity. About once each year, he drifts by this way, stopping in at the office to look over the exchanges and to panhandle us for the price of a meal. He is just one year older than the state of Kansas, but belies his age at least 10 years. Leaving our office, he sauntered back uptown to pick up a ride to Beloit where, no doubt, the boys at the Gazette and Call offices supplied him with the wherewithal for an evening meal and a place to flop for the night.

 

Glenn Kendrick, who has been employed in the mecha ...
February 19, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 257)

Glenn Kendrick, who has been employed in the mechanical department of the News and Times, severed his connection with us and left for his home in Cameron, Mo.

 

Ford Wilkins, a cousin of Mrs. M. W. Hardman, was ...
February 26, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 258)

Ford Wilkins, a cousin of Mrs. M. W. Hardman, was a guest at the Hardman home. Mr. Ford is editor of the Manila Bulletin, the only paper in that city published in the English language, and is returning to the Philippines from a trip around the world. He sailed from San Francisco Saturday, his 30th birthday.

 

We have received an invitation from E. J. Meister, ...
March 12, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 259)

We have received an invitation from E. J. Meister, who styles himself "managing editor" of a new daily newspaper to be born in Junction City -- provided enough suckers are caught in his net to swing the deal. The prospectus sent to us says that the new paper will sponsor every cause that Dr. Brinkley has stood for. For one dollar, we can become a subscriber to this new paper, receiving a copy daily for three months.

Barney Martin arrived from Burlington Junction, Mo., to accept a position on the mechanical force in the News office. Barney is a young man 22 years of age...and has several years' experience in the printing business.

 

During the past week, the Sixth District has lost ...
April 16, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 260)

During the past week, the Sixth District has lost two of its best newspapermen. Harry E. Ross, who has edited the Burr Oak Herald for many years, has sold his paper to Rusco and Istas and has purchased the Holton Signal. For 38 years, the name of Ross has appeared at the masthead of the Herald....The second newspaper to change ownership is the Stockton Review, Harry L. Covert, who has been editor of the paper for the past eight and one-half years, selling his interests to C. W. Hamilton.

 

The editor of the Cawker City Ledger is experienci ...
May 28, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 261)

The editor of the Cawker City Ledger is experiencing the thrill (?) of editing his paper without the use of a typewriter. Someone entered his office and lugged off his brand new portable Remington. Well, any newspaperman who gets so highhat that he gets away from the old trusty Oliver should be made to suffer.

 

The marriage of Miss Mary Ransom, daughter of Mr. ...
June 11, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 262)

The marriage of Miss Mary Ransom, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Ransom, to C. Brooks Holley of Media, Penn., took place Sunday morning at 11:00 o'clock at the home of the bride's parents....The bride has lived in Downs all her life. She attended the Kansas State Normal at Emporia, where she received her degree. For the past year and a half, she has been in charge of kindergarten in the local schools. The groom is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Holley of Toledo, Ohio. He is a graduate of Purdue University...and has been connected with the Pennsylvania Railroad in the engineering department....

 

The News and Times believes that the wheat growers ...
July 30, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 264)

The News and Times believes that the wheat growers are not getting enough for their wheat. We believe that they should be getting at least 75 cents for every bushel...but the market price is 27 cents. However, we are willing to do more than split the difference and will offer, for the next 30 days, 50 cents per bushel for wheat on subscription....Four bushels of wheat will pay for one year's subscription to the News and Times. You may pay as many years in advance as you please, or you may bring in the wheat and apply it on back subscription....All you are required to do is to deliver the wheat at the Voss & Verhage elevator and bring your weight slip to this office....

 

...If very much more wheat comes in, we are seriou ...
August 6, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 265)

...If very much more wheat comes in, we are seriously thinking of converting our printing establishment into a flouring mill....

The Osborne Farmer has installed a new printing press....The new machine is a No. 2 Miehle. This makes the fourth press the Farmer has installed during the past 50 years....

 

A young lady printer struck this office for a job ...
August 13, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 266)

A young lady printer struck this office for a job one day last week. We told her there was nothing doing, so she bummed a cigarette and departed.

Bob Good, former Cawker City newspaperman, has purchased a Democratic weekly newspaper at Salem, Mo., taking possession August 1st. Salem is a county seat town of about 1,700, but has three newspapers....Bob's removal from this district will probably leave a clear field for Edgar Mitchell in his race for the Democratic nomination for congressman.

 

J. L. (Jimmie) Seger, formerly employed on this pa ...
August 20, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 267)

J. L. (Jimmie) Seger, formerly employed on this paper, has moved from Crescent, Okla., where he had been located, to Shattuck, Okla., where he has a position on a newspaper.

The Glen Elder Sentinel has fallen into line and, following the example set by the News and Times, is offering 50 cents per bushel for wheat on subscriptions.

 

One of the cleverest bits of advertising we have s ...
August 27, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 268)

One of the cleverest bits of advertising we have seen...is a contest for boys and girls staged by the Smith County Pioneer. It was called a "Dog and Doll" contest in which boys and girls entered their dogs and dolls and the merchants gave prizes.

 

And how the wheat did roll in Monday, the last day ...
September 3, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 269)

And how the wheat did roll in Monday, the last day of our offer to pay 50 cents per bushel for the golden grain on subscription....At the close of its subscription campaign, the News and Times finds itself the owner of very close to 900 bushels of wheat.

 

Ed Martindale, field representative of the Kansas ...
October 15, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 270)

Ed Martindale, field representative of the Kansas City Journal-Post, was a caller in Downs yesterday in the interests of that excellent paper....

 

Each subscription is regarded as an open account. ...
October 22, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 271)

Each subscription is regarded as an open account. The name of the subscriber will be instantly removed from our mailing list at expiration of time paid for, if publisher is notified; otherwise, the subscription will remain in force at the designated subscription price....

 

The Beloit Daily Call celebrated its 30th birthday ...
November 5, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 272)

The Beloit Daily Call celebrated its 30th birthday on Thursday of last week. The Call is an offspring of the Western Call, which was established in 1873. In the year of its birth, A. B. Adamson became identified with the Daily Call and was its sole owner and editor up to 1913, when a partnership was formed with Harry K. Houghton, who had worked in various departments of the paper since 1903. The paper has since been under this ownership, although Mr. Adamson retired from active labors in the office in 1923, and in 1930 the name of his son, A. B. Adamson, Jr., was hoisted to the masthead as one of the publishers. The Call is a splendid little daily.

 

Don Barnes, former editor of the Cawker City Ledge ...
November 12, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 273)

Don Barnes, former editor of the Cawker City Ledger, has recently located in Longford, Clay County, and launched the Longford Leader. Volume 1, No. 1 of Don's new paper reached our desk last Saturday morning....

 

A few days ago, we had a subscriber ask us why we ...
December 3, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 274)

A few days ago, we had a subscriber ask us why we did not cut our price on subscription, and also why we didn't cut our advertising rates. The same two questions were recently asked of the editor of the Mankato Advocate, and his answer, which follows, is the same as ours: "Before the war we paid $2.85 per 100 pounds for print paper; now it costs us $5.00 laid down at the office. We got mats for the Linotype for 5 cents each; now we pay 9 cents and every other repair in proportion; inks, both for the paper and job work, are almost 100 percent higher."

 

Offers $100 reward -- J. E. Kissell, editor of the ...
December 10, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 276)

Offers $100 reward -- J. E. Kissell, editor of the Portis Independent, has the sympathy of every newspaper man in the valley. Some time during the night of December 2nd, a party or parties gained entrance to his newspaper shop and the things they did to his Linotype machine would fill a book. The associate editor of this paper, who has tinkered around typesetting machines for the past 20 odd years, was called to Portis last Thursday afternoon by Mr. Kissell to see if we could discover why the machine wouldn't function. We have had these tricky machines do almost everything under the sun to us, but never before have we seen a machine so completely demoralized within itself. We found every cog wheel, every cam and driving shaft out of time or, to put it in plainer words, the whole machine was turned inside out. And that wasn't the beginning of the trouble. The large cam that drives the mold wheel was broken and the back vice jaw had been sprung a half inch out of place. Mr. Kissell had been operating the machine the previous day, and it was working perfectly, and the following morning, when he started to make the final corrections for the paper, he found the machine in the above condition. It was quite apparent to us that someone had entered the office during Mr. Kissell's absence and had deliberately attempted to wreck the machine. Mr. Kissell has evidently come to the same conclusion and is offering a reward of $100 for information leading to the apprehension and conviction of the party, or parties, doing the damage. To say the very least, it is a low-down, scurvy trick and we hope the $100 reward has its effect.

 

J. E. Hale, at one time editor of the Osborne News ...
December 17, 1931, Downs News and Times (ID 277)

J. E. Hale, at one time editor of the Osborne News, is again back in the newspaper game. Mr. Hale's two sons, Glenn and Milford, own both the Formoso New Era and the Western Advocate, Glenn having been located at Formoso for the past 15 years. They have decided that the Advocate needs their undivided attention, so Glenn has gone to Mankato and his father will edit the Formoso paper.

The boys in this office have discovered a new way to keep their hands clean, and at the same time free from chaps....Printers and mechanics of all kinds have difficulty keeping their hands clean, especially when they become coated with ink, oils and greases. Of course, there are many kinds of soap that will remove the ink and grease...and then quite often the skin is left dry and hard with the result that the hands become chapped. Get a small can of common everyday sawdust, dip the hands into water, put a spoonful of sawdust in the palm of one hand, then apply soap. The sawdust will cause the soap to create a thick, heavy lather and in a jiffy the ink and grease will be removed. It works with success with either cold or hot water, but the hot water is preferable. After you do this the very first time, you will be surprised how soft and pliable the skin on the hands becomes, and also how thoroughly clean the hands appear....

 

W. C. Palmer of Jewell City definitely removes him ...
January 7, 1932, Downs News and Times (ID 278)

W. C. Palmer of Jewell City definitely removes himself as a candidate for state senator, much to the regret of his newspaper friends in this part of the state. In a signed statement in the Republican, he goes Calvin Coolidge one better, stating that he not only does not choose to run, but that he does not want to be a senator.

The depression has had little effect on the subscription list of this paper. We note with pride that our paid-in-advance subscribers are more numerous than usual at this time of year.

 

Barney Martin, the young man who has been employed ...
February 18, 1932, Downs News and Times (ID 280)

Barney Martin, the young man who has been employed in the mechanical department of this office during the past year, severed his connections with us last Saturday evening and left for his home at Burlington Junction, Mo.

 

Barney Martin, a young Missourian who had been emp ...
February 25, 1932, Downs News and Times (ID 281)

Barney Martin, a young Missourian who had been employed in the News and Times office,...writes the following, which he entitles "A Toast to Downs:" When M. N. Hillyer left Downs, he succeeded in getting about a column in the News and Times, and when a hobo passed through he even became a "columnist," so as perhaps advertising is at a low ebb and this would rank ahead of boiler plate to the makeup man, I'll see if I can get the bright lights of St. Joseph out of my eyes long enough to at least try to thank the good people of Downs, Kansas, for the pleasures they have bestowed upon me in the past year. Of course, this would be impossible to put into words, but as I've tried several things that were impossible in my young life, and as far as that goes, am trying an impossibility right now in trying to get a job, because hunting a job now is worse than hunting for a needle in the straw stack because, you know, the needle is there but the job may be and still may not, but there's nothing like trying, so nuff said. But anyway, although I have traveled throughout Missouri, Arkansas, Illinois and Iowa, I have never been in a single town that I would rather call home than Downs....Not a single place was the hospitality greater, the girls prettier and the men more likeable, so why should I, even though only a printer's devil, not be willing to take at least 15 minutes of my useless time to write this because if it does not get the wastebasket before the columns it won't be the first, and if it should get in the columns it wouldn't be the first, so in either event I'll live on. I can say, although the depression is at its worst, the bright lights are still here, as well as a few of the many friends although wedding bells have taken their usual toll. Many are the printing presses that have gathered dust since my departure and nothing but hard times were the cause, but we are all looking for the same as usual -- for a silver lining....So in closing I want to say "thanks so much" for your generosity and hospitality and I'll always remember "Downs Dozit" just out where the West begins....

 

A Downs lady is satisfied it pays to advertise. Im ...
March 24, 1932, Downs News and Times (ID 282)

A Downs lady is satisfied it pays to advertise. Immediately after advertising in the News and Times for a pair of lost gloves, she found them in her husband's pocket.

A little dingbat for the electric pot on the Intertype set us back $24.32 this week. As far as the firms that sell supplies to the printer are concerned, we are still living in the boom days of the war.

 

Work piled up on us in such heaps last weekend we ...
March 31, 1932, Downs News and Times (ID 283)

Work piled up on us in such heaps last weekend we were compelled to draft the services of Thorald Cowley to assist us in getting several hundred pounds of metal re-melted and ready to be converted into type for this week's paper. Thorald stepped right in to the work like an old hand at the game and turned out whole litters of "pigs" in no time at all.

Bert Headley, editor of the Smith County Pioneer, suffered an attack of the flu several weeks ago. He returned to work, but failed to regain his strength as rapidly as he thought he should, so last week packed up and lit out for the home of his mother in Oklahoma.

 

Arrangements are being made by the journalism clas ...
April 7, 1932, Downs News and Times (ID 284)

Arrangements are being made by the journalism class of Downs High School to get out the issue of the News and Times of April 21. The members of the class will...gather material for editorials, locals and news stories....They will also solicit the advertising and will have complete charge of assembling the paper with the exception of the mechanical work....

 

This Thursday morning sees new faces in charge of ...
April 14, 1932, Downs News and Times (ID 285)

This Thursday morning sees new faces in charge of the News and Times....During the past two years, the journalism class of the Downs High School has been publishing a monthly school paper, but the students have always wanted to get a touch of the real thing....Now they are being given an opportunity to appease that desire....

 

Many distressing things happen on press day to mak ...
April 28, 1932, Downs News and Times (ID 286)

Many distressing things happen on press day to make the life of the publisher anything but a bed of roses. Things happened with a vengeance at the office of the Alton Empire on last press day, when a small fire put the Linotype out of commission and burned up news and advertising copy for last week's edition. Editor Kurtz gathered up copy that was available after the fire and the composition was handled in the office of the Osborne Farmer, permitting him to get the paper out on time.

 

Now that B. P. Walker, state printer, has failed t ...
June 30, 1932, Downs News and Times (ID 287)

Now that B. P. Walker, state printer, has failed to file a declaration to become a candidate for re-election, he has friends out in the short grass country guessing whether he will again become a citizen of Osborne and take his place in the editorial chambers of the Farmer, or will move to California with his family and "retire."

 

Last week many of our readers were surprised when ...
August 11, 1932, Downs News and Times (ID 288)

Last week many of our readers were surprised when they received a copy of the old home paper and found but four pages....Four pages were our limit last week and also again this week. It takes a lot of material to fill an eight-page newspaper, and a certain percent of this material must be in the form of advertisements. When this advertising is lacking there remains but one thing to do, and this is to cut down on the size of the paper. This is not an apology but merely a reason for the four-page paper.

Barney Martin, a former employee of this office but now located at 518 South 9th Street, St. Joseph, Mo., writes that since leaving Downs last February he has worked for short periods in Arkansas, Illinois and Pennsylvania. He says: "...If a slick-tongued salesman tries to tell you of the prosperity elsewhere, just tell him you prefer Kansas any old time....

 

This office received a very pleasant call from Mr. ...
September 15, 1932, Downs News and Times (ID 289)

This office received a very pleasant call from Mr. and Mrs. Geo. E. Dougherty of Ontario, Calif., last Saturday. They were called to Beloit earlier in the week by the serious illness of their brother, Frank Dougherty....They called on the Getty families and M. W. Hardman. Mr. Dougherty's first wife was a sister of Will and Ed Getty. Mr. Dougherty was an old time editor of the Downs Times. He purchased the paper in 1881 and was at the editorial helm for six years. When he first took charge of the Times, Mr. Dougherty was considered to be the youngest editor in the state. After leaving Downs, he established the Dougherty Business College in Topeka, which he operated for 30 years. For a number of years he has been operating a real estate business in Ontario and he has been successful. While in this office he was much interested in looking through the old files. he found the issue (1882) giving the writeup of his marriage to Miss Getty, which we permitted him to keep.

The Smith County Pioneer celebrated its 60th birthday last week by printing 20 pages....Besides the usual run of local news, the issue carried many columns of early day history of Smith County. The issue is a distinct credit to its publisher, Bert Headley, and his able assistant, Walter Pattee, as well as to the mechanical force, Nate White, foreman; Leo Chance, Lewis and Roger Headley. The Pioneer was born at Cedarville, then the county seat....Bert Headley has been connected with the paper for the past 22 years, although for 40 years or more has been intimately connected with newspaper work in Smith County. Walter Pattee has been chronicling the local happenings for the Pioneer for 27 years, while the foreman has been on the job more than 20 years....

 

H. L. Covert, who recently sold the Norton Courier ...
September 29, 1932, Downs News and Times (ID 290)

H. L. Covert, who recently sold the Norton Courier, has purchased the Lincoln Sentinel-Republican and will take charge immediately. The paper has been owned for the past 21 years by Winslow Cipra, who is retiring from the newspaper business because of poor health. Before going to Norton, Mr. Covert published the Stockton Record.

 

Harry L. Clark, who for the past seven or eight ye ...
November 3, 1932, Downs News and Times (ID 291)

Harry L. Clark, who for the past seven or eight years has been employed by the Osborne Farmer, has purchased the Atascosa News at Jourdanton, Texas, a county seat town 36 miles south of San Antonio....Mr. Clark will be remembered as the proprietor of the Blue Ribbon Bakery in this city....

 

A. B. Sontag, servicing engineer for the Monomelt ...
November 10, 1932, Downs News and Times (ID 292)

A. B. Sontag, servicing engineer for the Monomelt Company of Minneapolis, Minn., was here on Thursday and converted the electric pot on the News and Times Intertype to gas. He also made installation of a Monomelt, a contrivance in which the Intertype slugs are melted, the hot metal then flowing into the hot metal pot automatically as it is taken out in the slug-casting process. Gas is also used on the Monomelt, which sets directly over the metal pot. The installation is an expensive proposition which will be offset in the expense of operation, as well as permitting us to secure better quality of type slugs.

 

Ray Breitweiser, editor of the Clay Center Daily D ...
November 17, 1932, Downs News and Times (ID 293)

Ray Breitweiser, editor of the Clay Center Daily Dispatch, and Warren Wright, foreman of the mechanical department of the Clay Center Times, were pleasant callers at this office Saturday afternoon....Warren also called on M. W. Hardman and C. M. Arnold, with whom he was acquainted when he resided in Phillipsburg.

 

We note by a Topeka paper that B. P. Walker, state ...
November 24, 1932, Downs News and Times (ID 294)

We note by a Topeka paper that B. P. Walker, state printer and owner of the Osborne County Farmer, has recently completed the erection of a fine new home in Topeka and his family is now comfortably located therein....

 

Lee Meadows, former editor of the Gaylord Sentinel ...
January 5, 1933, Downs News and Times (ID 295)

Lee Meadows, former editor of the Gaylord Sentinel and later actively engaged in Republican state politics, has sold his daily newspaper at Lamar, Colo.,...and has returned to Kansas.

 

After printing the News and Times in the form of a ...
January 12, 1933, Downs News and Times (ID 296)

After printing the News and Times in the form of a six-pager for several months, this week we greet our readers in the old form -- eight pages. When the depression began to make itself felt in this office over a year ago, an attempt was made to whittle down the overhead in order to meet the change in conditions. Two of the men employed in the back shop were let out, and other drastic changes made. The force left to handle the work decided that six pages were about all they could handle....From the very first week that we published the six-page paper, up to the present time, we have actually given our readers more reading material, column for column, than we gave them back in the good old days. A few years ago, when we were printing eight and ten pages every week, our reading columns were not half as numerous as they have been the past year. In spite of this fact, however, we have had numerous complaints on the six-page paper....We have secured a splendid serial story....In addition to this, we have secured other special features....And so this week marks a turning point with us and Old Man Depression -- a turning point which we hope will bring to all of us a bigger and brighter 1933.

Once in a while we are asked by a subscriber, "Why don't you reduce the price of the paper? Everything else has come down to conform to depression prices."....In the first place, a newspaper cannot possibly be published with the receipts of the subscription list. Without advertising, the life of a newspaper would be short for that is the source of profit to the publisher. When the volume of advertising drops off, as it has done in the past year, the profits dwindle and the newspaper finds it a hard matter to make both ends meet....When the statement is made that "everything is coming down," we are reminded that there are many items entering into the cost of publishing a newspaper that still remain the same as in the prosperous years....With advertising at the lowest ebb it has reached in the history of the town, and with other expense of publishing remaining at practically the high peak, the publisher could not bear the burden of the loss entailed for any great length of time with a reduced subscription price.

 

We had a subscriber tell us last week that one of ...
January 26, 1933, Downs News and Times (ID 297)

We had a subscriber tell us last week that one of the best things we had ever done to make the News and Times a better paper was the recent addition of the serial story. He was one of our rural readers and stated that since the depression he had been compelled to cancel his daily newspaper and too had been compelled to do away with the buying of magazines. "We find," he said, "that the old home paper gives us all of the local news, tells us what the legislators are doing, also gives us a brief resume of the happenings over the state, and now that we have the serial story to read we find ourselves quite well supplied with reading material."

 

Headlines:: Nation's banks are all closed; followi ...
March 9, 1933, Downs News and Times (ID 298)

Headlines:

Nation's banks are all closed; following orders of Governor Landon limiting withdrawals, president orders all blanks closed; banks to open Friday; restrictions of 5 percent withdrawals to remain in force for a time.

County payroll in scrip this month; county commissioners decide to issue scrip to all county employees; backed by the county; tax money not available; school teachers may also receive scrip for salaries.

Business as usual the Downs slogan; tie-up of funds in local banks is not expected to greatly hamper business here; currency not needed; Downs merchants will accept produce and bank checks in payment for merchandise.

 

Headline:: Downs banks again open for business; St ...
March 16, 1933, Downs News and Times (ID 299)

Headline:

Downs banks again open for business; State and National permitted to reopen under new banking law Wednesday morning; restrictions removed; except that no gold may be paid out or currency for hoarding or speculation.

 

...Years ago, a young man started a newspaper in A ...
March 30, 1933, Downs News and Times (ID 300)

...Years ago, a young man started a newspaper in Atchison. He called it the Atchison Globe and made it one of the best-known newspapers in the country. After working hours, he wrote a novel which he called "The Story of a Country Town" and that too in time became an American classic. The heroine of the novel is named Mateel, and when a daughter was born to the author she was given that name. The editor and author is Ed W. Howe, "The Sage of Potato Hill." Ed W. Howe's fame as an author rests upon the single novel, but the daughter, Mateel Howe Farnham, has just completed her fourth, "Lost Laughter," to be published by Dodd, Mead and Company. Mrs. Farnham cannot remember when she began to write. It seemed inevitable as a member of the Howe family. Her mother and two brothers assumed that she would write stories. Her father wanted her to be an outstanding newspaper woman, a feminine Ed Howe. When she was not quite 19 and living in Portland, Ore., she reported the Seattle Fair for the Oregonian and the New York Independent. Then she won the $500 prize by the Portland Chamber of Commerce for the best writeup of Portland. This was her first and only newspaper work, except for stray writings for her father's paper. She then began to write stories and almost immediately sold one to the Ladies Home Journal. Her two brothers followed their father's profession, but Ed Howe has never quite forgiven his daughter for failing to make it unanimous. All this sounds pleasant and painless, but years of hard labor lie between the first story and "Lost Laughter," which represents two and one-half years of work....

 

The knife on the paper cutter in this office has r ...
April 13, 1933, Downs News and Times (ID 301)

The knife on the paper cutter in this office has recently been sharpened to a razor edge. One of the printers conceived the brilliant idea that the big knife would be ideal for trimming fingernails, so he proceeded to give it a trial. He first tried it out on a thumbnail. The operation was entirely successful although, due to his inexperience of trimming fingernails with a paper knife, a piece of the thumb came off with the nail. But he is not discouraged and believes that with a little more practice he will be able to manipulate it with a little less bloodshed.

 

Ancient history -- The Osborne Farmer printed a co ...
May 4, 1933, Downs News and Times (ID 302)

Ancient history -- The Osborne Farmer printed a column last week under the above head, taken from its files of 1883. Among them, we glean the following items....The Downs Lamp flickered out last week. (The above reference was to a little paper called The Saturday Evening Lamp, edited in Downs by F. J. Hulaniski, who also edited the Bull City Empire. The paper was said to be on the order of the modern "tabloids" in the cities, and its "news" consisted mostly of gossip of a more or less unsavory nature, often involving the character of prominent citizens. It appealed to a very limited clientele and soon flickered out. -- Ed.) It is said that a man called VonSickle of Bull City called on Editor Hulaniski of the Empire last week with the intention of cutting him in two, so he could edit papers both at Downs and Bull City, but Hulaniski humorously drew a revolver and his assailant desisted.

 

It seemed like old times in the job department of ...
May 11, 1933, Downs News and Times (ID 303)

It seemed like old times in the job department of this office the last three days of last week, there being more jobs on the "hook" than at any time for many months....

H. L. Clark, who for several years operated the Blue Ribbon Bakery in Downs, and then returned to his first love, the printing business, has sold his paper at Jourdanton, Texas, and is now negotiating for a paper in southeastern Kansas. Harry has had several newspaper ventures since leaving Downs, and for a number of years was employed on the Osborne Farmer.

 

For three weeks, beginning next week, the News and ...
June 1, 1933, Downs News and Times (ID 304)

For three weeks, beginning next week, the News and Times will be in charge of D. B. McKay, the associate editor. During that time the editor, in company with Lew Meibergen, D. H. Scott, Roy McMillan and L. A. Griffiths, will be seeking the finny tribes in the lakes of Minnesota. Headquarters will be the same as for several years past, Villard, Minn....An Intertype operator by the name of Mendenhall of Brookfield, Mo., has been secured to assist in the show during the editor's absence.

Miss Beth Hodgson joined the reporters' staff of the News and Times Monday....She will remain with the paper during the summer months to gain what experience may be had in running down and writing the elusive local happenings of the town and community, and in the fall will enroll in a school of journalism....

 

A report was circulated in Downs last week that Ed ...
June 22, 1933, Downs News and Times (ID 305)

A report was circulated in Downs last week that Editor Harold P. Beason of the Athol-Gaylord-Cedar Review had moved his plant from Athol to Smith Center, where he would establish a new county seat newspaper. The old Smith County Pioneer, Bert Headley's paper, is recognized as one of the leading weeklies in the Sixth District, well liked by its army of readers, and as competitors personally we're glad Mr. Beason is starting the new paper and not us. If compelled to make a choice, we'd as soon tackle a wildcat in its native haunts as to tangle in a newspaper fight with that Smith County Pioneer bunch.

Here's a tip we'd like to pass along to the newspaper boys in this section of the state. During the past three weeks we have had in our employ Curtis Mendenhall, a native of old Missouri. Curtis is a high-class machinist-operator and an A-1 printer and pressman. We'd be glad to recommend him to any of the boys of the fraternity. It might be that you could not make room for him on the regular payroll, but possibly your Linotype or Intertype needs repairing. If such is the case, drop him a line, care of this office, and he will respond immediately. We have found him to be an exceptionally fine machinist....

 

Mrs. Lew Meibergen has handed us a copy of the Dow ...
July 6, 1933, Downs News and Times (ID 306)

Mrs. Lew Meibergen has handed us a copy of the Downs Weekly News, dated August 8, 1903. The editor and publisher was F. W. Gardner. The copy is the 28th issue of volume one....The editor has an editorial on "Celebrations" in which he shows a desire for the old-fashioned celebration, formerly held in Downs before the days when "money became the universal god." "Then," he says, "the people went home in the evening with their bodies rested and their minds and hearts refreshed, with neighborly friendships renewed; now they go home with tired bodies, feet blisters, with pacing up and down the burning pavements of the hot streets and their minds over-excited with dissipations of one kind or another."...Of the late celebration, he says: "There is good reason for believing that a traveling man living in another city rented rooms for two ladies and became general manager of their campaign during their stay here. He does business with a number of our merchants here, we are told, as salesman....There is no place so fair and lovely as that held by pure and noble woman in the esteem of virtuous men, and there is no place outside of hell so vile as that occupied by women who have cast aside their virtue, an the men who follow after them the devil wouldn't own."...

 

The News and Times correspondents and office force ...
August 10, 1933, Downs News and Times (ID 307)

The News and Times correspondents and office force picnic was pulled off at the VanderGiesen grove August 3, as per schedule. The evening was ideal, cool and nice; in fact, a campfire was enjoyed after the eats. About everything good to eat was there except a dish of turnips. Nine families were present....The big boss, W. H. Ransom, and wife tried to see that everyone had a good time. Bill had cigars for all that cared to smoke, but no 3.2 (beer)....Dan McKay, wife and daughter (you know Dan is the comic editor of the News) were early arrivals. While they are all poking fun at Dan for eating so much chicken, I don't believe he eats any more than anyone else....Dr. and Mrs. J. E. Hodgson and daughter were there. Miss Beth is local reporter and, by the way, the best one the News ever had....The doctor had a supply of digestive tablets that were free to everyone present....Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Getty and daughter, Miss Alberta, were present....Mrs. Getty is the lady who writes that fine column of news from Oak Dale....Mr. and Mrs. T. T. Reddick were present. Mrs. Reddick is one of the old correspondents of the News....She is the writer of the Elm Creek column....Mr. and Mrs. John Yost and daughter, Miss Evelyn, were there....John is the West Solomon writer....Mr. and Mrs. John Koeteeuw and family were early arrivals at the picnic grounds. John is official authority on all baseball games. In fact, he always played with the Dispatch team until he got so fat he couldn't run. He covers the Dispatch country in his column. Mrs. Flora Goheen and Mrs. Breakey and children were with us. Mrs. Goheen has had lots of experience as a news writer and sends in the column headed "By the Wayside." All regretted very much that the Cox family, the Hamptons, Hulls, Mrs. Humes and Mrs. McKeever could not be with us....By Harry Saunders.

W. H. Ransom was compelled to take to his bed last Saturday afternoon, and Sunday was a real sick man. Since that time, however, his condition has been rapidly improving....Sunday noon a phone call was put across the wires to Nate White of the Smith County Pioneer, and when he heard our SOS message guaranteed to send us efficient help by the rise of the following morning's sun. And he did. With the breaking of dawn Monday morning, Bill Workman, a first-class, all-around printer, was found standing in front of the office door, sleeves rolled up and ready to tackle anything in the printing line.

 

Randall Ford has sold his Plainville Times to D. C ...
September 7, 1933, Downs News and Times (ID 308)

Randall Ford has sold his Plainville Times to D. C. Clark of Bonner Springs, who took possession September 1. The Times has been one of the best edited country newspapers coming to our exchange desk....

 

About every known article has been left with the l ...
September 21, 1933, Downs News and Times (ID 309)

About every known article has been left with the lost and found department of this paper in years past, but it remained for this week for it to receive a live rabbit. This bunny, a white pet, was found on the highway west of Downs and left at the office last Thursday for the owner. The finder must have hypnotized the keeper of this department for he accepted the "find" without realizing what he was getting into. He has had the rabbit on his hands for a week and it may be another week before the owner is found, if ever. In the meantime, bunny demands three square meals a day and insists upon being let out of the cage daily for exercise. This is to give notice that in the future no species of the genus Lepus will be accepted by the department.

 

A newspaper is a funny institution. Something like ...
October 12, 1933, Downs News and Times (ID 310)

A newspaper is a funny institution. Something like a Billiken doll, it seems to thrive on knocks, and bobs up grinning after every slap. We know a man in this town who doesn't subscribe because the paper isn't fit to read. He is the first to read it at the pool hall each evening unless someone else grabs it first....We know a man who rarely spends a dime for advertising. He is the one man who asks for more free publicity than almost anyone else in town. We know a woman who not long ago found fault with the paper because it printed an article that was a bit risque. She repeated it so many times it was almost a tie between the woman and the paper as to who had the largest combined audience....We know a man who got arrested and as soon as he was released on bail hotfooted it to the newspaper office to demand that nothing be said. He is the fellow who about a year ago saw no reason why he should take the paper" because it protected a first-offender -- a mere kid. Yes, a newspaper is a funny institution. It is funny it can keep going in spite of all the things it does, doesn't, or does wrong." -- Horace Jones in the Lyons News.

 

The death of Frank P. MacLennan, editor of the Top ...
November 23, 1933, Downs News and Times (ID 311)

The death of Frank P. MacLennan, editor of the Topeka State Journal, recalls a visit by him and Ed Howe....They had come by train to Cawker City and drove to Downs, spending most of their time in the Times office, then located in the old Times building on the west side of North Morgan Avenue. Mr. Howe, then editor of the Atchison Globe, sat at the editor's desk writing, or jotting down notes, but Mr. MacLennan delved into every phase of the production of a country paper on a Washington hand press. Nothing seemed too small to enlist his interest, and his keen appreciation of the effort made to issue a paper worth the reading with such scant equipment won the love of the entire force. -- Quincy R. Craft.

 

Harold W. Dwyer has leased his Tipton Times to Al ...
December 28, 1933, Downs News and Times (ID 312)

Harold W. Dwyer has leased his Tipton Times to Al Dopking commencing this week. Dopking has been city editor of the Clay Center Dispatch for the past three years and is a good writer. Dwyer has given the people of Tipton a good, newsy paper and patronage has been as good as could be expected in a town of that size.

The Smith County Pioneer displayed a great deal of enterprise last week in publishing a Christmas edition in four colors. It was a very pretty number of 12 pages, crammed full of local ads. No one but a printer can realize the enormous amount of work it takes to print an edition like that.

A newspaper writer recently met Ed Chapman, popular editorial writer for the Topeka State Journal, and upon his return home referred to the rotund writer as a 250-pounder. My, my, how that man has fallen away since last we saw him.

 

Attention, Charlie Utt, Norm Nixon and a half doze ...
January 25, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 313)

Attention, Charlie Utt, Norm Nixon and a half dozen or so of you other "comedians" about town who have been in the habit of coming into our office and on rare occasions (when the floor has been swept) stomping your feet, jumping up and down and remarking: "Well, I never would have thought it, but there really is a floor in this building!" We dare you to come in now; in fact, we want you to come in and look around and stomp your hooves. We want to prove to you beyond doubt that there always has been a floor in the building, and not a layer of papers laid to walk upon. The past week has seen the floor swept from stem to stern (or words to that effect) and, believe it or not, a portion of the old flooring replaced with new. (Our invitation expires at the end of this week, because we don't intend to sweep again until next July, when we'll slick everything up in preparation for the city's birthday....)

 

The Beloit Gazette and the Beloit Daily Call, whic ...
February 15, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 314)

The Beloit Gazette and the Beloit Daily Call, which have controlled the county printing in Mitchell County for many years, received a jolt last week when the county commissioners awarded the work to the Cawker City Ledger, the Glen Elder Sentinel, and the Simpson News....The Hunter Herald and the Tipton Times will continue to print the commissioners' proceedings as heretofore.

 

We are grievously disappointed and feel that we ha ...
February 22, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 315)

We are grievously disappointed and feel that we have not accomplished a great deal the past year. When St. Valentine's day rolls around, we eagerly look forward to the distribution of the city mail and the arrival of a comic valentine, coming from someone who feels that we have done him wrong, and he wants to get even by sending us a valentine. Strange as it may seem, we didn't receive a single one, and feel that we are slipping.

 

All this talk an editor is not appreciated is nons ...
March 1, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 316)

All this talk an editor is not appreciated is nonsense, says an exchange, in telling how an editor of a neighboring town was presented a handsome bouquet by a bunch of fellow citizens. On the same occasion, a quartet from the local church sang a few songs and a minister made a little talk. After the minister's talk, six husky men carried the popular editor from the house and placed him in a model 1934 plumed sedan, and the whole town formed a parade. The appreciative crowd returned to their homes, serene in the thought of having provided one bright day in the career of their local news purveyor -- even if they had to wait until he was dead to do it. -- Lakin Independent.

C. W. Connelly, one of our old-time subscribers on route three, Osborne,...while in the office asked for a back copy of the News and Times...."I keep a file of the News and Times," Mr. Connelly said, "and very much desire this copy to keep my files intact."

 

During the past week, the Kirwin Kansan has change ...
March 8, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 317)

During the past week, the Kirwin Kansan has changed ownership, Carl A. Gray purchasing the plant from Mrs. F. L. Platt. The Platts have edited the Kansan during 32 of its 45 years of publication. The Kansan is the oldest paper in Phillips County.

 

Harold Dwyer, one of the feature writers on the Be ...
March 22, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 318)

Harold Dwyer, one of the feature writers on the Beloit Gazette, gave our latchstring a yank Monday afternoon....

 

Business is beginning to look up around this offic ...
March 29, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 319)

Business is beginning to look up around this office. We have just received a contract from the Standard Oil Company for nearly 400 inches of advertising space....

During the past three weeks, we have had in our employ a young man, S. O. Carter, who is a first-class Intertype operator. Last Friday, he received a call from Salina, where he was promised a steady position. That evening we got into communication with Ira Meadows' son at Gaylord, and the young man put in an appearance Saturday morning. At the time, he informed us that his father was in very poor health, suffering from a bad heart ailment. At 4:00 o'clock in the afternoon, he received word that his father had passed away. We have known Ira Meadows for many years. He was a mighty fine man and will be sadly missed.

 

J. A. George of Bellaire, a representative of the ...
April 5, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 320)

J. A. George of Bellaire, a representative of the Topeka State Journal, was in Downs Monday soliciting subscriptions and getting acquainted with old subscribers of that paper.

S. O. Carter, who has been assisting in the mechanical department of this paper for a few weeks, and went to Salina for a few days' work on one of the papers there, is again tickling the ivories on our Intertype.

The launching of a new newspaper in the community is always of keen interest to newspapermen, so naturally the force of workers on the News and Times were greatly disappointed when we failed to receive a copy of the first issue of the Osborne Journal, which was published last week....We'll excuse Editor Saunders this time, but we are giving him due notice that, if he does not put us on the exchange list p.d.q., he is going to hear a roar that will not have to be relayed between here and Osborne.

 

The supreme court, sitting at Topeka last week, ha ...
April 12, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 321)

The supreme court, sitting at Topeka last week, handed down a decision favoring Editor Gomer Davies of Concordia in a libel suit in which William Sheridan attempted to seek recovery of $10,000 from the publisher following publication of an article in the Concordia Kansan, owned by Davies, commenting on Sheridan's dismissal as a deputy state oil inspector. Davies commented Sheridan had been "thrown out on his ear...no doubt for cause." The court's opinion, written by Justice W. E. Hutchison, held this did not constitute libel per se and said, "Literary rules, as well as fairness in the interpretation, require that we read with this sentence the first sentence of the next paragraph, which is: `Yes, political cause'."

The newspapermen of the county met at the courthouse last Thursday morning and agreed to a more equitable division of the county printing patronage. The plan...met with the full approval of the county commissioners....The Osborne County Farmer was chosen as the official county paper and will print all the official notices. The county job printing was awarded to the Alton Empire, and the printing of the primary and election ballots was awarded to the Downs News. The patronage was distributed this year on the basis of seniority of the papers. Lots were drawn for the designation of the official county paper next year. The Natoma Independent was the fortunate paper....For the third year, the Farmer and the Independent will be eliminated for consideration for the official county paper and the designation will fall to one of the other papers of the county....This year the legal notices will be paid for at the full legal rate, which is 80 cents per square, a reduction of 20 percent from last year's legal rate....

With the nice run of advertisements in this issue of the News and Times, we are reminded of the good old days of but a few years ago.

 

Sixty-one newspapers were represented at the meeti ...
April 19, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 322)

Sixty-one newspapers were represented at the meeting of the Sixth District Editorial Association at the Avenue House in Beloit Sunday afternoon. It was decided to hold the fall meeting at Russell. Following a most interesting and instructive all-day session, the following officers were elected for the ensuing year: C. W. Hamilton of the Stockton Record, president; A. A. Gillispie of the St. Francis Herald, vice-president; Frank Hall of the Hill City Times, secretary-treasurer.

 

The News and Times came in for a little word of pr ...
May 10, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 323)

The News and Times came in for a little word of praise last week from the pen of F.E.C., who writes a column...in the Kansas Industrialist, official Kansas State College newspaper...: "W. H. Ransom prints one of the cleanest newspapers in Kansas, the Downs News. Maxine (Ransom) Rice, '25, is the daughter of Mr. Ransom. Dan McKay has been associate editor of the News for 12 years, and Mr. Ransom has been editor and owner 29 years. Between the two of them, they get out one of the finest small-town papers in the state. They understand machinery too, because their Linotype and their presses seem to do perfect work. Incidentally, the News office is one of the neatest shops that you'll run across....Mr. Ransom says national advertising has been a little better this spring."

 

The class in journalism called today, and complime ...
May 24, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 324)

The class in journalism called today, and complimented us by asking us to make a few remarks. We said: 'Young ladies and gentlemen, when you become active in the field of journalism, have high ideals. Write learned editorials. Guide the people. But, for the love of Mike, realize that paid locals are vital, and a good bill collector is the most essential member of the staff. I thank yuh'. --Snort Brown.

 

According to the Beloit Daily Call of June 8, the ...
June 14, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 325)

According to the Beloit Daily Call of June 8, the Osborne Journal is now in the hands of L. C. Spence, editor of the Cawker City Ledger. The Calls says that Robert Sanders, who launched the paper a short time ago, has announced the sale. Mr. Sanders sold the paper a couple of weeks ago to H. M. Kurtz, editor of the Alton Empire, and last week Kurtz released his interests in the plant to Spence.

 

We'll probably get shot when the big boss gets hom ...
June 28, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 326)

We'll probably get shot when the big boss gets home and discovers what we have done to his front page this week. But we just couldn't resist the temptation to do something different.. By the way, how do you like having your paper turned inside out and the local page yanked from the center of the paper and given front page prominence? (The front contained only local items without headlines.)

 

What might have been a disastrous fire was prevent ...
July 5, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 327)

What might have been a disastrous fire was prevented in this office early Sunday morning by the watchfulness of Fred Wire, night watchman. In passing the office in his rounds, Fred noticed a blaze under the Intertype machine. Gaining access to the office through a rear door, Fred saw that a gas pipe had sprung a leak and had ignited from the gas burner on the machine. Unable to extinguish the blaze and also unable to locate the gas cutoff, he called the editors and the blaze was stopped when the gas was turned off. Operations on the machine were suspended for a half day while temporary repairs were made. The extent of the damage to the Intertype may reach several hundred dollars.

George F. (Brooklyn Joe) Roddy, tourist printer, stopped off in Downs long enough last Friday morning to mooch two bits from our Intertype operator, then announced himself ready to hit the trail for Stockton, where, no doubt, he expected another touch. Joe claims to have seen 75 summers pass over his head and is just about the oldest printer out of captivity.

 

How many of our readers remember when the Downs Ce ...
July 26, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 328)

How many of our readers remember when the Downs Celebration committee announced that on homecoming night we would have a big public wedding and the bride and groom were residents of Burr Oak?...We are herewith printing a letter received this week from the bride: "Just got to thinking that tomorrow, the 24th will mark our 5th wedding anniversary....This fall, Howard plans to go to KU to further his education in journalism, while I remain here on the Herald. He has obtained a job in the printing plant at the university....--Ruth Rusco."...Shortly after Mr. and Mrs. Rusco were married, they purchased the Burr Oak Herald....

From the Washington Post...a letter written to his three sons by the late James Kerney, editor and publisher of the Trenton (N.J.) Times --

My Dear Sons: I am naturally much interested in the kind of things you write about. And yet I wonder if any of you realize the magnitude of the undertaking of preparing yourselves for the job of newspaper running....First, there is the making of the paper itself; the news and editorial departments. They require courage at the right time and charity at all times. You are always dealing with frail human nature, and your work is spread before the critical eye of the public every day. There is no place to hide....There is entirely too much disregard in most newspaper offices for the poor and uninfluential....The duty, first of all, is to give the public the actual news of what is happening, impartially and without bias....Back of the news should be the reputation of someone for outstanding honesty and courage to do the right, but to do it fairly and with a due regard for human weakness....The editorial end is the second line, and there not only fearlessness but a decent regard for others is essential....Always keep in mind that, in our business which covers every line of human endeavor, everything is grist for the mill....Always keep simple; never get high-hat; a pleasant word costs nothing and good manners cannot be put on for state occasions....Keep a sense of humor and be kind to everybody....Be affable to "damphools" who think they are important; you never can tell where and when they can do you a good turn. Nobody is really of much importance because the whole life of the greatest man is brief. Always keep in mind that life is too short for you to be small....The more kind things you do, the happier you will be. The real business of a newspaper is protecting the public from outrages, from politicians and rich high-binders, who live as smug leaders of the community while they lift your watch....

 

Editor J. E. Kissell and family headed a large del ...
August 2, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 329)

Editor J. E. Kissell and family headed a large delegation of Portisites to Downs Saturday evening to assist in the big annual celebration, J. E. having a pretty tough break of late,...injuring the back of his right hand on a nail, the nail ripping across the hand and cutting a long, ugly wound that required 13 stitches. He...says he has been experiencing no end of trouble in operating his Linotype and making up his newspaper.

 

Bert Headley, editor of the Smith County Pioneer, ...
August 9, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 330)

Bert Headley, editor of the Smith County Pioneer, has long held our admiration and in our humble eyes is one of the most brilliant writers in western Kansas. During recent years, he has done a great deal of traveling and while on his jaunts furnishes his paper with writeups of the country which he is visiting. At the present time, he is in South Dakota....

 

At 4:00 o'clock last Wednesday afternoon, the ther ...
August 16, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 331)

At 4:00 o'clock last Wednesday afternoon, the thermometer in this office registered 114. On Thursday, at the same hour, the reading was 112. Wednesday our big job press was turning out the last pages of the new telephone directory....It was then discovered that the heat had become too intense for one of the rubber rollers, and it started melting almost as quickly as butter set in the sun. By the liberal application of some of Art Hull's "dexterity," the run was completed -- and so was the roller.

 

George W. Shook, 1435 Plass Avenue, pioneer Kansan ...
August 23, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 332)

George W. Shook, 1435 Plass Avenue, pioneer Kansan and prominent Republican editor, died in a Kansas City hospital yesterday....Shook for years was a Republican editor in northwest Kansas and was editor of the Jennings Echo. He was postmaster at Jennings 10 years, starting under the administration of President McKinley. He served as head doorkeeper in the House during several sessions of the legislature. He was assistant sergeant-at-arms or assistant doorkeeper at the last three Republican conventions. After selling his newspaper, Shook moved to Topeka and had made his home with his son, Stanley J. Shook, business manager of Strickler's Business College. Mr. Shook learned the printing trade at Downs and worked on the Downs Times for several years. Back in 1888, he and a partner founded the Jennings Echo, Mr. Shook disposing of his interests in the newspaper in 1915. The name then was changed to the Jennings Gazette. Mr. Shook then went into the real estate business and was a large Decatur County landowner.... -- Topeka Capital.

 

Ed Howe, sage of Potato Hill and veteran Kansas ed ...
August 30, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 333)

Ed Howe, sage of Potato Hill and veteran Kansas editor, voices his feelings regarding the New Deal in an interview published Monday in The Country Home, national farm journal. "I never liked the Roosevelt type of man," says the 81-year-old journalistic firebrand who retired over a year ago. "They are too much for show, too quick on the trigger for safety, too oozy with idealistic leadership. The antics of the present administration are the craziest I've ever seen....I do object to a lot of new thought politicians up in Washington taking wild, unnecessary risks in my name, sending me the bill, and demanding that I be 'idealistic' and 'constructive' about it....If there's any type of person I loathe and despise, it's the do-good woman...so busy running around with baskets for this worthless family and that one and organizing benefits that she can't find time to keep her own house clean. It looks to me as if we have a whole army of professional do-goods in Washington now, and a lot of them wear pants....It's all wrong. Any way the government tries to help the farmer it's a mistake. There are good farmers, and when you find them like that they're the finest people living, but, taking the farmer as a class, he's the greatest cry-baby in the world, always expecting to be held in someone's lap and rocked....To be shiftless, to fail to chase down enough dollars to take care of your obligations and to keep you in your old age, so you can die like a gentleman -- that's what's shameful. Every loafer will be a worse loafer all his life, and harder to handle, because of the encouragement being given him now. The mistake people have made from the beginning is to try to make 'materialist' an epithet. That's wrong. I know of no duty that is not recommended for profit. Materialism teaches us to be just and decent and polite and fair." At this point the interviewer gulped hard and said, "I believe in the New Deal." "How do you manage to swallow such rubbish?" snorted Old Ed.

 

Ralph Hemenway, publisher of the Minneapolis (Kan. ...
September 27, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 334)

Ralph Hemenway, publisher of the Minneapolis (Kan.) Messenger, and Ralph T. Baker of Topeka, secretary of the Kansas Press Association, were in Downs Friday making a neighborly call at the News office.

 

Fire of an unknown origin destroyed the plant of t ...
October 11, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 335)

Fire of an unknown origin destroyed the plant of the Cawker City Ledger at an early hour last Thursday morning, and two adjoining buildings also burned to the ground. The building in which the Ledger was housed belonged to the publisher, L. C. Spence, editor of the Osborne Journal. We understand that both the building and equipment were covered by insurance....Later: The subscription list of the Ledger was sold last Saturday to Perry Betz, editor of the Glen Elder Sentinel, and Laverne Krenkel, editor of the Simpson News. We understand that, for the time being, the Ledger will be printed in the office of the Glen Elder Sentinel.

The Democratic Party of the Sixth District received a shock the past week when F. W. Boyd, editor of the Phillipsburg Review and a lifelong Democrat, openly announced that he was going to support Governor Alf M. Landon (Republican) in the November election....Boyd has been one of the really big shots in the Democratic Party as far back as memory of man runneth. He was postmaster at Phillipsburg during the Wilson administration....At one time, he was a Democratic candidate for congress and came mighty close to winning the race....

 

Charles Wright, who has been employed on the Cawke ...
October 25, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 336)

Charles Wright, who has been employed on the Cawker City Ledger for some time past, was a visitor in our office and informed us that he had purchased the Tipton Times from Harold Dwyer. Wright is to take possession of the plant on November 1. Dwyer has owned and edited the Times for the past several years....

We are returning copy to an Osborne firm which had requested space for an advertisement in this issue of the News and Times. Ordinarily we would be glad to receive such advertising, but in this case we feel that it would be unfair to local merchants to accept it, due to the fact that Osborne papers have repeatedly refused to accept advertising of Downs firms. Osborne business firms cannot consistently expect to buy space in this paper when they bring pressure to bear upon their home paper to refuse space for Downs firms.

 

Last week's Portis Independent carried the startli ...
November 15, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 337)

Last week's Portis Independent carried the startling announcement that Editor J. E. Kissell is seriously considering the idea of discontinuing the publishing of the paper in that city....Times...are rapidly changing. It has not been so many years ago that Portis was looked upon as one of the leading trade centers in the Solomon Valley. then a gradual change in conditions began. The horse and buggy days were forgotten. Fine highways were beginning to take the place of wagon roads....At one time, Portis boasted of several high-class mercantile establishments, but one by one they disappeared....These conditions not only made themselves manifest in Portis, but also existed in all other small towns so situated the country over. One of the business institutions in these small towns to suffer has been the local newspaper. Merchants leaving naturally meant less patronage, and less profits for the newspaper. The following is the announcement made by Mr. Kissell last week: "...There are various reasons, one of which is that we do not think folks care much about the small-town newspaper any more. Perhaps the biggest reason is the financial return for the amount of work involved. Many businessmen do not spend a dime a year with the small-town paper....This paper has some four thousand dollars and more of unpaid subscriptions which at this time do not look to be worth par value....It costs this paper nearly as much to operate now as it ever did. This statement is made as a matter of news -- and also as a matter of fact."

F. W. Arnold, editor of the Vermillion Times, was a Downs visitor Monday, favoring this office with a pleasant call. Mr. Arnold was register of deeds of Osborne County from 1903 to 1908....

 

A Topeka man, writing to the Kansas City Star, sta ...
December 13, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 338)

A Topeka man, writing to the Kansas City Star, states that William Allen White has no political prestige in Kansas. But William can write a magazine article about his lack of political prestige and make $10,000 out of it. William is one man who does well without political prestige.

 

Some time ago we bid on a job of printing for a me ...
December 27, 1934, Downs News and Times (ID 339)

Some time ago we bid on a job of printing for a merchant, received the order, and made a little profit. Now we are in the market for a new pair of shoes and a hat and would like to receive bids from those selling such articles. As the merchant said: "We want to be fair to all." -- A. V. Butcher.

 

Daddy Oliver retires -- This office received an an ...
January 10, 1935, Downs News and Times (ID 340)

Daddy Oliver retires -- This office received an announcement this week from the Central Topeka Paper Company that J. W. Oliver had been retired after 25 years of active service with that firm. Downs businessmen upon whom he called, and the News and Times force particularly, will miss the friendly greetings of this splendid old gentleman. On October 16, he reached his 86th year and spent the day "on the road" as usual....This office has purchased practically all of its paper stock through "Daddy" ever since he started on the road for the Topeka firm and we've always found him a square shooter and a good friend.

 

Dick Edwards, who was employed on the mechanical f ...
January 24, 1935, Downs News and Times (ID 341)

Dick Edwards, who was employed on the mechanical force of the News and Times several years ago, was an early Saturday morning visitor....Dick, since leaving Downs, has covered a great deal of country, editing newspapers in Colorado, Arkansas, Tennessee, Mississippi and other places. He was en route to Goodland, where he had a position awaiting him.

 

The Kansas City Times on Friday carried a photo of ...
April 11, 1935, Downs News and Times (ID 342)

The Kansas City Times on Friday carried a photo of A. W. Robinson, publisher of the LaCrosse Republican, it being his 84th birthday. The veteran publisher for a number of years published the Cawker City Ledger, leaving there in 1907 when he bought the Republican. Associated with him are his son, L. L. Robinson, and his grandson, L. L. Robinson, Jr. The elder Robinson started his newspaper career at the age of 10 and has been engaged in it continuously.

 

Ed Howe, the Kansas apostle of conservatism, was 8 ...
May 9, 1935, Downs News and Times (ID 343)

Ed Howe, the Kansas apostle of conservatism, was 82 years old last Friday and celebrated the event in Miami, Fla., where he is wintering.

 

John Peach, editor of the Cawker City News, has pu ...
June 6, 1935, Downs News and Times (ID 344)

John Peach, editor of the Cawker City News, has purchased the Norton Champion and will take charge within the next 10 days.

 

A beautiful new sign adorns the front of this offi ...
August 1, 1935, Downs News and Times (ID 345)

A beautiful new sign adorns the front of this office. It is 15 feet long and replaces the large sign that has been in use more than 20 years. The sign contains three words, "The Downs News," in large raised letters of white on blue background....It is the work of Walt Reid.

We acknowledge a very pleasant call from E. J. Garner, editor of Publicity at Wichita, last Friday afternoon.

Editor Hart of the Lebanon Times was a brief but pleasant caller at our office last Friday.

 

Our trip to Downs, by E. J. Garner -- The editor o ...
August 8, 1935, Downs News and Times (ID 346)

Our trip to Downs, by E. J. Garner -- The editor of Publicity took a few days off since last issue and over the weekend had the pleasure of meeting and greeting old friends, acquaintances and former neighbors at Downs. More than 40 years had elapsed since we had met many of our schoolmates, but at that we got a real kick out of the visit. While this, the 56th anniversary of the town, was well attended, the spirit of revelry as displayed in former years was woefully lacking...."

 

J. W. "Dad" Oliver, 87, widely known by newspaper ...
October 10, 1935, Downs News and Times (ID 347)

J. W. "Dad" Oliver, 87, widely known by newspaper and businessmen in central and northwest Kansas, died Thursday night of last week in a hospital at Watsonville, Calif. Mr. Oliver had been a traveling salesman for more than 60 years. At the age of 60, he moved to Salina and became a salesman for the Central Topeka Paper Company. He continued to travel as a salesman until last June...."Daddy" Oliver was one of the finest men we have ever known....He was always pleasant and congenial and accommodating almost to a fault.

 

The address of Roy Bailey, editor of the Salina Da ...
October 24, 1935, Downs News and Times (ID 348)

The address of Roy Bailey, editor of the Salina Daily Journal, before the Rotary Club Tuesday evening proved to be a real treat.....Much of his talk was confined to sound and practical advice to the club in connection to its usefulness to the community. He had a good story to illustrate practically every statement....

 

The editor of this paper has been appointed local ...
November 21, 1935, Downs News and Times (ID 349)

The editor of this paper has been appointed local chairman for Downs and community of the Will Rogers Memorial Fund and authorized to receive contributions....

 

The Country paper. I am the oldest business in tow ...
November 28, 1935, Downs News and Times (ID 350)

The Country paper. I am the oldest business in town; Old mills have been abandoned, I persist. Old houses, old hotels of great renown, Have gone their ways but I, I still exist; Upon my inky pages there appears, The story of this place throughout the years. I told of truth and war, of girls who wed, Of rich and poor alike, of thief and sage, And how they lived, though most of them are dead, While ageless I am of the presage; Man's varied acts have always been my text -- What happened long ago and what comes next. Though I am old, in truth I still can say, Nothing can be so nearly up-to-date; Both yesterdays and morrows I survey -- Of ne'er-do-wells and those of high estate. I lived because I served, and still shall live. Because of all I have, to all I give! -- Author unknown.

 

Editor L. C. Spence of the Osborne Journal was a b ...
December 12, 1935, Downs News and Times (ID 351)

Editor L. C. Spence of the Osborne Journal was a brief caller at our office.

 

A broken cog on a wheel of our cylinder press dela ...
December 19, 1935, Downs News and Times (ID 352)

A broken cog on a wheel of our cylinder press delayed operations for a while this week....We took our troubles to Bill Ruth...who replaced the missing cog in jig time.

 

Last week, due to a breakdown in the press room, t ...
December 26, 1935, Downs News and Times (ID 353)

Last week, due to a breakdown in the press room, the News and Times failed to go to press at the usual hour Wednesday afternoon. Starting the press shortly before the noon hour, about one-third of the papers were run through the press when the break occurred. Our old standby, W. P. Ruth, was called in and it was long after the evening lunch hour before the wheels were started running again. This was the first time in three or four years that the paper has failed to go into the mail later than 5:00 o'clock on Wednesday evening.

 

This paper is in receipt of a full-page likeness o ...
January 23, 1936, Downs News and Times (ID 354)

This paper is in receipt of a full-page likeness of Roy Bailey of the Salina Journal. It was sent out by the Wichita Eagle Engraving Service. Under his name appears this notation: "Another great man with a modest complex....Mr. Bailey thinks the people of his territory have been patient and long suffering....He is an excellent businessman and enjoys a wide acquaintance throughout his city and state." And this might have been added: He would make Kansas a mighty good governor.

 

Charles H. Trapp, 72, editor of the Pink Rag and v ...
February 20, 1936, Downs News and Times (ID 355)

Charles H. Trapp, 72, editor of the Pink Rag and veteran editor of Topeka, died last Monday morning at his home in that city....He first worked in the coal mines at Leavenworth. Later he entered the printing business on the Leavenworth Times. After learning the trade, he became an itinerant printer and worked on various newspapers. He arrived in Topeka on a bicycle in 1900 and began working in the state printing plant. Later he went into business for himself and in 1907 started the publication of the Pink Rag. Charley Trapp was a fearless writer and politicians the state over were often made to feel the strength of his pen.

That interesting little paper, the Pink Rag, published at Topeka, comes to our desk this week minus the splendid editorials by its editor, Chas. H. Trapp....The Pink Rag heads the list for reader interest among our exchanges.

 

The Osborne Empire-Journal published a splendid Ea ...
April 9, 1936, Downs News and Times (ID 356)

The Osborne Empire-Journal published a splendid Easter edition. The paper was in the form of a 20-page edition....We congratulate Kurtz and Meadows on the excellent showing they are making with their new paper in the county seat.

 

S. O. Carter, who has been employed on the News an ...
April 16, 1936, Downs News and Times (ID 357)

S. O. Carter, who has been employed on the News and Times as Intertype operator for more than two years, will sever his connections with the paper this week. He has secured a more remunerative position on the Salina Journal. Sam is a first-class operator and a most congenial worker.

 

Harry L. Clark, who formerly operated the Blue Rib ...
April 23, 1936, Downs News and Times (ID 358)

Harry L. Clark, who formerly operated the Blue Ribbon Bakery in this city and later entered the newspaper business, has sold his newspaper at Filer, Idaho....Harry is retiring largely because of his health....He will continue to reside at Filer and for a time endeavor to catch up on his trout fishing.

 

Lynn Brodrick, Marysville publisher and national c ...
April 30, 1936, Downs News and Times (ID 359)

Lynn Brodrick, Marysville publisher and national committeeman for Kansas, announced definitely he would not be a candidate for governor. Democrats had placed great hopes in Brodrick.

Eighteen cases of eggs found their way to the News and Times office last Saturday....There are 30 dozen eggs to the case, so the 18 cases represent 540 dozen or 6,480 eggs. Nearly 50 farmers took advantage of our offer to accept eggs on subscription at the rate of 25 cents per dozen. This was about eight cents above market price on that day. Farmers started unloading eggs at the office before 8:00 o'clock in the morning....The eggs average about 12 dozen to the farmer, although several brought in a full case. The total number advanced the subscriptions of farmers in the vicinity approximately 67 years....The office force is still suffering with "kinks" in their backs from transferring eggs into the cases....

 

The News editor enjoyed a pleasant visit with Mr. ...
June 4, 1936, Downs News and Times (ID 360)

The News editor enjoyed a pleasant visit with Mr. and Mrs. Walt Smith of Kansas City, Kan., on Memorial Day. Twenty-five years ago Walt was associated with R. T. Weld in publishing the Downs Times....Walt pulled out some 25 years ago to locate in Herington as editor of the Times. A few years later he went to Kansas City to accept a position as ticket agent with the Rock Island Railroad. A few years ago he was promoted to the consolidated ticket office at 914 North 6th Street, where he represents all lines from the union station at Kansas City, Mo....

 

Don't tell Editor Krenkle of the Cawker City Ledge ...
June 11, 1936, Downs News and Times (ID 361)

Don't tell Editor Krenkle of the Cawker City Ledger that the life of an editor is a bed of roses. An article in the Ledger was not to the liking of one of his subscribers and the latter took a sock at the editorial jaw, inflicting wounds that required the services of a physician.

 

If you are looking for someone on whom to pour a l ...
July 23, 1936, Downs News and Times (ID 362)

If you are looking for someone on whom to pour a little sympathy or pity, look no further than the force in the News and Times office this week. Here we are all rarin' to go out on the White Way and cut didoes with the multitudes of pleasure-seekers at the annual celebration, but no, 'tis ballot printing time and the whole force, from the editor down to the devil, is cooped up here in the print shop printing the ballots that you may go to the polls on August 4th and vote for your favorite candidate....

Mrs. Modena Acre of Quinter recently purchased the Moreland Monitor from Fred Naylor.

 

C. W. Hamilton, editor of the Rooks County Record ...
November 12, 1936, Downs News and Times (ID 363)

C. W. Hamilton, editor of the Rooks County Record at Stockton, pulled our latchstring Tuesday. Mr. Hamilton wasn't feeling any too jubilant over the results of the late election, but was pleased that his good friend Frank Carlson caught the fancy of the voters and was returned to congress....Mr. Hamilton performed the duties of secretary to Mr. Carlson during the past two years, and wrote an interesting column for the papers of the district during the time congress was in session.

 

A dispatch to the Topeka Daily Capital from Norton ...
November 26, 1936, Downs News and Times (ID 364)

A dispatch to the Topeka Daily Capital from Norton on Nov. 22: A. L. Drummond, 71, Norton attorney, former minister and newspaperman and resident of Norton for 46 years died today after several weeks' illness of pernicious anemia and a year of failing health. He came to Kansas with his father, A. C. Drummond, and family in 1880 and located at Portis, where the elder Drummond published the newspaper. Four years later, young Drummond came by rail to Edmond and overland to Norton, his home since with the exception of six years at Downs and Smith Center in the ministry of the Christian church, for which he also was pastor here for several years. Shortly after his arrival here, he was employed by the late J. W. Conway on the Weekly Champion but later had his own newspaper. During the past quarter century, Mr. Drummond has held several public offices, including probate judge, representative in the 1914 Legislature, county attorney, and mayor of the town.

 

Spending their New Year birthday together, the 73- ...
January 7, 1937, Downs News and Times (ID 365)

Spending their New Year birthday together, the 73-year-old twin brothers, J. E. and E. J. Garner, will observe a childhood custom they have been unable to keep in recent years. E. J. Garner is editor of the Wichita newspaper Publicity. J. E. comes for the occasion from Mulhall, Okla., where he has operated a farm for 35 years. The twins were born near Toledo, Iowa, on January 1, 1864....In 1874, when they were 10 years old, they came with their parents to Osborne County near where Downs is now located....They made the trip in covered wagons, spending four weeks on the way, being greatly delayed because rain fell every day of the journey....E. J. recalled that he had wanted to be a printer and newspaperman ever since he could read. His first chance came when, at 17, he acted as country correspondent for the local newspaper, the Downs Times, and soon after was hired as an apprentice typesetter. He has been in the business ever since....E. J. started, owned and operated the first newspaper in Almena. J. E. went into Oklahoma long before it became a state to homestead a plot of ground.... -- Publicity (with picture).

 

Many readers...will remember a young man who was e ...
February 11, 1937, Downs News and Times (ID 366)

Many readers...will remember a young man who was employed in the mechanical department...six or eight years ago, the young man being Jimmie Seger. After leaving Downs, Jimmie went back to his home state, Oklahoma, where he entered college. Later he became affiliated with a newspaper at Crescent, Okla....During the past three or four years, he has held down the position of advertising manager on the Guthrie State Register. Last week a letter was received...stating he had purchased a half interest in his father's newspaper at Geary, Okla....

 

Ray Francis, recently employed on the Hunter Heral ...
March 18, 1937, Downs News and Times (ID 367)

Ray Francis, recently employed on the Hunter Herald, is now manipulating the keys on the News and Times Intertype.

 

J. E. Kissell, editor of the Portis Independent, w ...
May 20, 1937, Downs News and Times (ID 368)

J. E. Kissell, editor of the Portis Independent, was attacked by an irate citizen of that town last Friday evening, and emerged with a black eye and cuts on his face and head. Editor Kissell has been outspoken in opposition to the granting of a beer license in Portis, and this possibly was the reason for the attack which appears to have been most uncalled for. Or possibly the attack was provoked because Kissell, as chairman of the school board, recently signed a warrant against the irate citizen for distributing obscene literature to Portis school children. The following account of the attack is from the pen of Editor Kissell:

"Last Friday evening, the 14th, about dusk, I went to the Nichols station at the north edge of town...to convey to him some suggestions regarding a beer license which he had applied for. I really went as city clerk but was not required to go absolutely and it was as much a favor to him as anything else that I went. I had told him I would keep him posted on developments and, as he had no phone, I went out. I had previously talked to him in my office and had no idea he would get rough. We talked about it just a short time in his station and had no particular argument there. As I started out, he also came out and then he apparently became enraged and declared people had it in for him and that I did and also he blamed me for things I had no part in. He was just mad at everyone in general and I think would have had a run-in with most any official under the same circumstances. I told him he was his own worst enemy and, as I turned to get in the car, something hit me along the side of head and face. I was completely dazed and I just remember a hard lick on top of my head. I guess I was clear out, so to speak, for a few moments and he must have hit me at least several very hard blows and possibly with something more than his fists, although I cannot say as to that, except my condition would not appear to be such as would come from fists. There was an inch cut on my head that bled profusely and one side of my face and head is still swollen and black, also one eye black and there is a bad spot on one arm which appears to have been jumped on with the heel of a shoe. I was able to drive downtown and have been working since and now have no apparent serious effects, unless an eye is hurt some." Nichols was arrested Saturday and gave bond.

 

More worries and responsibilities were heaped upon ...
June 3, 1937, Downs News and Times (ID 369)

More worries and responsibilities were heaped upon Editor Emmett Kissell of the Portis Independent when he was made defendant in an $8,000 libel suit last Monday. VanTilburg, operator of a filling station and eating house on the north edge of Portis and plaintiff in the action, charges that the Portis editor made malicious and libelous statements in an article published a few weeks ago. The case was filed in the district court of Osborne County by Attorney Ralph Noah of Beloit, legal representative of VanTilburg. -- Smith County Pioneer.

 

Editor Perry Betz of the Glen Elder Sentinel ran i ...
July 29, 1937, Downs News and Times (ID 370)

Editor Perry Betz of the Glen Elder Sentinel ran into a bit of Linotype trouble last week, and Friday was compelled to step outside his own workshop to have the tail end run of copy put into type form. Perry knew right where to go to get the work done -- the News and Times office in Downs -- and our machine operator soon had the frown eased from his brow and had him hitting the homeward road with enough straight matter set to fill his columns.

 

Editor R. M. Rees and family of Hunter were among ...
August 5, 1937, Downs News and Times (ID 371)

Editor R. M. Rees and family of Hunter were among the Hunterites enjoying the Downs Celebration.

 

Lee Meadows last week sold his interest in the Osb ...
August 12, 1937, Downs News and Times (ID 372)

Lee Meadows last week sold his interest in the Osborne Empire-Journal to his partner, Byron L. George, who now has full control of the paper. Lee is a top-notch newspaperman....A rock-bound and lifelong Republican, Lee has been attempting to write Democratic editorials and the result has been as ludicrous as might be expected....We are not acquainted with Lee's successor, "Bye" George, but in the event he is a "chip off the old block" he has the makin's of a real newspaperman. His father, Emmett D. George, whom the writer has known intimately for more than 30 years, was a successful newspaperman for many years and a brilliant writer.

 

Your associate editor enjoyed a brief visit last S ...
September 23, 1937, Downs News and Times (ID 373)

Your associate editor enjoyed a brief visit last Sunday afternoon with L. E. Burkholder and Herschel C. Logan, both employees of the Consolidated Printing and Stationery Company of Salina. The former is one of the finest all-around printers in this section of the state, and the latter is art director for this well-known printing establishment. Mr. Logan...is one of the charter members of the Prairie Print Makers and by invitation became an active member in the Print Makers Society of California. His art activity has been centered in the Middle West, where he is frequently referred to as "The Prairie Woodcutter." Mr. Logan left with us a few samples of his work, pictures of typical Kansas scenes done in wood.

 

Edgar Watson Howe, internationally known author, p ...
October 7, 1937, Downs News and Times (ID 374)

Edgar Watson Howe, internationally known author, paragrapher and philosopher, died in his home in Atchison last Sunday morning....Mr. Howe was 84 years of age. He founded the Atchison Daily Globe December 8, 1877. He retired as publisher and editor of the Globe in 1911 and soon after established a publication, E. W. Howe's Monthly, the paid circulation of which took it to nearly every country on this earth. Mrs. Clara Howe, wife of E. W. Howe, died at Westport, Conn., on Wednesday of last week.

 

Effective January 1, newsprint will enter the nobi ...
November 25, 1937, Downs News and Times (ID 375)

Effective January 1, newsprint will enter the nobility of paperdom. On that date it advances to the tune of about 20 percent. It will cost the country publisher approximately $14 per ton more than he is now paying. Anyone attempting to publish and eight-page paper for less than $2 per year will find the going pretty hard from now on.

 

This paper last week had H. A. Meibergen offering ...
December 9, 1937, Downs News and Times (ID 376)

This paper last week had H. A. Meibergen offering "all-wood" sweaters at close-out prices, when he intended to advertise "all-wool" sweaters....Some thirty years ago, this paper made an error in type an inch high that was talked about for months afterward. We left the letter "r" out of the word shirts.

 

Charley Wright, editor of the Tipton Times, was a ...
December 30, 1937, Downs News and Times (ID 377)

Charley Wright, editor of the Tipton Times, was a brief caller at our office.

J. Howard Rusco, editor and owner of the Logan Republican, was a visitor at this office between trains Monday morning. Mr. Rusco, who is a senior at Kansas University, was en route to Logan to get out the next issue of the paper. Francis Moore, former partner of Mr. Rusco and who had agreed to remain at the helm on the paper until Rusco graduated next spring, was critically injured at Lawrence Sunday. He slipped on the icy walk, striking on his head in the fall. He was still unconscious when Rusco left him at Lawrence. If his condition does not improve, Rusco will probably remain at Logan and finish his school work at some future date. Mr. Rusco was married in Downs, he and his bride being the first couple to be married at the public weddings held on the celebration grounds.

 

Our office windows were washed Monday of last week ...
January 20, 1938, Downs News and Times (ID 378)

Our office windows were washed Monday of last week. The Missus feared that we might not be able to see the New Year come in. -- Chetopa Advance-Clipper.

 

...Some predict that the small town and the small ...
January 27, 1938, Downs News and Times (ID 379)

...Some predict that the small town and the small newspapers are doomed to an early death. This does not seem possible of the News and Times, and its home town,...neither of which appear to need the services of a doctor at this time....

 

The fourth annual Kansas Day banquet...was one of ...
February 3, 1938, Downs News and Times (ID 380)

The fourth annual Kansas Day banquet...was one of the most successful affairs of its kind ever held in Downs....Roy Bailey, editor of the Salina Daily Journal, the speaker, delivered one of the finest talks that was ever heard before a Downs audience. He painted a vivid picture of the early period of Kansas beginning with the expedition under the Spaniard leader, Coronado,...who came in search of the "Seven Cities of Gold."...

 

Harold Dwyer, the man who writes "U.S. 24 Highway ...
March 17, 1938, Downs News and Times (ID 381)

Harold Dwyer, the man who writes "U.S. 24 Highway Notes," paid our office a brief but friendly call. Harold is an ex-newspaperman, having held positions with the Cawker City, Beloit, Tipton and Clay Center newspapers.

 

For the second time in its history, the News and T ...
April 7, 1938, Downs News and Times (ID 382)

For the second time in its history, the News and Times this week was designated as the official county paper by the board of county commissioners....The paper will be compensated at the rate of 80 percent of the legal rate. The Osborne County Farmer was awarded the contract for the county job printing, and the Natoma Independent was awarded the contract for printing the ballots for the primary and fall elections. All the county ballots have been printed by the News and Times during the past four years....

 

Harry Kurtz, for several years editor of the Alton ...
May 5, 1938, Downs News and Times (ID 383)

Harry Kurtz, for several years editor of the Alton Empire, and then later editor of the Osborne Empire-Journal, has purchased a newspaper plant at Ault, Colo.

 

Gomer Davies, veteran editor of the Concordia Kans ...
June 16, 1938, Downs News and Times (ID 384)

Gomer Davies, veteran editor of the Concordia Kansan, addressed the Rotary Club Tuesday evening. In his characteristic style, he berated John L. Lewis, CIO labor leader, branding him as "a dangerous man who is the greatest menace to the American Constitution since the Civil War, and who favors the establishment of dictatorship in this country." Mr. Davies has been personally acquainted with Mr. Lewis for many years and has great admiration for him as a man, but does not agree with his policies....

 

One step won't take you very far -- you've got to ...
July 28, 1938, Downs News and Times (ID 385)

One step won't take you very far -- you've got to keep on walking; one word won't tell folks who you are -- you've got to keep on talking; one inch won't make you very tall -- you've got to keep on growing; one little ad won't do it all -- you've got to keep them going. -- Exchange.

An editor in a small town in the Indian territory took a several days' vacation while a friend explained that the society item reading "Two young men went with their girls to attend the church social and as soon as they left, the girls got drunk," should have had the comma placed after "girls."

 

Fifty-nine years of married life...were brought to ...
September 8, 1938, Downs News and Times (ID 386)

Fifty-nine years of married life...were brought to a close when Mrs. Gomer Davies, wife of the publisher of the weekly Concordia Kansan, died...Aug. 31....She was in her 78th year.

 

While in Downs last week, the proprietor of the Do ...
October 6, 1938, Downs News and Times (ID 387)

While in Downs last week, the proprietor of the Downs News, Wm. Ransom, took this writer in hand and led him directly to the office of the News, or what used to be the News. Now it has a sort of KC Star appearance and everything is right on tap and at the finger's end. Dan McKay was at the Oliver reeling out copy by the yard and Ray Francis was converting it into reading by the galley. The News shop has been overhauled from top to bottom....We'd almost like to go down and work a week or two in the News office. -- Portis Independent.

 

Harold Dwyer, editor of the Woodston Argus, was a ...
November 10, 1938, Downs News and Times (ID 388)

Harold Dwyer, editor of the Woodston Argus, was a business visitor in Downs.

 

Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Boyd, editors of the Phillips C ...
November 17, 1938, Downs News and Times (ID 389)

Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Boyd, editors of the Phillips County Review, visited briefly with Downs friends last Saturday morning. They had attended the editorial convention in Belleville the previous evening....

 

It is hard for a poor editor to please 'em all. A ...
November 24, 1938, Downs News and Times (ID 390)

It is hard for a poor editor to please 'em all. A Kansas widow is suing a paper for saying in an obituary that her husband went to a happier home. -- A. V. Butcher.

For a few minutes Last Thursday morning, our office resembled the meeting place of a convention of newspaper men. F. W. and McDill Boyd of the Phillips County Review stopped in to say howdy while en route to Kansas City. While they were in the office, in popped Richard Mann of the Osborne Farmer. Then, when the morning train pulled in, Chas. Mann of the Osborne Farmer stepped in for a few moments to chat with us....

 

From the daily press we learn that Emmett George o ...
December 29, 1938, Downs News and Times (ID 391)

From the daily press we learn that Emmett George of Topeka, father of Bryon George, editor of the Osborne Empire-Journal, was critically injured in an automobile accident at Independence, Kan. Friday night....

 

There came to our exchange desk last week a copy o ...
January 19, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 392)

There came to our exchange desk last week a copy of the Franklin County (Neb.) Sentinel and we were made acquainted with the fact that, with the issue of January 5, Mr. and Mrs. Riley Smith had become sole owners and editors of the paper....Six or seven years ago, Mr. and Mrs. Smith came out from Manhattan, where they had both been employed on a newspaper for some time, and Mr. Smith accepted a position with us....

 

From history of Rose Valley school: Cornelia Craft ...
January 26, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 393)

From history of Rose Valley school: Cornelia Craft gave up her teaching pursuits soon after finishing in our district and joined her father, the late E. D. Craft, in newspaper work, along with her brother Quincy....While in this work she met and married Del Cox....A couple of years after their marriage, they purchased the E. D. Craft homestead, where they make their home....

Editor Harold Beason of the Smith County Review and his right-hand man, Frazier Brown, motored down from Smith Center...to do a bit of checking up on some machinery which they had recently installed in their shop, and which wasn't functioning properly....

Its policy prohibiting the publishing of beer or liquor ads, this paper this week is forced to refuse a proffered schedule of beer advertising.

 

This week the News and Times enters its 61st year ...
February 2, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 394)

This week the News and Times enters its 61st year of existence in Downs....The News entered the newspaper field in December 1902 with Rev. Gardner as its editor. The paper was purchased by C. E. Mann and W. H. Ransom on April 1st, 1905, and continued under this management for 15 years. Since 1920, when Mr. Mann became the editor of the Osborne County Farmer, the paper has continued under its present management. The present editor's name (W. H. Ransom) has appeared on the masthead for nearly 34 years....

 

Homer E. Clark, 72 years of age, former editor of ...
March 9, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 395)

Homer E. Clark, 72 years of age, former editor of the Republic City News, died at a Denver hospital on February 23....

 

A Central Branch editor last week picked up a Winc ...
March 16, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 396)

A Central Branch editor last week picked up a Winchester rifle which a friend had left at the office...and started up the street to deliver it to the owner. The first delinquent subscriber he met called him to one side and insisted upon paying his back subscription. A little further on, another man who had been owing a bill for 10 years liquidated the obligation. Three merchants gave him copy for display advertising, although they had never believed it paid to advertise in the paper before. When he got back, he found a farmer waiting to deliver a load of hay, another with 10 bushels of potatoes, another with 15 bushels of corn. That night a wagon load of wood and a barrel of apples were left at his home. -- Kansas City Star.

 

By W. F. Hughes in the Rooks County Record:: We we ...
April 13, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 397)

By W. F. Hughes in the Rooks County Record:

We were rummaging around among the old newspapers of the State Historical Society in Topeka a few months ago and discovered the first Rooks County Record ever published. The date was December 6, 1879. We read the introductory remarks of the editor, W. L. Chambers, then a young man, ambitious for the future...It has been a most valuable asset to not only Rooks but adjoining counties...and still takes its place among the leading weeklies of Kansas....For more than 40 years, Mr. Chambers continued as its editor and publisher, with largely one view in mind, the upbuilding of the town and community....He came into Stockton, according to a little pamphlet published in 1919, "Forty Years in Stockton," on a tri-weekly stage from Bloomington, Neb., arriving Thanksgiving Day in 1879. The stage was a two-seated surrey without top, and behind a light team of ponies he came the 65 miles in a drenching rain. Wet to the skin, he knocked at the door of the old log hotel....Within this famous Joe McNulty hostelry, he found a number of jolly boarders....He especially mentions the old log hotel, famous over a large territory as the home of Mrs. Joe McNulty's huge steaks and generous flapjacks. Spending his first night in Stockton at the old log hotel, he writes: "The remembrance of my first night in Stockton will always stay with me. About a dozen of us slept on the floor above, the beds being so close together it was difficult to pass down the center, stumbling over the piles of clothing and footwear."...The Record office was on the corner now occupied by the Stockton Lumber Company....Two or three days after his arrival, the printing press for the Record, which had been purchased in Chicago by a partner of Mr. Chambers, a Mr. McBreen, arrived in Osborne, the nearest railroad point. How to get it to Stockton was the next question. It finally reached Stockton in a wagon drawn by a pair of mules owned by Joe McNulty. There were no bridges in those days and it took two days to make the trip, stopping only at Bull City for a couple of hours for refreshments for both men and mules....

 

By W. F. Hughes in Stockton Record:: We wrote a br ...
April 20, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 398)

By W. F. Hughes in Stockton Record:

We wrote a brief history of the founding of the Rooks County Record in our last week's column. When we were just a youngster on the old farm in Paradise Township, we were a reader of the Rooks County Record. It was one of the first periodicals that came into the old soddy that we then called home. We are still reading it. We have known its three editors most intimately -- Chambers, Covert, and Hamilton....

 

The spring session of the Sixth District Editorial ...
April 27, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 399)

The spring session of the Sixth District Editorial Association was held last Friday at Phillipsburg. Approximately 60 editors and their wives were present. A photo-engraving plant was set up at the Hotel Bissell and the demonstration was of great interest to those privileged to see it. At noon, an elaborate lunch was served in the Legion rooms of the community building. At 2:00 o'clock the afternoon session was opened and the visiting editors were welcomed to the city by Gene Henderson. Frank Hall of Hill City gave the response. L. L. Robinson of LaCrosse opened the program with an interesting talk titled "Thanks for the Memory," followed by Miss Marion Ellet of Concordia, who criticized the misrepresentation by radio and movie of the girl reporter. Miss Ellet thinks someone should make immortal the real "heroine of the press" by writing of the girl reporter as she really is and not an exaggeration such as the hard-boiled character of fiction. The feature speaker of the afternoon, Fred Hill of Hamburg, Iowa, spoke on "Community Building" and used pictures to illustrate his suggestion on how a newspaper may help the community to thrive, and also how the community might help the newspaper. McDill Boyd of Phillipsburg combined newspapers and politics in a talk which he called "Not for Publication." J. Howard Rusco of Topeka, secretary and field manager of the Kansas Press Association, reported on bills in the legislature which directly affected newspapers of the state. Round-table discussion, with Dick Mann of Osborne presiding, was as usual of great interest. Before adjourning, Walter Carlisle of Jamestown was re-elected president, Howard Reed of Hoxie was chosen vice-president, and Mrs. E. A. Pinkerton of Glasco as secretary. The fall meeting will be held in Norton some time in October.

Samantha Steele Says (by Mrs. Dan McKay):

Last Friday, we camouflaged ourself as an editor and attended the Sixth District editorial convention at Phillipsburg, with the following result: ...Mrs. McDill Boyd, the official hostess, turned out to be a girl we had known when she was a tiny tot. Time dashes on! And there she was, grown up into a very charming young woman....Mrs. Harvey Roe of Burr Oak, looking like nothing else but the little girl you left at home because you didn't want to take her out of her classes in grade school, was there to put the spotlight on everybody. In fact, Rubinoff and his violin would have been no greater attraction than Alice and her camera. We have always doubted that report about Gomer Davies being in his eighties, but after meeting him we admit that it might be possible. Not that he looks it; to the contrary. But no man could gain so much knowledge, learn to become such an interesting conversationalist, or such an expert flatterer, in anything short of eighty years. A photo engraving machine salesman hinted to a prospective customer that arrangements could be made for easy payments. Prospective customer: "Yes, I know what you mean -- a dollar down and a sheriff a week." One of the high spots was our meeting with Miss Marion Ellet of Concordia. She has a sweet personality and is as clever as her "Musings" which, by the way, are syndicated and printed in the Kansas City Journal-Post and other papers, including the Downs News. And meeting J. Howard Rusco for the first time reminds us that, along with several thousand other people, we were a witness at his wedding, when he was the groom at the first public wedding staged by the Downs Celebration committee some years ago.

 

Brooklyn Joe, who claims to be one of the oldest o ...
May 18, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 400)

Brooklyn Joe, who claims to be one of the oldest of old-time printers not in captivity, is roaming the land again, we notice by a few of our exchanges. Joe resides in some town down in the southeastern part of the state and every spring starts on the road. He used to "make" Downs as regularly as the robins, but a few years ago, when he stopped at our office and asked that he be permitted to "throw in a little type" for the price of a meal -- we told him to hop to it and pointed to a case. Joe immediately picked up bag and baggage and left in a huff -- and has never called on us since.

 

H. S. Givler, editor of the WaKeeney World for 25 ...
June 1, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 401)

H. S. Givler, editor of the WaKeeney World for 25 years, passed away on May 23 in a hospital in Halstead....In 1894, Mr. Givler purchased the Western Kansas World at WaKeeney and edited the paper until 1919, when he sold his interests to F. D. Shaw and J. W. Bingham. He owned and operated the first picture show in WaKeeney, served 13 years as postmaster in that city, and also served Trego County two terms in the state legislature.

Editor Merle Rees of Hunter, accompanied by Mrs. Rees and son Lorraine, were in Downs Saturday to attend the Indian-cowboy parade.

 

The settlement of the Twelve Mile country was the ...
June 15, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 402)

The settlement of the Twelve Mile country was the result of a colonization movement....The group of settlers...left new York in April 1871 and in due time detrained in Solomon City....The Twelve Mile post office was established in 1874. Up to that time it had been supplied by what was called the Twelve Mile Mail from Cawker City....A petition was circulated for a post office and Joseph Gledhill was recommended as postmaster as his house was most centrally located. It went into operation July 1, 1874, as a special office with Bethany (now Portis) as the office of supply....At the end of the first year, a star route was established from Cawker to Smith Center....Billy Jenkins, founder of the Smith County Pioneer, was the contractor....

 

Walt Mason, 77, author of the nationally circulate ...
June 29, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 403)

Walt Mason, 77, author of the nationally circulated rippling rhymes, died at his LaJolla home in California on June 22. He had been in declining health for several years. Mason's poems were published in 200 newspapers of the United States and Canada. A resident of LaJolla the past 25 years, Mason came to America in 1880 to take a job as pressman in St. Louis. Later he became an editorial staff member of newspapers in Emporia and Atchison and Lincoln, Neb.

 

Letter from Walt H. Smith of Kansas City, Kan., to ...
July 6, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 404)

Letter from Walt H. Smith of Kansas City, Kan., to Mertie Berry Hampton:

So you're the guy responsible for the News scooping the Times on that front page article about the change of postmasters in Downs some 30 years ago....Your article in last week's issue was my first intimation as to the identity of the true culprit....There I was with all the inside dope, holding for the next week's issue -- big headline and hot front page stuff....Reminds me of the time when some man committed suicide at Waconda Springs one Sunday morning. I had quite an article about it. After the paper was out, Charlie Mann came around and said: "How in heck did you find out about that suicide? I was at Waconda for a couple of hours Sunday and heard nothing about it." But Ransom and Mann were fine competitors and I am glad to remember them as among my best friends -- tried and true. During those days, the celebration committee delegated Bill Ransom and myself to come to Kansas City and arrange for some amusements for the celebration. We were supposed to have returned home by Sunday morning. We missed a train or two and finally Tuesday evening, while yet in Kansas City, I wired Grace I had missed my train. I made one great mistake, however; the telegram was filed an hour or so before time for the departure of the train. That was hard to explain and should you ask Grace about it today she would tell you she had her own conclusions about it. But when I got home Wednesday morning, I found nothing had been done over at the Times office as to preparing any news of any sort for that week's issue. It was a dark picture. I hit out for the News office, explained the situation with the result that I got every news item the News had. I went back to my office, wrote up three or four columns of news and really got out quite a decent issue. I think the Times force always wondered just how it was done, and this is the first time it has been told. For a time, it looked like I might have to resort to the tactics of the old-time newspaper man who, upon getting out an issue of the paper, went on a tear and did not return until time for the next issue. He looked the situation over, then on the front page he set in type the following: "By request of our many subscribers, our last week's issue is reproduced." But the News came to my rescue....As you know, I have been selling railroad tickets for 28 years and I find I am not much of a writer any more....

 

We experienced a narrow escape from utter disaster ...
July 6, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 405)

We experienced a narrow escape from utter disaster on Tuesday morning of last week. The first run of the paper was on the press and everything set to start the wheels rolling when it was discovered that the big motor which operates the press was out of commission. Upon examination, it was found that one of the contact points had worn away, allowing a "short" and the result was that a quart or so of lead had been melted away. It looked like a case of either a new motor or a trip to the shop of an expert in Salina to have the damage repaired. And then a happy thought struck us -- why not try Ray Cole! Mr. Cole was called on the job, removed the motor, and started to work. In less than an hour's time the motor was back on the job functioning better than when it was new.

 

Larry Freeman, editor of the Ellis Review, sold hi ...
July 13, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 406)

Larry Freeman, editor of the Ellis Review, sold his interests in the paper to Dan Brookhart, foreman of the Western Kansas World, WaKeeney. Freeman will go to California, where he has purchased a newspaper at Westwood.

On press day of last week (Wednesday) the thermometer in this office stood at exactly 102 degrees from 1:00 o'clock in the afternoon until we sneaked home at 5:00 o'clock. The following day, during the same hours, the reading was 105.

 

C. W. Hamilton, editor of the Rooks County Record, ...
August 10, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 407)

C. W. Hamilton, editor of the Rooks County Record, and his son Cloyce last week purchased the Barber County Index at Medicine Lodge. Cloyce will be in charge of the paper....

 

G. T. Ward, for the past month Linotype operator a ...
September 7, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 408)

G. T. Ward, for the past month Linotype operator and printer for the Burr Oak Herald, assumed the editorial duties of that newspaper last week, succeeding Alice Roe, editor and manager of the Herald for the past four years. Mrs. Roe expects to join her husband in Garden City, where he is employed as Linotype operator on the Garden City Daily Telegram.

 

Karl L. Kennedy, editor and publisher of Kansas Bu ...
September 14, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 409)

Karl L. Kennedy, editor and publisher of Kansas Business Magazine, and H. C. Logan, art director of Consolidated Printing and Stationery Co., Salina, called at this office last week.

 

Irvin Hogue, publisher of the Delphos Republican, ...
October 19, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 410)

Irvin Hogue, publisher of the Delphos Republican, passed away on Thursday of last week.

Will Morton of Glasco has assumed charge of the Burr Oak Herald, which is owned by J. Howard Rusco, who is now the salaried secretary of the Kansas Press Association with residence in Topeka.

 

The signing of the agreement between Turkey and Fr ...
October 26, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 411)

The signing of the agreement between Turkey and France and England is a "break" for Miss Beth Hodgson of Downs, who is stationed at Istanbul as a correspondent for the London (England) Express and Chronicle. Now that Turkey has been drawn into the limelight, the world will look to that country more than ever for sidelights in the news regarding that country's attitude towards the war situation....

The Burr Oak Herald was awarded the contract for printing the state WCTU paper, "Our Messenger," for the coming year of 1940. Seven thousand copies of this paper will be printed....About 25 years ago, the Downs News had the contract for printing this paper, our contract calling for ten thousand copies each month.

 

The Beloit Daily Call celebrated its 38th year of ...
November 2, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 412)

The Beloit Daily Call celebrated its 38th year of service to the Beloit community on October 21. The Call was started in October 1901, and the present editor, Harry K. Houghton, began working on the paper as a compositor in October 1903.

 

Clarence O. McCall, 54, advertising man and job pr ...
November 30, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 413)

Clarence O. McCall, 54, advertising man and job printer at the Beloit Gazette for years, was found in the basement of his home...and died at 7:53 o'clock. A coroner's jury...brought in a verdict that the deceased had met his death by "self-inflicted wounds in the right side of the head with a .32 caliber revolver...."

A. W. Wright, for many years connected with the Minneapolis Better Way, died at the Clay Center municipal hospital on Thursday night of last week....

 

Talking directly to readers and advertisers alike, ...
December 7, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 414)

Talking directly to readers and advertisers alike, the Springfield (Minn.) Advance-Press outlines what readers expect for $2 a year, then points out to them why they should patronize advertisers, and, in turn, shows advertisers why the newspaper deserves their business:

What do you expect from your newspaper? Well, you expect more from your newspaper than you do from any other person or institution to which you pay the sum of $2 a year.

You expect your newspaper to give you all the news for 52 weeks. That's why you pay $2 for it, but

You expect your newspaper to take the lead in advocating changes for the betterment of the community.

You expect your newspaper to expose graft in public affairs, to forestall it by publishing itemized accounts of all public moneys spent.

You expect your newspaper to maintain a high standard of morality, supporting things that are right and condemning things that are wrong.

You expect your newspaper to maintain a high standard of enterprise, devoting column after column to propaganda, supporting the band, the baseball team, community celebrations, Boy Scouts, high school athletics, school programs, home talent plays, and dozens of such causes and events.

You expect your paper to boost for good roads and protect your community's claim to its share of road improvements.

You expect your newspaper to build up confidence in your home financial institutions and protect home investors from making unwise investments of surplus funds, warning against fake salesmen and other financial pirates.

You expect your newspaper to combat the peddler nuisance.

You expect your newspaper to establish friendly contact with the rural readers so as to induce them to make your town their town.

You expect your newspaper to give notice of all public meetings, public observances, conventions, etc.

You expect your newspaper to urge support of poor relief benefits, library drives, Red Cross drives, etc.

You expect your newspaper to publish church notices, church programs, club news, farm bureau information...and cover all doings of the many semi-public organizations.

You expect your newspaper to support every meritorious organization's effort for the city's good.

And you expect all this for $2 a year.

No, it can't be done for that. The money you, as a subscriber, pay for this paper covers less than one-fourth the cost of publishing the paper. The other three-fourths must be paid by advertisers.

Since the advertisers pay a large share of the expenses of publishing your newspaper, don't you think you owe them the duty of patronizing them whenever they offer you equal or better values than non-advertisers?

And you, Mr. Advertiser, don't you think that, in view of the many services which the newspaper performs, for which the newspaper derives no compensation, but which mean more business and more profit to you, the newspaper deserves your advertising and printing business? Make your community newspaper your advertising and printing medium and you help build up the community. Send your advertising dollar away from home and you do just what you wouldn't want others to do to whom you look for business. It is just as important that the advertising dollar remains in the community as it is for the grocery dollar and the clothing dollar and the rest of the commodity dollars that make your home town prosperous to remain at home.

 

When you receive your copy of the paper this week ...
December 28, 1939, Downs News and Times (ID 415)

When you receive your copy of the paper this week you may think that part of it has been lost in the mails, but it contains only four pages. With the force observing the Christmas holiday, and part of the force being ill with the flu, we had time only to print four pages.

D. B. McKay, who rustles most of the news for this paper and is a vital force in handling the work of the office, became a victim of the flu on Monday and has since been confined to his bed.

 

Last week, this paper completed 61 years of servic ...
January 25, 1940, Downs News and Times (ID 416)

Last week, this paper completed 61 years of service in Downs....In looking back over the lean years of the past decade, we can recall no time when the boss failed to meet the weekly payroll, although there were times when he had to put up a pretty strong argument with the banker to do so. Someone has referred to the past decade as the Dirty Thirties, and there are some who will admit that the term is applicable. We would prefer to look back upon them as years rich in experience -- the sort of years that we wouldn't have missed for anything, but wouldn't give a slick dime to see again....It is the conviction of many that a change is due -- a change for the better -- and that the Forties will bring crops and prosperity....

 

The two-story frame building first door north of G ...
March 14, 1940, Downs News and Times (ID 417)

The two-story frame building first door north of Griffiths Grocery, known to old-timers as the Forline building, is being razed this week....The building was among the first erected in Downs. It was built about 1880 by J. A. Forline, who occupied it for many years with a stock of drugs....When Mr. Forline moved out the building was occupied by the Briggs grocery store, according to the recollection of E. L. Getty, and later the I. N. Rogers barber shop. In recent years, it has been the home of the Ray Cole Electric Shop. In early years of the century, an addition to the rear of the present building was the home of the News, the entrance being on the south side of the barber shop. The News was in this building when C. E. Mann and W. H. Ransom purchased it from W. B. Gaumer in 1905. The rent at that time for the 25x30-foot room was $35 per month. After a few months, the News owners purchased a small building that had been discarded by Frank Baker as a restaurant and moved it to one of the S. T. Kindley lots just south of the Drager blacksmith shop. This was the paper's home until its present home was built in 1907.

 

Tudor Charles, former associate editor of the Kans ...
April 11, 1940, Downs News and Times (ID 418)

Tudor Charles, former associate editor of the Kansas Farmer and Mail and Breeze, died on Tuesday of last week at his farm home in Republic County....He accepted the position of associate editor of the Capper's publications mentioned above, resigning from that position in March 1939 to return to the family farm in Republic County.

 

Next Saturday will be egg day in Downs, the day yo ...
April 18, 1940, Downs News and Times (ID 419)

Next Saturday will be egg day in Downs, the day you may bring the News and Times your eggs at far above the market price and get credit on your subscription. On this day only, we will give one year's subscription for 12 dozen eggs....Right now there are plenty of eggs in the country, and on the local market they are selling dirt cheap....No eggs will be accepted either before or after this date.

 

Last Saturday was "cackle day" with the News and T ...
April 25, 1940, Downs News and Times (ID 420)

Last Saturday was "cackle day" with the News and Times and its army of readers, and from early morning until late in the evening the hen fruit literally poured into the office from all corners of the universe....All in all, we received a grand total of 963 dozen eggs. Put into cases, this totaled 32, and put into individual eggs the total received was 11,556, which is some eggs in anybody's language. Robert Dillon was drafted into service and the way he juggled the eggs from case to case and from bucket and basket to case proved to us that he "knew his eggs."

 

Miss Beth Hodgson (of Downs), a writer for the Ass ...
May 23, 1940, Downs News and Times (ID 421)

Miss Beth Hodgson (of Downs), a writer for the Associated Press...at Istanbul, Turkey, has been transferred to Athens, Greece. Her reportorial activities have been extended to cover Turkey, Greece, Syria, Iraq, and Iran. Miss Hodgson...is writing a book on the life of Attaturk, the late Turkish ruler....

 

...Emmett George, well-known Kansas newspaper man ...
June 27, 1940, Downs News and Times (ID 422)

...Emmett George, well-known Kansas newspaper man of Osborne, has made declaration of his intention to run for the Republican nomination for state senator from the 32nd District, composed of Osborne, Lincoln, Russell and Ellsworth counties.

In a recent speech in Emporia, "Young Bill" White was quoted in the Emporia Gazette as giving the following observations from his recent tour of Europe where he was in 18 countries: "The older generation in Germany fears the consequences of Hitlerism. I have heard some of them say that only a defeat for Germany can save their country. The youth of Germany are loyal to the Nazi government and know nothing of the older days of German leanings toward democracy."...

 

Emmett George announces for senator: "...I am not ...
July 11, 1940, Downs News and Times (ID 423)

Emmett George announces for senator: "...I am not a stranger to the district. My boyhood days were spent here, just north of Downs....After moving from one green pasture to another, I am back here to stay and to enjoy once again the `Peace of the Solomon Valley.'...I managed two campaigns in the Sixth Congressional District, both men winning the nomination. I managed four state senatorial campaigns and two for successful candidates for governor. Once I was chosen by the Sixth District as their delegate to the Republican National Convention and became its secretary. All those jobs were held without pay and at considerable personal expense. I enjoyed them all for the experiences they brought and the friends that were made. On the pay side, I've never solicited a political job. But was offered a few that I accepted, postmaster for four years, secretary to the State Senate two sessions, private secretary to Gov. Henry J. Allen and secretary to John D. M. Hamilton when he was speaker of the House of Representatives....I will give the very best that is within me to represent the district and its interests.... -- Emmett George, Osborne.

 

The Bunker Hill Advertiser, which has been owned a ...
July 11, 1940, Downs News and Times (ID 424)

The Bunker Hill Advertiser, which has been owned and published the past two years by Mr. and Mrs. Ben Birkey, is being moved to Dorrance, where a newspaper will be established for the first time in about 20 years.

The Boyd family of Phillipsburg have announced the purchase of the Mankato Advocate from the Hale estate. The paper will change hands August 1. Frank W. Boyd, Jr., will have charge of the Mankato Advocate. McDill (Huck) Boyd is general manager of the Phillipsburg Review. Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Boyd, parents of McDill and Frank, now live in Topeka, where Mr. Boyd is chairman of the state board of administration.

 

...Several years ago, when a factory representativ ...
July 25, 1940, Downs News and Times (ID 425)

...Several years ago, when a factory representative called on us and told us about the merits of a typesetting machine, something that...had just been placed on the market, we listened to him with respect -- and bought one of the machines. And we have lived to learn that this machine has made for us and saved for us many hundreds of dollars....

Just so we might make you a little jealous of the life of a newspaper man, since all we have to do is sit in a nice "cool" office, we might mention that last Friday afternoon our thermometer registered 108 when we closed the doors at 5:00 o'clock and called it a day.

Warren Morford, editor of the Lenora News, was forced to take a layoff last week and nurse an infected hand....Last week's issue of the News was gotten out by Mr. and Mrs. Krehbiel.

Lowell Smith, who has been editing and managing the Logan Republican for some time past, has turned the paper over to Richard Mann, who will take charge August 1. He is the son of C. E. Mann, editor of the Osborne Farmer, and was reared in a newspaper shop.

 

Last week, when the News and Times failed to show ...
August 8, 1940, Downs News and Times (ID 426)

Last week, when the News and Times failed to show up in the post office at the usual time Wednesday evening, telephone calls started pouring in from all directions....It was the first time in a score of years that the paper failed to make connections with the post office later than Wednesday evening....When Thursday rolled around, and still no paper, then indeed did the telephone wires into this office become hot....Our failure...couldn't be helped. The auditing company in charge of preparing the copy for the city budget failed to get the copy to us until the passenger train arrived in the city Thursday morning, and it was nearly noon before the copy finally reached this office. The assembling of the copy into type form is a long and tedious job...but by 11:30 Thursday evening the job was completed, the forms made up bright and early Friday morning and the big press was put in motion....

 

Death claimed editor's daughter -- Inez Ann Betz, ...
September 5, 1940, Downs News and Times (ID 427)

Death claimed editor's daughter -- Inez Ann Betz, three and one-half years of age, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Perry Betz of Glen Elder, passed away at the Community Hospital in Beloit.

Two weeks ago, the Hill City Times published a 20-page paper that just about took the cake. The edition was gotten out primarily to advertise Hill City Pioneer Days Jubilee....Editor Frank Hill did a mighty fine job of preparing copy for this edition....The demand for the edition far exceeded his anticipations and he sent out an SOS call, offering 10 cents for all copies returned to the office.

 

A. W. Robinson of LaCrosse died at his home in tha ...
September 12, 1940, Downs News and Times (ID 428)

A. W. Robinson of LaCrosse died at his home in that city on Tuesday of last week. Mr. Robinson came to Kansas in 1861 from Pennsylvania. He worked first on the old Topeka Record, then established the Marion Record in 1869, the Winchester Argus in 1885, and the Valley Falls New Era in 1887. He published the Cawker City Ledger 10 years, then moved to LaCrosse with his family in 1907 and became publisher of the LaCrosse Republican. He still was associated with his son in publishing the paper at the time of his death.

 

Dick Mann, who has been editing the Logan Republic ...
November 21, 1940, Downs News and Times (ID 430)

Dick Mann, who has been editing the Logan Republican for the past few weeks, announced that he has accepted a position as editor of a newspaper near Topeka....Floyd Matteson of Zenda will succeed Mr. Mann as editor of the Logan paper.

 

Dr. and Mrs. J. E. Hodgson received a cablegram fr ...
December 5, 1940, Downs News and Times (ID 431)

Dr. and Mrs. J. E. Hodgson received a cablegram from their daughter, Miss Beth Hodgson, stating that she had just been transferred from Greece to Bulgaria. Miss Beth has been a correspondent for the London Chronicle for some time....

With last week's issue of the Jewell County Monitor, that paper ceased to be the property of J. O. Rodgers and passed into the hands of Frank Boyd and his sons of Phillipsburg. The paper will be consolidated with the Western Advocate which they purchased from the Hales some time ago. The Jewell County Monitor was established in 1874 and for the past 24 years has been owned and edited by J. O. Rodgers.

 

Walter Pattee, who for more than 35 years has been ...
December 12, 1940, Downs News and Times (ID 432)

Walter Pattee, who for more than 35 years has been associated with the Smith County Pioneer, retired from active duty as local news editor December 1st and with a whang and bang shoved his old Oliver typewriter back against the wall and stepped out of the office to take his place among plutocrats of his fair city....We have never seen a man who could "juggle up" as many local news items at Walt...and could write it up in a style no other writer could imitate.

Since her expulsion from Turkey last week, Miss Beth Hodgson...has received publicity in all sections of the nation. Scarcely a daily paper...has failed to carry the story about the mysterious order demanding that she leave the country where she had been working as a newspaper correspondent for more than a year. The story by the Associated Press, sent from Sofia Bulgaria...: Elizabeth Hodgson, 21-year-old Kansas correspondent for the London News Chronicle, who was expelled from Turkey, has arrive here. Miss Hodgson said her expulsion was the result of a "misunderstanding" and that she expected permission to return within a month....As correspondent of United Press and the London Express, Miss Hodgson was covering Turkey, Persia, Syria and other Near East territory from Istanbul, Turkey....

The Colby Daily News suspended publication last week and the editor, John Peach, says he is giving up the struggle. Peach at one time edited the Cawker City Ledger, then went to Norton, and about five years ago to Colby.

 

Carl Gray of Kirwin was a pleasant caller at our o ...
January 23, 1941, Downs News and Times (ID 433)

Carl Gray of Kirwin was a pleasant caller at our office....Carl edited the Kirwin Kansan for a number of years, leasing his plant last year to the Phillips County Review, in order that he might accept a position as auditor in the state taxing department.

The flu...has been rather hard on the newspaper boys. Two weeks ago, Editor Perry Betz of the Glen Elder Sentinel fell victim....Last week, Editor C. E. Mann of the Osborne Farmer, together with his foreman, Ira Anderson, and reporter, Mrs. Vera Botkin, were all taking the count....

 

The first issue of the Phillips County Leader, pub ...
March 13, 1941, Downs News and Times (ID 434)

The first issue of the Phillips County Leader, published by Clarence Gleason, appeared Tuesday of last week. It is said the new paper has a circulation of 3,000 paid-in-advance subscribers. Warren White, former editor of the Phillipsburg News, will be editor.

 

E. L. Getty called on us. "Just as I started to st ...
March 20, 1941, Downs News and Times (ID 435)

E. L. Getty called on us. "Just as I started to step through your door," he said, "I was reminded of the first time I saw the city of Downs. I arrived in Downs on the train and my father met me at the depot. He took me and my luggage to a rooming house that stood where the News and Times office stands today. The house was later moved to West Railroad Street and today is known as the Nichols residence. My first night in Downs was spent sleeping in an upstairs room in this house. That was way back in September 1879...."

 

If you give your paper to someone who is positivel ...
March 27, 1941, Downs News and Times (ID 436)

If you give your paper to someone who is positively incapable of raising the subscription price themselves, that's charity and is commendable. If you give your paper to someone who could subscribe but mooches instead, that's merely depriving the newspaper of revenue that is needed to help meet the costs of publication. -- Greenleaf Sentinel.

 

For several years we have used a small matrix cast ...
April 24, 1941, Downs News and Times (ID 437)

For several years we have used a small matrix caster in casting advertisements, pictures, cartoons, etc., for newspaper printing. This week we have purchased from the Western Newspaper Union one of their very latest model automatic casters, known as "The Speed-Line." This new caster will cast a matrix five columns in width and 18 inches in length, is equipped with gas, and guaranteed to turn out work almost as fast as one can stand by its side and operate a lever.

Warren White, probably the oldest newspaperman in northwest Kansas, died at his home in Phillipsburg last Thursday. Warren White went to Phillipsburg nearly 45 years ago and started the publication of the Phillipsburg News. Later he purchased the Dispatch and consolidated the two papers, which he continued to edit and publish until a few years ago, when he sold his plant to F. W. Boyd. Just recently, he became affiliated with the Phillips County Leader, a new paper established at Phillipsburg about a month ago.

A. F. Whistnant, editor of the Lucas Independent and the Sylvan Grove News, was a very pleasant caller....

 

Mrs. E. A. Pinkerton, who has edited the Glasco Su ...
June 5, 1941, Downs News and Times (ID 438)

Mrs. E. A. Pinkerton, who has edited the Glasco Sun since the death of her husband about six years ago, is retiring. The Sun will be edited by Charles Barrett and his son, John, of Arlington.

 

Miss Beth Hodgson...was united in marriage on May ...
June 12, 1941, Downs News and Times (ID 439)

Miss Beth Hodgson...was united in marriage on May 21 to Dogan Nadi of Istanbul, Turkey....The bride graduated from Downs High School in 1935. That fall she entered Missouri University. She majored in journalism and finished the four-year course in three years. She went abroad and found employment on the London Chronicle. She was sent to Istanbul and for the past two years has been reporting the political and war news from that important sector of the theater of war. She also has represented the Associated Press at Istanbul, and for some time has been a regular contributor to Newsweek. Mrs. Nadi has informed her parents that she will continue her literary work.

 

Two weeks ago...we mentioned a poem which had appe ...
October 23, 1941, Downs News and Times (ID 440)

Two weeks ago...we mentioned a poem which had appeared in the columns of the Times under date of July 27, 1888....And now comes a letter from Q. R. Craft, Albuquerque, N.M., explaining the matter. Mr. Craft and his father, E. D. Craft, were editors of the Times when the poem appeared in its columns....His article follows: "All who knew father and me know that we could not write poetry, but my mother, who wrote to order on many occasions, gave me the lines to which you refer for the celebration special....The celebration special was a miniature of the weekly edition, run off, as to the outside pages, on the Pearl job press, mounted on a float, and fed by Will Hill of the Western News, Stockton, who later published the Plainville Times....The papers were distributed along the route."

 

E. J. Garner, editor and publisher of Publicity in ...
December 11, 1941, Downs News and Times (ID 441)

E. J. Garner, editor and publisher of Publicity in Wichita, has discovered "Myrt," as he used to call me, through Grassroots in the Topeka Capital. Editor Garner used to stick type on the Times many years ago. We had a lot in common then, and dried our hands from the same old black, germ-laden towels. He sports some flashy postal cards on which he has pasted a clipping from this column with comments that I am afraid to re-publish. -- Mertie Berry Hampton's "Truck Patch" column.

 

Walter A. Carlile, editor of the Jamestown Optimis ...
March 5, 1942, Downs News and Times (ID 442)

Walter A. Carlile, editor of the Jamestown Optimist, after viewing the situation regarding the steadily increasing costs incident to publishing a newspaper, has decided that, rather than increase the subscription price of his paper, to request that all subscribers pay up back accounts and pay in advance if they want to continue receiving the paper. "...When your subscription expires, your Optimist will stop immediately...."

 

The first newspaper victim of the tire rationing p ...
March 12, 1942, Downs News and Times (ID 443)

The first newspaper victim of the tire rationing program is the Colony News. Jack Jaconsen of Kincaid, who publishes both the Kincaid Dispatch and the Colony News in Anderson County,...has been compelled to discontinue the News as he lacks tires to make the necessary trips between the two towns.

 

The Osborne Farmer announced last week that beginn ...
March 26, 1942, Downs News and Times (ID 444)

The Osborne Farmer announced last week that beginning May 15 the subscription price would be raised to $2 per year. During the past few years, the Farmer's subscription rate has been $1.50 in Kansas, $2 per year outside the state.

 

After 88 years, the Kansas City Journal quit busin ...
April 23, 1942, Downs News and Times (ID 445)

After 88 years, the Kansas City Journal quit business last week. That's a good record....If we stay in business that long and keep going as we are at the present time, we'll be in debt more than the government is. -- Altoona Tribune.

 

The two daily newspapers in Abilene will consolida ...
April 30, 1942, Downs News and Times (ID 446)

The two daily newspapers in Abilene will consolidate May 1st and will be known as the Reflector-Chronicle, issued as an afternoon daily. Charles H. Harger, veteran publisher of the Reflector, will continue as publisher, while C. W. "Red" Wheeler, of the 72-year-old Chronicle, will become business manager.

 

An Associated Press dispatch: "A federal grand jur ...
May 7, 1942, Downs News and Times (ID 447)

An Associated Press dispatch: "A federal grand jury returned 80 indictments today....A wide variety of charges was contained in the grand jury's report, including one against Elmer J. Garner, 70, and his son, James, 45, publishers of a Wichita weekly newspaper, on an accusation they had published seditious articles and editorial comment...." Monday morning, the news commentator at station WIBW, Topeka, said that, immediately after the indictment, both of the Garners had been placed under arrest, but had been released on bonds of $1,000 each and were cited to appear in federal court next September.

 

Charles Wright, editor of the Tipton Times, was la ...
June 11, 1942, Downs News and Times (ID 448)

Charles Wright, editor of the Tipton Times, was laid up last week, suffering from an injured foot. Charley stepped on a nail and...immediately took serum shots for lockjaw. He was unable to get down to his office during the entire week, and the boys over on the Hunter Herald got his paper out.

 

Charles Wright, editor of the Tipton Times, is slo ...
July 2, 1942, Downs News and Times (ID 449)

Charles Wright, editor of the Tipton Times, is slowly recuperating from a battle with blood poisoning....He had the misfortune to step on a nail and his foot became infected. He entered the Community Hospital at Beloit, where a piece of infected bone was removed from his foot.

Robert VanPelt has purchased the half interest of his partner, Bob Good, in the Salem (Mo.) Post. Mr. Good is retiring from the newspaper business because of his health. -- Publishers' Auxiliary.

 

Ray Francis, Intertype operator on the News and Ti ...
July 16, 1942, Downs News and Times (ID 450)

Ray Francis, Intertype operator on the News and Times for the past five years, has accepted a position on the Norton Daily Telegram....The News and Times regrets that it is unable to meet the salary demand which his services justify....

Editor Charles Wright of the Tipton Times is still a one-footed man, and is getting his paper out under distressing difficulties....It was found necessary to remove a bone from his foot. He has since been carrying the injured member in a heavy cast.

 

These past two weeks have been strenuous ones in t ...
July 30, 1942, Downs News and Times (ID 451)

These past two weeks have been strenuous ones in the News and Times printing establishment....Last week, for the first time in more years than we can remember, the News and Times went to its readers with four pages printed in the home office and four furnished by the Western Newspaper Union. We have had more than one person tell us that they liked the arrangement, since it gave them a great variety of reading matter.

 

We received a letter from Mord Smith, the former D ...
August 27, 1942, Downs News and Times (ID 452)

We received a letter from Mord Smith, the former Downs boy who is editor and publisher of The American Dog Magazine in Seattle. "...As a result of your kindness in publishing my editorial, I have received a number of letters from old-time friends, some suggesting a reunion of the old gang...."

 

The News force is on the verge of nervous prostrat ...
September 24, 1942, Downs News and Times (ID 453)

The News force is on the verge of nervous prostration through its failure to solve a shop mystery. For the past year or more, the job printing department has kept standing a type form used for the printing of a form for the Downs Sales Company. The form was kept locked up in a chase, 12 x 18 inches and weighing something like 20 pounds, ready for use when needed....We had occasion to use it and, when the printer went to get it, discovered that it was gone. An article that size is not easily misplaced....The type form could be of value only to a print shop, but we are willing to take oath that no printer would steal it. Although it would be worth less than a dime as scrap metal, it contained about $10 worth of material and required about a day's time to reset the form. Our only hope is that it went into some scrap pile and that it may account for the scalp of at least one ornery Jap.

 

A deal was closed last week whereby the Osborne Co ...
October 29, 1942, Downs News and Times (ID 454)

A deal was closed last week whereby the Osborne County Farmer passed into the hands of Byron L. George, editor and publisher of the Empire-Journal, who takes possession next week. The paper will be published under the name of the Osborne Farmer-Journal. The Farmer was established 68 years ago....B. P. Walker came into possession of the paper about 40 years ago, purchasing it from C. W. Landis. Mr. Walker retired about 22 years ago and since that time the paper has been in the able hands of Chas. E. Mann....The Journal was established a decade or more ago and in 1934 was consolidated with the Empire of Alton. the Journal-Empire was purchased in 1937 by Mr. George and under his guiding hand has reached a high place in the newspaper field. Mr. George also acquired ownership of the Farmer building and the paper will continue to be published there. This leaves Osborne County with but four papers....

 

It was the good fortune of the associate editor of ...
December 3, 1942, Downs News and Times (ID 455)

It was the good fortune of the associate editor of the News and Times to be among a group of Kansas, western Missouri, and Oklahoma newspapermen called to Kansas City last Friday to attend a conference relative to the fuel situation, the conference being presided over by Ben Adams, president of the Gas Service Company which serves the tri-state area....Mr. Adams pointed out that the demand for oil in the East for war purposes was one contributing factor to our diminishing supply of gas here in the Midwest....This same condition is affecting our coal supply....In summing up the whole situation,...we people out in this section of the state...need not become too greatly alarmed over the situation, at least for the remainder of the present winter....

Letter from Floyd Johnson, local mayor who had been called into the service: "...I know darn well the men want news from home and the local paper is the best medium for providing that news. I'd like to see a serviceman's section in the paper in which newsy items concerning men, or from men, stationed in camps over the country...."

Acting upon the suggestion of Captain Floyd Johnson, as well as many other good friends, starting next week the News and Times will put all news pertaining to the boys in the armed service under one heading....We ask the cooperation of the parents and all friends of the boys in service in reporting items of news concerning them....

 

From the Portis Independent: "The Independent will ...
December 17, 1942, Downs News and Times (ID 456)

From the Portis Independent: "The Independent will suspend publication soon, likely by the first of the year of 1943. That means but four more issues will be published. There is no occasion to make a statement of any length as to the reason. It can be summed up like this -- conditions brought on by the war and the trend away from the small towns. The world moves these days on rubber tires, even in a period of rationing. Suspension means for the time being, but if the war lasts very long the resumption of the paper is doubtful. We regret a lot to discontinue the paper for, after printing it for 30 years, it has become a habit."

The passing of J. E. Kissell and his newspaper will be regretted by the citizens of Osborne County in general. Emmett is a bully good fellow, liked by one and all, and the passing of these two old landmarks will most certainly leave a void in our midst.

 

C. E. Mann, former editor of the Osborne County Fa ...
December 24, 1942, Downs News and Times (ID 457)

C. E. Mann, former editor of the Osborne County Farmer and a Kansas newspaperman for half a century, is taking a much needed rest at his home in Osborne.

 

The old printers' towel that has seen service in t ...
December 31, 1942, Downs News and Times (ID 458)

The old printers' towel that has seen service in this office for lo these many years has been consigned to the garbage can. This was made possible on the day before Christmas when Mrs. Sabert Hampton (who knows all about printers' towels, she having been employed in this office several years) presented the force with two new towels. Considering the length of time the old one has lasted, these towels should see service for the next 12 or 15 years.

 

Dick Mann has recently accepted a position as asso ...
February 4, 1943, Downs News and Times (ID 459)

Dick Mann has recently accepted a position as associate editor of the Kansas Farmer and Missouri Ruralist -- Capper publications published in Topeka. Dick has been employed for the past few years in secretarial work and publicity work at the statehouse in Topeka, and recently was employed in the office of Gov. Payne Ratner.... -- Osborne Farmer-Journal.

 

Last Monday when we awakened to learn that over Sa ...
March 25, 1943, Downs News and Times (ID 460)

Last Monday when we awakened to learn that over Sabbath the OPA had slipped a fast one over on us and had "frozen" butter, lard, cooking oils, etc., we faced a week of horror and dark clouds loomed thick overhead. And then came afternoon -- and into our office walked one of our good friends in the person of James Deters, husband of that splendid young lady who writes such interesting items from Oak Creek -- and right away appeared the silver lining in the clouds. Mr. Deters handed us a bucket full of home-made lard which his good wife had sent in to the office force. It's little things like this that make us glad we're in the newspaper business.

 

Fire which started under the stage on Wednesday af ...
April 1, 1943, Downs News and Times (ID 461)

Fire which started under the stage on Wednesday afternoon of last week damaged the Lido Theater building and equipment to the extent of approximately $3,000. Damage to the building was estimated by W. H. Ransom, the owner, at $1,500....

The News and Times has been operating similar to a one-cylinder engine the past week, so we want to make apologies if the reading columns do not come up to your expectations. Mr. Ransom has been confined to his home since Sunday with a severe cold that has kept him bedridden the greater portion of the time.

 

Willard Henry Ransom was born Jan. 30, 18 ...
August 2, 1951, Downs News and Times (ID 465)

Willard Henry Ransom was born Jan. 30, 1877, at Henry, Ill., and passed away July 24, 1951, at Villard, Minn. Left alone as a small boy, he was reared by his maternal grandmother, Mrs. Mary Kenyon.

When he was 16 years of age, he went to Seattle, Wash., where he served as a printer's apprentice. Later he located at Phillipsburg, Kan. He was employed there for a number of years, during which time he was united in marriage to Miss Ellen Wright. To this union two daughters were born, Maxine, at Phillipsburg, and Mary, at Downs, where the family had moved in 1905.

Mr. Ransom, in partnership with C. E. Mann, now of Topeka, purchased the Downs News and in 1915 they purchased the Downs Times and consolidated the two papers. In 1920, Mr. Ransom acquired the interests of Mr. Mann and has since owned the newspaper, retiring from active business in 1943.

Mrs. Ransom passed away July 3, 1911. On Aug. 29, 1912, he was married to Daisy Sibelius, who was a wonderful mother to the two girls until her death in 1946. Mrs. Frances Cutshaw and Mr. Ransom were married Nov. 8, 1947, this union lasting only until Nov. 29, 1949, when she preceded him in death.

W. H. or "Bill," as he was familiarly known to his many friends, was a member of the Downs Masonic Lodge, AF & AM No. 204. Bill engaged in many civic affairs, being a member of the local school board, served on the city council, was a past president of the Rotary Club and was assessor for several years. During his business life, he was interested in anything that tended for the betterment of the city and community.

His daughter, Mary Holley of Glyndon, Md., preceded him in death on Jan. 30, 1951. Survivors are his daughter, Maxine Reardon, and grandsons Jimmy Reardon, Willard and Peter Holley, and son-in-law Brooks Holley...; one sister, Mrs. Mae Heininger of Henry, Ill.

Willard H. Ransom, an appreciation, by Charles E. Mann --The passing of Willard H. Ransom came to me as a personal sorrow, for in our 15 years' business association together he was like a brother to me. I met him in the fall of 1899, when he came to Phillipsburg from Seattle, Wash., to visit relatives there.

Being a printer, we naturally were drawn together, and later when he accepted employment with the old Phillipsburg Herald, where I was also employed, we formed a friendship which lasted for more than half a century. Our friendship was cemented by the hardships we went through together, for our first 10 years in Downs meant days and nights of hard work.

Through it all he exhibited the utmost faith in our ultimate success, which came to us only after we had been able to buy the Downs Times and consolidate it with the News, thus taking over the entire field.

One had to be intimately acquainted with Ransom to understand him, for he had little diplomacy in his makeup and as a result was often misunderstood and misjudged by many. Under a studied, cold exterior, he had a heart that was as gentle and soft as any woman's. And I, who knew him best, really learned to love and appreciate him, for along with his kind nature I found him essentially honest in his dealings and integrity was the cornerstone of his character.

Had he been able to enjoy better educational advantages in his early youth, I am sure he could have gone far, but always having had to struggle hard to gain a livelihood he missed the opportunities that would have rounded out his character and achievements, and as a result excessive diffidence obscured his merit.

In spite of difficulties and disappointments, he always provided well for his family and made no little success of his life in later years, and through it all his loyalty to Downs and to Kansas was the ruling idea of his life. He was at heart a good man; he was my best friend, and his passing breaks the link that has bound us together in friendship for over 50 years.

A friend is gone, by D. B. McKay -- As we come closer to the sunset of life, it seems as though those who leave this vale of tears are so many of them our old friends. We are saddened by their passing and, when the news came that Bill Ransom was gone, mere words would not express the sense of personal loss which we felt. Your editor came to Downs in 1920 and for 23 years worked side by side with Bill in the office. We found him to be honest in his dealings, fair to his employees, and his acquaintances were easily made into friends. Bill enjoyed life to the fullest and was happy whether at work or enjoying his favorite recreation, fishing....In thinking of Bill Ransom and his passing, we think of him as a "great oak" that has been removed from against the sky, leaving a void, never again to be filled.

 

Saturday morning about 2:15, the fire whistle b ...
October 30, 1952, Downs News and Times (ID 464)

Saturday morning about 2:15, the fire whistle blew and, instead of the News editors going to the scene of the fire, the fire came to the editors. Tom Moore of the Hotel Lipton awoke around 2:00 o'clock and smelled smoke. After checking the hotel rooms, he went out in the alley and discovered smoke seeping through the roof of the News office.

He turned in an alarm and firemen and other help soon arrived. The fire is believed to have started in the file cabinet where files of the News for many years were kept. Most of the papers were destroyed or badly damaged by smoke and water.

Adjoining the file cabinet was a type cabinet which, with its contents of 40 cases of ad type and leads, was burned beyond use. A large number of job forms, which were kept set up for quick use on job work orders, were completely destroyed. The interior of the office was ruined by smoke and will have to be re-decorated. The heat was intense and caused plaster to crack and fall. Several windows were also cracked by the heat.

The News force, working under the handicaps, has put out the best paper we could under existing circumstances....Most of the larger type used in ads was destroyed and old type had to be used. We hope that things in the print shop will soon be back to normal.

Emmett Kissell of Portis, former editor, loaned some type and leads. Reverend Stewart, also of Portis, a former Linotypist, telephoned offering help; Perry Betz of the Glen Elder Sentinel came over and offered everything, even the shirt on his back, and many friends offered aid in any way they could....

 

Alumni address by Donald Davis: John Wolt ...
June 11, 1953, Downs News and Times (ID 466)

Alumni address by Donald Davis:

...John Wolters and I formed a window-cleaning "company," equipped ourselves with ladders, sponges, cloth, water bottles and Bon Ami, and went about town washing the merchants' windows. I remember when we washed the windows at the Downs News office so clean that Bill Ransom and Charlie Mann complained the light from outside hurt their eyes! There must have been 50 million fly specks on those windows.

....As I grew up, my favorite "hangout" was the Downs News office. The type cases and the printing presses and the stapler and the folding machine fascinated me -- and I learned to "stick type" by hand -- taught by Mertie Berry, Bill Ransom and Charlie Mann. That was before the days of Linotypes and other noisy machinery, and I can recall how all the workers would sing in wonderful harmony as everyone sat on a stool before a type case, fingers flying to put the next week's edition in type!

Then the press would roll, the papers would emerge to be addressed, and they gave me the privilege of carrying armfuls of folded papers up the alley to the post office for mailing. Many's the Wednesday night I made those trips, sometimes through deep snow, and the papers would all be in the post office mail boxes Thursday morning, or to be delivered out on the rural routes. No postmen, no door-to-door delivery in those days, everyone gathered at the post office to wait for the mail, to visit and to gossip, and to rush to the package window when it finally flew up....

 

This issue of the Downs News and Ties marks the ...
January 6, 1955, Downs News and Times (ID 467)

This issue of the Downs News and Ties marks the beginning of the 76th year of its existence in the field of journalism. Like any business in the short grass country of Kansas, it has led a life of ups and downs, depending upon crop conditions.

...The present editor came to Downs in response to a distress call from the late W. H. Ransom, 35 years ago this coming February. Mr. Ransom and C. E. Mann were then co-editors of the News and Times. Mr. Mann was a state representative and had been called to Topeka to attend a special session of the legislature. This left Mr. Ransom on his own to get out the paper and he appealed to us for help.

We came to Downs with the intention of staying just two weeks -- and here we are 35 years later still plugging away with printer's ink up to our elbows. These have been wonderful years in a wonderful town with wonderful people.

...When we took over the destinies of the paper, we had but one thought in mind -- to uphold the high standards which had been set forth by our predecessors and to give the citizens of Downs and community a newspaper to which they might point with pride. Whether we have succeeded is, of course, a matter of each individual's opinion. We believe that none can say that we have not tried to give the people a good clean newspaper, one that is devoid of liquor advertisements, or anything that might shock some of our readers....Today the News and Times goes into almost one-third more homes than it did before we took charge of the paper, offering the advertiser a greater coverage than ever before in its history....

 

1956: Many folks in the Osborne County area were s ...
April 19, 1956, Downs News and Times (ID 468)

Many folks in the Osborne County area were saddened last week, says the Natoma Independent, upon hearing of the passing of the Osborne County Extension Farm Reviewer. Death was attributed to a broken heart, the Independent declares. State supervisors of Extension Council activities have frowned on the Reviewer since its birth. The paper has been despondent for some time, so the demise was not altogether unexpected. The Reviewer had been published in the office of the Natoma Independent.

 

Darrel Miller, Kansas State College junior in t ...
April 26, 1956, Downs News and Times (ID 469)

Darrel Miller, Kansas State College junior in technical journalism from Downs, was announced as winner of a $200 scholarship offered by the Kansas City Press Club....Miller has been active on the staff of the Kansas State Collegian, student daily, since he enrolled in journalism at K-State in 1953 and this past semester served as editor of the publication. Previously, Miller had three years of newspaper work on the Downs News and later, while in the army in Germany, worked on the staff of Stars and Stripes.

 

Names of 38 Kansas State College students who r ...
May 3, 1956, Downs News and Times (ID 470)

Names of 38 Kansas State College students who received gold K-Key awards for outstanding work on student publications this year were announced....Among those cited for outstanding writing or editing for the Collegian was Darrel E. Miller, Downs.

 

Darrel E. Miller of Downs is among 35 students ...
May 16, 1956, Downs News and Times (ID 474)

Darrel E. Miller of Downs is among 35 students who will be recognized as senior leaders at Kansas State College this week. Miller will receive his degree in technical journalism. The 35 were selected on the basis of scholastic achievement and participation in campus activities.

Miller has served as sports editor, feature editor, assistant editor, news editor, editor, and columnist for the Collegian, college tabloid; and as sports editor of the Royal Purple, college yearbook. He has served on the Board of Student Publications, is past president of Sigma Delta Chi, men's journalism fraternity; is a member of Blue Key, senior men's honorary; and received Phi Kappa Phi recognition for high grades.

He has received the Kansas City Press Club scholarship, Journalism Memorial Fund editorial award, the Joel Halperin humor award, and K-Key awards for journalism.

Darrel was also honored when he was named outstanding male graduate of 1957, and received the Sigma Delta Chi scholarship certificate as the male student with the best scholarship record (2.395 with A as 3.0 and B as 2.0). Darrel got his first taste of newspaper work in the News office, and was employed here for several years, and the editors believe he is deserving of all awards and honors he receives.

 

Six Kansas State College journalists were annou ...
May 17, 1956, Downs News and Times (ID 471)

Six Kansas State College journalists were announced as winners of special awards for professional and scholastic achievement....Journalism Memorial Awards, given annually in memory of eight graduates and former students...who lost their lives in World War II, were won by Darrel Miller, Downs, for his work on the editorial staff of the Collegian, student daily, and two other journalism students....

 

The News and Times office is still functioning ...
October 11, 1956, Downs News and Times (ID 472)

The News and Times office is still functioning on two cylinders, and indications are that we may have to get along the best way we can for at least a few more weeks. We have "feelers" out and at this time have a few letters out that may bring us an all-around printer and machine operator.

 

Lillie M. Washabaugh, editor of the Natoma Inde ...
May 18, 1957, Downs News and Times (ID 473)

Lillie M. Washabaugh, editor of the Natoma Independent and unsuccessful Democratic candidate for state printer in 1956, will become state printer June 30. Gov. George Docking said Thursday he will appoint her to succeed Ferd Voiland, who resigned....Mrs. Washabaugh will become the first Democrat and the first woman ever to hold the post, which carries a $7,500-a-year salary.

 

With the beginning of the new year, 1958, the D ...
January 9, 1958, Downs News and Times (ID 475)

With the beginning of the new year, 1958, the Downs News and Times celebrates its 79th birthday -- yes, 79 years, some long and lean, others passing quickly, all too quickly in these later years, and some of the not so lean but prosperous -- all depending, more or less, upon the prosperity of the farming area.

Several editors have been at the helm of the Downs News since its birth and many, many millions of words have been printed telling of the comings and goings of the citizens, their births and passings and other items of interest. The paper has changed hands several times and the present editors have been in charge, first by lease, in 1944, and by ownership since 1948.

We have tried, to the best of our ability, to publish a paper which might be of interest to our subscribers and it is through their support that we hope we have been able to do this.

We wish to thank advertisers, news contributors, and others who have helped, as without your help the paper would have ceased to exist.

 

Samantha Steele Says, by Grace McKay -- Inasmuc ...
April 17, 1958, Downs News and Times (ID 482)

Samantha Steele Says, by Grace McKay -- Inasmuch as the new editor cannot very well "toot his own horn," the spirit of this long-deceased column comes out of the shadows to present a clipping from a recent issue of the Smith County Pioneer. We hope you'll stick long enough to read it.

Welcome, Darrel Miller and wife, new publishers of the Downs News! And congratulations on that first issue. This information may be of interest to Pioneer readers. Darrel is a Smith County product. He attended the Oriole rural school and high school at Lebanon. Since then he has made a record for himself at Kansas State College as a journalism student.

This much to you business people at Downs -- You have as your new publisher one of the most outstanding journalism students ever graduated from Kansas State College. He deserves your support. Your town needs a newspaper. Don't neglect your support. Men like Darrel Miller don't have to slave in a weekly shop. The trade is calling for young men with his abilities. Give him a break. Boost that advertising budget a little and give him a chance to really put Downs on the map.