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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Downs Times

Articles in database from Downs Times:    860

About two weeks ago we arrived in this pleasant li ...
February 19, 1880, Downs Times (ID 1953)

About two weeks ago we arrived in this pleasant little city with our printing material, after a tiresome wagon ride of three days. The first thing we did after arriving here was to look for some vacant building wherein to set up our press, etc., and commence operations; but after running all over the city we were convinced of the fact that everything in the shape of a building was occupied, and we were obliged to unload in a vacant lot and await the erection of a building.

No time was lost in making arrangements for this, and in less than two days time the building was so that we could place our material inside it and do some work, though far from being completed.

Day after day the good work progressed until the carpenters were ready to vacate and make ready for the painters, who also did a very fine job in painting the outside, and staining and varnishing the inside of the building. We have quite a large office, and venture to say one of the prettiest and neatest in the state. The wood work was contracted for by Messrs. Wilson and King, and the painting by Messrs. Hunter and Wilkinson, both parties doing good work which will stand as an advertisement of their abilities.

Considerable building is now being done here. A stone church house is being built by the Baptists, a fine hotel 36x70 is being built by James Kinsel, another larger livery stable is being built by John Boice, A. Z. Blunt is completing his residence on the north side, and many others which we cannot mention.

It is our prediction that Downs will double her size by the 4th of July and count an even thousand. The boom has hardly commenced, and we can hear the wheels of commerce and the sound of the hammer of industry blending together. Several lots have been sold during the past week and building will soon commence....

Last week we ordered a complete job printing outfit from St. Louis, consisting of a good press, new metal and wood type, fancy rule, letter heads, bill heads, note heads, statements, envelopes, cards, etc., and now are ready to take orders for all kinds of printing, do as good work as any other country printing office, and at the lowest possible prices. Bring in your work.

Salutatory -- It is the usual custom to lay out a course which a paper intends to pursue upon starting. We came to this place in a legitimate business enterprise, and have no rash promises to make or effect. We have not received a cent for coming, and are relying upon our merits for whatever support we may receive. We have come to go up or down with Downs. If she does well, we hope to stay by her; if not, we will be numbered in the general wreck. It will be our earnest endeavor to make The Times worthy of whatever patronage may be conferred upon us. We shall work for the general interests of Downs and the Times, money and our country, and do it in an honest and fair manner.

The Times will be a Republican newspaper in the full sense of the word. Our presidential choice is -- any good Republican who can be elected. It will advocate that which is lawful and elevating, and denounce that which is wrong. We will also make a specialty of local news, and endeavor to give the truth and stand by it. Being on the junction of the railroad, we hope to give full railroad news, and such other news as will be of general interest. In short, we propose giving the people of Downs a paper that they may be proud of, if support will justify, and we think it will from present appearances.

Our future policy and actions may show truer than promises made with no intention of fulfillment what our paper will be. This salutatory is short, and in conclusion we invite all to drop in and see us. Time will tell the rest. Yours respectfully, Nicklin Bros.

From the Norton Advance -- On Tuesday last, Tom and Charley Nicklin, the boys who for the last ten months have been employed on the Norton County Advance, took their departure for the new town of Downs, in Osborne County, there to begin, as soon as possible, the publication of the Downs Times. They took with them the press and material with which they were about to begin the publication of a second paper in Norton, and will get to work without delay. The boys are good printers, easy and fertile workers, energetic in business and agreeable in manners, and the people of Downs are to be congratulated in securing them as citizens. Downs is a bright, new, lively town and the Nicklin boys are bright, new, lively boys, and they will make a success of a newspaper there if anybody can.

 

...A committee consisting of W. E. Taylor, Wm. Mel ...
April 22, 1880, Downs Times (ID 1968)

...A committee consisting of W. E. Taylor, Wm. Mellen and Tom G. Nicklin were appointed at the recent meeting to investigate as to the sum that may be voted for a school house, what kind of a building, and the probable cost....

 

J. W. McBride of the Gaylord Herald has sold that ...
April 29, 1880, Downs Times (ID 1971)

J. W. McBride of the Gaylord Herald has sold that paper to Webb McNall, and James A. Scarbrough will manage it. Mac will start a new seven-column Republican paper in Cawker, to be called the Journal. Newspaper wars may be expected.

More new type, rule and other stock just arrived, and we will not take a back seat on job printing.

J. W. McBride, his wife and printer called on us yesterday while journeying from Gaylord to Cawker City, their new home....

The Friend, published at Osborne and edited by Rev. Foster, has been handed to us. It is a very neat little church organ....

 

The following resolution was passed by the Editori ...
May 6, 1880, Downs Times (ID 1975)

The following resolution was passed by the Editorial Association at their recent meeting at Kirwin: Resolved, that the course of the Leavenworth Times and others, in sending solicitors and canvassers into the districts of western country editors to take orders for job work at ruinously low prices merits the severest condemnation, not only of this association, but of the people among whom they are struggling to build up journals which will be of benefit to their constituencies and the state.

 

We are in need of a load of short-cut stove wood, ...
May 13, 1880, Downs Times (ID 1976)

We are in need of a load of short-cut stove wood, and if any of our subscribers who owe us can bring a load of wood it will answer the purpose of subscription money....

Some of our business men do not advertise with us, but expect to receive the advantages of the paper without paying for it. If we live at Downs and work for her, the people must give us support.

 

Number one of the Cawker Journal has come to us, w ...
May 20, 1880, Downs Times (ID 1979)

Number one of the Cawker Journal has come to us, well filled, and printed on entirely new material. Mac is on the temperance and Republican side of the fence....

 

A few persons have left the country indebted to th ...
May 27, 1880, Downs Times (ID 1983)

A few persons have left the country indebted to the Times. If you have not the money to pay, come and tell us so, rather than sneak off leaving honest debts unpaid. A newspaper can only be run with money.

 

Brother Charley has gone away to do better or wors ...
June 10, 1880, Downs Times (ID 1991)

Brother Charley has gone away to do better or worse. He is a good workman and will get along where anybody else can. By taking his trip north, he will be better satisfied with himself, and may do better. May luck attend him.

The Times was four months old last week and those who subscribed for four months will now please renew, as we must know whether to continue the papers or not.

 

The Cawker Journal promised to give each man in Do ...
June 17, 1880, Downs Times (ID 1993)

The Cawker Journal promised to give each man in Downs who subscribed for three months a puff. Our citizens have not yet seen the taffy, and will invest in their home paper when they want a business notice hereafter.

The Harlan Independent man may publish our items without credit, but we hope he will be generous enough not to credit to an exchange.

 

Friend Barnhart of the Farmer dropped in on us Tue ...
June 24, 1880, Downs Times (ID 1994)

Friend Barnhart of the Farmer dropped in on us Tuesday while we were very busy working on the school bond election. We hope he will call and see us some time when we are at leisure.

 

Friend Barnhart of the Farmer is after the Times f ...
July 1, 1880, Downs Times (ID 1996)

Friend Barnhart of the Farmer is after the Times for opposing his candidate, Capt. Osborne, and supporting Hays. He ridicules our youth and says we do not know anything about the choice of the people and have no means of knowing. We acknowledge the corn as to being the youngest editor in Kansas of a seven column paper, but we hope to survive that awful sin....

 

Today the Times is six months old, and this is the ...
August 12, 1880, Downs Times (ID 2006)

Today the Times is six months old, and this is the end of the second quarter. Between this and pay day we want to have a general settlement. If we owe you anything, bring in your bill and we will pay it; if you owe us anything, please be kind enough to settle. It takes money to run a newspaper. Thanking those who subscribed for six months, we now ask them to do so again. As a newspaper lives by the patronage of business men, we must insist that you advertise. Some have done well in the past, and we respectfully solicit a continuance of the same. -- Tom G. Nicklin.

 

Thad. Jones, of the Cawker Journal force, was kill ...
August 26, 1880, Downs Times (ID 2008)

Thad. Jones, of the Cawker Journal force, was killed by lightning Tuesday evening about six o'clock, while standing in the front door of the office. The bolt struck him in the head, passing into his body and killing instantly, and then spent itself in the iron press, which is supposed to have attracted it. He was about 24 years old, and leaves a bride of a few weeks to mourn his death....

United States Senator Plumb called on us yesterday and subscribed for the Times. He has never before been in the northwest, but likes the country....

 

W. G. Harvey has purchased Dr. Taylor's interest i ...
September 2, 1880, Downs Times (ID 2010)

W. G. Harvey has purchased Dr. Taylor's interest in the Times building and the office will be moved to Beason's lots, near the depot.

 

Persons wishing to make publication of final proof ...
September 30, 1880, Downs Times (ID 2015)

Persons wishing to make publication of final proof or contest notices should request their attorney to send the same to us. Any notices which are nearer to us than any other paper are ours by rights. As our price is the same as the other papers charge, we justly claim notices within our limits. Our attorneys at this place are prepared to attend to all kinds of land business.

Rev. Craft's milk wagon was upset by the high water while crossing the river Friday, and his horse was nearly drowned....

George Ficard, the able local editor of the Farmer, has severed his connection with that paper and gone on his claim. He will find his way back to journalism like a duck to water.

 

Webb McNall is hot. The Mo. Pacific railroad won't ...
October 7, 1880, Downs Times (ID 2017)

Webb McNall is hot. The Mo. Pacific railroad won't give him a pass and he is sucking his own blood by calling the road a rickety old concern. The editor of the Gaylord Herald is of the opinion that Webb McNall is a bigger institution than the MPRR. Webb publishes a good paper and is entitled to more than a...pass....

 

The county printing matter seems to be in a fair w ...
October 14, 1880, Downs Times (ID 2019)

The county printing matter seems to be in a fair way to culminate in a lawsuit, as we have expected. The Truthteller and Farmer could not come to fair terms on the county printing last January, hence instead of getting it at legal rates they offered to do it for nothing and board themselves, and Borin got the printing by giving two dollars for the privilege of doing it to beat Barnhart. Now the scene has changed and Borin wants pay for some of the printing understood to be included in the contract....

Columbus Borin, the man of the Truthteller and tribulation, came down to see us Thursday last. He went back on the same train with Governor St. John and Postmaster Hays. That was a strange party.

 

Some of our farmer friends who owe for the Times m ...
October 28, 1880, Downs Times (ID 2024)

Some of our farmer friends who owe for the Times may pay the debt by bringing in a load of wood or a few chickens. When you come to town, please remember this.

 

Work Together, Boys. During our short stay in Down ...
November 4, 1880, Downs Times (ID 2026)

Work Together, Boys. During our short stay in Downs we have tried to work for the general interests of the young city and country surrounding. If mistakes have been made, they have been of the head and not of the heart. Upon every question concerning our good, the Times has taken sides with what we considered the right. Opposition has never been wanting on any question, political or otherwise. We took a very active part in securing the fine schoolhouse which stands on the hill -- a credit to Downs and Osborne County. For that, one or two

stopped their papers. We favored the jail bonds and were snowed under, but Osborne County will change her mind on that question before five years. The Times has worked decidedly in favor of a flouring mill at Downs, and our fondest wishes are being realized to the highest extent....Again the Times has worked for a bridge across the river south of Downs, and shall do so until that end is accomplished....

 

Look elsewhere and find Wm. Mellen's advertisement ...
November 11, 1880, Downs Times (ID 2027)

Look elsewhere and find Wm. Mellen's advertisement. His office is now at the Times.

 

The Stockton News has winked out and the Record ha ...
November 18, 1880, Downs Times (ID 2030)

The Stockton News has winked out and the Record has grown smaller. The two-for-five editor of the latter unreliable sheet was in town Monday, but was ashamed to call after lying so about us and sending us no paper.

 

Our editorial brothers, Barnhart and Borin, called ...
November 25, 1880, Downs Times (ID 2032)

Our editorial brothers, Barnhart and Borin, called on us last week.

Hon. T. M. Helm, the best register this land district ever had, called Wednesday on his way home to Kirwin. Billy Jenkins' target has lived through the rose season and all the calumny heaped upon him by the Pioneer and other paid opposition. Each county has more than one newspaper now, and it takes more than $25 or an old font of type to oust a good officer for any individual interest.

 

Kirwin has two papers now, as the Greenback Harlan ...
December 2, 1880, Downs Times (ID 2036)

Kirwin has two papers now, as the Greenback Harlan Independent outlived its welcome in Smith County and has moved into the graveyard of the Progress and Iconoclast. We are pleased because of the removal of the Independent for two reasons. Kirwin may appreciate it better, and it will give the Times a larger field of final proof country. We wish it all the success the Greenback cause deserves. In a few weeks we expect to hear of it being excluded from the U.S. mails as an advertising dodge.

The editors of the Osborne papers are carving out the destiny of the Times to suit themselves, sometimes advertising us and again doing some injury by stating that we intend going to Osborne. Allow us to settle that matter by saying that the address of the Times will be Downs for a very long time to come. Our young city will poll as many votes as Osborne by next general election and we cannot afford to give up such a good city and location, while we thank our Osborne friends for their kind assistance and invitations to go to Osborne City with our newspaper. In the county printing matter, we have entered into an agreement with F. H. Barnhart, of the Farmer, to submit a joint contract to the Hon. Board of County Commissioners to do all the county printing interesting to the general readers in both papers, each to receive half legal rates....For the general good of the county, we very respectfully request the Hon. Board of Commissioners to give this matter their serious attention.

Mark J. Kelley, a new traveler of the Topeka Commonwealth, called yesterday.

 

The Truthteller has not been issued for about two ...
December 9, 1880, Downs Times (ID 2038)

The Truthteller has not been issued for about two weeks, and we think Borin is off looking for a location, although he claims that he is to go to St. Louis, confer with General Manager Talmage and take a special car all over Texas with the superintendent in official style.

 

One of the best newspaper and job printers in the ...
December 23, 1880, Downs Times (ID 2045)

One of the best newspaper and job printers in the state wants a situation.

Address Times, Downs, Kansas.

Dr. Thompson of the Smith County Free Press called Monday and told us something about the true inwardness of journalism in that county. He says the senatorial fight there has caused the land office patronage to be taken from the Free Press and restored to the Pioneer, and the Helm suit against Jenkins will be withdrawn. According to the custom, the land officers are now expected to furnish blood for every political leech who runs a paper. We know of several blood-suckers in this district.

 

Topliff of the Cawker Free Press has a new printer ...
December 30, 1880, Downs Times (ID 2048)

Topliff of the Cawker Free Press has a new printer. He arrived last week, and Top wears a 7x9 smile.

 

The Times and Farmer will each hereafter publish a ...
January 13, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2049)

The Times and Farmer will each hereafter publish all legal matters pertaining to the county and receive a recompense of fifth per cent each. The Times has now been running nearly a year and has tried to give all the news, and state it plainly. It has taken sides with right and opposed wrong. It has made few enemies and numerous friends. The support so far has not been what it should, but we hope and believe it will grow better when the spring trade opens up and the town receives a new impetus. Our subscription list is as large as we can expect considering the failure of last year's crop. We shall, however, try to give our patrons a better paper than we have done in the past, and will make every improvement we can afford. No person can afford to be without his official county paper, and we invite you to call and subscribe to the Times.

According to promise, Webb McNall of the Gaylord Herald stopped over here last Friday. He is a lively candidate for sergeant-at-arms of the House....

 

Brother Charley is working for State Printer Marti ...
January 20, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2052)

Brother Charley is working for State Printer Martin in his Topeka establishment. The office turns out the best work in the Union.

 

ONE YEAR OLD: This is my first birthday, and I am ...
February 10, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2059)

ONE YEAR OLD

This is my first birthday, and I am a yearling.

My address shall be Downs, Kans., for another year.

I am now one of the official papers of Osborne County.

I have appeared every Thursday morning for a year, on time.

I have had no steam power ambitions, hence no mortgages.

I have trodden upon the political corns of some. Some have returned the compliment.

I have made mistakes of the hand, but not of the heart; he who has not may cast the first stone.

I hope I have done some good -- at least made Downs and the world no worse for having lived.

Many changes have taken place in Downs since my birth, and brighter days seem near at hand.

I have courted no favors, defended the right and denounced the wrong at the peril of getting licked.

During the past year, I have not grown pompous, wealthy or fat. I commenced even with the world and have held my own.

If you like me, and want me, pay up for another year; bring or send in your address with $1.50. I propose to grow brighter the older I grow. -- Downs Times

Neighbor Headley of the Gaylord Herald called on the Times Friday. He is keeping up the record of the Herald while Webb is using his muscle in Topeka.

 

Friend Borin and W. W. Watson of Osborne passed ea ...
March 3, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2064)

Friend Borin and W. W. Watson of Osborne passed east for their visiting wives last week. Borin says the Truthteller will live.

 

For some unknown reason, the Mayor ordered Clerk P ...
March 10, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2066)

For some unknown reason, the Mayor ordered Clerk Poole not to have the ordinances printed in the Times this issue. We have charged only half legal rates for most of the city printing, and have done much gratuitous work beside. It is also a fact that other bills against the city have not been discounted by the holders. We have worked hard to build up Downs, and are entitled to the same compensation as others, as it costs money to run a paper. All we ask is legal rates -- the same as paid by the state and county, and surrounding cities.

$1 per square of 250 ems is legal living price. Law requires that before ordinances take effect they must be published in the city paper. We pay our share of taxes and ask nothing but what is fair. We shall discount our bills in the same proportion that others do. That is fair.

We are pleased to say a sidewalk ordinance passed at council Tuesday. The Times was in favor of sidewalks when Dr. Taylor and Mayor Craney killed the sidewalk issue in council six months ago. We have not changed our base, but are glad the mayor has. Had Mayor Craney worked for sidewalks then, we would not now be wading mud up to our knees. When you are button-holed on this question, remember the flop. Make no pledges to any man for mayor of Downs until election day.

 

COLUMBUS BORIN. Editor Osborne Truthteller Skipped ...
March 17, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2067)

COLUMBUS BORIN. Editor Osborne Truthteller Skipped the Country last Week. Osborne Mourning in Sackcloth and Ashes at the Departure. Another Loved One Gone. -- The Truthteller came to us last week bearing a new management. It insists that it is not dead, the best evidence to the contrary. Two weeks since Borin went away on a visit, and the incredulous community supposing he had vamoosed, divided his household goods and print shop among the creditors. The boys got out a paper of superior style, setting forth that a new head was necessary. Borin soon after arrived home, and must have been surprised. The Truthteller will probably die a lingering death. Mr. Columbus Borin was delivered over to the sheriff by Cooper & Murray, his bondsmen in the

R. R. Hays libel case, to come up in April. For some reason, he was allowed a little more freedom than proper, by misrepresenting that his other bondsman, A. W. Gowan, would still hold good on the $1,000 bond. His crocodile tears and earnest pleadings kept him from going to jail, and true to his reputation he took the first opportunity to play dirt upon those who have befriended him. When the big round moon and the twinkling stars sang together over the slumbering city of Osborne, Columbus Borin shook the dust from his No. 13 shoes, put on his No. 4 hat, and started out for more genial climes between two days. He is not a neophyte in crime, hence bartered his mortgaged property before he took leg bail....When Osborne wants another paper, we hope she will get one that will not be prostituted by everyone who has a crow to pick. Now we desire to call your attention to the character of him who has committed perjury, sold the politics of his newspaper, defended crime and murder, blackmailed and sponged money, basely sold his best friends and stung the hand which protected him -- Mr. Columbus Borin, fugitive from justice.

 

We are sorry to say that of all the ordinances tha ...
March 24, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2069)

We are sorry to say that of all the ordinances that have been passed since incorporation, not one was passed in legal form. No legal prosecution can be forced under them. It has been proposed to remodel them.

We were presented with a petition on Monday signed by most of our business men, requesting John Jackson to allow his name to be used as a candidate for mayor of Downs. We signed the petition for several reasons. Jackson Bros. have done a glorious thing for Downs in building their mammoth mill....Of course, Mr. Jackson is not a candidate in the sense of the word usually applied, but we are confident that he will serve like a true citizen when the people have elected him to that position.

 

To be, or not to be, that is the question; whether ...
March 31, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2071)

To be, or not to be, that is the question; whether it is nobler in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of politics, or, by flopping, end them? Must we bear the ills of the mayor we have, or, by opposing, elect one that we know not of? To ride behind the mayor's fast steed, to drink nice beer, and play soft games of pool, is something to be devoutly wished for. By opposing the mayor, and losing squares of legal city printing long drawn out -- aye there's the rub -- are we not unjust to No. 1? Conscience makes cowards of us all. All to be lost by opposition; all to be gained by warring for he who wants it worst. The very thought of flying steeds, soothing beer, fat games of pool and city ordinances, flash across Hamlet's greedy vision. Hamlet loves wealth, and beer, and pool, and -- votes. Out native resolution has been sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought; we love the smiles of city mayors and popularity acquired in various ways. Hamlet can not buck the glittering tinsel, hence will war no more.

 

Owing to no-opposition ticket, the election was ve ...
April 7, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2073)

Owing to no-opposition ticket, the election was very quiet, and most of our people voted the straight ticket because there was no other....For mayor, J. B. Craney received 83....Everybody knows Joe, who hasn't a hair between his head and heaven. He will now have another chance to do something for Downs than he did last year, and we hope he will succeed....

Good Joke on Craney. -- Before election day, the Times did not work very hard for Craney for mayor, and Joe wouldn't ride us behind his fast steed, set up the beer or give us soft snaps on pool. Why, he even drove to the suburban town of Cawker last Sunday to get election tickets printed, after driving his poor steed to death all week. Joe hain't a working encyclopaedia or biographical dictionary, so he got nearly all the names spelled wrong, and had to get his tickets printed at the Times after all. Now, when the city dads want some ordinances or printing done, we recommend them to Cawker. We can then do the work correctly for them and feel prouder.

It has been agreed to dismiss the Borin-Hays libel suit. Borin is at Glenville, Neb., living a retired life on the interest of his debts.

After election we drank some soothing beer and played a soft game of pool with the mayor. All fights were declared off.

Downs Times for Sale. Business will call me to England May 1st, and I desire to sell the Downs Times and patronage. The material is new and complete and the patronage good. I have the county printing also. The right man can find a bargain by addressing Tom G. Nicklin, Downs, Kansas.

 

Our office has been moved near the depot, and now ...
April 14, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2076)

Our office has been moved near the depot, and now we are safe from fire, nearer the center of town, and closer to the depot and post office.

Friend Topliff of the Cawker Free Press put his portly form into this office Monday. He had been up to Osborne to see if the Truthteller was really dead for certain. He says it is.

 

Whether we sell the Times or not, it will go on ju ...
April 21, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2081)

Whether we sell the Times or not, it will go on just the same. We propose to write a few short letters home to the paper while away.

 

Mayor Craney is up at Oberlin, the new land office ...
April 28, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2082)

Mayor Craney is up at Oberlin, the new land office town. We should feel sorry to lose Jo. He is a good fellow if he does take fits. Downs would have to abandon her charter for want of mayor material if Jo should go. When he sees this item he will swear that the Times shall not print another ordinance.

 

Doc Thompson of the Smith Free Press has been gran ...
May 5, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2086)

Doc Thompson of the Smith Free Press has been granted a $3,500 pension. We always did wonder why the Free Press was so solicitous in regard to pensions, but the secret spring has come to light. Doc will now pay his paper and wash bills.

 

During the absence of the editor, Wm. Mellen will ...
May 12, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2090)

During the absence of the editor, Wm. Mellen will attend to office matters, and J. T. Payne will do the mechanical part of the Times.

 

Bailey of Harlan is trying to buy the Truth Teller ...
May 19, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2092)

Bailey of Harlan is trying to buy the Truth Teller outfit to start a paper at Harlan. The outfit is idle and Harlan should have a paper by all means, for it is nearly as large as Glen Elder, which has a paper.

 

With this issue, I cease to be proprietor of the T ...
May 26, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2095)

With this issue, I cease to be proprietor of the Times. I have worked hard to make the paper newsy and first-class, and how well I have succeeded the people must judge. The future of Downs and the Times is what the business men make them. The paper is now prospering, and is well founded above the groveling soreheads who have dogged its life. I am proud to say it has fearlessly denounced wrong men and measures and sustained right and justice. As a fish loves water, so do I love journalism, and will return again. The new firm with my assistance will go on in the good work, and I recommend them to you. I thank my many friends for their patronage and support; I cheerfully forgive my few enemies, and hope heaven will enter the same favor upon them. -- Tom G. Nicklin.

SALUTATORY. In assuming control of the Times, we make few promises for the future. The paper shall be conducted in the future as in the past. It shall be kept up to its present standard, and it shall always be our aim to still further improve it whenever possible, and to make it a first class county news paper. It shall represent and always work for the interests of Downs. It shall be always an advocate of right and a fearless denunciator of wrong. Asking the patronage and support of all who are interested in the welfare and prosperity of Downs, we are -- Respectfully yours, Dougherty & David. (George E. Dougherty and Silas David)

Nicklin has sold this paper to Dougherty & David, who take charge this week. Geo. E. Dougherty, late editor of the Mitchell County Key, will be editor.

Nicklin will remain with us and the Times some time and assist in making the paper the best in the northwest.

 

We learn that George Ficard will breathe life into ...
June 2, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2097)

We learn that George Ficard will breathe life into the Osborne Truth Teller and call it a daily paper. It will begin life about Monday and continue in uncertainty. We wish it success.

We have said the Kirwin Chief and Pburg Herald were smutty, but they take a back seat for Smith County papers.

 

Mr. Dougherty of this paper is attending the gradu ...
June 9, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2099)

Mr. Dougherty of this paper is attending the graduation exercises of his college class at Sterling, Illinois.

 

The boys of this office, Will Knight and Francis T ...
July 7, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2103)

The boys of this office, Will Knight and Francis Trubey, celebrated the 4th at Cawker and Beloit. They report a big time.

 

Not Guilty -- Dismissed. For a long time, the lega ...
July 14, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2104)

Not Guilty -- Dismissed. For a long time, the legality of the Downs ordinances, which were published only in pamphlet form, has been questioned. Wm. Mellen was arrested last week for refusing to comply with the poll tax ordinance, because it had not been published in the city paper according to the requirements of the law. Tom Nicklin and Frank Crouch went bond for his appearance, and Tuesday the case was tried before Judge Phelps, argued on one side by Attorney Mellen and on the part of the city by Squire Huff. Much law was presented and a lively interest was shown to know whether or not the ordinances were valid. The Police Judge found Mellen not guilty and dismissed him. In the evidence, it was found that not one pamphlet has been sold or given away, although the law regards publicity of paramount importance. Many other defects were found, showing that the city has probably but few ordinances which can be legally enforced, and without danger of contest. The public are left to judge as to the true character of the prosecution. It will result in more care being taken in city matters. Criticism of Attorney Mellen in his plea upon Mayor Craney resulted in an assault and battery by Mayor Craney, after the trial and dismissal, upon Mr. Mellen. For this offense he was brought before Squire Bowers on Tuesday and fined five dollars and costs.

The City Council had a meeting last night, Councilmen Forline, Dimond, Faries and Brunson present. A motion was made to publish all the City Ordinances in the Times; yeas, Forline and Dimond; nays, Brunson and Faries; a vote of the Mayor decided the motion lost.

In another place, we mention the assault upon Mr. Mellen by the Mayor. It was a most disgraceful proceeding, injustifiable under any circumstances and in the man who above all others in town is expected to keep the peace it is simply despicable. It is to be regretted that no provision is made by the City Ordinances for the impeachment of a Mayor for such a heinous offense. There is universal indignation at the insignificance of the fine imposed. The people are agitating the question of a petition requesting him to resign, and the holding of an indignation meeting to adopt resolutions in disapproval of his misconduct.

The Osborne Daily News is a very good paper, and instead of showing signs of dying out, is growing better every day. It certainly speaks well for Osborne City to so well support so good a daily.

 

S. W. Knight, one of the boys of this office, was ...
July 28, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2106)

S. W. Knight, one of the boys of this office, was down home at Glen Elder on Sunday and on Monday he took in the Greenback meeting at Beloit.

 

The paper has been unavoidably delayed this week, ...
August 4, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2115)

The paper has been unavoidably delayed this week, owning to failure of the type founders to forward type which we had ordered and needed for this issue.

 

Tom Nicklin is reporting the Knox murder trial for ...
August 11, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2116)

Tom Nicklin is reporting the Knox murder trial for the river papers.

This week ends a quarter, and we hope all our advertisers will be ready this week to settle up for the last three months.

 

That sprightly little paper, the Osborne Daily New ...
August 18, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2117)

That sprightly little paper, the Osborne Daily News, suspended publication last Saturday, after an apparently successful career of two months.

Osborne will soon have another weekly newspaper, a successor to the Daily News; it will be called the Osborne News, and will be Republican in politics.

C. W. Nicklin is now in St. Louis, undergoing treatment for weak eyes, caused by overwork in the state printing office. His eyes are healing and he will enter Evanston College in September to study for the ministry. Thus a good printer will be spoiled.

 

The Cedarville Democrat, which came out in a flowe ...
September 1, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2120)

The Cedarville Democrat, which came out in a flowery salutatory a month since, is about to bite the dust. It was started on the inflated money system, and the holders of notes didn't get toadied enough to tickle their fancy. The concern has been seized, and the Meat Ax has gone down to an early grave.

 

(City ordinances printed on front page. Also in is ...
September 15, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2123)

(City ordinances printed on front page. Also in issue of September 22.)

 

George Ficard will do the work on the Portis Patri ...
September 29, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2125)

George Ficard will do the work on the Portis Patriot for a while.

Borin was hovering around Portis last week, and we judge he edited the Patriot.

Last week the Portis Patriot arrived, filled with dead Osborne ads and old liver-pad cuts.

The first installment of the Portis Patriot went down under mortgage Saturday. A horse went first, and the rest of the concern will go and sleep with the roses soon.

 

Just as we predicted, the Portis Patriot has chang ...
October 6, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2126)

Just as we predicted, the Portis Patriot has changed from a Greenback paper to an independent paper, and Bryant has been fired from management of it. A stock company of Portis men now own and run it. It may be made a newsy paper, and we wish it success. Some say it has suspended.

 

The Downs Times, for brief pointed items, is a wor ...
October 20, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2128)

The Downs Times, for brief pointed items, is a worthy namesake of the Great State Daily. -- Leavenworth Times.

 

This is the last week that the Beloit Courier and ...
November 3, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2131)

This is the last week that the Beloit Courier and Burr Oak Reveille will refer to us an unadulterated liar. Politics will cease now for a while and common decency will return to the editors who have thrown dirt so freely in the championship of Smith.

 

We never did know how terribly mean we really are ...
November 24, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2140)

We never did know how terribly mean we really are until we read this week's Cawker Journal, in which McBride gives us the following "send off:" "Tom G. Nicklin is no longer editor of the Times, but gives way to Geo. E. Dougherty, whose knowledge of courtesy is as limited as wool on a swine."

Tom G. Nicklin left Downs on Monday for Kirwin, where he will take charge of the Chief. We wish Tom abundant success. Tom Nicklin has left all note and mortgage accounts with Squire Huff for attention.

 

Explanatory. The lateness of this issue is entirel ...
December 8, 1881, Downs Times (ID 2143)

Explanatory. The lateness of this issue is entirely unavoidable on our part; the paper for this week's issue was, without our request or knowledge, delayed four days in order to get in the President's Message; not having the paper we could not issue any sooner than we do. We are sorry to have so disappointed our readers, but under the circumstances no apology further than an explanation is needed and none offered.

The Kirwin Chief has improved very perceptibly since Tom Nicklin has taken charge of it....

The first number of the Portis Patriot under the management of I. S. Drummond was issued last week. It is a very neat and newsy sheet and certainly deserves a liberal support....

 

Tom Nicklin started out this week as traveling cor ...
January 12, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2151)

Tom Nicklin started out this week as traveling correspondent for the Leavenworth Times.

This week we move our office building up the street upon the lot next the post office; come and see us in our new quarters. We have been all out of shape for several weeks past with moving, or attempts to move our office. If our friends will have a little patience, we will get things straightened out before long.

 

Every day a number of persons rush into our office ...
January 19, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2153)

Every day a number of persons rush into our office thinking it to be the Post Office, then back out in astonishment and look up and down the street to ascertain just where they are. For their benefit we have put up this sign: "This is Not the Post Office. NEXT door."

We are late again this week on account of the delay last week caused by the moving of our building; by next week we expect to have caught up again.

 

We now have a new sign in front of our office that ...
February 16, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2158)

We now have a new sign in front of our office that all who run may read and know where the Times may be found. John Russell painted the sign and did a good job.

 

Mr. Fuller, an old typo formerly of the Cawker Jou ...
February 23, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2159)

Mr. Fuller, an old typo formerly of the Cawker Journal office, spent Tuesday night in town and of course called on the Times.

 

J. N. Fuller of Cawker, an old "Knight of the stic ...
March 2, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2160)

J. N. Fuller of Cawker, an old "Knight of the stick and rule," is now in the Times office.

 

There was a drunken tramp editor in town last Thur ...
March 9, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2161)

There was a drunken tramp editor in town last Thursday night.

"The Downs, Kansas, Times -- Geo. Dougherty's paper -- was greatly improved last week by setting its home news in large, clearly readable type." -- Sterling (Ill.) Standard.

 

Tom Nicklin wants to dispose of all his Downs prop ...
March 16, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2162)

Tom Nicklin wants to dispose of all his Downs property, real estate and notes. Inquire at Downs Bank.

Fred Hulaniski, local editor of the Cawker Free Press, is squelching McBride of the Cawker Journal. Get offen 'em, Fred, what's the use pounding a man when he's down?

The Cawker City Free Press, Fred Hulaniski local editor, is a lively little sheet and deserves a good patronage.

Frank Dougherty is back in the Times office this week, to take the place of Silas David, who is engaged in the manufacture of brooms for a while.

Tom Nicklin has bought the Salina Herald and will take charge of that paper April 1st. Tom now has a good paper in a good town and we wish him success.

 

A lot of the boys the other day had a trial of the ...
March 23, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2164)

A lot of the boys the other day had a trial of their respective ability at jumping and Tom Nicklin carried off the champion belt, no one else being able to reach his mark.

Tom Nicklin, "a citizen of Salina," was in the city Saturday and of course attended the city caucus. He reports Salina booming. Tom will put an entire new dress on the Salina Herald. He takes possession today and will issue his first number next week.

 

Mad, Mac? Got your back up? Kicking are you? Well, ...
March 30, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2166)

Mad, Mac? Got your back up? Kicking are you? Well, now bray; and to do it well, bray naturally; you know how. Your cowardly attack through the columns of your paper (the Cawker City Journal) last week upon a gentleman who is engaged upon our paper was uncalled for and beneath the dignity of a respectable journal.... You made the attack, thinking, no doubt, that he would have no opportunity of defending himself, but as we like a little fun once in a while we shall allow him as much space in our columns as he chooses to occupy....

 

Our first love, the Downs Times, has a neat new dr ...
April 6, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2167)

Our first love, the Downs Times, has a neat new dress and is neat and newsy. -- Salina Herald.

W. H. Nelson of the Smith County Pioneer dropped in on us last Monday. He reports everything lovely in Smith Centre, and the Pioneer prosperous; Gus and Jack both having experienced religion, the office is quieter and more respectable than it used to was....

We send several hundred copies of the Times every week to different points through the East. Many hundred people see it. They naturally form an opinion of our town from the paper. If our advertising columns are well filled, they will say Downs has a lot of energetic business men, who will build up the town and thus make it a good point. If our local columns are well filled, they will say Downs is a lively, wide-awake town. Hence they will conclude, and very rightly too, that Downs is a good town to live in and a good town to do business in.

It will thus be the means of bringing new citizens and more business men to our town....We ask and shall expect a liberal advertising patronage from every business man in Downs who takes price in the prosperity and growth of his town. He works against his own interests who refused to patronize his own town paper. A word to the wise is sufficient.

 

W. C. Huff is a good blacksmith; he did some good ...
April 13, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2168)

W. C. Huff is a good blacksmith; he did some good work for us this week on our press.

We got some more new printing material while in Kansas City last week. We are bound to make the Times one of the neatest papers in the state.

We are putting a printing office at Bull City and the Key will shortly be printed at home.

 

The Cawker City Free Press has been enlarged to ei ...
April 20, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2170)

The Cawker City Free Press has been enlarged to eight columns and makes a first rate appearance. It is evident Steph. went to Cawker to stay. Last winter when the hard times struck him, he cut his paper down to a size that he could carry through without embarrassment, kept it neat and spicy with local matter, and now opens out on the broad gauge and presents to the people of his town a much better paper than they have ever had before....

We were never more agreeably surprised than yesterday. When our forms were about ready for the press, a silver cloud spread itself before our door and commenced rippling into our office. There was danger for a time, gentle reader, that you would get no paper this week; we had been reading a treatise on spiritualism and instinctively looked for their golden harps. Our surprise gave way to admiration when we discovered that it was nineteen or eleven ladies, members of the "Ladies' Aid Society" of Downs. They remained with us for a few happy moments and then left us to our lonely contemplation. We immediately struck up "I want to be an angel."...

We occasionally get a dollar cigar -- and it doesn't smoke any better than a stinker, either -- or a dime offered us, which in these stringent times is a great temptation. It comes about thusly: A fellow comes into the office and entertains us for a half hour or three-quarters of an hour with a rambling account of his private affairs and winds up with a request that we give him a good "send off," or in other words insert in our local columns an advertisement for him, very condescendingly tendering us a cigar for the same. "It will make a good item for you, you know, and help to fill up your paper." Generally some soothing remark like this follows his exit from the door: "A member of the brass band." "More cheek than brains." "The infernal old skinflint." And our toes itch in our boots with a desire to accelerate his motions as he leaves the office and the thought arises that a very small hole would do for him to crawl into.

 

Press Wanted. We want a good cheap 8 column Washin ...
May 11, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2174)

Press Wanted. We want a good cheap 8 column Washington hand press. Address at once, stating price, Times, Downs, Kansas.

 

Geo. E. Dougherty, editor of the Downs Times, call ...
July 6, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2181)

Geo. E. Dougherty, editor of the Downs Times, called last Saturday. He had been over south of the river somewhere, to see his girl probably, and was on his way home on foot, hot, tired and dusty.... -- Cawker Free Press.

 

Ye editor has been too sick most of the time durin ...
July 20, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2183)

Ye editor has been too sick most of the time during the past week to do any work and nearly all the work fell upon our "devil" until Tuesday, when Brother Drummond of the Portis Patriot kindly helped us out by sparing us a man from his office....

 

The Stockton Record has made another break and now ...
August 10, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2188)

The Stockton Record has made another break and now issues a daily edition.

Ralph Cary of the Bull City Key office has been helping us out on this week's Times.

Our force this week consists of Frank Dougherty, Lincoln Drummond, and Ralph Cary, and we have had an opportunity to see the old adage about three boys fully exemplified.

There is an immense amount of work to get out an edition of two thousand copies of a paper the size of this week's issue, as we have had occasion to discover this week. Under the circumstances, it has been impossible to get out as good a paper as we would like. When we get rightly started with our new form we will give our patrons a paper of which they can be proud.

The Times is having quite a subscription boom. We do not need any soliciting either....

The Times force now conducts a private boarding house at No. 1 Schoolhouse Square. All contributions of farm produce, chickens, turkeys, etc., will be gratefully received in exchange for subscription.

 

Our mammoth edition of last week kept our entire f ...
August 17, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2189)

Our mammoth edition of last week kept our entire force hard at work until Monday evening, thus allowing us only two days, without any additional help, to get out this issue....

 

The Camp Fire is the name of a new monthly paper a ...
August 24, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2190)

The Camp Fire is the name of a new monthly paper at Cawker, published by L. Alrich in the interests of the GAR.

Patriot vs. Decency. The Portis Patriot last week devoted a half column to a lot of slush for our especial benefit, and we suppose the editor is happy in the knowledge that he has beaten us; for he is well aware that we are at least half way decent and would not resort to the use of sneak thief adjectives as he does....

The Portis Patriot heaps abusive language by the stick-ful upon our innocent head and almost uses us up, as it were -- all because we had the unparalleled audacity to publish an item which rather gave the impression that our neighboring village is somewhat on the quiet order....Just read and ponder over the following item, which you will readily recognize, inasmuch as it emanated from your pen...: "Now we staid in Downs all day Monday week ago, and didn't see nary a man or woman, either, from this country in town. But we didn't notice it, because that is the normal condition of Downs."

The libel suit of McBride vs. DeYoung and Hulaniski was decided last week. DeYoung was fined $25 and costs, amounting in all to about $350, and Hulaniski was acquitted.

The Bull City Key will soon be printed at home. The Key, in the year during which it has been published, has been of great and inestimable benefit to the town, but the business men, although enterprising as a rule, have not seemed to appreciate it as they should....

 

Wanted, at once, a good printer, at this office; m ...
August 31, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2193)

Wanted, at once, a good printer, at this office; must understand job printing. The right kind of a man can have a permanent position.

Shaw, the jovial representative of the Hinman & Moody paper company of Kansas City, was in town on Tuesday and made the Times a visit.

We lack about 50 copies this week to supply our subscription list, although we last week increased our regular order by 25 copies; and we are compelled to send our exchanges half sheets this week. We are receiving new subscribers daily, and, like Oliver Twist, are still wanting "more."...

The newspapers of northwest Kansas are changing hands so fast that we can hardly keep track of them.

The editors of northwest Kansas are all young men, with very few exceptions. If they were all assembled at one time they would make a body very noticeable in this respect.

 

Oliver Zellers of Cawker helped us out on the Time ...
September 14, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2196)

Oliver Zellers of Cawker helped us out on the Times this week.

A. J. Runyon, editor and proprietor of the Bull City Key, was in town Saturday getting some material for his office.

From this week hence, the Bull City Key, which has been printed in the Times office for the past 15 months, will be printed at home. A. J. Runyon is now the proprietor and Franz Drummond has charge of the mechanical department.

We have had an immense amount of trouble lately to get help in the office; and as an unavoidable consequence we have been late with our paper; printers are wonderfully scarce in this part of the country. We were fortunate enough to secure the services of Fred J. Hulaniski, who started in this morning and will stay with us, moving his family here as soon as he can get a house. Mr. Hulaniski is an excellent printer in all branches of the business....

 

Married, on Tuesday, Sept. 19th, 1882, at the resi ...
September 21, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2198)

Married, on Tuesday, Sept. 19th, 1882, at the residence of the bride's parents, in this city, by Rev. A. T. Riley, Mr. Geo. E. Dougherty to Miss Rose Getty. The ceremony took place at 10 o'clock a.m., the members of the two families and one or two intimate friends being in attendance. The bride and groom left on the same day for Chicago, Ill., where they will spend a few days visiting friends, and will return home next week, when they will commence housekeeping for themselves in the Haskell building near the schoolhouse. A goodly number of the friends and acquaintances of the high contracting parties attended them to the train....Mr. Dougherty is the proprietor of this paper, and we take advantage of his absence to say a word in praise of himself and the fair young wife. Fate has garlanded the chaplet of our friend with one of the fairest and sweetest flowers that ever bloomed in the parterre of beauty....

 

During the last two weeks, Frank Dougherty has bee ...
September 28, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2199)

During the last two weeks, Frank Dougherty has been at work in the Times office, manipulating the silent messengers of thought. He goes back to the life of a granger on Saturday.

Ye editor and wife have returned from Chicago, where they had a very pleasant visit.

"From the Downs, Kansas, Times we learn that on Sept. 29th Mr. Geo. E. Dougherty, editor of that paper, was married to Miss Rose Getty of Downs, and that they left for Chicago on a bridal tour. And by the Inter Ocean we see that they were in the city this week at the Exposition. Many of our Sterling people will recognize in Mr. Dougherty a graduate of the Second Ward School a very few years back...." -- Sterling (Illinois) Standard.

 

Fred Hulaniski has moved his family to Downs from ...
October 5, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2200)

Fred Hulaniski has moved his family to Downs from Cawker, and will occupy the Huff house near the blacksmith shop.

We have received a lot of new job material and are now better prepared than ever to do job printing in good style and at low prices....

There isn't a bachelor on the Times force now, and we want it distinctly understood that produce on subscription or otherwise will come in awful handy. Produce means anything under the sun that the stomachs of a brace of printers and their suffering families can digest. We are not particular whether it is a bag of new sorghum, a bushel of "murphys," a chunk of Kansas hog, or a dozen specimens of nine-year-old spring chicken. This will make it easy for some of our subscribers to square up for their newspaper.

Fred Hulaniski took sick this morning and was compelled to quit work. This left ye editor all alone, and he has proven unequal to the task, the paper being again behind time....

Olly Zellers, the young metal pounder of the Cawker Free Press, enlivened us with his gentle racket Monday evening.

 

We stand ready to wager a bushel of red onions aga ...
October 12, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2202)

We stand ready to wager a bushel of red onions against a $7 bill that any merchant who gets job printing done in Atchison or any other place away from home loses money by it, and if he will call at this office we will convince him of it in about a minute.

Any printer who is mean and little enough to travel around through the country soliciting job work in towns that contain printing offices is a stinker of the first water, and ought to be kicked with a pair of stoga boots headed with feet. Atchison Globe please copy.

Henry Vogler is "ink boy" now in the Times office and wields the roller on press days with the skill of an old hand at the business. If he keeps on as well as he has begun, in a few years he will make a full-fledged printer and will have mastered a noble trade -- one that will enable him to starve to death for the rest of his natural existence.

 

The Burr Oak Reveille is one of the best papers in ...
October 19, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2203)

The Burr Oak Reveille is one of the best papers in this section.

On time this week; we have caught up at last, and as ye editor won't get married again for a while we think it safe to say that the Times will be on time as a regular thing hereafter.

The Cawker Free Press is a splendid good local sheet, but it makes a decided failure in trying to be independent in politics. Steve is a Democrat to the backbone, and it will crop out, in spite of everything.

 

Austin L. Topliff, the only newspaper man in the n ...
November 9, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2207)

Austin L. Topliff, the only newspaper man in the northwest except Billy Caldwell who girts eleven feet and a half around the waist, was in town yesterday...but he forgot to call on us. He is hereby notified that the Times office is located nearly opposite the St. James Hotel, ground floor.

It is strange what ideas some men have of the newspaper business. They do not seem to realize at all that the space in our newspaper is the same as merchandise -- that we must make our living from the sale of that space -- and they often ask us to give them advertising at half what it is worth, and sometimes even less....

Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Dougherty of Naomi, Mitchell County, were in the city over Sunday, visiting their son and daughter, ye editor and wife.

 

The Times office was a favorite loafing place duri ...
November 16, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2208)

The Times office was a favorite loafing place during the cold weather of the past week. We always have a good fire when it is cold, and our friends are very welcome.

The table of election returns put us back considerably with this issue; we lost a great deal of time and work in finding out that we hadn't enough figures in the office to set up the table complete, and we had to distribute most of what we had set up in order to get figures enough to give the vote on the county ticket and governor. We were sadly fooled on that table.

 

The Kansas Herald of Hiawatha is the best state ex ...
November 23, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2209)

The Kansas Herald of Hiawatha is the best state exchange on our list. For sound, logical argument, solid common sense, and pointed, outspoken editorials it takes the lead.

Two of the fellow citizens arose on their dignity and stopped their paper last week, and the life of the Times hung by a slender thread for nearly 24 hours, when fortunately seven other men came in and subscribed.

Senator Tom Nicklin of Salina will be in Downs today.

 

There are some business men who will ask us to giv ...
November 30, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2210)

There are some business men who will ask us to give them a complimentary notice every week in our paper and will then, after we do this, send their work to an Atchison printing establishment instead of giving it to a home institution, and will not even give us an advertisement. There is a man in this town who has treated us in just that way, and we hereby inform him that if he can't appreciate a favor any more than that he will hereafter pay five cents a line for any item about him or his business that he desires inserted in the Times.

Tom Nicklin has enlarged his Salina Herald to a nine column sheet and adopted the patent.

The Portis Patriot will be moved to Osborne "to supply a long felt want" there. Drummond has evidently found out that, however plausible it may be in theory, it is no success in practice for the paper to support the town instead of the town supporting the paper.

The Lenora Leader office was burglarized the other night and things turned topsy-turvy, but nothing of value taken because there was nothing to take.

 

With a stove red-hot all day, yesterday and today, ...
December 7, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2212)

With a stove red-hot all day, yesterday and today, we have hardly been able to keep from freezing while at work, and most of the time it has been impossible to generate heat enough to warm up so that we could do any printing. With a stove almost against our backs, we roasted on that side, while nearly freezing on the other side.

 

No Times during holiday week. We are going to rest ...
December 14, 1882, Downs Times (ID 2213)

No Times during holiday week. We are going to rest up, to start the new year with invigorated intellects and constitutions.

H. I Bryant, the founder of the Portis Patriot, surprised us by dropping in upon us last Friday night. He had just arrived from Nebraska, where he is now located.

The Cawker papers will not issue at all during the holidays and the most of the papers in this part of the state will, we presume, judging from their action last year, do likewise....

 

Drummond has sold his interest in the Portis Patri ...
January 4, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2214)

Drummond has sold his interest in the Portis Patriot to his partner, Hoyt. Hoyt will move the office to Harlan and go in with the Advance man. Thus does the Patriot terminate its existence. Requiescat in pace.

Fred Hulaniski has bought the Bull City Key and will convert it into a six column folio, all home print, and will tack to it the name of The Western Empire. Rather a big name for such a little paper in such a little town.

The newspaper business is discouraging now, if it ever is. Papers all over the state are cutting down their size on account of the dull times.

 

We want wood on subscription right away. Our wood ...
January 18, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2215)

We want wood on subscription right away. Our wood pile is getting pretty low and we must have some.

 

Fred Hulaniski moved his family to Bull City yeste ...
February 1, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2216)

Fred Hulaniski moved his family to Bull City yesterday morning. Mr. Kehr and daughter of Jewell County, father and sister of Mrs. F. J. Hulaniski, were visiting in town.

The Western Empire of Bull City claims to be the only reliable paper on earth. The Kansas Herald, of Hiawatha, makes the same claim. One of the two men must be lying about the matter.

To those who owe us: We need our money. You have carried it long enough. If it was your grocery bill you would pay it....This week we shall send bills to all who owe $1.50 and more, and we would like everyone to pay at least a part of it.

The Western Empire of last week was profuse in its advice to its readers to trade at Downs. Good advice, certainly, but it would seem to us that the Bull City merchants would rather he would say a word for them also.

I. S. Drummond and John Pain of Portis were in the city on Tuesday. Mr. Drummond has sold his interest in the Patriot to his partner Hoyt and is now a granger.

 

Hulaniski, Czar of the Western Empire, as the Stoc ...
February 8, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2217)

Hulaniski, Czar of the Western Empire, as the Stockton Record styles him, was in town on Monday. He reports his Empire prospering. Fred was on his way to Cawker, there, we suppose, to interview the Journal man.

 

We were compelled to pay cash for fuel this week b ...
February 15, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2219)

We were compelled to pay cash for fuel this week because several delinquents who have promised us wood failed to come in on time.

Ho! Ho! Ho! The Portis Patriot has come to life again, with a new man at the head. He says he will have to run a patent inside. From the appearance of the paper, we'd think it would be a good idea to run it with a patent outside also.

 

The Western Empire man declares that creameries do ...
February 22, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2220)

The Western Empire man declares that creameries do a town more harm than good and he hopes that Bull City will not get excited over this matter as all her sister towns are doing. We would refer Freddie to the story of the fox and the grapes, which he will find in his school reader.

Come, no more fooling; we need that wood right away. A dozen men have promised us wood on subscription, most of them agreeing to have it here months ago; we have been compelled to buy fuel all winter, just because these men failed to do as they agreed to do....

We want several good canvassers to solicit subscriptions for this paper, and will allow a liberal commission.

Our Monthly, Bird-in-Hand, Pa., quoted February 22, 1883, in Times: Geo. E. Dougherty, formerly of this neighborhood, is now editor and proprietor of the Downs Times, a weekly newspaper at Downs, Kansas. It is a creditable sheet and we wish it success.

 

Copied from Osborne Farmer -- The Downs Times man ...
March 1, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2221)

Copied from Osborne Farmer -- The Downs Times man made affidavit last week that the circulation of his paper in Osborne County is only 201 copies. The Times can probably boast of the smallest circulation of any paper in the state of Kansas. There are very few newspapers that haven't some distinguishing feature.

Exactly; and the Farmer's distinguishing feature is hoggishness and selfishness of the deepest and meanest dye; he wants everything and abuses anybody and everybody who in any way prevents him from securing all the newspaper patronage within the county; he regards the establishment of every other paper in Osborne County as "infringing upon his territory," as he expresses it....This year...the commissioners chose to "infringe upon his rights" to such an extent as to give "his" printing to another paper, and Barnhart is mad....The Farmer in the above item knowingly and willfully gives a wrong impression of the matter. The fact is the Times can boast of a list very nearly if not quite one half as large as that of the Farmer, notwithstanding the fact that the Farmer is five years older....Downs is situated near the boundary lines of Mitchell, Jewell and Smith counties, and in consequence the greater portion of our subscription list is outside of Osborne County. The commissioners asked for a statement of the circulation in Osborne County, and that we gave....

 

We made a trip on Monday to Glen Elder, our old st ...
March 15, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2223)

We made a trip on Monday to Glen Elder, our old stamping ground. We had not been in the town for about two years, but found many of our old friends in the days when we published the Glen Elder Key....

 

1883: Five years ago tomorrow ye editor started hi ...
March 22, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2225)

1883

Five years ago tomorrow ye editor started his first paper, and after tomorrow he will have legal authority to vote. We feel like donning a new suit and slicking up -- if someone would donate us a suit.

Tom Nicklin is in town visiting among his many friends here. Tom intends to go West to the Pacific Coast.

Guess we'll be a candidate for mayor -- we will have attained the age of 21 by election time, and will therefore be eligible as far as age goes.

Hulaniski sends 21 copies of his paper to this post office, by actual count last week. This is very good, but not enough to warrant him in telling our businessmen, as an inducement for them to advertise in his paper, that he has a circulation of 200 in this immediate neighborhood. "Honesty is the best policy," Fred, always.

Hulaniski says in his last issue that we cut him off our exchange list because he was mean enough to get the county printing. This is an unmitigated falsehood and Fred knows it.

 

Tom Nicklin has disposed of all his property in Do ...
March 29, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2226)

Tom Nicklin has disposed of all his property in Downs and in a few days will be all ready to start for Washington Territory.

 

1883: Miss Emma Getty is learning the mysteries of ...
April 5, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2227)

1883

Miss Emma Getty is learning the mysteries of the "art preservative" in the Times office.

George Carter of Stockton set type in this office last week.

 

1883: The Harlan Advance has been sold to J. D. Ge ...
April 12, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2228)

1883

The Harlan Advance has been sold to J. D. Getys. This makes the third time that paper has changed hands within one year.

Editor McNall of the Gaylord Herald owns 320 acres of land and is much looked up to.

W. G. Harvey has sold his building, in which the Times office is located, to A. Wade.

 

1883: It speaks well for a town to have no vacant ...
April 26, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2229)

1883

It speaks well for a town to have no vacant houses, but it is awfully inconvenient sometimes. We have discovered this by experience. A. Wade bought the building which we have occupied for our office, for the purpose of moving it upon his lot in the south part of town and converting it into a dwelling. We then discovered, after a diligent search, that there was not a suitable room in town that could be obtained.

ONE MOMENT, PLEASE -- The building which the Times office has occupied for over three years has been sold and will be converted into a dwelling house. We must find other quarters at once. There is not a suitable room in town obtainable -- all occupied. The only thing we can do is move out on the street or build a shanty ourselves. We prefer the latter. We are sure our friends would rather see us do the latter. But it will take money. And this is what we wish to say: We want you to help us. Give us 25, 50 or 75 cents, one, two or even five dollars, on subscription. All favors, large and small, will be duly appreciated, and our invitation extends to all. This is no dun -- not a bit of it. ...What we want is money -- and we don't care who gives or how much. Only, we don't ask it as a gift; we intend to give you value received for it....If a hundred pay us an average of 50 cents each it will be a big lift....We have worked hard to give you a good paper and have tried to do our share towards building up our town....We vacate the building just as soon as this week's paper is out, and we want to have work commenced on our building by Monday morning sure, so that we can move in and issue a paper next week....

The idea that the people in this part of the county must go to the Bull City paper to get official news because it is the official paper of the county is all nonsense. Last week our readers got all this matter in the Times from one to four days sooner than they could have got it in the Empire.

The Cawker Free Press is no more. It has been supplanted by the Public Record, L. L. Alrich in charge. It makes a good start and we wish it success.

 

1883: Our country friends came to our aid last wee ...
May 3, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2230)

1883

Our country friends came to our aid last week in a magnanimous manner and we shall remember them for it.

We have our printing office pretty well scattered now, while our new building is being put up. Most of the material, we have packed away in different places, and our big press, together with enough type to get up the paper, we have in our kitchen where we live. We are in a mood to repeat more emphatically than ever that it is decidedly inconvenient sometimes to live in a town that has no empty houses; however much that fact may speak for the prosperity of the town.

Our new office building is under way and will probably be nearly ready for us next week. Then comes the moving again. Ugh -- how we dread it.

The first issue of C. H. Topliff's paper, the Osborne City News, will appear next week.

Our readers will have to overlook all deficiencies this week. We consider it doing well to get out a paper at all, with the work we have had in moving our office.

 

1883: We are not yet in our new office, and our re ...
May 10, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2231)

1883

We are not yet in our new office, and our readers will have to overlook all imperfections. With our office so scattered and material packed away as we are compelled to leave it, for want of room, we have to work under too great a disadvantage to do much.

S. A. Getty is building our new office.

Our friends came to our aid most handsomely, and we are able to put up a combination office and dwelling that will accommodate us nicely. We expect to issue our next paper from there.

 

1883: There has been no let-up on the part of the ...
May 17, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2232)

1883

There has been no let-up on the part of the wind since work was commenced on our building, and its progress was considerably hindered in consequence.

The first issue of Chas. Topliff's paper, the Osborne News, made its appearance last week. It is a neat and newsy sheet.

L. S. Clark helped to shingle the roof of our new house; he nailed on one thousand shingles for the fun of the thing and the good of the cause, and showed that he was an adept at the business. It was quite a favor and Mr. Clark has our thanks.

 

1883: We are a little late with our paper this wee ...
May 31, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2233)

1883

We are a little late with our paper this week, but we couldn't do any better. We moved this week, both household goods and printing material, and our readers must make allowance for this.

Thanks to the ready assistance given us by our friends we now have a good building of our own, which will not only make us a good office but will enable us to live nicely overhead, convenient to our work.

Hulaniski is engaged in a pitched battle now with the Stockton Record. Fred uses a column of his best space to designate the Record a liar.

We didn't print our last issue in our new office after all. We missed connections and so printed again in our kitchen. This issue, however, is run off entirely in our new quarters.

 

1883: Tom Nicklin and Will D. Jenkins have started ...
June 7, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2234)

1883

Tom Nicklin and Will D. Jenkins have started a paper called the Reveille at Whatcom, Washington Territory.

 

1883: The Bull City Empire has been cut down in si ...
June 14, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2236)

1883

The Bull City Empire has been cut down in size.

The Portis Patriot seems to be -- in its own estimation -- infallible, and because it is so, it considers itself justifiable in heaping abuse and unreasonably severe criticism upon its contemporaries who do make mistakes. Now we don't claim to be infallible, and the Patriot is the only paper we know of that is so....We have never met our neighbor but such actions will help us to form a decided opinion of the gentleman without ever seeing him.

 

1883: Among our callers yesterday were C. H. Topli ...
June 28, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2237)

1883

Among our callers yesterday were C. H. Topliff, editor of the Osborne News; C. J. Lamb of Kirwin, one of the Greenback lights and editor of the Independent; C. H. Moody of Burr Oak, G. B. nominee for congress last fall; Mr. Winsor, late editor of the Mankato Review; G. F. VanVeiser, present editor of the Review; Geo. W. Reid, editor of the Salem Argus, H. H. Fadley of Burr Oak. All were in attendance upon the convention.

 

We'll warrant the assertion that if our citizens h ...
July 2, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2239)

We'll warrant the assertion that if our citizens had given us the money which they gave the St. Louis Dispatch for writing up our town, we would have given them a great deal more for their money than they received.

Our businessmen seem perfectly willing to give a foreigner from one to two hundred dollars to write up our town in a paper where it will do but little good, and then, when we go to a terrible lot of work and expense to get up a big issue, scatter several thousand copies, and do the town some good, they want us to be satisfied with $5 over the cost of the paper. Then they preach "patronize home industries." Ugh!

For the money our businessmen gave the St. Louis Dispatch to write up (!!!) our town we would get up a rattling good issue, giving a ten times better description of Downs than that paper did, and then scatter four or five thousand copies, so as to do our town one hundred times as much good as the Dispatch ever will do. Besides this, it will help us some, and keep the money at home. "Put this in your pipe and smoke it."

It seems strange to us that businessmen will allow themselves to be so taken in by foreign advertising schemers, when they have a reliable advertising medium right in their own town. ...Some months ago, a man named Henry carried several hundred dollars from Downs to pay for "puffs" of our town and businessmen, and all acknowledged that they were sold -- But now a St. Louis man has succeeded in roping them in, in the same way....

Our old friend and classmate Ed S. Hamaker, now of Abilene, surprised us last Wednesday by dropping off the train at this place to make us a visit, and has livened up our office considerably during the past week, setting up type and kicking the job press to amuse himself. Ed and ye editor spent many pleasant hours together at school and in June 1879 carried off their diplomas together....Ed is just now off to the great Spirit Springs with one of our typos and our office is quiet enough to enable us to write the foregoing.

 

Ye editor last week tried for the first time the e ...
July 5, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2238)

Ye editor last week tried for the first time the experiment of mashing a finger in the job press. He did not succeed with the mashing so well as he might have done but he was perfectly willing to consider the experiment a success and stop where he did.

 

We have turned over a new leaf and hereafter will ...
July 26, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2240)

We have turned over a new leaf and hereafter will charge for our merchandise, as other merchants do....We need the money as badly as anybody, and we will give our citizens ample opportunity to invest all they wish in printing, right here in the Times office. Give us a call.

 

1883: We print 450 extra copies of the Times this ...
August 2, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2241)

1883

We print 450 extra copies of the Times this week, nearly all of which were ordered in advance of publication.

 

1883: Conductor Jack Nicholas took forty copies of ...
August 9, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2242)

1883

Conductor Jack Nicholas took forty copies of last week's Times and sent them to his friends. If all our businessmen took as much interest in the prosperity of our town, in proportion to their financial interests, as Mr. Nicholas -- a railroad man -- does, Downs would boom as it never has. It takes money to build up a town and not a cent judiciously expended in advertising the town is lost.

Copied from Beloit Courier: Dougherty, of the Downs Times, was in town last Saturday. He was almost beside himself with joy over the success that attended the anniversary celebration at his town the day previous. We don't blame him, for they have a nice town and the Times has done more for its success than any other institution in its borders.

Kirwin has a new paper, the Republican, under the management of Rev. G. W. Wood. This makes four papers -- three weeklies and a daily -- in Kirwin.

Tis strange, 'tis passing strange, yet 'tis true -- The Cawker Journal, after four years railing at "patent sides" and showing up its own superiority on account of being "all home print," has at last succumbed to the inevitable and adopted the "ready print" plan.

 

1883: Hulaniski thinks there is a splendid opening ...
August 30, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2245)

1883

Hulaniski thinks there is a splendid opening in Downs for a second paper, and so there is -- one plenty big enough to swallow all his spare change and all that his friends may advance him besides.

We were the first in this section to adopt the serial story feature, and the rest are rapidly following our example. We are always on the watch for anything to make our paper more interesting to our readers....

As a rule here in Kansas, when a town begins to be large enough to support one paper, some fool printer comes along and thinks there is a splendid opening for a second paper, and there generally is, so good an opening, in fact, that the paper generally falls through. Hulaniski may find such an opening in Downs, if he tries a second paper here.

 

1883: Fred Hulaniski has in his office a job press ...
September 20, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2247)

1883

Fred Hulaniski has in his office a job press that has for us many pleasant memories clinging to it. Nearly 5-1/2 years ago we bought it in Chicago and used it in Sterling, Ill., for a year, six months of that time in the publication of a weekly paper, the rest of the time with a monthly, printing one page at a time. Then we brought it to Naomi, Kansas, where for six months we continued the publication of the monthly. In January 1880, we started a paper at Glen Elder, printing it six months on this press in a magazine form, twelve pages, one page at a time. From there we brought the press with us to Downs, thence to Bull City, where we sold it to A. J. Runyon; he in turn sold it to Hulaniski, who now has it. It has done good service in its day, and having so much connection with our career in the newspaper business, it made us feel as though we had met an old friend when we saw the press the other day.

We have been compelled to order an extra quire of paper this week to supply our increased list of subscribers.

W. S. Whitmore is about to start a paper at Harlan. Walter has been working for some time on the Cawker Record. He is a good printer and will get out a good paper. Success to him.

Our "devil" deserted us last week, leaving the work entirely upon ye editor and his better half; but the paper is out on time just the same.

 

1883: Silas David, formerly one of the proprietors ...
October 4, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2249)

1883

Silas David, formerly one of the proprietors of the Times, is now farming near Emporia.

 

1883: We are in receipt of a letter from Hamburg, ...
October 11, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2250)

1883

We are in receipt of a letter from Hamburg, Germany, asking for sample copies of the Times. This paper is known far and wide, and it advertises Downs wherever it goes....The Times has done more to make our thriving little city known abroad than any other institution, firm or individual within its borders. We get very little credit for it, however, but we have become so accustomed to fault finding and condemnation that this does not worry us any.

Osborne County is getting overstocked with papers, there being six in the county.

 

1883: Tom Nicklin and Billy Jenkins are getting ou ...
October 25, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2252)

1883

Tom Nicklin and Billy Jenkins are getting out a rattling good paper at Whatcom, Washington Territory.

 

1883: By special invitation ye editor and wife spe ...
November 1, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2253)

1883

By special invitation ye editor and wife spent Monday afternoon at the home of E. D. Craft, and took tea with them. We spent an hour very pleasantly in looking through Mr. Craft's fine library, after which we partook of a sumptuous repast prepared by the skillful hands of our hostess, of which a nice young turkey formed a prominent feature. We were then shown around the farm. Mr. Craft lives one and a half miles south of town and supplies our citizens with milk. He has a splendid farm of 160 acres, half of which is fenced in for pasture. He has eleven cows, milking ten at present....We must not forget to mention their two bright children, Miss Cornie and Master Quincy. The latter is quite a poetic genius and entertained us with quite a lot of poetry of his own composition....Cornie declared that there was no poetry about her, but she showed that she possess considerable musical ability by rendering some difficult music in a very skillful manner on the piano....

We want a boy who wants to learn printing, who will not tire of the business, nor think he has learned the trade after working two weeks; one who is not afraid of work; and will not be a traitor to his employer. We have a job for the right kind of a boy -- none others need apply. P.S. No Bull City boys need apply either -- we've had enough experience with boys from that direction.

 

1883: An almost unprecedented rush of job work in ...
November 15, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2257)

1883

An almost unprecedented rush of job work in the last three weeks has turned us topsy-turvy, and delayed us with our paper. We have, however, succeeded in securing a boy, who will begin work next week, and if he stays any longer than the last two we have had, we expect to make up for past deficiencies.

 

James Garner is now learning the art of printin ...
November 22, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2259)

James Garner is now learning the art of printing in the Times office.

 

1883: The people who have read Hulaniski's paper a ...
November 29, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2260)

1883

The people who have read Hulaniski's paper and got by heart his favorite threat against his critics, creditors and foes, who are numerous, of "knocking their brains out with a sponge," would have laughed till two weeks from next year if they had been in our office last Tuesday and seen Frank Jones try that game on him by plastering the back of his head with a wet sponge, and plaster said individual all over with pithy remarks; we suppose the water from the sponge kept the pompous editor very cool as he was enabled to read a paper upside down through the whole performance and seem perfectly unconscious.

It is very seldom that we have the good fortune to partake of so sumptuous a repast as the dinner ye editor and wife partook of on Thanksgiving Day, the guests of Misses Sadie Garner and Elora Nevill, at the farm residence of Wm. Garner; the dinner was prepared entirely by these two ladies, and it reflected great credit upon their skill in the culinary art....

 

1883: Want of space prevents us doing justice to t ...
December 13, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2262)

1883

Want of space prevents us doing justice to the surprise party given last Saturday evening by the young folks of Elm Creek in honor of the birthday of the lady who conducts the cooking department of the Downs Times....

The first number of the Harlan Chief, W. H. Whitmore's paper, is received. It is a creditable sheet, chock full of interesting, newsy matter, and if the citizens of Harlan can't appreciate such a paper they don't deserve anything in the way of prosperity. Success to you, brother Whitmore.

To Printers -- We want to sell fifty pounds or more of good primer at 30 cents per pound; we want to get smaller type in place of it. Address this office.

 

1883: Copied from Stockton News -- "We understand ...
December 20, 1883, Downs Times (ID 2264)

1883

Copied from Stockton News -- "We understand that Hulaniski of the Bull City Empire will start a paper at Plainville in the spring. Huly is terrible good at starting papers, but they don't seem to last."

 

We are getting a new bookcase for the Public Libra ...
January 31, 1884, Downs Times (ID 2268)

We are getting a new bookcase for the Public Library and adding new books constantly. Our aim is to build up a library here that will go ahead of all our sister towns. There are now 252 books in the library.

 

Copied from Gaylord Herald -- "M. H. Hoyt, editor ...
March 6, 1884, Downs Times (ID 2275)

Copied from Gaylord Herald -- "M. H. Hoyt, editor of the Portis Patriot, lives in Lincoln Township, in Smith County, and pursues the peaceful vocation of a granger on weekdays and writes his heavy editorials on Sunday between meetings."

 

Harlan, judging from its paper, the Chief, is one ...
March 13, 1884, Downs Times (ID 2277)

Harlan, judging from its paper, the Chief, is one of the liveliest towns on the Central Branch. The businessmen of that town appreciate the fact that they must patronize their paper liberally if they want it to represent their town to the best advantage.

 

Downs Times Public Library -- In 1882, to supply a ...
March 20, 1884, Downs Times (ID 2279)

Downs Times Public Library -- In 1882, to supply a want in our city, the editor of the Times started what is now known as the Downs Times Public Library. The start was small but the intention was to add to the library as fast as the patronage demanded. We did not wish to make any money out of it, in fact we have spent a great deal more for books than the income has been. The aim is to furnish our town with a good circulating library....The list of books now number 266 and the library is quite well patronized. ...Just as soon as we can make the necessary arrangements we shall have a reading room in connection, with all the principal magazines and papers....A good library is a splendid institution in any town.

Mark J. Kelley, formerly of the Beloit Record, has returned to Kansas from Iowa and is now editor of the Washington Register.

Both of the Smith Center editors went to church last Sunday.

 

This week we are our own "devil;" we have loaned o ...
April 24, 1884, Downs Times (ID 2282)

This week we are our own "devil;" we have loaned our office boy to the Cedarville Review man, who is sick and sorely in need of help. Yesterday we helped the Cawker Journal folks, who were in the same fix. So it has kept us hustling to get around all right.

We are in receipt of the Plainville Echo, a new paper published by J. F. Thompson. He evidently employs Hulaniski to do the most of his writing, for we don't believe he could himself so nearly imitate Fred's style.

 

We expect to go to Chicago in about three weeks, a ...
May 8, 1884, Downs Times (ID 2283)

We expect to go to Chicago in about three weeks, and upon our return will enlarge and otherwise improve the Times.

We are going to the Editorial Convention at Beloit next week, and the Times will probably be a day late in consequence.

 

Copied from Osborne Farmer -- "Jim Huff of Downs w ...
May 22, 1884, Downs Times (ID 2284)

Copied from Osborne Farmer -- "Jim Huff of Downs was a welcome guest Friday. Jim claims the distinguished honor of having been remotely connected with the first newspaper published in Osborne County. In the spring of 1871, Mark J. Kelley started the Osborne Times. He had it printed in Concordia, and issued three or four numbers. Jim drove oxen in those days, and he brought the first edition up from Concordia behind his slow team, being snowed in two or three days on the trip."

 

Three years ago this week, Geo. E. Dougherty took ...
May 29, 1884, Downs Times (ID 2286)

Three years ago this week, Geo. E. Dougherty took charge of the Times. During that time the circulation and advertising patronage of the paper have doubled, . we are well pleased, although our patronage now is not near what is should be; we have endeavored to make the Times a first class local paper and have never done any soliciting, preferring to make the paper such that people will want it without any coaxing. Our aim in the future will be, as in the past, to improve as fast as our patronage will justify. About July 1st, or before, we shall make the paper one-third larger than it now is, and otherwise improve.

Tomorrow (Friday) morning we (ye editor and wife) start on a trip east, to be gone several weeks. We go first to Sterling, Ill., to visit a week with ye editor's old school-time friends and to attend the reunion of his class on the fifth anniversary of their graduation. From Sterling we will go to Chicago to spend a week. We have now been publishing a paper in this state for four years and a half without cessation, one year of the time publishing two papers, and we have had in that time only one two-weeks vacation....

The officers of the Northwest Kansas Editorial Association for the ensuing six months are: President, J. W. McBride of the Cawker Journal; Vice-Presidents, C. M. Dunn of the Minneapolis Messenger; N. F. Hewett, Cedarville Review; A. B. Wilder, Scandia Journal; and Wm. Bissel, Phillipsburg Herald. Secretary and Treasurer, L. C. Headley, Gaylord Herald. Assistant Secretary, J. Q. Royce, Smith Center Bulletin. Official paper, Gaylord Herald.

The following named newspaper men were in Downs Tuesday and Wednesday: -- S. H. Dodge, Beloit Gazette; J. Q. Royce, Smith Center Bulletin; G. W. Anderson, Smith Center Pioneer; C. J. Lamb, Kirwin Independent; L. L. Alrich, Cawker Record; -- Evans, Russell Herald; H. C. Root, Atchison Champion; N. F. Hewit, Cedarville Review; H. K. Lightfoot, Logan Freeman; F. J. Hulaniski, Bull City Empire; L. C. Headley, Gaylord Herald; J. W. McBride, Cawker Journal; Wm. Bissell, Phillipsburg Herald; Dr. Jenkins, Kirwin Chief; J. G. Dodge, Beloit Gazette; C. W. McDonald, Concordia Empire; G. W. Wood, Kirwin Republican; Jack Downing, Hays Star Sentinel; W. S. Tilton, WaKeeney World; J. S. Greason, Atwood Citizen; C. H. Topliff, Osborne News; W. C. Thornton, Lenora Northwest; T. C. McBreen, Stockton News; -- Graham, Portis Patriot; J. H. Wright, Lenora Leader.

 

Say Mr. Editor, thus were we accosted the other da ...
July 10, 1884, Downs Times (ID 2289)

Say Mr. Editor, thus were we accosted the other day, "don't you want a boy to learn the printer's trade? I have one, he's smart -- but he got his head hurt and he'll never be good for anything but an editor."

We received our new type, and if you want some fancy job work we are now prepared for it.

The Sterling (Ill.) Standard now comes to us with the name of A. Bayliss at the head as editor....Prof. Bayliss is a man who will always have a warm place in our heart, having been the last, and of all our teachers, the favorite....

 

Fred Hulaniski takes charge of the Stockton News t ...
July 17, 1884, Downs Times (ID 2290)

Fred Hulaniski takes charge of the Stockton News this week. Dr. Martin takes his place on the Bull City Empire.

 

Editors Lamb and Garretson of the Kirwin Independe ...
July 24, 1884, Downs Times (ID 2292)

Editors Lamb and Garretson of the Kirwin Independent, Topliff of the Osborne News, Whitmore of the Harlan Chief, Winsor of the Mankato Review, Reed and Moody of the Salem Argus attended the convention and favored us with calls.

 

Link Drummond and Frank Dougherty, who were imps t ...
July 31, 1884, Downs Times (ID 2293)

Link Drummond and Frank Dougherty, who were imps together in the Times office two years ago, met for the first time since then in this office on Monday. Link has grown six inches taller and is a good printer now.

 

Now, when we retire from the editorial chair and b ...
September 11, 1884, Downs Times (ID 2294)

Now, when we retire from the editorial chair and become a farmer, do you know what we shall do? Well, occasionally, all through the year we will take the editor something good to eat, "garden sass," melons, pumpkins, roastin' ears, apples, peaches, berries, potatoes, etc., etc., in their season, with a chicken or turkey thrown in once in a while, because we know by experience that the editor will appreciate it and it will encourage him too.

 

The improvements on the Times building will soon b ...
September 25, 1884, Downs Times (ID 2297)

The improvements on the Times building will soon be completed, and then we will have as cozy a place as any of them.

Late again; but hereafter we shall not be bothered with carpenters and plasterers and we will then try to make up for present deficiencies.

 

As we expected, J. B. Craney is mad because we ref ...
October 2, 1884, Downs Times (ID 2298)

As we expected, J. B. Craney is mad because we refused to support him for Representative and in accordance with his "rule or ruin" policy he is using his influence in every possible way to injure us....Mr. Craney has treated us like a dog, endeavoring to force us into his service when he needed any newspaper support -- and we confess we have been fool enough to do his bidding -- and at other times heaping the worst abuse upon us....He is not a public spirited man, and has worked for himself alone....But look at him from a temperance standpoint -- which is our way of looking. Think of a man like Craney to represent a temperance county in the legislature -- a man whose principles and practices are so at variance with the sentiments of his constituents....What security have we for Craney's good behavior while there when he will become intoxicated in his own town?...As soon as he saw that we would not support him, he at once did all in his power to get our business men to withdraw their patronage from us and promise it to another paper which he proposed to have started....The amount of genuine friendship -- "in time of need" -- shown us by J. B. Craney during our three years' residence in Downs is so infinitesimally small that a microscope would scarcely reveal it....

 

By the way, why was it that last year, when the of ...
October 9, 1884, Downs Times (ID 2299)

By the way, why was it that last year, when the office building we were in was sold and we couldn't get a room in town -- why was it that our "best friend in time of need" (!) Craney, was unwilling to rent us even a part of the room which he now offers free of rent to anyone who will start a second paper.

Our "best friend" informs us that his starting a paper here is identically the same as our getting another store started here -- that if twenty stores can live in Downs twenty newspapers can live here also. This is just about the kind of an argument he would make in the legislature on any subject....

 

We this week put up the name of J. M. Morgan as ou ...
October 16, 1884, Downs Times (ID 2300)

We this week put up the name of J. M. Morgan as our candidate for Representative. There is not a man who is better or more favorably known through the county than Mr. Morgan....

Where was Joe Craney during the war, while J. M. Morgan was fighting gallantly for his country? The old soldiers of this county want to know. And, by the way, Craney is the man who said, "D--n the soldiers! What do I care for the soldiers, any more than anyone else?"

 

Our edition last week was 1,600, and is the same t ...
October 23, 1884, Downs Times (ID 2302)

Our edition last week was 1,600, and is the same this week. That means about 4,000 readers.

 

John G. Eckman, one of the best printers in the st ...
October 30, 1884, Downs Times (ID 2304)

John G. Eckman, one of the best printers in the state, in every respect, is now a permanent attache of the Times, and our readers may expect improvements henceforth.

 

When that Portis Patriot man does any work for our ...
December 25, 1884, Downs Times (ID 2308)

When that Portis Patriot man does any work for our business men, we wish he would put his imprint to it. Everybody naturally supposes that it is done at this office, and we haven't the faintest desire in the world to receive credit for such botch-work as that Portis office turns out. It makes us hot, and we feel as though we'd like to kick that blacksmith clear out into the Pacific Ocean....

We want you to help us get the news around town. Even had we sufficient business to enable us to hire a reporter, who could spend his whole time in hunting the news, we would still be unable to get it all; but we cannot do this, and are kept in the office most of the time....

 

We worked hard all day Christmas and got no turkey ...
January 1, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2309)

We worked hard all day Christmas and got no turkey.

And still our job printing department is overcrowded....If it continues thus we shall have to add a fourth man to our force....

We were very much disappointed on Christmas day by being so rushed with job work that it was positively impossible for us to accept the invitation which we received from Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Craft to dine with them....

We need money. The paper dealers are pushing us and we will be compelled to do some pushing in order to satisfy their demands. It takes piles of money to run a paper, and we can never keep any money long enough to start a bank account; hence the necessity of this call. This is addressed entirely to those who are in arrears for three years or more on subscription....

 

J. N. Fuller set type for us this week.: ...
January 8, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2310)

J. N. Fuller set type for us this week.

 

The Osborne News and Smith Center Bulletin are hav ...
January 22, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2312)

The Osborne News and Smith Center Bulletin are having a wordy war, each trying to outdo the other in running down the other's town. Here is Topliff's last: "We understand that an active effort will be made in Smith Center to incorporate, so that an ordinance may be passed prohibiting the building of any more sod houses within the city limits."

 

Walt Whitmore, editor of the Harlan Chief, was in ...
January 29, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2313)

Walt Whitmore, editor of the Harlan Chief, was in the city Saturday, and of course called on the Times.

The Concordia Daily Times has succumbed to the inevitable. The editor says he is not willing to work himself to death for nothing.

 

The Smith Center Pioneer and Kirwin Chief have cut ...
February 5, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2314)

The Smith Center Pioneer and Kirwin Chief have cut down in size one column to the page on account of hard times.

 

Brother Topliff of the Osborne News is now a full- ...
February 19, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2316)

Brother Topliff of the Osborne News is now a full-fledged Democrat.

 

...C. W. Nicklin, who with his brother Tom started ...
March 5, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2318)

...C. W. Nicklin, who with his brother Tom started the Downs Times, is at present at Solomon City assisting Rev. A. T. Riley in his religious work. He has completed his four years' course at Evanston College and is now a minister of the M.E. Church.

 

F. W. Hiddleson, formerly editor and proprietor of ...
March 12, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2319)

F. W. Hiddleson, formerly editor and proprietor of the Beloit Nationalist, is now principal of the Downs public schools, and wears the prefatory title 'Prof.' with as much dignity as he performed the duties of an editor in the endeavor to 'fill a long-felt want'. -- Chicago Newspaper Union.

 

The Smith Center Pioneer, one of the oldest papers ...
March 19, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2320)

The Smith Center Pioneer, one of the oldest papers in northwest Kansas, has suspended publication.

 

J. N. Fuller has gone to Alton to help Hulaniski o ...
March 26, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2322)

J. N. Fuller has gone to Alton to help Hulaniski on the Empire.

F. H. Barnhart, who has published the Osborne County Farmer ever since its establishment ten years ago, has sold his entire interest in that paper to S. E. Ruede, who has been associated with him in its publication since last July....

 

The Downs Cornet Band serenaded the Times twice th ...
April 2, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2323)

The Downs Cornet Band serenaded the Times twice this week, and it isn't necessary to add that they made some excellent music....

 

The editor of the Portis Patriot is sharp. He Apri ...
April 9, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2324)

The editor of the Portis Patriot is sharp. He April-fooled the whole town, and has won a place by Peck's Bad Boy and Tom Sawyer. He printed bills for a lecture to come off at the school house the evening of April Fool's day, and went over and rang the bell himself, holding his sides all the while to keep from splitting with laughter at his huge trick. But nobody came, and now he has the whole year to reflect on "The best layed schemes o' mice and men."

 

Tom Nicklin and his partner, W. D. Jenkins, propri ...
May 14, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2331)

Tom Nicklin and his partner, W. D. Jenkins, proprietors of the Whatcom (W.T.) Reveille, have got themselves into a libel suit, the amount of the damages claimed being $20,000.

James Garner, a former attache of the Times, is again at work in this office.

 

The Times man is moving into his new dwelling hous ...
May 21, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2333)

The Times man is moving into his new dwelling house on East Blunt Street this week. This gives the Times more room and soon we shall have a sanctum, a press room and a composing room. Our increasing business has made more room necessary.

 

I have located a barber shop in Downs, over the Ti ...
May 28, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2336)

I have located a barber shop in Downs, over the Times office, and I would respectfully solicit a share of the patronage. -- M. A. Cook.

 

Harry Root, of the Atchison Champion, visited Down ...
June 4, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2338)

Harry Root, of the Atchison Champion, visited Downs this week. Mr. Root has been connected with the Champion for a number of years and is acquainted with nearly everybody in Northwest Kansas. He is now making his headquarters at Kirwin, where his family is spending the summer.

 

Sheet music at reduced prices at the Times office. ...
July 23, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2340)

Sheet music at reduced prices at the Times office.

We are now at work upon a supplement of the Times to be issued next week, containing a full writeup of Downs, its business, history, surroundings, etc., making a pamphlet of 32 or more pages. We shall issue 5,000 copies and it will be a very desirable issue in which to advertise....

 

The Anniversary Extra which was to appear last wee ...
August 6, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2343)

The Anniversary Extra which was to appear last week was unavoidably delayed and will be completed this week. It is a pamphlet of 32 pages, with a write-up of Downs and vicinity, and we will sell them at five cents per copy, mailed to any address. Buy a few copies for your friends in the east.

 

A new paper cutter is the latest addition to the T ...
August 13, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2345)

A new paper cutter is the latest addition to the Times job office.

 

Lew Headley of the Gaylord Herald has been appoint ...
September 3, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2346)

Lew Headley of the Gaylord Herald has been appointed justice of the peace by Gov. Martin.

J. W. Stewart of the Smith Centre Bazoo, H. A. Yonge of the Beloit Democrat, and G. W. Reed of the Salem Argus were in the city yesterday attending the Democratic judicial convention and called on the Times.

 

The Webster Eagle is the name of a neat and newsy ...
September 10, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2347)

The Webster Eagle is the name of a neat and newsy six-column folio paper just started at Webster, Rooks County, by H. K. Lightfoot. This makes five newspapers for Rooks County.

 

Geo. E. Dougherty, lodge deputy for Downs Lodge No ...
October 8, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2349)

Geo. E. Dougherty, lodge deputy for Downs Lodge No. 48, I.O.G.T., started Monday morning for Topeka to attend the annual session of the Grand Lodge of the State.

 

J. E. Garner, a printer on the Downs Times, was in ...
October 15, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2350)

J. E. Garner, a printer on the Downs Times, was in town this week and gave this office a call. In connection with S. L. Ellis he talks of starting a paper in this or Decatur County. -- Norton Courier.

 

Jas. E. Garner came back from his western trip las ...
October 22, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2351)

Jas. E. Garner came back from his western trip last Saturday. He has selected Almena, a new town in Norton County, on the B&M, as the site of his future place of business. S. L. Ellis will go into partnership with him....

 

J. E. Garner left Wednesday night for Almena and h ...
November 5, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2352)

J. E. Garner left Wednesday night for Almena and his partner G. W. Shook will go next week, where they will make their future home, engaging in the newspaper business.

We have had to do most of the work on this week's paper without any assistance, and as we just got back from the east Sunday it has been impossible for us to get out on time....However, we shall have a printer next week and then we will be all right.

George Shook leaves tonight for Almena, Norton County, where he will join James Garner in the publication of the Almena Star. He has sold his house and two of his lots in Shook's addition...and takes his household goods with him. The boys have a good location and we hope they will prosper.

Clarence Crippen, who learned the rudiments of the printing business in this office, was a caller on Monday. He has been working in the Salem Argus office.

Mrs. Geo. E. Dougherty, who has been in Chicago under medical treatment for two months and a half, is visiting in Sterling, Ill., for several weeks, after which she will return to Chicago. She is improving in health and expects to be able to return home by Christmas.

 

Clarence Crippen is now a member of the Times forc ...
November 19, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2354)

Clarence Crippen is now a member of the Times force.

 

F. J. Hulaniski, accompanied by his wife and baby, ...
November 26, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2357)

F. J. Hulaniski, accompanied by his wife and baby, went on the editorial excursion to Atchison and went on to Kansas City before returning.

 

We have put up a reading table in our office for t ...
December 3, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2361)

We have put up a reading table in our office for the convenience of the public, and shall keep thereon our exchanges and other periodicals. Our patrons are cordially invited to come in and take advantage of this when they want to read.

We have added some new material to our job office the past week and will add considerable more during the next three months....

 

Miss Lillie Dougherty is helping in the Times offi ...
December 10, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2364)

Miss Lillie Dougherty is helping in the Times office, her assistance being made necessary by our rush of work.

 

In accordance with our custom we shall not issue a ...
December 17, 1885, Downs Times (ID 2366)

In accordance with our custom we shall not issue any paper between Christmas and New Year. We are sure our readers will grant us this partial vacation -- we say partial because we will still have enough work to keep us busy most of the week -- especially as we will have given 52 issues in this year without an issue that week.

 

Tom Nicklin of the Whatcom, Washington Territory, ...
January 7, 1886, Downs Times (ID 2369)

Tom Nicklin of the Whatcom, Washington Territory, Reveille is now chief clerk of the house of representatives in that territory....

 

Most of the newspapers in this part of the state c ...
January 14, 1886, Downs Times (ID 2370)

Most of the newspapers in this part of the state came out last week "on the half sheet," or else issued not at all. We were fortunate in obtaining paper before the (snow) blockade set in, and our readers got a full sized paper.

A bevy of pretty girls called one day this week with the alleged purpose of learning a few secrets of the art preservative, but after soiling their dainty hands with printer's ink they turned up their noses and departed as suddenly as they came, vowing they would rather marry millionaires than printers.

 

We hear that Joe Wright, a real estate agent at Sa ...
January 28, 1886, Downs Times (ID 2373)

We hear that Joe Wright, a real estate agent at Salem, has begun the publication of the Union at Cora, Smith County. We trust that the Union will unite the discordant factions of that place, and with Joe at the helm we predict that it will be kept Wright side up with care. He has also started a real estate agency in connection with his paper.

The Orchard, Vineyard and Berry Garden for January is received. This is a monthly journal published at Cawker City by J. R. Hendricks, devoted to the interests of the fruit growers of this section....It is published at the very low price of fifty cents a year and no one interested in fruit growing can afford to be without it. Send for a sample copy.

 

Our little item last week in regard to gambling, a ...
February 11, 1886, Downs Times (ID 2376)

Our little item last week in regard to gambling, although not at all of a personal nature, aroused the ire of some of our citizens to a considerable extent, some giving themselves dead away by withdrawing patronage from us on that account. One man in particular, who is known to be daily violating another law of our state, took the trouble to abuse us most roundly, and he will receive our especial attention if he does not go a little slower hereafter.

The Alton Dramatic Company, composed of home talent, played "Under the Laurels" last Saturday night. Hulaniski played one of the prominent parts.

With this issue the Times enters upon its seventh year. For six years -- almost as long as Downs has had its existence -- it has been heralding the news of this vicinity and working for the interests of its town. It has always taken pride in saying a good word for Downs at every opportunity and in encouraging everything that would advance the prosperity of the town. We have ever done our utmost to give our patrons a good paper and to merit the approval of all fair minded people, and we shall continue to do so. We are grateful for the favors of the past and trust we may merit a continuance of the same.

We have a stove that is like a great many boys in town -- it smokes too much. When our office doors and windows are all open on a cold day it does not necessarily mean that we are roasting hot -- we may be simply trying to get some fresh air.

 

Frank Dougherty of Naomi came up on Saturday to vi ...
February 18, 1886, Downs Times (ID 2379)

Frank Dougherty of Naomi came up on Saturday to visit his Downs friends and we availed ourselves of the opportunity and set him to work in the office Monday morning. We have kept him busy there ever since, and by the end of the week we hope to be caught up again with our work.

 

The Alton Empire complains of hard luck, melting a ...
April 1, 1886, Downs Times (ID 2384)

The Alton Empire complains of hard luck, melting a roller, C.O.D. of $90 on its paper, having a form pied, and its office nearly destroyed by fire, all in one week.

A new venture at Osborne is the Western Odd Fellow, published by Topliff & Ruede. As its name would indicate, it is devoted to the interests of the I.O.O.F.

 

The consistent (?) man withdraws his patronage fro ...
May 13, 1886, Downs Times (ID 2388)

The consistent (?) man withdraws his patronage from us because we favor the closing of the billiard halls and then abuses those who do not choose to deal with him because he is working for the billiard halls. Just as the capitalists and corporations of the East are crying so loudly for a law to punish "boycotting," when they have themselves provoked it by boycotting members of labor organizations. They are not willing to grant to others the privilege which they expect to exercise themselves with impunity.

 

We have ordered a bird's-eye view of Downs, which ...
May 20, 1886, Downs Times (ID 2390)

We have ordered a bird's-eye view of Downs, which will be ready by June 1st; the picture will be 12 x 18 inches in size showing the town in good shape. The pictures will be printed on heavy cardboard and sold at twenty-five cents each. Leave your orders at once at the Times office.

At the meeting of the Northwest Kansas Editorial Association held at Norton last Friday, C. Borin, of Oberlin, was chosen president and W. H. Whitmore, of this city, secretary for the next six months; and it was decided to hold the next meeting in this city in November. Our people will give them a cordial welcome, and we hope that every editor in Northwest Kansas will attend. This point is easily reached from every direction and we will guarantee a pleasant time to all who come.

 

J. R. Green, the Beloit druggist who mauled Editor ...
June 3, 1886, Downs Times (ID 2393)

J. R. Green, the Beloit druggist who mauled Editor Anderson with a ball club, has been bound over in the sum of $1,000 to appear at the next term of district court on a charge of assault with intent to kill.

I. S. Drummond, late of the Pioneer, has taken editorial charge of the Harlan Advocate. Drummond knows how to make a good paper, and the Harlan people will help themselves by helping him.

 

The city printing -- We are glad to know that it i ...
July 22, 1886, Downs Times (ID 2396)

The city printing -- We are glad to know that it is very seldom indeed a member of the newspaper fraternity makes such a consummate ass of himself as our contemporary on the south side did last week in regard to the city printing; and he deserves and receives not only the ridicule of all sensible people for his babyish action, but also their condemnation and contempt for his most libelous and villainous attack upon Brown, Sample and Neff, of the city council.

The possession of a newspaper does not give its owner the right to assail with impunity the character of individuals and accuse them of "high handed robbery" and "a deep laid plot to rob the city," etc., when there is not the least occasion for it, as did Whitmore last week.

There probably never was a greater display of unadulterated cheek than Whitmore has made since he came to Downs, expecting as he has done, to receive everything the city has in the way of newspaper patronage and as mad as a spoiled child because he does not get it, ready to abuse and injure anybody and everybody who does not choose to patronize him.

The Times is twelve times as old as the Chief and has done more for Downs than any other institution in the city, and it should certainly be entitled to some preference over a new paper. This is what a majority of the council thought -- all but Wells and Markert, who are personally at enmity to us and would favor almost anything to down the Times.

The big blow about economy and money stolen is the silliest and most inconsistent nonsense on the part of the Chief and the rest of the kickers. If a majority of the council had been in favor of the Chief, Whitmore would have asked and received the printing at full legal rates and more, too, if there were any way to get it; and his friends, instead of bewailing the "steal," would have rejoiced....

Mr. Markert, who was Whitmore's main stand-by in the council and who was undoubtedly posted by his boss, told another councilman that "Dougherty will charge full legal rates, which are $5.00 per square and Whitmore would do it for one-fourth that." The fact is, the legal rate is $1.00 per square and we propose to print ordinances for 75 cents per square and council proceedings free....

 

To our patrons -- During the last eight months, re ...
August 26, 1886, Downs Times (ID 2398)

To our patrons -- During the last eight months, realizing that it was a hard time for all, especially the farmers, we have been very lenient with our patrons, and have undergone great inconvenience and expense in order to accommodate those who were in arrears.

We have accounts due us in this vicinity to the amount of from two to three thousand dollars, most of it for subscription long past due, and in small amounts. Many are in arrears for from two to five years, and we hope, now that times are becoming some better, and the farmers can dispose of their grain at fair prices, that they will reciprocate the favor by paying at least a part of their accounts at once, as we are badly in need of the money....

Please come in soon and pay us what you can or tell us if you are unable to pay, and thus greatly oblige. Yours very respectfully, The Downs Times.

 

A change -- The Times is now a semi-weekly paper a ...
November 20, 1886, Downs Times (ID 2410)

A change -- The Times is now a semi-weekly paper and will hereafter be issued on Wednesday and Saturday of each week. This is an improvement which we trust our patrons will appreciate, as they will receive the paper twice as often and the news will be fresh. We shall aim to make a specialty of the news of this locality and the state in general. We believe, also, that advertisers as well as readers will find the change an improvement, making the paper a better medium than heretofore.

The subscription price of the paper will remain the same -- $1.50 per year, 75 cents for six months, 50 cents for four months and 25 cents for two months.

Advertising rates will be as follows:

$100.00 per col. per year, for 1 insertion each week.

$150.00 per col. per year, for 2 insertions each week.

Local notices 5 cents per line per week, 1 insertion.

Local notices 7-1/2 cents per line per week, 2 insertions.

"Steve DeYoung, the former editor and proprietor of this paper when it was known as the Free Press, has taken a claim near Jackson, Decatur county, and will soon be a homesteader." -- Cawker Record.

 

We this week change our publication days to Tuesda ...
February 15, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2418)

We this week change our publication days to Tuesday and Friday, as those days will be better for the north and south mails. Our subscribers along the Downs and Delhi mail route will by this arrangement receive the paper on publication days, while on the Smith Centre route subscribers will receive it on Tuesdays and Saturdays. We will go to press on Mondays and Thursdays at 8 o'clock. Advertisers will take notice.

A Stinker -- A Times reporter the other day overheard an interesting conversation between the "secretary" of the Downs Amusement Association and a stranger, evidently a traveling man. Said the latter to the former, "You ought to go to Gaylord; they license anything there; you can get a license to run card tables anywhere in town." To which the "secretary" responded, "We could here, too, if we had the right kind of editors; the one on this side is all right, but the one on the other side of the track (the Times) "is a ---------- -------- stinker!" We have seldom received praise from any source which we regard as so high a compliment as the above, considering the source....

 

Subscribe for the Times.: Books bound at this offi ...
April 12, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2428)

Subscribe for the Times.

Books bound at this office.

Sheet music for sale at this office.

Old papers for sale at this office.

 

The quill driver of the Times went to Concordia ye ...
May 17, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2443)

The quill driver of the Times went to Concordia yesterday morning to attend the Editorial Association held in that city.

 

The Downs Headlight is the name of a new paper, th ...
June 21, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2448)

The Downs Headlight is the name of a new paper, the first issue of which will appear on Thursday of this week, with James E. Garner at the head. James is an old citizen of this place, and has many friends here who will wish him success, but whether Downs is able to support three papers is yet to be seen.

The other day a farmer approached us and in a confidential tone said, "Say, where can I get something to drink?" "At the well back there," we replied. He seemed stunned for a minute then inquired, "Where is Whitmore's office?" We gave him the desired information and he went off happy as a big sunflower.

The Chief has announced its intention of devoting no more space to the Times. This seems strange indeed, in view of the fact that the Chief, ever since its first issue, has been persistently pitching into us in the most malicious manner simply to provoke a quarrel with us; to which attacks we paid no attention until within the past two or three weeks....

 

The Chief man has now thought of a name that he th ...
June 28, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2451)

The Chief man has now thought of a name that he thinks will completely annihilate us and bring down upon us the unspeakable contempt of the whole world. He now speaks of us as "the editor of the WCTU up the street." The poor deluded fellow doesn't seem to know that the WCTU, far from being an object of contempt, is as popular an organization as there is in the land, and is gaining in influence and popularity all the time, because its work is for the right and for humanity.

The Union, published at Cora, Smith County, has been discontinued and the material moved to Lebanon to be used in the publication of the Criterion.

 

Last Friday evening, W. C. Roberts and J. S. Johns ...
July 5, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2454)

Last Friday evening, W. C. Roberts and J. S. Johnson, the veterinary surgeon, got into a fight and were quickly surrounded by a crowd, many of whom seemed aching for a general row and it wouldn't have taken much to have caused it. They finally dispersed, however, but later in the night a mob of masked men got Johnson and rode him on a rail. The next day Roberts, Johnson and Banta were arrested, charged with disturbing the peace; they all plead guilty and were fined, the first two $2 each, and the last $1 and costs. We do not know who was to blame in the commencement of the fuss, but it is evident that whiskey was the real cause of the general disturbance. The occurrence was a disgrace to our town and it behooves us as a city to check the tendency to lawlessness which has shown itself here in the last few months especially, and which is constantly increasing. Close the rum holes -- there is no use to deny their existence -- and punish crime, instead of encouraging it by tolerating it or by letting offenders off as easily as possible....

 

Another Attempt at Bulldozing -- The Editor of the ...
July 8, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2456)

Another Attempt at Bulldozing -- The Editor of the Times Assaulted in His Own House -- On Tuesday at about nine o'clock at night, after we had locked up and were about to retire, and at a time when one would naturally expect to find us alone, W. C. Roberts came to our office (also our place of residence) and was admitted, whereupon he demanded of us, for publication in the Chief, a written retraction of the article in our last issue regarding the fracas last Friday night. We told him if he would show us that we had made any misrepresentations we would cheerfully correct them in our next issue, but that we would not go back on anything we had said until we found it to be untrue. He threatened but to no purpose; we insisted that we could see nothing to retract, consequently would retract nothing. He then demanded a statement to the effect that we did not believe that whiskey was the cause of the disturbance last Friday night; we told him we could do nothing of the kind for we believed that it was. He thereupon pounced on us so suddenly that we could not get up from the chair in which we were sitting, and proceeded to pommel us with the evident intention of doing us up, which he would no doubt have succeeded in doing but for the interference of S. A. Getty, who happened in just before the assault. Roberts at once surrendered himself to Constable Litel and the next morning in Justice Remy's court pled guilty to assault and battery and was fined $15 and costs -- $10. Mayor Huff showed the position of the city government, or at any rate of himself as mayor, by appearing before the court, where, claiming to represent the city, he presumed to instruct the justice as to his duties in the case, although no one else could see what the city had to do with it as it was a state case, his intention being apparently to throw out the impression that we were to blame and that Roberts' action was justifiable. The whiskey ring has been trying in every way to choke us off -- boycotting, bullying and using brute force to accomplish their ends -- but we believe our position to be right and we propose to maintain it.

The Osborne Farmer has changed hands, F. H. Barnhart retiring. The new firm is Ruede, Crampton & Landis, with S. E. Ruede as editor, C. W. Crampton business mangaer, and Chas. Landis foreman. They have dropped the twelve-page plan and print eight pages, all at home....

 

Dougherty of the Downs Times was pounded by an ira ...
July 15, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2458)

Dougherty of the Downs Times was pounded by an irate street brawler whom he had published last week. The Times is determined to civilize Downs, if George has to take a drubbing every day. -- Beloit Gazette.

"The editor of the Downs Times was pounced upon one night last week by a tool of the whiskey ring there who have been fighting him and violence attempted but was prevented by a person who happened along. The association had a handsome fine to pay and no satisfaction out of the matter either." -- Concordia Times.

"Bro. Dougherty of the Downs Times was almost 'done up' the other day by an enraged citizen of the town, on account of an article which appeared in his paper. If Dougherty made any misstatement he is certain to retract. If he told the truth, he will stick to it if he is licked every day in the week." -- Osborne Journal.

"The Downs Chief has a new head." -- Oberlin Eye. "Now the next thing in order is a new head for the Chief's editor. One with brains in it." -- Beloit Democrat.

 

Hutchings Brothers, the photographic artists, will ...
July 22, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2460)

Hutchings Brothers, the photographic artists, will be here with their Railroad Photo Car next Monday....They were here several months ago and we heard nothing but praise from the many persons who had work done by them....

 

F. H. Barnhart, the founder and until recently one ...
July 26, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2462)

F. H. Barnhart, the founder and until recently one of the publishers of the Osborne Farmer, has bought the Journal of that place. It seems impossible for Barnhart to remain out of the editorial harness.

 

C. F. Knowlton, ex-editor of the Osborne Journal, ...
July 29, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2464)

C. F. Knowlton, ex-editor of the Osborne Journal, has bought a half interest in the Greenleaf Journal and takes charge of it next week.

Harry Root of the Atchison Champion, J. M. Covert of the Leavenworth Times, and W. T. Irwin of the Abilene Gazette took in the celebration and wrote up our town for their papers.

Mr. and Mrs. J. Q. Royce of the Smith Center Bulletin were here on Wednesday. J. Q. has attended all of our celebrations and he pronounced our trades display the best feature we have had yet.

The following newspaper folks attended the celebration: -- J. Q. Royce, Smith Center Bulletin; C. J. Lamb, Kirwin Independent; S. H. Dodge, Beloit Gazette; Franz Drummond, Portis Patriot; C. A. Hill, Stockton News; W. L. Chambers, Stockton Record; A. L. Topliff, Cawker Journal; A. Alrich, Cawker Record; L. G. Better, Concordia Blade; M. C. Singrey, Kirwin Chief; H. N. Boyd, Logan Freeman; J. A. Burton, Jamestown Kansan; Harry Root, Atchison Champion; J. M. Covert, Leavenworth Times; W. T. Irwin, Abilene Gazette; H. D. Graham, Webster Eagle; Frank Lewis, Woodston Register.

 

In our list, in Friday's issue of newspapermen who ...
August 2, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2467)

In our list, in Friday's issue of newspapermen who attended the celebration, we overlooked the names of W. D. Gerard, Osborne News; W. H. Nelson, Smith Centre Pioneer; and J. G. Eckman, representing the Osborne Journal. There were at least 24 newspapers represented here on that day.

 

F. H. Barnhart, the new editor of the Osborne Jour ...
August 5, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2468)

F. H. Barnhart, the new editor of the Osborne Journal, has gone to Chicago to buy a new outfit, including steam presses, etc. Barnhart is determined to have as good an office, as well as to issue as good a paper, as there is in the state.

 

We understand that the Headlight will be moved to ...
August 9, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2469)

We understand that the Headlight will be moved to Luray, Russell County, next week.

 

Villainous -- Whitmore of the Downs Chief gratuito ...
August 12, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2472)

Villainous -- Whitmore of the Downs Chief gratuitously insults Bro. Barnhart of the Osborne Journal in his issue of last week. His assertions in regard to Mr. Barnhart as a man and citizen are lies, pure and simple, while a few more doses of such villainous billingsgate as he ends up with will effectually stink the author out of the newspaper field in Osborne County. Try to be decent, Mr. Chief. -- Osborne Farmer.

A stranger in town after reading yesterday's Chief expressed his astonishment that the people of this place would tolerate such a paper as that and said that in any ordinary town a man who would publish such abominable stuff as Whitmore does would be run out of town without ceremony.

"The Downs Chief, in pretending to reply to our remarks about the free beer feature of the Downs celebration, merely performs the buzzard act of vomiting carrion whenever its nest is disturbed. What we said the decent people of that city know to their sorrow to be only too true. Much worse could be said with equal truth of Downs. Not the least unfavorable symptom of moral disorder is the fact that a newspaper of the character of the Chief should be the recognized exponent of local sentiment, as appears to be the case....There is no question but that decent people are in the majority in Downs, if a census was to be taken, but the events of the past few weeks seem to indicate that the other fellows are in the saddle just now." -- Osborne Journal.

The clippings from the Osborne papers, which we reproduce in this issue, show Whitmore's standing among the newspaper fraternity generally; the Chief is regarded as a disgrace to journalism. And the paper disgusts not only newspaper men but all decent people who read it.

 

The Downs Chief in its blood-thirsty braggadocio s ...
August 16, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2473)

The Downs Chief in its blood-thirsty braggadocio style thinks it is doing much to defend the reputation of that town. We think its course has the very opposite effect on the minds of steady-going people. The Chief will probably call us a 'dirty, lying hypocrite' for venturing this opinion. -- Jewell Republican.

 

Whitmore has for the last four months been predict ...
August 19, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2477)

Whitmore has for the last four months been predicting that the Times could not possibly hold out a month longer and actually seemed to be soft enough to believe it, and the dismal failure of his frequent predictions has had a bad effect on his nervous system....

 

Here is the Portis Patriot's opinion of our cellar ...
August 23, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2478)

Here is the Portis Patriot's opinion of our cellar contemporary: "Even the Chief can find no word of excuse for his mob and resorts to his favorite argument -- that of attempting to blacken the characters of those who do not believe and do as he does...."

 

After abusing us until his supply of adjectives an ...
August 26, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2481)

After abusing us until his supply of adjectives and pet names is completely exhausted, Whitmore now "whines like a whipped cur" -- to use one of his favorite expressions -- over what he terms "Dougherty's personal attacks" on him. How sad!

Commencing with our next issue, which will appear on Thursday, Sept. 1, the Times will be changed to a weekly (from twice a week). This will give our cellar contemporary something to write about for weeks to come.

 

Our cellar contemporary with clock work regularity ...
September 1, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2484)

Our cellar contemporary with clock work regularity charges us with fighting our town; this he does upon the very erroneous supposition that the law-defying element which he represents compose the town; a large majority of our city are respectable, law-abiding people as the clique now in power will be very apt to learn at the next election....

Our best people are very indignant over the fact that a match game of ball was allowed within our city limits last Sunday afternoon, accompanied by cheering and yelling that was heard nearly all over town, to the great annoyance of the community, and we believe that another attempt at anything of the kind will get the participants in trouble....

The first number of the Luray Headlight is at hand. James and John Garner are the publishers, the former being editor.

 

Ben Baker of the Chief office is taking in the Caw ...
September 8, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2487)

Ben Baker of the Chief office is taking in the Cawker fair this week. Mr. Dodd of Beloit is helping in the office in his place.

And still our rush of job work continues. What our cellar contemporary imagines to be "the death rattle of the Times" is only the "rattle" of our busy job press.

 

Under the caption "Kickers to the front," our cell ...
September 22, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2490)

Under the caption "Kickers to the front," our cellar contemporary has this to say: "There has been some kicking here among a few of the 'goody-goody' people concerning playing ball on Sunday at this place. We understand the Times man wanted the boys arrested, but he would not put up bonds for the cost when he entered his complaint...." As regards the above statement about the Times man, we can say that the Chief deliberately lied. We never made any complaint, nor ever spoke one word with any officer in regard to prosecuting anyone for playing ball at any time, and we defy the Chief to prove to the contrary....

 

The Herald's new press has arrived and the fightin ...
September 29, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2491)

The Herald's new press has arrived and the fighting editor is out rustling for funds to pay the freight, which amounts to a trifle more than the cost of the press. -- Gaylord Herald.

 

Link Drummond, who used to work on the Times and h ...
October 20, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2498)

Link Drummond, who used to work on the Times and help us "bach" several years ago, surprised us with a visit last week. He, too, is now married and he brought his wife with him to visit her relatives here. Link has been running the Norton Democrat but has sold out and will work on the Courier of that place.

The many friends...of Rev. A. T. Riley, who was pastor of the M.E. church of this city from 1879-83, will be pleased to learn that he is now prospering finely. He has worked very hard since he left here until last year, while at Carbondale, his health broke down completely; since that time he has been unable to do any preaching and his physicians give him but little hope of entire recovery so that he can again engage in active work, but his health is much better now than it was a year ago. He is now running a job printing office in Topeka and the Times family had the pleasure of visiting his pleasant home while in that city last week.

 

Good bye! This is my last issue of the Times. Comm ...
November 3, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2500)

Good bye! This is my last issue of the Times. Commencing next week, Ralph W. Norwood of Sterling, Ill., will take charge of the paper. As soon as I can get my business settled up I shall remove to Topeka, where I have purchased a half interest in a well established job printing business.

For six years and a half I have conducted the Times; I have always tried to make it a clean newspaper, ever working for the interests of Downs, in whose future I have always had implicit and enthusiastic confidence; I have from time to time seen my predictions fulfilled four-fold, and expect to see many more developments in the growth of our city that will be as surprising as any we have yet had.

In my career here I have had my ups and downs -- have undergone the hardships attending the conducting of a paper in a little village and have had the satisfaction of seeing that village grow into a thriving city, with every business interest keeping pace with the growth of the town.

I have made a number of enemies and I believe, some friends, and I am proud of both, because I feel that I have won them both by doing what was right.

I have every reason to believe that my successor, with the support and cooperation which he will be sure to receive from the people of our city and vicinity, will make the Times one of the best papers in northwest Kansas, and a credit to himself and his town.

With malice toward none, but good will to all, and hoping and believing that Downs and the Times will ever prosper, I remain, Very truly yours, Geo. E. Dougherty.

Ralph W. Norwood, the new Times man, arrived here yesterday from Sterling, Ill., and will take charge of the paper next week. He was accompanied by his brother Percy, who will help him in the office.

 

A Howdy. With this issue I take charge of the Time ...
November 10, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2502)

A Howdy. With this issue I take charge of the Times, Mr. Dougherty retiring. The paper has borne a good reputation under his management as a readable and reliable one -- a newspaper in every sense of the word -- and I shall try to keep up that reputation. It has been known as a "clean" sheet not only here, but in all Northwest Kansas, which merit its readers are assured the present editor will maintain. The friends of the paper will confer a favor on me by telling or writing the news which they hear, and to them I rise in my saddle to deliver the terse salutation of the plains, "How!" Respectfully, Ralph W. Norwood.

Ben Baker of the Harlan Enterprise spent Sunday in town, and in company with Henry Vogler of Kansas City, called on the Times Saturday.

 

Major Whitmore of the Chief holds up his good righ ...
November 17, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2504)

Major Whitmore of the Chief holds up his good right hand and says on oath: "Mr. Norwood is a very pleasant appearing young man, and we hope he will make the Times a success." Shake, major; you are a man and a brother.

Our exchanges are full of good words for Mr. George E. Dougherty. In this connection it will not be amiss to say that Mr. Dougherty, young as he is, has been longer in editorial harness, without interruption, than any other man in this section of Kansas, excepting one. That exception is W. H. Caldwell of the Beloit Courier. Mr. Barnhart of the Osborne Journal has been longest in the chair, but for about a year he laid aside the pen and the scissors and betook himself to the plow and the harrow, thus breaking his record. Mr. Dougherty commenced publishing the Glen Elder Key when in his 17th year, and for nearly eight years has been philanthropically devoting his energies, in the way his conscience told him was best, for the good of the people.

 

Frank Coffey of Cawker City, formerly an employee ...
December 1, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2506)

Frank Coffey of Cawker City, formerly an employee of The Times, was here over Thanksgiving.

 

Quin. Craft has been added to the reportorial staf ...
December 29, 1887, Downs Times (ID 2508)

Quin. Craft has been added to the reportorial staff of the Times. His first work in his new capacity was to visit the lower schools with pencil and paper and tell of the closing exercises.

 

Ben Baker of the Harlan Enterprise came into the T ...
January 19, 1888, Downs Times (ID 2511)

Ben Baker of the Harlan Enterprise came into the Times office last week. He will suspend the publication of his paper until spring, and in the meantime expects to locate in Downs and with the Chief. Major Ben has a good reputation as a newspaper man and has a large number of friends outside of that charmed circle.

 

John Q. Royce! There is a name which will go thund ...
February 2, 1888, Downs Times (ID 2515)

John Q. Royce! There is a name which will go thundering down the ages in the archives of the Kansas State Historical Society. John Q. Royce! There is grandeur in it. He is the majordomo of the Smith Center Bulletin, and it has caused him dyspepsia. Perhaps the rivalry of the Smith Centre Pioneer, one of the brightest, newsiest, best printed, and most enterprising of the Kansas papers, is the source of his stomach troubles and mental worriment. Here is what John Q. Royce says of the Times: "The Downs Times man certainly has a great deal of trouble trying to write the biography of the men in Kansas. First, he made an awful break about the life and personal character of our Congressman, E. J. Turner, and now he has W. P. Troth of Atchison, the bachelor traveling man, going to move his family to Downs. You had better take a slower train, young man."...John Q. Royce might make a good walking biography of Kansas men, but he looks awkward on stilts. And so does a circus clown.

 

Major Topliff of the Cawker Journal, with Major Wh ...
March 8, 1888, Downs Times (ID 2518)

Major Topliff of the Cawker Journal, with Major Whitmore of the Chief, made a pleasant call on the major of this paper one day last week.

 

R. W. Norwood, the ex-Times man, started last Satu ...
March 22, 1888, Downs Times (ID 2521)

R. W. Norwood, the ex-Times man, started last Saturday evening for Illinois, stopping at Kansas City and St. Louis on the way.

Lost -- A nickel-plated composing rule with Q. R. Craft scratched on one side. Finder will greatly oblige by leaving at this office.

 

Farewell. In leaving Downs and the Times, I desire ...
March 27, 1888, Downs Times (ID 2523)

Farewell. In leaving Downs and the Times, I desire to express my appreciation of the many favors and kind treatment which I have received from the citizens during my stay here, and I trust that the good will shown me and all the patronage I received (with much more) may be given my successors, that they may be enabled to make the Times not only a gratifying success as an individual enterprise, but also an important factor in the growth and development of Destiny Downs. All accounts due the Times at this time for subscription, advertising or job work since Nov. 1st, 1887, are payable to E. D. Craft & Son.

-- R. W. Norwood.

Salutatory. To the good People of Downs and Vicinity -- Patrons, Friends and Fellow Citizens:

Having been a free-holder of Downs before it was incorporated as a city, and having overlooked its growth and progress with interest every day for over eight years, we think it can truly be said that no one feels a greater regard for its prosperity, in the highest sense of the term, than we do.

In assuming the proprietorship of this paper we point with something of a feeling of pride to our past record (no city every having been supplied with purer, better milk for eight years) and would simply say that we intend this sheet shall in the future be as clean, wholesome and honest. The retiring editor, Mr. Norwood, a young man of "Sterling" (Ill.) principles, could not feel thoroughly naturalized in our young commonwealth and leaving his best wishes for the Times, has returned to the "Sucker State," regretted by his many friends here. The Times has been fortunate in its leaders from the first, and we hope to sustain its reputation as a newsy and reliable local sheet.

We earnestly ask your help and encouragement for its columns in the future as in the past. We shall endeavor to secure competent assistance in the office, so that the job department also will merit the patronage of our citizens. To the farming community we would add that, being a farmer also and having given considerable attention, since our occupancy of a "land grant from Uncle Sam," to the crops adapted to our section, as well as to the breeding and care of good grades of stock, we hope with your kind cooperation to make our columns of value to all by the interchange of ideas and experiences.

To the Christian and enterprising public -- let us try to MAKE THE MOST of our glorious heritage, here in the center of the foremost of States -- foremost in morals, in sobriety, in healthfulness and in all the recent developments of brain and hand.-- E. D. Craft.

We never learned to throw brickbats and do not think it will pay to learn at this mature age. In assuming the proprietorship of this paper we are aware of the fact that there is another well established paper in town; but we would say to our friends (and we do not know that we have any enemies) that we think there is room enough, and people enough, to give each paper a thriving circulation. And as we have heard the wish expressed by some who subscribe for both papers that they could have one paper earlier in the week, we have changed our day of publication from Thursday to Tuesday. Consequently our fund of news this week is smaller than usual.

 

We have made arrangements with W. H. Wahl to assis ...
April 3, 1888, Downs Times (ID 2525)

We have made arrangements with W. H. Wahl to assist us on the Times. He is recommended by his friends in Stockton as being the best printer ever in that city. Geo. E. Dougherty, who has been helping us until we could find a suitable printer, will return home this week, by way of Kansas City, where he intends to purchase a complete outfit of material for his job office in the capital city.

 

Lew C. Headley of the Gaylord Herald and A. Barron ...
April 17, 1888, Downs Times (ID 2527)

Lew C. Headley of the Gaylord Herald and A. Barron of the Cedarville Globe passed through Downs on their way home from Beloit last Thursday morning, and made the Times a call. They appear to be substantial, weighty men, as the end of the car in which they were sitting broke down.

 

Q. R. Craft of the Times attended the Northwest Ka ...
May 29, 1888, Downs Times (ID 2534)

Q. R. Craft of the Times attended the Northwest Kansas Editorial Association last week, taking in the sights in Stockton, and was a member of the excursion party on their tour through Kansas City, Leavenworth, Fort Scott, and Topeka.

 

Fifth anniversary of the Northwest Kansas Editoria ...
June 5, 1888, Downs Times (ID 2537)

Fifth anniversary of the Northwest Kansas Editorial Association held at Stockton May 23-24, 1888. The Tuesday evening train on the North Branch brought eight editors and ladies, who stayed overnight in this city, and the Wednesday morning train from the east was so full that when we started for Stockton many had to be checked through as baggage. After a pleasant ride of two hours through the beautiful valley of the South Solomon, we became aware that we were approaching a great city....The association was opened with an address of welcome by C. W. Smith; and after a lively interchange of ideas and methods for better journalistic work...they proceeded to appoint officers for the ensuing year. L. L. Alrich of Cawker City was elected president, and C. M. Dunn of Minneapolis secretary....The literary program presented at the M.E. church...consisted of an interesting paper on "Pioneer Journalism in Northwest Kansas" by F. G. Adams, secretary of the State Historical Society....As we started our tour, we found that the enterprising businessmen of Downs had telegraphed an invitation...for the whole company to stop off at Downs for a free supper, and when we reached Osborne we met a delegation from the Downs press bearing cards of introduction and entertainment to the Tremont and Howell House, the two principal hotels. We enjoyed the trip immensely....

Press compliments. The following are a few of the many complimentary notices, showing what the Northwest Kansas editors think of our city:

On our arrival in the city of Downs...the party were escorted to the Howell House and Tremont House, where we found the tables fairly moaning under their great weight of good things. -- Smith Center Bulletin.

The public spirit of Downs and her people was shown in a very handsome way...when the whole train load of editorial excursionists was taken to the Howell House and the Tremont House and furnished with a splendid supper free of charge. The Downs Times was at the head of the scheme. -- Rooks County Record.

Shortly after leaving Stockton, a telegram was received from J. W. Huff, mayor of Downs, stating that supper had been prepared for 100 excursionists by the citizens of that city. On the arrival of the train at Downs, the editors and their ladies were escorted to the Tremont House and the Howell House, where they partook of an excellent supper, after which they went on their way in a most happy frame of mind. -- Edmond Times.

 

W. H. Nelson has sold his interest in the Smith Ce ...
July 17, 1888, Downs Times (ID 2540)

W. H. Nelson has sold his interest in the Smith Centre Pioneer to his partner, J. N. Beacom, and will hereafter edit the Kensington Mirror.

We are sorry to learn that S. E. Ruede of Osborne has for the present severed his connection with the Osborne Farmer....He in company with George Dodge of the Beloit Gazette will hereafter publish a new paper at Marceline, Mo. News items are compelled to keep very shy to escape Mr. Ruede's eye, and we contemplate a general waking up of some of the old Missourians.

 

There has been quite a number of changes in journa ...
July 24, 1888, Downs Times (ID 2547)

There has been quite a number of changes in journalism in this locality recently. The Alton Empire has become the property of Moore & Goodard, A. G. Grubb being compelled by ill health to resign his position....The new parties are not only making the Empire hold its own, but they have improved it in several respects.

The Downs Chief has changed from and eight-column folio to a five-column quarto, and by other changes has bettered its appearance. By reading both sides of the question, the Republican side in the Topeka Capital, Kansas City Journal and other prominent sheets, and the Democratic side (?) in the Chief, we are really beginning to know something.

 

The Stockton Democrat has changed hands, F. U. Mon ...
September 11, 1888, Downs Times (ID 2558)

The Stockton Democrat has changed hands, F. U. Montgomery, a prominent businessman of Stockton, having purchased the plant. We understand H. T. Miller will edit, that is he will sit around the center table playing cards while W. H. Walker, their able printer, does double duty.

 

Many years ago while residing in the Empire State, ...
September 18, 1888, Downs Times (ID 2560)

Many years ago while residing in the Empire State, one fall at the old Putnam County fair there was a side show at which the only object on exhibition was an idiot with a very singular shaped head, long grasping fingers and a large mouth which was always partly open. The only two words which the idiot spoke during the exhibit were "you lie," and frequently while the manager was relating where he captured him, the condition in which he found him, and his manner of treating him, the idiot would interrupt him by simply saying "you lie," and each time the audience would roar with laughter, not at what was said by the manager but by the correction made by the idiot. The amusing scene was brought very vividly to our recollection by the reference made to us in the Chief of last week's issue.

 

Volume one, number one of the Christian Citizen re ...
September 25, 1888, Downs Times (ID 2562)

Volume one, number one of the Christian Citizen reaches our table. It is published by the Riley & Wake Publishing Co., in which Geo. E. Dougherty, an old time resident of this city, is a stockholder. Rev. A. T. Riley, the head of the firm, was the pastor of the M.E. Church at this place several years ago.

 

Fred Hulaniski, who several years ago was connecte ...
October 9, 1888, Downs Times (ID 2566)

Fred Hulaniski, who several years ago was connected with the Times in this city, is now editing a paper in Wichita called the Commercial Bulletin.

 

...The Chief is throwing out hints to the effect t ...
October 16, 1888, Downs Times (ID 2569)

...The Chief is throwing out hints to the effect that the business people of Downs must swallow his double-faced dealing without making faces, or he will expose their crookedness. The Chief started out as a neutral sheet, but made itself a holy terror to all who dared oppose it, the thing turned about, and exhibited its cloven foot and fixed itself in an attitude ready to annihilate any who might be foolhardy enough to say why do ye so. Now I claim that after the Chief had obtained the patronage of the people of Downs and surrounding country on the ground that it was an unpartisan sheet, its editor had no moral, and I would almost say, no legal right to make it an ultra partisan paper.

It seems to me a case of obtaining goods under false pretenses. At any rate I should say it is in very poor grace for the Chief to be doing such high kicking when it was the first to break faith with its patrons.... -- P. W. Kenyon.

 

(During a serious fire in the Grinnell building an ...
January 8, 1889, Downs Times (ID 2584)

(During a serious fire in the Grinnell building and other buildings) ...the gentlemen running through our composition parlor to carry harness, etc., into the back room brushed against and pied about half a column of type, but notwithstanding this the Times is but slightly late.

 

The Cawker Journal under Ferd Prince is a vast imp ...
January 15, 1889, Downs Times (ID 2586)

The Cawker Journal under Ferd Prince is a vast improvement. Cawker is now well represented in the newspaper field; in fact, it has more newspapers than anything else.

 

This issue closes the ninth year of the successful ...
February 5, 1889, Downs Times (ID 2591)

This issue closes the ninth year of the successful existence of the Downs Times. It commenced with the little six-months-old railroad junction and has sturdily maintained its position alongside the steadily growing town like a little steam tug parting the waves on our Western rivers, and bearing along to certain destiny the immense cargo under its special patronage.

 

Mark J. Kelly, editor of the Edmond Times, is stil ...
March 5, 1889, Downs Times (ID 2595)

Mark J. Kelly, editor of the Edmond Times, is still missing. He left for Kansas City three weeks ago and has not been heard from since. Another resident of Edmond has been sent to look him up but has found no trace of him further than that he left Kansas City on the night of Feb. 10th. His wife is continuing the publication of the paper.

 

F. J. Hulaniski, who was for several months forema ...
March 19, 1889, Downs Times (ID 2597)

F. J. Hulaniski, who was for several months foreman of this office, and who is well known to our people, who has published papers at Downs, Wichita, Alton, Osborne and almost all the smaller towns in the state, Cawker included, has begun the publication of the Kansas City Sun, a society paper. "Huly" is one of the most humorous authors in the country, and judging from the first two numbers, we believe the Sun will be a luminary of no small importance.

 

We take this opportunity, one for all, to inform M ...
April 9, 1889, Downs Times (ID 2602)

We take this opportunity, one for all, to inform Mr. Whitmore and the public generally that we consider the Chief's slurs a greater honor than its praise could be. Being a low lived, Democratic sheet so long as there could be final proof notices or other favors gained thereby, he is now ready to flop in hope of financial gains upon the other side (and he needs help, poor fellow, being they say inextricably in debt to everybody he can persuade to trust him). But the Chief's innuendoes don't work well, as they offend the moral sense of the average citizen, whatever his political views may be.

 

The public must feel very grateful to the Globe fo ...
April 16, 1889, Downs Times (ID 2604)

The public must feel very grateful to the Globe for informing them that it is a Republican paper. Had it not been for the statement to that effect they would doubtless never have discovered the fact.

 

Our merchants and grocerymen are beginning to find ...
May 7, 1889, Downs Times (ID 2608)

Our merchants and grocerymen are beginning to find out that the Times is the local paper which reaches the masses and especially the rural population. When people come in to buy the specialties noticed among the locals, the dealers find on questioning them that the advertisements in the Times are the ones which bring them the custom.

 

F. J. Hulaniski, editor of the Kansas City Sun, wa ...
May 14, 1889, Downs Times (ID 2611)

F. J. Hulaniski, editor of the Kansas City Sun, was in the city last evening. Although his fame is now as wide as the Union, he did not forget the Times office where the latent powers of his great genius were in the incipiency, but favored us with a whole half hour's call.

 

North West Kansas Editorial Association and excurs ...
May 21, 1889, Downs Times (ID 2613)

North West Kansas Editorial Association and excursion. The association having been appointed at Minneapolis this year, we boarded the train Thursday morning and started for the long-anticipated trip. Forty-nine editors and their ladies from the northwest territory were met at Beloit by a portion of the Minneapolis reception committee....In the evening the high-spirited pencil pushers assembled in an adjoining hall where a grand feast awaited them....The next morning at 8:30 the association again met in the hall for a strictly business meeting....The following corps of officers was elected to serve for the ensuing year: President, C. M. Dunn of Minneapolis; vice-president, T. A. Filson of Concordia; secretary and treasurer, R. F. Vaughn of Mankato. At 10:10 the newspaper boys were obliged to bid a reluctant farewell to their newly made friends in order to take the Union Pacific train to Abilene....Headley of Gaylord, Hewitt of Glen Elder, and Burton of Jamestown were to enter upon their new duties as postmasters of their respective towns on the 16th, so could not attend the Editorial Association....Our city was enlivened, both on the outward trip last Thursday morning and again on the home stretch Monday evening, with the jolly presence between trains of some 30 of our Western editors and their ladies, who took in the Minneapolis Association and Excursion to Denver and the Rockies....

 

Tom G. Nicklin, the originator of the Times, has r ...
May 28, 1889, Downs Times (ID 2616)

Tom G. Nicklin, the originator of the Times, has received the appointment of clerk of the district court at Whatcom, Washington Territory.

"The wife of Mark J. Kelley has paid nearly $250 of his debts, nearly all made out of the Edmond Times since Kelley's departure for parts unknown about three months ago." -- Portis Patriot.

 

The Globe wishes the Topeka Capital and the Downs ...
June 18, 1889, Downs Times (ID 2617)

The Globe wishes the Topeka Capital and the Downs Times would find something to talk about besides the beauty of prohibition, and especially the prohibitory law enforced....In his attempt to say we had criticized any action of the city officials, he himself acknowledges more that is derogatory to them personally than we had ever thought of saying. More than that, he intimates that our work is nearly finished; hold on, Ben, we know that "misery likes company," but we have always been able yet to keep up a good credit by faithfully paying our debts while the Globe had to get its last patent from the Kansas Newspaper Union C.O.D. How long the Globe can do this, leaving back debts unpaid, we cannot say, and would not have mentioned the matter had he not tried by all means true or false to injure use....

 

The Downs Chief and Globe are going for the Times ...
June 25, 1889, Downs Times (ID 2618)

The Downs Chief and Globe are going for the Times of that city because that paper thinks that they can celebrate without beer. We think it would look better for the Chief and Globe if they would take the same stand on this question that the Times has taken. -- Cawker Journal.

 

The former editor of this paper, R. W. Norwood, ha ...
July 31, 1889, Downs Times (ID 2624)

The former editor of this paper, R. W. Norwood, has aspired to greatness, we judge from two facts -- he is a principal stockholder in the National Journalist Publishing Company, of Chicago, with eight men working under his supervision -- and his location looms up skyward to the height of 13 stories. The firm is just now issuing a beautiful souvenir book descriptive of Watertown, South Dakota, and constantly increasing its mechanical appliances to make this publishing house one of the first in that part of the city....

 

Frank Coffey, a former employee of the Times, but ...
August 21, 1889, Downs Times (ID 2629)

Frank Coffey, a former employee of the Times, but now a resident of Scottsville, is the happy father of a daughter.

 

The Downs Times will be an all-home-print after Au ...
September 4, 1889, Downs Times (ID 2633)

The Downs Times will be an all-home-print after August 20. This is an evidence of general prosperity in their locality, and clearly indicates the ability of E. D. Craft & son to successfully manage a newspaper. -- Publishers Auxiliary.

 

The advertisers of Downs know a good thing when th ...
September 25, 1889, Downs Times (ID 2635)

The advertisers of Downs know a good thing when they see it. The Times always has been their favorite, but our largely increasing county list is pleasing them better than ever. Our edition is four quires larger this week than it was before we began our canvass of the county.

 

The Kansas City Thinkograph has thinked out, and H ...
October 16, 1889, Downs Times (ID 2637)

The Kansas City Thinkograph has thinked out, and Hulaniski is around looking for a job. -- Record.

The Glen Elder Herald is at present under a cloud, N. F. Hewitt having forsaken it and his son Arthur has temporarily suspended publication. Arthur could make it pay if it were not for the embarrassments. Fred Hulaniski was investigating it on Monday and may probably settle down to the quiet retirement of a country publisher as he finds life amid the glitter, glare and crimes of the wicked city at the mouth of the Kaw repugnant, and inconsistent with his strict views of propriety. -- Record.

Another editor given his dues: J. N. Beacom, publisher of the Pioneer, is the newly appointed postmaster at Smith Centre.

 

We are glad to see the prosperity of James E. Garn ...
November 13, 1889, Downs Times (ID 2644)

We are glad to see the prosperity of James E. Garner, a former Downs boy, who now edits the Almena Advance, and has now enlarged it to nearly double its former size.

 

Joe Wright will start a new free trade "Journal" a ...
December 18, 1889, Downs Times (ID 2651)

Joe Wright will start a new free trade "Journal" at Lebanon.

 

F. Barnhart, the veteran newspaper man of Osborne ...
January 1, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2654)

F. Barnhart, the veteran newspaper man of Osborne County, has sold out his interest in the Journal to W. S. Tilton of WaKeeney. Mr. Tilton has been editor of the WaKeeney World for ten years and is one of our most brilliant writers.

...Mr. Barnhart is not only a talented editor but also one that weighs each thought he expresses so that we have heard it said that, when Barnhart speaks, the public can depend on his words to be true as gospel.

A Pleasant Surprise -- On Tuesday night, the home of E. D. Craft was the scene of a most pleasant little gathering. By eight o'clock, about 30 of the more prominent members of the Baptist Church and Sunday School had assembled, bearing baskets filled with refreshments. In the midst of this merriment and happy conversation, an outer door was thrust open and an elegant Platform Rocker landed in the midst of the company, taking its station immediately in front of the genial host. Mr. Craft was then commanded to face the music of the well-known voice of H. H. Welty while he vocalized the following sentiments:

"In behalf of the teachers and others in your Sunday School, it is my pleasant duty to ask your acceptance of this gift as a slight token of our affection for yourself and of our thanks for your able management as superintendent of our Sunday School, and our gratitude for your tireless efforts in connection with our Sunday School Teachers' Meetings...." Mr. Craft responded in a very happy manner, most cordially thanking the donors, saying he had not labored in view of any such reward, but had ever been amply repaid in connection with the effort put forth....The good ladies then actively appeared on the scene, took charge of the spreading of napkins and passing of plates well filled with delicious slices of cakes with apples, et cetera....After music and pleasant conversation, we dispersed and wended our way to the "watch meeting of 1889." -- A Visitor.

 

The Osborne Farmer and Journal have been consolida ...
January 8, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2656)

The Osborne Farmer and Journal have been consolidated under the name of the Farmer. W. S. Tilton takes a half interest and C. W. Landis one-half.

J. D. Cox is learning the art preservative in this office, and bids fair to become a good typo.

 

Amidst the shades and shadows and failing eyesight ...
January 22, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2660)

Amidst the shades and shadows and failing eyesight of an editor's worrisome life, what could more effectually bring light out of darkness and joy out of sadness than to have a friend (on whom you had never been conscious of having bestowed a favor) step into your office and lay upon the editorial desk a case containing a pair of gold-bowed, rolling-tipped spectacles? These glasses made the trembling, hazy lines of the dailies as plain and steady as the big letters in our first spelling book. H. H. Welty simply made the remark, "Please accept these as a present from myself and Carrie." May the words of Christ, "Blessed are your eyes, for they see," be true in your case in all that our blessed Savior implied by that figure. -- Senior Editor.

 

The Portis Patriot came out last week bright and s ...
January 29, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2664)

The Portis Patriot came out last week bright and sparkling under the management of E. R. Powell.

Mrs. S. A. Getty arrived at her home in this city Saturday evening after an absence of about six months. She left Mrs. G. E. Dougherty, who has been very sick with brain fever, on her feet again....

 

M. H. Hoyt says he has bought out the Downs Globe. ...
February 19, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2670)

M. H. Hoyt says he has bought out the Downs Globe.

 

Ben T. Baker, who has been a resident of our city ...
February 26, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2672)

Ben T. Baker, who has been a resident of our city for nearly four years, has disposed of his property and business here and will leave about March 1st for Wichita, where he has a position with the South Western Newspaper Co. He will work in the house for about a month and then take the road. Northwest Kansas will be his territory with headquarters at Beloit, where his father is now landlord of the Brunswick....

There is a great demand for good stenographers, and at good salaries....It isn't necessary to try to learn the old systems of shorthand. You can accomplish the same or better results in very much less time and with very much less effort by learning the Pernin system, which is so simple that children not yet in their teens are mastering it....You can get thorough instruction by mail for 50 cents per lesson, paying for each lesson as you order it. Write for further information or send 50 cents for first lesson to Geo. E. Dougherty, 626 Kansas Ave., Topeka, Kansas.

 

Editor J. W. McBride of the Cawker Times called br ...
March 12, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2676)

Editor J. W. McBride of the Cawker Times called briefly while in the city today....

And now Clarence Newman has joined the comedy troupe. The Times is having bad luck with its printers.

 

Herbert M. Fletcher has purchased the Alton Empire ...
March 19, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2679)

Herbert M. Fletcher has purchased the Alton Empire. He has held for some time the position of bookkeeper in the Exchange bank of Osborne. He is a fine appearing young man....

 

Stockton Record: "The Downs Chief kicks because so ...
April 2, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2683)

Stockton Record: "The Downs Chief kicks because some respectable people down there are trying to enforce the prohibition laws. Democratic papers never fail to howl when the subject of temperance is broached."

The Cawker Journal has suspended publication. Ferd Prince edited a good clean sheet, but Cawker could not support three papers, and the two journals remaining are lively ones and will abundantly supply Cawkerites with home reading.

Correct: The Chief in its last issue charges the Times with being a Republican journal, devoted to strict prohibition, the direct organ of the Farmers' Alliance; we would add that it is also the patron of our Free School System, the disseminator of Sunday School intelligence besides being the best local paper in town. And, good people, if there is anything else real good that you know of, just trot it out and we will help you advertise it.

 

The county commissioners...today voted the Downs T ...
April 9, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2685)

The county commissioners...today voted the Downs Times and the Osborne County Farmer to be the official county papers for the coming year, to be paid fifty percent of legal rates. ...There was a strong feeling on the part of the commissioners for the Osborne News, but they said, "We will not pay political debts with the people's money," and it is a strong triumph of principle over partisanship....The Farmer and the Times, which are acknowledged to be the two leading periodicals in the county, represent a bona fide circulation IN OSBORNE COUNTY larger than all the other publications combined, besides furnishing larger and better sheets of reading matter....

 

Capt. W. S. Tilton, the soldier-editor of the Osbo ...
April 16, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2687)

Capt. W. S. Tilton, the soldier-editor of the Osborne Farmer, called pleasantly at the Times sanctum Thursday morning while on his way to Hill City via Edmond. At Gaylord, he was joined by Lewis Hanback and C. E. Carter, who also delivered addresses at the Hill City campfire....

John Parks, the somewhat portly but highly pleasant and social editor of the Beloit Democrat, favored us with a short call while in the city Monday. John formerly resided a short distance east of this city....Under his management, the Beloit Democrat is the leading Democratic journal of western Kansas.

 

The Northwest Expositor is being issued from this ...
April 30, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2692)

The Northwest Expositor is being issued from this office this week.

W. H. McBride was in the city Tuesday morning. He has sold his Bogue Signal printing outfit to the Beeman boys, who will start an Alliance paper at Covert.

The Northwest Kansas Editorial Excursion will visit the cities of Wichita, Guthrie, Okla., and Fort Worth, Texas....The newspapers of Downs will probably be represented as follows: Globe, E. L. Raub and sister Nellie; Chief, W. H. Whitmore and A. B. Collins; Times, Quincy and Cornie Craft; Expositor, Joseph D. Cox.

 

The patrons of the Prairie Belle school, Bethany T ...
May 7, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2695)

The patrons of the Prairie Belle school, Bethany Township, turned out en masse last Friday noon and took the teacher, Miss Cornie Craft, entirely by surprise while they spread a bountiful dinner at the school house, of which over fifty partook....

 

Jim Garner will move his Advance plant to Norton. ...
May 14, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2697)

Jim Garner will move his Advance plant to Norton. His paper has been designated the official county paper of the Alliance.

 

Colorado City Chieftain: "B. T. Baker of Kansas ha ...
May 21, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2699)

Colorado City Chieftain: "B. T. Baker of Kansas has accepted a position on the Chieftain staff, and will operate in Colorado Springs and Manitou...."

 

A. B. Collins has quit the Chief. He talks of star ...
June 11, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2703)

A. B. Collins has quit the Chief. He talks of starting a second paper at Jewell City in company with E. L. Raub....

The Northwest Kansas Editorial Association voted to give a prize to the paper furnishing the most faithful and concise writeup of the Galveston trip....We proscribe our modesty when we clip the following good opinion from the Delphos Republican: "The poetical account, Mankato to the Gulf, by Mrs. Craft of the Downs Times is the best writeup we have seen. She ought to get the prize."

 

We are in receipt of the Colorado City Iris, a tri ...
June 18, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2705)

We are in receipt of the Colorado City Iris, a tri-weekly paper published by Benedict & Baker, the latter being the Ben T. Baker formerly of this city.

Charlie Hill of Stockton was a guest of ye editor yesterday. He was en route to Havensville, Pottawatomie County, driving his blooded trotting horse, "Printer." His brother Will, who now has charge of the Havensville Register, has greatly improved the paper, and we feel sure the Hill Bros. will make a strong newspaper team.

 

W. H. Caldwell of the Beloit Courier had just got ...
June 25, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2708)

W. H. Caldwell of the Beloit Courier had just got settled in his new building when he learned of his own appointment to the receivership of the Kirwin land office, and that of his son to a cadetship at West Point.

The Portis Globe put in an appearance Saturday and from its perusal we are led to believe that Hoyt intends to afflict that peaceful community for four or five weeks. The Osborne Farmer truthfully remarks: "Honestly speaking, Hoyt is no more fit to edit a newspaper than a hog is to preach the gospel. We don't believe that the Alliance can conscientiously support such a paper that Hoyt can produce."

 

Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Alrich of the Cawker Record are ...
July 2, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2711)

Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Alrich of the Cawker Record are off to Boston to attend the National Editorial Association....

Ferd Prince has moved the Cawker Journal plant to Concordia, and is preparing to launch his new Alliance paper this week. He is given a good bonus and we wish him heartily all the success in the world.

 

C. E. Anderson, late of the Chief, Kirwin, has acc ...
July 9, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2713)

C. E. Anderson, late of the Chief, Kirwin, has accepted the position of local editor of the Alliance (Ferd Prince's new paper at Concordia) and will move to that place....The first number was issued last Saturday.

 

Byron J. Thompson, editor of the Lebanon Criterion ...
July 16, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2716)

Byron J. Thompson, editor of the Lebanon Criterion, died in his home in Oak Township, Smith County, last Tuesday evening from morphine poisoning. Mr. Thompson was the founder of the Mankato Monitor, edited the Smith Centre Pioneer at one time, and later removed to Oak Township....He was troubled with neuralgia contracted during the war and while taking morphine to relieve the excruciating pain he took an overdose. We feel sad over the death of this greatly respected brother editor and sympathize with the bereaved family.

 

Press representatives were numerous and among the ...
July 26, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2719)

Press representatives were numerous and among the callers at Times headquarters (during the Celebration) we noted: Harry Root, Atchison Champion; E. L. Raub, Lebanon Criterion; John Parks, Beloit Democrat; Hulaniski, Glen Elder Herald; A. Barron, Cedarville Globe; J. M. McNay, Phillipsburg Dispatch; and J. E. Garner, Norton Advance.

 

Ben T. Baker of the Colorado City Iris came home t ...
July 31, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2720)

Ben T. Baker of the Colorado City Iris came home to celebrate but a daily newspaperman has little time for visiting and he was compelled to return Tuesday.

 

The Portis Whisperer has discontinued publication. ...
August 14, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2724)

The Portis Whisperer has discontinued publication. Its editor, E. R. Powell, intends to go east. We will miss the bright and spicy Whisperer from our exchange table.

 

A. G. Alrich of Cawker City has been suffering fro ...
August 21, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2726)

A. G. Alrich of Cawker City has been suffering from attacks from prostration from overwork. He will take a vacation and jaunting trip for his health.

The Western Advocate, the new Alliance paper for Jewell County, is at hand. It is published at Burr Oak by W. E. Bush.

 

The Downs Times is without exception the best loca ...
September 4, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2730)

The Downs Times is without exception the best local newspaper that comes to our office. It contains more local news than any of the others. -- Scottsville News.

The Jennings Times will move to Oberlin. This will give George Shook of the Echo the whole field, which is no more than he has deserved for a long time.

J. D. Cox of the Times will attend the meeting of the Northwest Editorial Association next week at Colby....

 

From the Cawker Record we learn that A. G. Alrich ...
September 11, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2732)

From the Cawker Record we learn that A. G. Alrich is temporarily engaged at Foley's bindery in Lawrence, where he has charge, among other details, of three girls. From appearances on the Galveston trip, we thought one was about all Allie could conveniently manage.

J. D. Cox of the Times left Monday for Colby to attend the Northwest Kansas Editorial Association. He will also take in the excursion which left Colby yesterday for Colorado Springs, Manitou, Leadville and Glenwood Falls, Colorado. Del is an all-round rustler and interested worker while at home and you may guess correctly that we miss him.

Northwest Quill-Drivers in Congress. (Special to the Downs Times) Colby, Kansas, Sept. 9, 1890 -- The Northwest Kansas Editorial Association convened here today with a good attendance....After dinner the company assembled and, after music and invocation, listened to a genial address of welcome to which C. V. Kinney of the Oakley Graphic responded. R. A. Dague gave an interesting address on "A Successful Newspaper." A. W. Crippen of the Logan Freeman followed with "Some of Our Trials."...James Jones, editor of the Russell Record, discussed at length "The Subscription List." This evening the knights of the quill and their ladies are partaking of a sumptuous banquet at Opelt's Hotel....The editors of the Cat and Tribune have thrown open their doors to the visitors....

A Double Compliment to Walt. (Beloit Democrat) Walt Whitmore of the Downs Times was in Beloit last Friday on business and found time to call around and occupy one of our cushioned chairs a short time. Walt is seriously thinking of leaving this portion of Kansas and seeking his fortune in other lands. Be this as it may, we wish him abundant success.

A dispatch from Brother Cox states that he has been made assistant secretary of the Northwest Kansas Editorial Association. We always entertained great hopes for Del, that he would rise in the world.

 

The Barnard Times has suspended.: The Glen Elder H ...
September 25, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2735)

The Barnard Times has suspended.

The Glen Elder Herald has failed to materialize for two weeks.

The Salem Argus is no more. Nearly all the businessmen have removed from Salem.

J. Q. Royce, now of the Arkansas City Daily Traveler, has disposed of his interest in the Smith Centre Pioneer-Bulletin to W. H. Nelson, formerly of the Pioneer.

 

W. H. Nelson of the Smith Centre Pioneer-Bulletin ...
October 2, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2737)

W. H. Nelson of the Smith Centre Pioneer-Bulletin was in the city Friday evening and Saturday. He is arranging for a joint Republican meeting at some point between Downs and Cawker....

Joe Wright has sold his interest in the Smith County "official organ" and will resume publication of the Lebanon Journal.

 

The Farmer's Aid of Covert and Headlight of Luray ...
October 9, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2739)

The Farmer's Aid of Covert and Headlight of Luray have succumbed to the pressure of the close times and will suspend for a season.

Editor M. H. Hoyt is down from Nebraska looking after Osborne County interests. He has located at Clay Center, Neb., and will probably issue the first number of his new paper next week.

An eight and one-half pound daughter made its advent on Sunday into the home of G. E. Dougherty, 1515 West Sixteenth Street, Topeka, Kan. George now holds the position of stenographer to the superintendent of telegraph of the Santa Fe system. He has been at this work about a month and is getting along nicely.

W. H. Wahl, formerly foreman of the Times office, but of late connected with the Smith Centre Pioneer-Bulletin, was over Friday evening mingling with old friends. He is at present engaged in collecting for J. Q. Royce.

 

J. M. McAfee, formerly of the Luray Headlight, has ...
October 30, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2741)

J. M. McAfee, formerly of the Luray Headlight, has received an appointment as clerk in the pension bureau at Washington at a salary of $1,200 a year.

 

Ben T. Baker, who has lately been connected with t ...
November 6, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2743)

Ben T. Baker, who has lately been connected with the publication of the Colorado City Iris, has accepted a position on the Colorado Springs Daily Mail.

 

W. H. Wahl, formerly of the Times office, now guid ...
November 13, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2744)

W. H. Wahl, formerly of the Times office, now guides the course of the Lebanon Criterion, E. L. Raub having sold out in his favor. Mr. Wahl is an excellent printer and a thorough newspaper rustler, and already his earmarks are visible on the Criterion.

 

Messrs. J. W. and J. S. Parks of Beloit have remov ...
November 27, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2748)

Messrs. J. W. and J. S. Parks of Beloit have removed the name Democrat from the masthead of their strictly Alliance organ and have substituted the name The Western Call.

The Utah Leader of Payson, Utah, comes to our table this week (and with satisfaction as it is an unusually neat and spicy weekly); we note at its helm the names E. R. Powell and A. L. Topliff....

 

Editor Fletcher of the Alton Empire was in the cit ...
December 11, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2751)

Editor Fletcher of the Alton Empire was in the city Tuesday evening, stopping overnight. Mr. Fletcher is improving the Empire very much and is preparing to add to his office a large amount of new material.

Columbus Borin has sold the Kirwin Chief to John R. Lane, the present editor.

The Lebanon Journal has suspended. It is rumored that Joe Wright will travel for the Atchison Champion.

Harry M. Ross, formerly a Times compositor, has drifted into journalism again. The first number of the Palmer Pioneer under his management is on our table.

 

The Stockton Clipper is a thing of the past.: The ...
December 25, 1890, Downs Times (ID 2754)

The Stockton Clipper is a thing of the past.

The Waldo Enterprise has been moved to Stockton to be used in the publication of an Alliance "organ."

A. L. Topliff has returned from Payson, Utah, and E. R. Powell continues the publication of the Leader alone.

 

Jim Garner, late editor of the official Alliance p ...
January 1, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2755)

Jim Garner, late editor of the official Alliance paper of the Sixth Congressional District, is now connected with the Dunlap (Iowa) Herald.

 

Allie G. Alrich, now foreman of the bindery depart ...
January 8, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2757)

Allie G. Alrich, now foreman of the bindery department of the Lawrence Daily Journal, spent New Year's week at his home in Cawker.

The People's Sentinel started out with the first of the year to fill the newspaper field at Glen Elder. It is published by Clark E. and Mabel Harvey, is Alliance in politics and is neat and spicy in its appearance and makeup.

 

The mumps are becoming rampant. They even dared to ...
January 15, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2759)

The mumps are becoming rampant. They even dared to tackle Clarence Newman, who has gracefully donned a shawl and complacently accepts the inevitable. With his articulatory organs in such complete thralldom, this knight of the Chief's local quill can but feebly express his contempt for the malady. The Owl Club, of which he is the central light, is standing by him faithfully while he is thus afflicted.

 

The Chief office has moved into the old Booth buil ...
February 12, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2763)

The Chief office has moved into the old Booth building south of Reinhardt's barber shop. This room, besides being convenient and well lighted, is plenty large enough for all Democratic caucuses and celebrating.

 

The Kirwin Chief, John Lane's paper, has been sold ...
March 19, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2765)

The Kirwin Chief, John Lane's paper, has been sold to the Independent publishers, Landes & Son. The Chief has been published at Kirwin for something over 17 years....

 

Frank S. Drummond, in early years editor of the Po ...
March 26, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2768)

Frank S. Drummond, in early years editor of the Portis Patriot, is now assisting Walter Tidballs in the publication of the Burr Oak Herald.

 

Ben T. Baker is now city editor of the Colorado Sp ...
April 2, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2769)

Ben T. Baker is now city editor of the Colorado Springs Daily Mail.

 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Wahl of the Lebanon Criterion d ...
April 23, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2771)

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Wahl of the Lebanon Criterion drove down Tuesday afternoon....Mr. Wahl expects to leave Lebanon Sunday night for Colorado Springs, where he will take charge of a job office for John Q. Royce. Mr. Royce and lady will remove to the Springs as soon as he finishes his work at Topeka.

 

Columbus Borin of Oberlin was a caller at the Time ...
April 30, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2773)

Columbus Borin of Oberlin was a caller at the Times sanctum Saturday. He was returning from a ten days' trip abroad, during which time he had taken abed but twice. He left home Monday for Washington, D.C.

 

Web McNall, register of the Kirwin Land Office, wa ...
May 7, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2774)

Web McNall, register of the Kirwin Land Office, was in the city Saturday.

 

The Norton new Era has passed in its checks.: ...
May 21, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2777)

The Norton new Era has passed in its checks.

 

Prof. and Mrs. Beacom were visiting in Smith Centr ...
June 4, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2778)

Prof. and Mrs. Beacom were visiting in Smith Centre last week with the family of Editor Beacom of the Pioneer-Bulletin....

 

Mrs. E. D. Craft of this paper took the train this ...
June 25, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2781)

Mrs. E. D. Craft of this paper took the train this morning for Clay Center to attend the annual meeting of the Northwest Kansas Editorial Association.

 

Some Whom We Met While at Clay Center. The Times r ...
July 2, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2783)

Some Whom We Met While at Clay Center. The Times representative, while in Clay Center, had the pleasure of making the personal acquaintance of Senator P. B. Plumb, who has succeeded during the stormy period of the past few months in keeping himself in touch with the people, and was himself at one time a practical printer....We also shook the hand of Noble Prentis, formerly editor of the Atchison Champion and a versatile writer whose bright sayings are always provocative of merriment and good feeling. On being made acquainted with Judge F. G. Adams, the patriarch of Kansas history, he graciously invited us when visiting Topeka to call into the State Historical Society's rooms and he would show us the whole eleven volumes of Downs' history as embodied in the Times, in good shape. He also referred to pleasant recollections he had of participating in an impromptu supper tendered the Kansas editors by the good people of this city at the close of the associational gathering at Stockton in May 1888....

The Editorial Association. ...The first session opened shortly after 2:00 o'clock at the M.E. Church in Clay Center, President D. A. Valentine in the chair....It took the whole of this session to arrange preliminaries for putting the Association on a good working basis and a committee was appointed, consisting of Dodge, Sawhill and McBride, to draft a new constitution and by-laws and to define boundaries and re-name the Association, as its old name had been confiscated by an offshoot Northwest Kansas Association. On the following morning, this committee reported the new name as North Central Kansas Association, including in its territory the Fifth Congressional District and three tiers of counties in the Sixth, fixing its western boundary at the west line of Phillips, Rooks, and Ellis counties. President Valentine of the Clay Center Times was re-elected by acclamation to fill the same office next year; J. W. McBride, vice-president; C. B. Kirtland, treasurer; and J. L. Bristow, secretary, and the next place of meeting Salina. An executive committee consisting of Walton, Hutchins and Gomer T. Davies was also elected to constitute with the president and secretary a board of directors to take immediate steps for incorporating the Association and procuring a charter. The evening session on Thursday was...opened by an appropriate address of welcome by Senator Harkness, the response being given by Editor J. W. McBride of the Cawker Times. A short history of this organization formed January 15th, 1884, was also rehearsed by the above named gentleman....Col. D. R. Anthony, in a short speech, emphasized the absolute necessity of truthfulness in journalism....The excursionists started for Colorado Springs and the mountains late Friday afternoon but...we were obliged to forego the coveted pleasure....

 

The city is without an official paper at present. ...
July 9, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2784)

The city is without an official paper at present. The re-appointment of last year's incumbent was voted down at the recent council meeting.

 

The Chief is devoting most of its space these days ...
July 16, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2786)

The Chief is devoting most of its space these days to advertising the Times and its editors. For this courtesy we gracefully make our acknowledgment, only wishing that during the life of this contract he had enough circulation that the advertising amount to something.

The Chief is no more, having sold out "body and breeches" we are informed to D. O. Munger of Washington, who will issue an Alliance paper from the remains of the deceased sheet aforesaid. Peace to the ashes of the Chief. Its "taking off" reminds us of the lone mule which gave a tremendous kick in its death struggle. But we forbear, as we were always taught in our youth to let up on a fellow when he is down.

 

While in Chicago, the Times representative on the ...
July 23, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2788)

While in Chicago, the Times representative on the Teachers' Excursion received a pleasant call from R. W. Norwood, the courteous young editor who so ably filled the chair on this paper previous to its present management. Mr. Norwood is now one of the publishers of the National Journalist, issued from 21, 23 and 25 Plymouth Place, Chicago, Illinois.

 

Munger, the man that was to have bought the Chief, ...
July 30, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2790)

Munger, the man that was to have bought the Chief, has purchased the Blue Rapids Motor.

Clay Cross of Portis returned from Payson, Utah, about a fortnight ago and is now recuperating at his old home. He has been helping E. R. Powell in his printing office at Payson.

 

Webb McNall has assumed editorial charge of the Le ...
August 6, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2792)

Webb McNall has assumed editorial charge of the Lebanon Criterion.

Percy Norwood, a printer in the Times office during the winter of 1887-'88, is now married and has settled down to housekeeping in his old home, Sterling, Illinois, where he has employment in the Standard office.

 

Mrs. F. J. Hulaniski, wife of the celebrated humor ...
August 20, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2793)

Mrs. F. J. Hulaniski, wife of the celebrated humorist, writer and printer, has sued her husband for a divorce. Hulaniski is a well meaning man but fools with liquor.

 

Elmer J. Gooden has taken editorial charge of the ...
August 27, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2795)

Elmer J. Gooden has taken editorial charge of the Burr Oak Herald and Franz Drummond has removed to Cambridge, Nebraska, where he will engage in the furniture business.

John Sullivan is sticking type in the Chief office.

"Miss Cornie Craft is writing intensely interesting descriptive letters to the Downs Times from New York and Vermont. She is one of the Kansas teachers who attended the teachers association at Toronto." -- Reprinted from the Kensington Mirror.

 

Robert Frost, who has been pounding pewter at this ...
September 17, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2798)

Robert Frost, who has been pounding pewter at this office the past ten days, left Saturday on a business trip to Day, Clay County.

 

Miss C. Craft reached home on Sunday noon from her ...
September 24, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2800)

Miss C. Craft reached home on Sunday noon from her extensive trip through the Eastern states, and resumed her school in Rose Valley district next morning.

Geo. E. Dougherty, now of Topeka, has resigned his position with Supt. of Telegraph Gemmell of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad to accept a more lucrative position as stenographer to Judge Geo. S. Green of the Supreme Court, and can be found in the State House, just east of the Senate Chamber, on the same floor, Room No. 2.

 

Hugh K. Bush, the gentlemanly and experienced prin ...
October 1, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2802)

Hugh K. Bush, the gentlemanly and experienced printer of Portis, who has for the past few weeks been working on the Osborne News, was in the city Saturday on his way to Concordia, where he has a like position on the Concordia Times.

 

F. J. Hulaniski, the versatile ex-editor and found ...
October 8, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2803)

F. J. Hulaniski, the versatile ex-editor and founder of the Western Empire, is now assisting in the publication of the Plaindealer at Ouray, Colorado, and is dealing some telling blows against the third party movement for which he labored last fall until his stomach revolted at the task and he found it imperative to seek a cleaner field. His work on the Plaindealer is easily recognized by old acquaintances. -- Alton Empire.

 

Last Words. With this issue, the Times passes unde ...
October 22, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2805)

Last Words. With this issue, the Times passes under the new management of H. M. Fletcher & Co., and we bespeak for our successors all the kind consideration and cordial cooperation from the general public that have been ours in the past.

We have personally enjoyed the friendly relations that have existed between writer and reader and can rejoice in the honest belief that our constituency will be better served in the future. For nearly four years we have endeavored to keep the patrons of the paper informed....The necessity for this change is occasioned by one member of the firm, Q. R. Craft, having accepted a position as mail agent and is now engaged in distributing the mail on the Rock Island between Belleville and Phillipsburg. We shall ever cherish in our recollection the frequent favorable mention of us in many exchanges as well as also the appreciative remarks of many of the citizens who have removed to other places of the country and who have often informed us that the Times was welcomed as a personal letter from their old home....Hoping in the days to come the Downs Times may not cease to get better and grow brighter, we shall ever hope to remain yours most gratefully and respectfully, E. D. Craft & Son.

Salutatory. The change in the management of the Times will not be followed by any material changes in the editorial policy, so far as the support of fixed principles of the Republican Party is concerned. We firmly believe that the acts of the party during the last few years offer as little opportunity for just criticism as those of any other period in its glorious and unparalleled career. At the same time we will always endeavor to consider the theories and acts of opposing parties in a fair and impartial manner, and so present our own views candidly and inoffensively. At the present time, we consider the defense of the fair name of our glorious state and the reputation of the enterprising citizens who dwell within its borders to be paramount to all other issues. We intend to make a specialty of local and county news, to faithfully record all events of general interest to our readers, and to furnish as high a class of state and general news as the patronage of the paper will justify. We shall at all times strive for the advancement of the interests of the city of Downs and the county of Osborne in general, and trust that our efforts in this direction will merit the approval of our patrons. Very Respectfully, H. M. Fletcher.

John Q. Royce, formerly of the Smith Center Bulletin, is thinking seriously of starting a daily paper in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Hugh K. Bush, the Portis printer, was a pleasant caller Monday....

 

H. M. Fletcher, editor of the Alton Empire, was in ...
October 29, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2807)

H. M. Fletcher, editor of the Alton Empire, was in town last Friday and bought the Downs Times, and this week's issue comes out under the new management. The new editor we hope will have success in his new enterprise. -- Chief.

"H. M. Fletcher, editor of the Alton Empire, last Friday purchased the Downs Times of E. D. Craft. Fletcher will conduct both papers. We expect to see the Downs Times do some valiant work for the Republican Party from this time forward." -- Osborne Farmer.

 

Good Bye. Last Saturday we sold the Downs Chief to ...
November 28, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2811)

Good Bye. Last Saturday we sold the Downs Chief to H. M. Fletcher, proprietor of the Times, and the two papers will be consolidated. We did not drop out of the paper business in Downs from choice, as we have made many warm friends in the six years of our stay here, but matters over which we had no control necessitated our disposing of the plant. We have possibly made a few enemies, and if we have we are glad of it. The man who can publish a country weekly without making enemies is too good for this world. However, we are out of the business, and now wish to thank the business men of Downs for courtesies extended in the past. They have stood by us nobly, and no matter where we cast our lot, we shall always have a kindly feeling for them. Our successor is a bright newspaper man, and we believe will give the people of Downs a good paper, and we wish him success in his new undertaking. Again we bid our patrons farewell. -- W. H. Whitmore.

To the Public. As is well known, a few weeks ago we purchased the Downs Times, and, believing that the city could better support one good paper than two mediocre sheets, we negotiated for the purchase of the Chief, with the view of consolidating the two concerns and combining their patronage. With this united support a really good paper can be published in Downs, and, if the business men of the city and the people of the surrounding country will stand by us, they shall have as good a local paper as is published hereabout -- if such power within us lies. First and foremost, the paper will be known as the Downs Times, and will seek to build up the city which supports it, the country which surrounds and maintains the city, and after these may, when occasion serves, branch to a limited extent on state and national affairs. But the latter will be considered as secondary matters....The Times will be essentially a Downs paper -- partisan in this respect, as well as a firm and unswerving friend of the farming community upon which our town depends for its very existence....Will you help us? We believe you will. Start in right now. Bring in all the news; also a lot of ads, locals and job work. They will be appreciated and will encourage us to renewed effort. -- Very Respectfully, H. M. Fletcher & Co.

 

E. D. Craft, ex-editor of the Times, is making a n ...
December 3, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2812)

E. D. Craft, ex-editor of the Times, is making a number of improvements on his farm south of town.

"Quincy R. Craft, the boy editor of the Downs Times, who entered the mail service a few weeks ago, has been promoted to a run on the Rock Island from St. Joseph to Minco." -- Atchison Champion.

Notice. The subscription books of the Downs Chief are now owned by us, and all subscriptions paid in advance will be continued with the Times. All past-due subscriptions are payable at the Times office, and all those who are in arrears are respectfully requested to call and settle at their earliest convenience....Respectfully, H. M. Fletcher & Co.

That our landlord, G. H. Skinner, is an accommodating man, no one knows better than do we....With a couple more side windows we can do much better work. We are here to stay, and we want more light. We want a cylinder press, and will have it before a year rolls over our heads. With Mr. Skinner as a landlord and the people of Downs to back us, there is hardly any bound to our ambition -- but, unlike Anetaeus, our wings are not stuck on with wax, and therefore we have no expectation, or even remote fear, of falling ingloriously to the earth....

 

Capt. W. S. Tilton, the senior editor of the Osbor ...
December 10, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2813)

Capt. W. S. Tilton, the senior editor of the Osborne Farmer, was in the city last Friday.

Quincy R. Craft was in town Monday and Tuesday. He is now running on the Rock Island between St. Joseph and Dodge City, a distance of 376 miles.

 

For a faithful helper and intelligent advisor when ...
December 17, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2814)

For a faithful helper and intelligent advisor when setting up complicated machinery commend us to Charlie Ray. He stuck by us all the time we were engaged in setting up our new power press, and did a lot of hard work as well as good thinking. A. M. Skinner is also entitled to a large share of gratitude for assistance rendered in an hour of need. Without bragging it can be said that Downs now has the best power press within many miles -- a Potter drum-cylinder of standard make.

Like many more old Kansans, John Q. Royce has returned to his old love to stay, having purchased an interest in the Smith Centre Pioneer-Bulletin....

 

Elliott Eckman of Osborne is assisting in the Time ...
December 24, 1891, Downs Times (ID 2815)

Elliott Eckman of Osborne is assisting in the Times office.

S. E. Ruede, who for the past month has so ably assisted in the publication of the Times, has purchased the Osborne News and taken immediate possession. He will make the News a strictly independent paper....

In the language of an esteemed contemporary, we have just received an immense amount of job stock, including nearly everything in the stationery line, and we might truthfully add that it is a larger stock than has ever before been brought into Osborne County at any one time. Bring in your orders for all kinds of printing.

 

In the rush of work incident to moving and changin ...
January 7, 1892, Downs Times (ID 2816)

In the rush of work incident to moving and changing the form of the paper, we have neglected to state that the Times office was moved into the office of the Chief in order to secure more room and better light. Since locating in our new quarters, we have purchased a splendid Potter cylinder press with which we have been trying to improve the appearance of the paper and will continue to improve it until it shall be as well printed as any newspaper in the state. We have anticipated the needs of the people of Downs for many years in advance in this matter, and we trust that our patrons will not hesitate to endorse our action by extending to us such a support as will justify and repay the expenditure that has been necessitated in the last few weeks. Come in and see what we have done and what preparations we are making to place the Times office in the front rank as a newspaper and job printing institution, and you will be assured that the mite which you may contribute toward the support of the paper will be judiciously expended.

 

W. D. Gerard, ex-editor of the Osborne News, has b ...
January 14, 1892, Downs Times (ID 2817)

W. D. Gerard, ex-editor of the Osborne News, has been appointed by Sheriff Rathbun to the position of undersheriff.

 

A. B. Collins, a former resident of this city, who ...
January 21, 1892, Downs Times (ID 2818)

A. B. Collins, a former resident of this city, who has been in the state of Washington the past year, returned last Friday night, and is temporarily assisting in the Times office.

 

W. A. Liscom, traveling agent of the Kansas Newspa ...
February 4, 1892, Downs Times (ID 2819)

W. A. Liscom, traveling agent of the Kansas Newspaper Union, was in the city in the interest of his house last Thursday.

The Osborne Farmer has put in a new job press for heavy work in order to successfully compete with the other offices in the county.

Editor E. Owens of the Stockton News was in Downs Monday....

 

The Osborne News appeared in fine style last week, ...
February 11, 1892, Downs Times (ID 2820)

The Osborne News appeared in fine style last week, having been printed on a Campbell cylinder press which Editor Ruede has just added to his already very complete plant.

 

E. R. Powell returned last Tuesday night from Pays ...
March 3, 1892, Downs Times (ID 2821)

E. R. Powell returned last Tuesday night from Payson City, Utah, where he has been engaged for the past two years in the publishing of a newspaper....Doubtless the people of Downs will be pleased to learn of his intention to permanently locate here.

 

The editor of the Clyde Argus announces that he ha ...
March 17, 1892, Downs Times (ID 2822)

The editor of the Clyde Argus announces that he has been publishing his paper for his health long enough and that unless enough dollars materialize next week to make life agreeable, the publication will be indefinitely postponed.

"Among many other improvements added of late, the Beloit Call has a new patent Duplex air compressor...." Salina Journal.

 

Borin is the name of a new post office in Decatur ...
April 14, 1892, Downs Times (ID 2823)

Borin is the name of a new post office in Decatur County in honor of Columbus Borin of the Oberlin Eye.

The county printing for the ensuing year was awarded yesterday to the Osborne County Farmer and the Downs Times at one-half of legal rates. A bid was filed by the Osborne County News to do all the printing for one cent, except for the delinquent tax list, which would be charged at full legal rates. As the delinquent tax list usually amounts to as much as all the other county printing together and sometimes more, it was apparent to all that the offer of the Farmer and Times was much more favorable to the interests of the people....

A copy of the first issue of Newspaperdom, published at New York, comes to our table this week. It is the most complete trade journal we have ever yet examined.

"The Minneapolis Messenger sandwiches its paid locals with squibs from the Atchison Globe -- just as one eats lemon after a dose of quinine -- to take away the taste." -- Leavenworth Times.

 

The following items appeared in the Osborne News l ...
April 21, 1892, Downs Times (ID 2824)

The following items appeared in the Osborne News last week: "The commissioners awarded the county printing to the Farmer and Downs Times at 50 percent of legal rates, as against a bid of one cent made by the News. Mr. Duffy was the only one that voted against this action, and thereby went on record as a friend of the taxpayer. Where are Hahn and Delay? The party strings were pulled and the puppets, Hahn and Delay, danced according to the pull. The News offered to do the county printing proper for one cent, but that bid seemed not to be sufficiently high, so the printing was let to the Republican combine at 50 percent of legal rates, and will consequently cost the taxpayers at least several hundred dollars extra." The Times reported the action of the commissioners correctly in last week's issue. The official report by the Alliance county clerk corroborates our statement as to the facts. The News, in trying to make it appear that its bid of one cent was on the same proposition as that of the Farmer and Times, is practicing a deliberate deception....In another item, the News hedges by saying it offered to do the "county printing proper" for one cent, but then it stops abruptly instead of continuing to say what it offered to do the balance of the work for....

Henry Healey resumed charge of the railroad fence gang....Allen Delay has taken his place in C. G. Ray's restaurant.

"A stranger may go into any town in the United States and be encouraged to start another paper, being assured that those already in existence will soon die after he has started a really good one." -- Atchison Globe.

The paper mill at Salina is expected to commence operation next week. The demand for ordinary straw paper having decreased to some extent, they will extend their business to include the manufacture of light and heavy wrapping paper and manila tag board. They will use 25 tons of straw per day and all the rags and paper they can obtain within a reasonable distance.

Webb McNall has resigned his position in the Kirwin Land Office and L. C. Smith of Stockton has been appointed in his place.

 

C. D. Newman is helping out the Times force this w ...
May 5, 1892, Downs Times (ID 2825)

C. D. Newman is helping out the Times force this week.

H. C. Leonard, the genial representative of the Kansas Newspaper Union, was in the city yesterday.

The Osborne News says the commissioners had no legal knowledge that the Times and Farmer had any county circulation. Editor Ruede is getting quite technical. He must be preparing to run for county attorney next fall.

Just a few more words in regard to the county printing and the News' boast of 789 circulation in the county. The Times has one-half that number in the city of Downs alone, and the Farmer undoubtedly has fully as many at the Osborne post office alone...and yet the News wanted the printing at a higher rate than the two papers are receiving for the same work.

 

W. L. Chambers of the Stockton Record will attend ...
May 12, 1892, Downs Times (ID 2826)

W. L. Chambers of the Stockton Record will attend the National Editorial convention at San Francisco.

Webb McNall was defeated at the Smith County convention last Saturday and W. H. Nelson of the Pioneer-Bulletin received the instructions by a vote of 81 to 63....

 

The plant of the defunct Clifton Review has been p ...
May 19, 1892, Downs Times (ID 2827)

The plant of the defunct Clifton Review has been purchased by J. W. Mahaffey, formerly of the Burr Oak Herald, who will start a paper at Ezbon City.

Ben T. Baker of the Smith County Journal was in the city Monday morning on his way to the circus at Beloit.

 

If you wish to listen to some of the finest vocal ...
June 2, 1892, Downs Times (ID 2829)

If you wish to listen to some of the finest vocal music you ever heard, just drop into this den and hear the cigar makers overhead when they are tuned up and in full blast.

 

Lode Baker of the Glen Elder Sentinel was in town ...
June 9, 1892, Downs Times (ID 2830)

Lode Baker of the Glen Elder Sentinel was in town yesterday.

N. F. Cornell, traveling agent for the Rocky Mountain News, stopped over in this city Friday night to visit his brother, Geo. Cornell.

J. W. McBride, proprietor of the Cawker City Times, has purchased a new power press....

 

For a faithful helper and intelligent advisor when ...
August 11, 1892, Downs Times (ID 2832)

For a faithful helper and intelligent advisor when setting up complicated machinery commend us to Charlie Ray. He stuck by us all the time we were engaged in setting up our new power press, and did a lot of hard work as well as good thinking. A. M. Skinner is also entitled to a large share of gratitude for assistance rendered in an hour of need. Without bragging it can be said that Downs now has the best power press within many miles -- a Potter drum-cylinder of standard make.

 

J. M. Saunders is fixing up the old Times office b ...
August 18, 1892, Downs Times (ID 2831)

J. M. Saunders is fixing up the old Times office building and will soon open therein a harness and shoe shop.

A host of lovely young ladies invaded this office Tuesday night while we were running off the inside of the paper on our power press, the boys in town furnishing the power. The head of this concern pulled through all right, but the emaciated local chaser, not being accustomed to seeing so much loveliness all in one bunch, was completely prostrated, and has not yet fully recovered.

 

The Kansas Christian Advocate, George E. Dougherty ...
September 2, 1892, Downs Times (ID 2833)

The Kansas Christian Advocate, George E. Dougherty editor, a former editor of this paper, comes to us this week asking for an exchange.

 

The editor of this paper has been out in the south ...
September 22, 1892, Downs Times (ID 2834)

The editor of this paper has been out in the south part of the county the past week looking after his farm. If you see anything in this issue that pleases you, give the boys the credit for it. If you have any grievance and want to do up somebody, wait till the editor returns, as we do not like to fight, while it is only a pleasant pastime for him.

 

We believe it to be only right and just that when ...
October 13, 1892, Downs Times (ID 2835)

We believe it to be only right and just that when a person is deserving of a kind mention, it is no more than our duty to accord them a friendly mention in this great moral and religious journal. Some seem to think that such notices are meant for taffy. Such thoughts originate in a diseased brain. Our mind is not affected.

 

The Times office was connected with the city water ...
December 22, 1892, Downs Times (ID 2840)

The Times office was connected with the city water mains by a two-inch pipe on Tuesday. This, for the present, will give us an excellent fire protection, and water for office use, and will later on furnish power for our Potter cylinder press.

 

C. M. Dunn, who came to this city yesterday to tak ...
February 9, 1893, Downs Times (ID 2846)

C. M. Dunn, who came to this city yesterday to take a position in the Times office, was obliged to return to Abilene today on account of the illness of his wife.

 

We take pleasure in announcing this week that we h ...
February 16, 1893, Downs Times (ID 2848)

We take pleasure in announcing this week that we have secured the services of T. V. Blackman, formerly of Eureka, where for several years he occupied the position of foreman of the Greenwood County Republican. He comes highly recommended as an expert newspaper writer and job printer. . . .

The water motor to furnish power for our presses was placed in position last week, but it looked so small for such a Herculean task that we did not dare to brag very much about what it could do until we had thoroughly tested it. When we started it, however, last Thursday evening, it exceeded our highest expectations as to power, as with only fifty pounds of pressure it drove our Potter cylinder at the rate of 1000 impressions per hour. The motor is only about twelve inches in diameter and its power surprised everyone who saw it. It was made by the Belknap Motor Co. of Portland, Maine, and parties in need of a cheap power that is always ready for use cannot do better than to correspond with this company, provided, of course, that they are located in a city which has as fine a system of water works as Downs is blessed with.

 

The Downs boys like the Osborne News better than t ...
March 9, 1893, Downs Times (ID 2851)

The Downs boys like the Osborne News better than the Times, because it makes such a large kite. Thus there is a use for nearly everything.

 

It was our pleasure to be present at the North-Cen ...
February 8, 1894, Downs Times (ID 2883)

It was our pleasure to be present at the North-Central Kansas Editorial Association at Beloit last Friday and Saturday and we can unhesitatingly say that it was one of the most successful sessions of the association that has ever been held. . . .

The members assembled at the opera house, where they were called to order by the president, S. H. Dodge, and proceeded to carry out the program arranged by the committee.

The first paper, by J. L. Bristow, of the Salina Republican, on "The College Man in a Newspaper Office," was an able presentation....

The paper on "Woman's Work in Journalism," by Mrs. E. L. Alrich, of the Cawker Record, was replete with many interesting facts and details regarding the subject and reference was made to instances where women have accomplished great results in journalistic work. . . . The discussion which followed developed a consensus of opinion that there was an almost unlimited field in journalism for women. . . .

D. A. Valentine, of the Clay Center Times . . . gave his experience in successfully bringing his subscription list to a "cash in advance" basis, which brought forth a general discussion of the subject....

"The Business End of Journalism," by Gomer T. Davies, of the Republic City News, was of especial interest to those whose fortune it is to be located in towns too small to support a publisher by legitimate newspaper work. His experience was that the profits derived from a real estate and insurance business in connection with a small paper were far greater than the amount which could be depended upon from advertising. . . .

The public meeting at the opera house in the evening was opened by an address of welcome by Mayor A. G. Mead....Manifold's Military Band, the pride of Beloit and of the state, was in attendance and their inspiring music interspersed the program....Ex-Governor Riddle delivered an able and eloquent address, after which the band wound up the program with a grand concert.

The association convened for business again Saturday morning and papers were read by W. S. Tilton, of the Osborne Farmer, on the subject "To What Extent Should a Newspaper Support Public Enterprise Without Pay," and by Tell W. Walton, of the Lincoln Republican, on "The County Newspaper in Politics." Both papers were very able productions by men whose lifelong experience in the business enabled them to speak with a high degree of intelligence. . . .

J. L. Bristow, A. P. Riddle, D. A. Valentine, H. M. Fletcher and Mrs. Alrich were elected delegates to attend the National Editorial convention....

 

Populist papers as a rule are very much alike in m ...
August 23, 1894, Downs Times (ID 2900)

Populist papers as a rule are very much alike in most respects, but for editorial imbecility and plain, low-down lying about local as well as political affairs, the irresponsible sheet which poses as the "organ" of the party in this city is under its present management entitled to the sweepstakes prize.

 

The outfit of the Cawker Times is being packed for ...
September 6, 1894, Downs Times (ID 2904)

The outfit of the Cawker Times is being packed for shipment to Idaho, the subscription list and good will having been sold to the Beloit Gazette. In leaving the entire field to the Record, the Times is relieving the merchants of that city of the burden of advertising in two papers, which is an entirely useless expense in a town the size of Cawker City.

 

The World has been in a peck of trouble during the ...
October 25, 1894, Downs Times (ID 2907)

The World has been in a peck of trouble during the past few weeks. A bill of sale for the outfit was first given to Allen DeLay in payment for labor, and then several populists who had been putting up money for the last six months to keep the paper alive came in and refused to allow the possession of the property to pass to DeLay. To prevent this, the agent for the first mortgagee took possession and held it until a transfer was made to Martin Rychel, who now claims the ownership.

 

We are sorry to be obliged to issue the Times late ...
December 27, 1894, Downs Times (ID 2911)

We are sorry to be obliged to issue the Times late this week, as it is, but the plate matter which should have arrived on the noon train Thursday did not get here until night -- something which we hope will not happen again this century.

 

Harmon Wilson has accepted a position with his old ...
January 3, 1895, Downs Times (ID 2913)

Harmon Wilson has accepted a position with his old employer, Mr. Fletcher, on the Downs Times, and went to work there Monday. We should have been pleased to keep him on the Gazette, but his interests and obligations took him away from us. -- Beloit Gazette.

 

As it is about time for the annual meeting of the ...
January 10, 1895, Downs Times (ID 2915)

As it is about time for the annual meeting of the North-Central Kansas Editorial Association, it is hereby respectfully suggested to whatever committee the matter would naturally fall to that the only thing necessary to make the organization a howling success is a printers' band. Gomer Davies, of the Republic City News, could lead it, and do a good job too. Del Valentine, of the Clay Center Times, is an expert at blowing music out of the twisted tubes, and Art Waterman, of the Delphos Republican, toots a good cornet. Tom Skinner, of the Osborne Farmer, is a honey on the baritone, and Allen DeLay, of the Alton Empire, can punch great gobs of melody out of a slide trombone. Bob Caldwell, of the Beloit Courier, can't be beat when it comes to playing the snare drum, and Johnnie Parks, of the Beloit Call, has beaten the bass drum on many a march with nary a discord. Jones, of the Russell Record, and Joe Antrobus, of the Beloit Gazette, are each excellent clarinetists, and this office will furnish a saxophone player. With this start the rest of the instruments could be easily filled, and a band such as that would attract more attention than a circus parade.

 

W. G. Smith, who for the past two months has acted ...
January 17, 1895, Downs Times (ID 2917)

W. G. Smith, who for the past two months has acted as manager of the World, of this city, concluded last week that he could not afford to labor longer for the honor connected with the institution, and after collecting his bills about town took the train Monday noon for Logan, where his parents reside. Although a good printer, he found it impossible to make even a bare living in the publication of a second paper in this city, and decided to quit while his credit was good.

It is not likely that the paper will ever be issued again.

 

Dick Ward, the jolly barber-printer, went up to Al ...
February 7, 1895, Downs Times (ID 2920)

Dick Ward, the jolly barber-printer, went up to Alton Monday evening to help Allen DeLay a few days on the Empire.

Topeka makes a big talk occasionally about the ability the members of her Ananias Club display in steering clear of all semblance of the truth, but if they every try to keep abreast of the Liars' Club which holds nightly sessions at the Times office, they will have to get up early in the morning and travel hard all day.

L. C. Headley, the well-known editor of the Lebanon Criterion, made a welcome call at this office Monday. Headley is one of the pioneer newspaper men of the northwest, and the hard knocks and vicissitudes he has encountered in his twenty years and more of hustling in the newspaper business in this country entitle him to a much better layout than fortune has favored him with -- to say nothing of his natural ability, which alone ought to entitle him to a front seat in the lap of luxury.

 

Attorney W. E. Cox, of Stockton, and C. E. Nichols ...
February 14, 1895, Downs Times (ID 2921)

Attorney W. E. Cox, of Stockton, and C. E. Nichols, a Plainville printer, were in town the latter part of last week. Mr. Cox made arrangements while here for the purchase of the material of the Downs World, which lately died a natural death, and the outfit has been moved to Plainville, where it will be used in running a populist sheet. A representative of the Lincoln Newspaper Union is authority for the statement that an Iowa printing outfit is also on the road, bound for Plainville. The last man who held forth there was a practical printer, and a good one too; but he found that running a paper in Plainville necessitated a longer wait between square meals than his system could stand, and he pulled out for a better lay. So if two shops are opened there, it will probably not be long until a loud and vociferous call for aid will be heard from the brethren of the Plainville press.

 

Harmon D. Wilson went down to Beloit Monday aftern ...
June 20, 1895, Downs Times (ID 2926)

Harmon D. Wilson went down to Beloit Monday afternoon to enjoy a well earned vacation of a few weeks. If the Times lacks its usual brightness during his absence, our readers will know the reason.

 

Council Proceedings....H. M. Fletcher, city clerk. ...
September 5, 1895, Downs Times (ID 2930)

Council Proceedings....H. M. Fletcher, city clerk.

The Beloit Call devotes its entire space to local news and advertising and publishes no general news.

 

The Kansas Breeze and Topeka Mail have been consol ...
September 12, 1895, Downs Times (ID 2931)

The Kansas Breeze and Topeka Mail have been consolidated under the name of the Topeka Mail and Kansas Breeze....

 

A. L. Drummond of the Norton Republican was a call ...
September 26, 1895, Downs Times (ID 2932)

A. L. Drummond of the Norton Republican was a caller Friday in the interest of the Topeka Paper Company and fitted us out with a quantity of job stock.

 

The Times appears this week in much larger form th ...
October 10, 1895, Downs Times (ID 2933)

The Times appears this week in much larger form than for several months past and we trust that the patronage will increase with the size so as to enable us to maintain it properly. There is but one other paper in Osborne County of its present size or equal to it in any way....The Times has fully demonstrated that it is here to stay. It always has been here; it always will be here.

"Allen DeLay, for the past five months an attache of this office, returned to his home at Downs, Kansas, Wednesday. In his short stay with us, he proved himself an exceptional printer and in his departure a vacancy is left that will be hard to fill." -- Marceline Mirror.

 

F. W. Arnold, who rendered valuable assistance in ...
November 7, 1895, Downs Times (ID 2934)

F. W. Arnold, who rendered valuable assistance in the Times office last week, went up to Alton Saturday night to take possession of the Western Empire, which he has purchased. The paper will appear this week as the Alton Empire....

 

On account of having our office torn up by the car ...
November 21, 1895, Downs Times (ID 2935)

On account of having our office torn up by the carpenters and plasterers, the Times is late again this week....The Times office building has been materially improved the past week by the addition of some windows and a general overhauling, which have made a much pleasanter and warmer room for the winter.

 

F. J. Hulaniski, formerly of this city, was electe ...
November 28, 1895, Downs Times (ID 2936)

F. J. Hulaniski, formerly of this city, was elected county judge of Ouray County, Colorado, as a Populist at the recent election.

 

The Magnolia Club dropped in unexpectedly upon Mrs ...
December 5, 1895, Downs Times (ID 2937)

The Magnolia Club dropped in unexpectedly upon Mrs. H. M. Fletcher Tuesday evening, the occasion being the 27th anniversary of her birthday.

The Times office was never so well equipped to do fine job printing as it is today. We have new type, new rollers and good ink, the three imperative requisites....Kansas City or St. Louis prices met in every case.

 

Until further notice, we will allow 20 cents a bus ...
January 2, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2939)

Until further notice, we will allow 20 cents a bushel for good corn on subscription, either in advance or on old accounts....H. M. Fletcher & Co.

 

C. W. Landis, the junior editor of the Osborne Far ...
January 16, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2940)

C. W. Landis, the junior editor of the Osborne Farmer, passed through town...on his way to St. Augustine, Florida, to attend the National Editorial Association in that city....

 

Harry Root, the veteran newspaper solicitor and co ...
February 6, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2941)

Harry Root, the veteran newspaper solicitor and correspondent, has severed his connection with the Atchison Champion and is now on the road for the Topeka State Journal.

 

It is reported that Capt. W. S. Tilton has sold hi ...
February 13, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2942)

It is reported that Capt. W. S. Tilton has sold his interest in the Osborne Farmer to his partner, C. W. Landis. We are not advised as to the particulars, or what effect the transfer will have upon the former's candidacy for Congress.

 

H. M. Fletcher and F. W. Arnold, editor of the Alt ...
February 20, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2943)

H. M. Fletcher and F. W. Arnold, editor of the Alton Empire, left Sunday morning for Leavenworth to attend the State Editorial Association....

 

An exchange says never judge a man by outward appe ...
February 27, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2944)

An exchange says never judge a man by outward appearances. A shabby coat may enwrap a newspaper publisher, while the man wearing a high-toned plug hat and sporting a gold-headed cane may be a delinquent subscriber.

 

Miss Florence Headley, the accomplished young edit ...
March 5, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2946)

Miss Florence Headley, the accomplished young editress of the Gaylord Herald, was in the city the first of the week and made the Times office a pleasant call.

 

Change of Management. It is with a feeling not unm ...
March 26, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2947)

Change of Management. It is with a feeling not unmixed with regret that we announce to our readers and patrons that this is the last week of our ownership and management of the Times, which passes into the hands of Capt. W. S. Tilton, until recently the senior editor of the Osborne Farmer. ...While we regret that it has now become advisable for us to leave the field in which we have labored continuously for over four years, we feel that we could hardly choose a more able successor....Mr. Tilton has been a highly successful newspaper publisher for a great many years....As for ourselves, we will continue with the paper for the present in a subordinate position....Very respectfully, H. M. Fletcher & Co.

"Billy Coates gave up his job in the News office last Saturday and has gone to Portis to work for Levi Burke, the horse trainer. Hoy Smith is again pawing pewter in the News office." -- Farmer.

 

We Salute You. In assuming control of the Downs Ti ...
April 2, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2948)

We Salute You. In assuming control of the Downs Times, we have a few remarks to offer. The Times, under our management, will be just about such a newspaper as we are paid for making. We confess a strong desire to make this paper at least as interesting in all departments as any other paper in Osborne County. We indulge the assumption that the people of Downs and the country tributary to this place wish to keep alive this confession. If this assumption be correct, advertising, job work and subscriptions will come to us in quantities enabling the carrying into effect of this policy....This disposition, furthermore, must be completely divorced from the notion that such support is in the nature of alms. It must rest upon the well-assimilated conviction that judicious advertising is profitable to the advertiser....In politics, the Times will be aggressively, progressively and consistently Republican. It will not hesitate to criticize wrong acts of its own party....The cause of law and order and that of higher education in all directions will always find the Times a fearless champion. Our best efforts will be devoted to siding in the solution of the vast industrial problems connected with the development of western Kansas. Respectfully yours, W. S. Tilton.

S. J. Hartman, one of the best men who ever sold paper to printers in western Kansas, is out of the employ of the Irwin Paper Co. of Quincy, Illinois, and has taken the road for the Kansas City Paper House. Mr. Hartman is an old resident of Phillipsburg, but he moved from there a few months ago to Salina.

H. L. Mumford, traveling solicitor for the Kansas City Star, was in town Tuesday and made this office a pleasant call. One of the principal features of Mr. Mumford's work is to sell sets of Cyclopedia Britannica, to be furnished by the Star.

A traveling knight of the type case reached town Sunday evening. He stopped here overnight, helped the Times out a while on Monday, and proceeded up the track toward Gaylord that afternoon.

 

The county printing for the ensuing year was let y ...
April 16, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2949)

The county printing for the ensuing year was let yesterday to the Osborne Farmer, the Downs Times, and Alton Empire...representing a combined circulation of 2,800 copies. The county board had an opportunity to let this printing to the Osborne News, claiming a circulation of 1,032 copies, at rates below what the three papers took it for....The county...had been scoured by Populists to secure signers to petitions asking that the county board award this printing contract to the lowest responsible bidder. While the fight was on before the county board, the Populist leaders present and participating were challenged to name a Republican who had ridden over any part of the county circulating one of these petitions. The challenge found in the listeners the stillness of death....

Well, We're After 'Em. "We are pleased beyond expression that Bro. Tilton has purchased the Downs Times. That paper circulates quite extensively in the southern portion of this county, where the vote has been very strongly Populist. With his vigorous editorials we expect him to be able to help redeem that portion of the county, and if he does not we shall expect him to help shoulder the responsibility with the Republican papers of the county." -- Smith County Pioneer.

Allen DeLay went down to Beloit Monday morning to work on the Times.

After the county printing squabble at the courthouse yesterday was concluded, our Populist friends who had felt so desperate in the morning could not repress a smile. They had been led to see the ludicrous side of their position.

 

R. P. Rice, traveling salesman for the J. W. Butle ...
April 23, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2950)

R. P. Rice, traveling salesman for the J. W. Butler Paper Co., Chicago, passed east Monday morning....Mr. Rice is the son of old General Rice.

Quincy R. Craft went down to Beloit Monday morning, and is doing effective work gathering news for the daily Gazette.

Comrade A. F. Colnon of 10 miles northeast of Portis was a delightful caller this morning. Like other readers of the Times, when in this city he naturally drifts into the factory where the light of civilization is manufactured....

 

Noting what the Times of last week said concerning ...
April 30, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2951)

Noting what the Times of last week said concerning the employment of our fellow-townsman, Quincy Craft, on the Gazette during the encampment, that paper adds: "And we want to add that everyone in the Gazette office was a firm friend of Quincy Craft from the time he commenced work. He is a very modest and quiet worker, but gets all the news, and writes it up in an interesting and original way...."

 

T. W. Ward, familiarly known as "Dick," has not be ...
May 14, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2952)

T. W. Ward, familiarly known as "Dick," has not been working in the Times office since last Thursday owing to an accident which overtook him that evening....He cut a gash about two inches in length across the inner side of his arm....

 

W. R. Baker, the good-looking editor of the Glen E ...
May 28, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2953)

W. R. Baker, the good-looking editor of the Glen Elder Sentinel, called on us during the noon hour last Tuesday. He was on the way to the Populist convention at Colby, but intended to go by the way of Smith Center to pay a visit to his brother Ben.

H. R. Fletcher is devoting his energies to the pursuit of agriculture these days....

 

Quincy Craft has been in the post office this week ...
June 4, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2954)

Quincy Craft has been in the post office this week in the absence of Postmaster Carney.

A. L. Drummond and family arrived last Friday from Norton. Last Monday morning, Mr. Drummond assumed the foremanship of the Times office. He is a newspaper man of experience and an excellent printer. He is considerably acquainted in Downs, having worked in the Times office in the early Eighties....

 

The Times wants to settle one thing right now. Peo ...
June 11, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2955)

The Times wants to settle one thing right now. People need not come into this office, displaying samples of garden products with the expectation of having them "puffed," unless they leave at least a one-mess sample.

 

The Times force will not vote for the waterworks t ...
June 25, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2956)

The Times force will not vote for the waterworks to get out of repair again. While we found willing hands to turn the big press, it didn't go like it does with the water motor as a propeller.

 

The editor of this paper was compelled to decline ...
July 2, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2957)

The editor of this paper was compelled to decline an urgent invitation to deliver a Fourth of July address at Stockton. He had been previously spoken to to be at the Sherman Bivouac at Jewell City on the 3rd and 4th.

It was a delightful call which we received yesterday during the noon hour from Hon. A. Hazen of Barnes in this state. Mr. Hazen was a fellow-member with the writer in the Kansas Legislature in 1887....

 

Harmon Wilson has sent to "Round Timberson," alias ...
July 23, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2958)

Harmon Wilson has sent to "Round Timberson," alias Ed Janes, "Missouri Pacific depot, Downs, Kansas," a bunch of stylish calling cards. Under the cut of a supposed Swede...appeared this vivid explanation: "Ay yoost koom ofer fom da ol'kontry."

 

'Twas better than a circus to hear Harmon Wilson a ...
July 30, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2959)

'Twas better than a circus to hear Harmon Wilson and Ed Janes on the 27th while they were imitating the two Swedes just over.

Ten thousand people come to town (for the Downs Celebration on Monday)....W. S. Tilton, on behalf of the mayor, delivered the address of welcome....

 

Harmon Wilson, while on the way to Alton Tuesday n ...
August 6, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2960)

Harmon Wilson, while on the way to Alton Tuesday night, informed us that he had left Beloit and gone to Atchison to live. He has acquired an interest in a job printing office in that city....

 

The editor of the Times expects to start next Satu ...
August 27, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2961)

The editor of the Times expects to start next Saturday afternoon to Topeka, where he will take the Kansas Department headquarters train Sunday afternoon for St. Paul, Minn., to attend the thirtieth annual national encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic.

"Quincy Craft, for a number of years editor of the Downs Times, when he was counted as the youngest editor in the state, has written the 'Legend of Waconda, or the Great Spirit Springs,' for the Beloit Gazette. He makes an interesting story of it." -- Atchison Champion.

 

Miss Cornie Craft returned Monday evening from her ...
September 3, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2962)

Miss Cornie Craft returned Monday evening from her extended pleasure trip through New York and other Eastern states....Quincy accompanied her on the return trip as far as Kansas City, where he stopped off to transact some business.

 

Capt. W. S. Tilton went to Logan yesterday. Today ...
September 17, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2963)

Capt. W. S. Tilton went to Logan yesterday. Today he delivers the address before the Modern Woodmen, this being Modern Woodmen day at the reunion. He is also on the program for an address to the veterans.

Ed Sample, Allen DeLay and Fred Lees started to Topeka Monday morning. These bright young men...have become students at Washburn College.

Quincy Craft returned home last Thursday night from his visit in the Eastern states....It was of sufficient length -- considerably over two months -- to give him opportunity for observation and reflection. Mr. Craft brought home with him a light case of rheumatism....

H. M. Fletcher is about to go to Wichita to begin the work of a substitute in the railway mail service....He passed a very creditable civil service examination at Salina last April, standing third in excellence among the large number of applicants. That is why he gets a position so soon....

 

Lively Times at Logan. The sixteenth annual reunio ...
September 24, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2964)

Lively Times at Logan. The sixteenth annual reunion of the Old Soldiers' and Sailors' Association of Phillips County now a matter of history.... The campfire of Wednesday night was presided over by Comrade W. H. McBride. Short speeches were made by Governor Humphrey, W. S. Tilton, Col. Jones of Norton, and others....The proceedings Thursday...Neighbor Tilton of Downs delivered an address in the afternoon. Governor Morrill...who occupied a seat on the platform during Mr. Tilton's address, followed in a grand speech to the old soldiers and sailors....Thursday evening, W. S. Tilton presided over the campfire. Governor Humphrey, Comrade W. H. McBride, F. H. Baker and others made magnificent talks....

W. S. Tilton's family took up their residence in Downs last Friday. They are living in what is known as the Chase residence in the east part of town.

 

A bum printer worked this office for breakfast Wed ...
October 15, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2965)

A bum printer worked this office for breakfast Wednesday morning and failed to return and "throw in" as he promised. He claimed to be from Omaha, on the way to Stockton to see his sister.

Miss Florence Headley of the Gaylord Herald made the Times a pleasant call Monday while on her way to Leavenworth, where she goes as a delegate from the Gaylord lodge, D. of R., to the grand lodge....

"Monday night last, Capt. W. S. Tilton, editor of the Downs Times, addressed a large and enthusiastic meeting at our neighboring town of Harlan on the political issues from a Republican standpoint. The Harlan Republican club filled up a large vacant store room as a public hall and it was more than comfortably filled. Captain Tilton made a strong and telling argument in favor of sound money and a protective tariff, answering the claims of the free trade and silver advocates, and held the closest attention of his audience from first to last...." -- Gaylord Herald.

 

The editor of the Times returned Monday night from ...
October 22, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2966)

The editor of the Times returned Monday night from a campaign tour of two weeks. He visited a large portion of the sixth congressional district....At WaKeeney, which had been our home for 11 years before we came to Osborne County, we were affected beyond expression at the many evidences of love and friendship which greeted us on every hand....Of the 22 counties in this congressional district, it now looks as if the Republicans will carry 14....

"Capt. W. S. Tilton of the Downs Times is making a vigorous campaign both through his paper and on the stump for protection and an honest dollar." -- Lucas Advance.

 

In all the dark days during the last seven years, ...
November 5, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2967)

In all the dark days during the last seven years, the Times never has despaired of seeing the majority of the voters of Osborne County return to the Republican column....

A Very Pleasant Debate. Col. C. M. Cunningham, Capt. V. E. Cunningham, Harry Woolley and W. S. Tilton drove from Osborne to the Grantham school house in Jackson Township last Saturday afternoon, where the last named had been called to discuss politics with ex-County Clerk Harry Gray....Ladies were present in force. It was estimated that at least 200 persons managed to wedge into the schoolhouse, while there were probably half as many who did not gain admission. We have no inclination, at this late date, to review the address....The speakers consumed an hour and a half each. Each treated the other with the utmost respect, and nothing transpired to mar the pleasure of the occasion....

 

A. L. Drummond, a workman on the Times, preached h ...
December 10, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2968)

A. L. Drummond, a workman on the Times, preached his first sermon at the Saunders school house, seven miles north of town, last Sunday. A goodly number were present and speak in commendatory terms of his first efforts in the ministry.

 

Quincy Craft has been employed to follow County Su ...
December 17, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2969)

Quincy Craft has been employed to follow County Superintendent-elect Ruede with a three months term of school in District 37....If intelligence and application to duty make the successful teacher, Mr. Craft will fully sustain the trust which the school board of District 37 has reposed in him.

 

Just Two Weeks. We find, by looking through our su ...
December 24, 1896, Downs Times (ID 2970)

Just Two Weeks. We find, by looking through our subscription books, that a large number of subscribers of the Times have presumed, to the extent of several years, on the credit of the publisher. Business cannot be conducted permanently on this basis....We have set apart the next two weeks as a special collection season....

"We notice by the Downs Times that A. L. Drummond preached his first sermon a week ago Sunday. Link is one of the best qualified young newspaper men in the state and the profession loses by his adopting the ministerial garb...." -- Almena Plaindealer.

A. L. Drummond, who had been in the employ of the Times for nearly seven months, moved his household effects to Smith Center last Friday. We understand arrangements have been made whereby he is to work on the Pioneer a portion of each week, devoting the balance of the time to the completion of his preparation for the ministry. Mr. Drummond has impulses and principles that are good. His presence in Downs, as a member of the cornet band, a leader in church work and a citizen and neighbor, will be missed by a large circle of friends....

 

The Mid-Continent, devoted to the interest of Wash ...
January 14, 1897, Downs Times (ID 2973)

The Mid-Continent, devoted to the interest of Washburn College, is now issued from a printing office on the college grounds, in charge of Allen DeLay. The Mid-Continent is ably prepared by the students, and while under Allen DeLay's efficient, painstaking direction we shall expect it to be a model of typographic excellence.

 

Link Drummond preached to a crowded house at Norto ...
February 11, 1897, Downs Times (ID 2974)

Link Drummond preached to a crowded house at Norton last Sunday. He did not go up there to preach, but his friends insisted and he gave them the best he had in his thinking box. Link lived there at one time and was engaged in the newspaper business and occasionally took a hand in a foot race for 'a little on a side' and was considered a hale fellow generally. -- Smith Center Bazoo.

 

Capt. W. S. Tilton and his daughters, Jessie and R ...
March 11, 1897, Downs Times (ID 2975)

Capt. W. S. Tilton and his daughters, Jessie and Rovilla, started Sunday morning to Waverly, in this state, to assist in celebrating Tuesday the completion of the 75th year of the life of Mr. Tilton's mother....

Our good friend, Chris Wolters, stated in last week's Osborne News that the editor of the Times had gotten money out of printing the ballots last fall with which to buy hogs. This was an admission that he had lied two weeks before in stating in the same organ that we had gone into the hog business because of being unable to make a living at running a newspaper. The Times is unable to say just what has given Mr. Wolters his itching for a controversy with us. We have tried to treat him decently, supposing heretofore that he was worthy of such treatment.

 

This week the six living children of Mrs. Rovilla ...
March 18, 1897, Downs Times (ID 2976)

This week the six living children of Mrs. Rovilla Tilton have been enjoying the hospitality of their aged mother, as has been their custom on the 9th of March of each fifth year, at her home on North Street (in Waverly)....In order of their ages they were: Col. W. Scott Tilton, editor of the Downs Times. The Colonel is a veteran of the 9th Iowa Cavalry and won distinction in some of the Indian campaigns which succeeded the Civil War; Mrs. Lou Holcomb; Albert W. Tilton; William Tilton; Emma; Mrs. Jennie Garrison....Mr. and Mrs. Tilton were pioneers in the settlement of Miami County, having located there in 1866.... -- Waverly Post.

E. J. Garner, late of the Logan Republican, but now of the Solomon City Sentinel, reached town last night....He will arrange to move his family to Solomon in a short time....

 

Timber We Must Have. It is a source of congratulat ...
March 25, 1897, Downs Times (ID 2977)

Timber We Must Have. It is a source of congratulation to the Times that the action of its editor in securing the passage of the State Forestry bill, ten years ago this winter, has been approved by the present legislature....Thus is the sense of the people voiced that we must have timber....

 

Miss Flossie Newlon was entered Monday morning as ...
April 1, 1897, Downs Times (ID 2979)

Miss Flossie Newlon was entered Monday morning as an apprentice in Mrs. Rownd's dressmaking establishment. Miss Newlon, as a printer in the Times office, is thoroughly popular because of her disposition to be generally useful. We hope that she will be equally successful in her new undertaking.

 

Sol Miller's death removes from the newspaper rank ...
April 29, 1897, Downs Times (ID 2982)

Sol Miller's death removes from the newspaper ranks in Kansas their most eccentric figure. His eccentricity was not based on unreasonableness. He was well informed on a wide variety of subjects. He felt unable even to attempt to speak in public. His weakness in this direction seemed to lend force to his pen. Aggressive to the point of cruelty, his powers of analysis were superb. For this reason, many who looked with contempt upon much of the drapery of his language had the greatest of respect for his deductions....He was perhaps the most noted editor and publisher of a country newspaper to be found in the whole country.

He believed in the efficacy of editorial writing, and demonstrated the correctness of his theory. As a disseminator of local news, his paper did not take high rank. His soul was not with that department. He had published the Chief in Doniphan County -- first at White Cloud, then at Troy after 1874 -- for almost 40 years.

 

Geo. Shook, a former resident of Downs, and now ed ...
May 6, 1897, Downs Times (ID 2984)

Geo. Shook, a former resident of Downs, and now editor of the Echo at Jennings, Decatur County, has been appointed postmaster of his town.

 

Two Memorial Addresses This Time. "Col. W. S. Tilt ...
May 27, 1897, Downs Times (ID 2985)

Two Memorial Addresses This Time. "Col. W. S. Tilton, editor of the Downs Times and founder of this great religious and moral weekly, will deliver the Decoration Day address at Collyer. We predict a rare treat for the Collyerites." -- WaKeeney World. That is to say, we have to hustle around from Phillipsburg, where our presence is promised on the 29th, to get to Collyer on the 31st. But we shall carry the point, even if the route does lie across a wide scope of country where railroad trains do not run on Sunday.

 

The editor of this paper reached home last night, ...
June 3, 1897, Downs Times (ID 2986)

The editor of this paper reached home last night, having completed a circle -- rather, an ellipse -- of nearly 500 miles. Saturday we addressed a splendid audience at Phillipsburg....Sunday afternoon we went from Phillipsburg to Colby, and from that place were driven, that night, across the country a distance of 25 miles to Oakley, on the Union Pacific trunk line. Early Monday morning, we took a train for Collyer, Trego County, reaching there in time for breakfast. There we were among old neighbors and friends, in a county where we had lived and labored for 11 years preceding the close of 1889....It was stated to us that no other speaker had ever addressed at Collyer as large an audience as confronted us Monday afternoon....

 

Rev. Link Drummond, says the Smith Center Journal ...
July 15, 1897, Downs Times (ID 2989)

Rev. Link Drummond, says the Smith Center Journal of July 1, performed his first marriage ceremony at Stewart the Sabbath before.

Bert P. Walker of the Logan Republican was in town....

 

We are doubly complimented. This office does not r ...
July 22, 1897, Downs Times (ID 2990)

We are doubly complimented. This office does not receive the Hays City Republican. We take this from the Osborne Farmer of last week: "Last week's Hays City Republican paid this high compliment to Editor Tilton: 'The Republicans on this line of road are well pleased with the appointment of W. S. Tilton, editor of the Downs Times, as receiver of the WaKeeney land office. If we had a few more honest, brainy fighters in the district like Mr. Tilton the Republicans would be on top today'."

"Quincy Craft of Downs has charge of the Mankato Monitor during the absence of Mr. Vaughn to Wisconsin, which is a guarantee the Monitor will be well taken care of during Mr. V's absence." -- Beloit Gazette.

We have been favored with several calls this week from Rev. A. L. Drummond, late foreman of this office, but now employed on the Pioneer and by the Christian Church at Smith Center. Mr. Drummond was attending the convention of Christian churches in this city.

 

E. J. Garner of the Solomon Sentinel reached town ...
August 5, 1897, Downs Times (ID 2991)

E. J. Garner of the Solomon Sentinel reached town last night....Mr. Garner is doing well at Solomon City....

 

Mr. Q. R. Craft, who was in charge of this office ...
August 19, 1897, Downs Times (ID 2992)

Mr. Q. R. Craft, who was in charge of this office during our absence, left for his home in Downs last Saturday. Mr. C. is an able and energetic news gatherer whose integrity can be banked on. He was ably assisted by his sister, Miss Cornie, Miss Kate Stotts and Omar Goodrich.... -- Mankato Monitor.

 

Thomas Cowley, roadmaster of this division, and W. ...
August 26, 1897, Downs Times (ID 2993)

Thomas Cowley, roadmaster of this division, and W. G. Christ, foreman of the Times, attended church in Cawker last Sunday.

 

W. S. Tilton went to Glasco this forenoon to deliv ...
September 2, 1897, Downs Times (ID 2994)

W. S. Tilton went to Glasco this forenoon to deliver an address at the big Modern Woodmen picnic....

 

The foreman of the Downs Times recently attended c ...
September 9, 1897, Downs Times (ID 2995)

The foreman of the Downs Times recently attended church, which is such an unheard of occurrence in newspaper offices that the local paper made mention of the event. In this connection, the question has often been asked where the term 'devil' for the boy learning the printer's trade originated. About 140 years ago, when Lew Headley of the Gaylord Herald walked into a printing office and asked for a job, he was such an ornery looking cuss that the proprietor asked him what he was good for. 'Folks say I'm the best feller in town at raising hell,' said Lew. 'The devil!' said the proprietor. 'Yep,' said Lew. Since then the word has been universally adopted in all regular and well governed offices. -- Logan Republican.

W. S. Tilton went up the north branch this afternoon on the way to Norton to address the reunion of old soldiers at that place....

 

Kind words never die.: "Capt. W. S. Tilton of the ...
September 23, 1897, Downs Times (ID 2996)

Kind words never die.

"Capt. W. S. Tilton of the Downs Times passed through the city on his way home from Norton....Captain Tilton is always in demand at old soldier gatherings and has gained for himself a state reputation as an orator. He is perfectly at home upon occasions of this kind, and it doesn't take him a month to get his 'think tank' in operation when he is called upon for a speech." -- Phillipsburg Dispatch.

"...The Captain is always interesting, but is unusually so at a soldiers' reunion among his comrades." -- Almena Plaindealer.

"...His address was that of a strong, patriotic and warm-hearted comrade and was well received. ...His address to the GAR at the reunion was the philosophy of peace through the wisdom of war." -- Norton Champion.

 

Personal. Through the most brazen effrontery, dupl ...
October 7, 1897, Downs Times (ID 2997)

Personal. Through the most brazen effrontery, duplicity, cowardice and treachery, I have been defrauded out of the registership of the United States land office at WaKeeney, in this state. Beaten fairly on the open field, Mr. Purcell (of whom some few up this way may have heard) has managed, with the aid of some other political bushwhackers, to crawl from the brush into this important position. There is in the Republican party a spirit of independence which refuses to brook the domination of the party boss after he has been discovered. Especially in the West, is this loathing of machine rule in politics thoroughly detested by Republicans. The Times aims to have something to say next week about machine politics in Kansas. We shall try not to be prosy either. -- Respectfully, W. S. Tilton.

We give space this week to some press comments. They show the general feeling in this congressional district concerning I. T. Purcell's appointment. We are in receipt from prominent Republicans of private letters of the same import. There are flies which imagine that the wagon goes because they light on its wheel. We are not after flies....

"The announcement that Capt. Tilton is to be let out of the registership of the WaKeeney land office is received with indignation throughout this congressional district...." -- Jewell City Republican.

"We were much surprised last week on learning that our old friend, Col. W. S. Tilton, had been made the victim of a damnable piece of political treachery on the part of someone. Everybody supposed that he was to be appointed register of the land office at WaKeeney on Senator Baker's endorsement, but when the time came the pie went to I. T. Purcell of Gove County...." -- Alton Empire.

"That gallant, unflinching Republican, Col. W. S. Tilton, is being made the victim of the most damnable piece of political treachery. Those who watch the current of political events will remember that months ago Mr. Tilton was endorsed and recommended by United States Senator Baker for the position of register of the WaKeeney land office. But a furor was created here last Saturday when the daily papers announced that I. T. Purcell of Gove County had been appointed to fill the position promised Col. Tilton. This dastardly piece of work is laid at the door of Cy Leland, who all along has been a strong supporter of Purcell...." -- Osborne Farmer.

"...The turning down of Captain W. S. Tilton of the Downs Times, who was to have been appointed to the land office at WaKeeney, is repulsive to Populists and Republicans alike. Mr. Tilton is a persistent -- and we might say unreasonable partisan -- and he indorses everything the Republican party does....It does seem that there is but little honor and less gratitude in politicians." -- Smith County Journal, Populist.

"...Tilton's friends all over the district are considerably worked up over his treatment and it augers ill for the leader who could in so underhanded a manner throw him down." -- Logan Republican.

"Col. Tilton of the Downs Times as in town this morning. Col. Tilton is the man who won the appointment of register of the WaKeeney land office and was swindled out of it by politicians." -- Atchison Champion.

Rev. Link Drummond, for a while last year foreman of the Times office, has severed his connection with the Smith Center Pioneer in order to devote his entire time to preaching.

 

A Personal Statement: We have promised to our poli ...
October 14, 1897, Downs Times (ID 2998)

A Personal Statement

We have promised to our political friends a statement of our convictions concerning the cause of the defeat of our candidacy for register of the U.S. land office at WaKeeney. What we shall say is based upon the theory that disreputable methods on the part of Republican politicians can have only the effect of injuring their own party. We shall speak pointedly. At the same time, we are under great obligations to certain political friends. Revolting at the thought of doing them any possible harm, we shall reject, for the present, at least, the use of voluminous materials in our possession which are anything but creditable to the perpetrators of the outrage which we are considering.

On evidence which we cannot challenge, our conviction is that Cy Leland and Joseph L. Bristow worked our defeat. Do not get "defeat" and "humiliation" mixed. We are not humiliated. We have done nothing to cause our humiliation....

Kansas voters generally are aware that in the month of June last Lucien Baker, a senator of the United States,...recommended ten men for as many federal offices in this state....While Senator Baker did not dwell upon this point, the fact is that in his recommendations for land office appointments and for revenue collector he sought to give to each east and west tier of counties in the western portion of the state one of these federal places.

Now, if, as is extensively believed, Cy Leland had...promised to Mr. Purcell the appointment of land register at WaKeeney, why did he not frankly say so to Senator Baker when the latter decided upon those ten recommendations?...It is Cy Leland's spirit of unfairness to which we take exception....The politician who worked these secret tactics did not, you may rest assured, fail to call upon his satellites for evidence to bolster up his case....We are informed that the statement was made to the president that we had been an anti-McKinley man!

...Cy Leland...had at Washington a handy man in Joseph L. Bristow. It seems that Mr. Bristow's time was only partially occupied with his duties as fourth assistant postmaster general....The papers were now ready for the president's action. Bigger than Senator Baker, Land Commissioner Evans and Secretary of the Interior Bliss combined, Mr. Bristow, at this juncture, secured for Mr. Purcell the appointment.

Some of our friends have assumed that we had in store a rich fund of abuse for Mr. Purcell. Nothing could be further from the fact. It is true that he displayed great moral weakness in turning guerrilla after having lost in an open contest. But this must charitably, as well as truly, be accounted for by the kind of political company which he keeps. The interests of the Republican party and of Senator Baker alike demand that the confirmation of Mr. Purcell's appointment, in December next, be defeated. As for ourself, we can kick and smile; but on the question of who is to distribute the federal patronage in Kansas, Senator Baker cannot afford to miss a cog or withhold a shot....He cannot afford to be trampled upon along the skirmish line.

"The editor of the Osborne Farmer deserves credit for the manner in which he stands by his former partner, Tilton." -- Russell Record.

"...Tilton is a hard-fighting Republican and deserves better treatment from his party." -- Topeka Advocate.

"The turning down of Capt. Tilton...is a piece of political skullduggery that merits the severest rebuke. No man in the state is more worthy of or more entitled to a share in the plums that are falling as a result of the Republican victory...." -- Belleville Telescope.

"...He (Tilton) is a most deserving man, a strong editor and a loyal Republican who has labored through his paper and on the stump for the success of his party...." -- Concordia Empire.

A Very Close Call -- Late Sunday afternoon, as W. S. Tilton, wife and little child were returning home from a drive into the country, the buggy in which they were riding was suddenly upset, the horse falling with it. The accident was caused by the horse taking sudden fright at the sight of a dog cart which was crossing Morgan Avenue at the first crosswalk south of the post office....The occupants of the buggy were thrown to the ground with such force as to hurt them somewhat, but the injuries were not serious....We cannot overstate our gratitude to the kind friends who came so speedily to our rescue.

Bert P. Walker, late of the Logan Republican, but temporarily on the retired list, has been in Downs....

 

(Headline to long story) Bristow Warned. Notified ...
October 28, 1897, Downs Times (ID 2999)

(Headline to long story) Bristow Warned. Notified Not To Meddle with Senator Baker's Affairs. The Penalty Is Dismissal. Senator Baker's Story of That Trip to Washington. Informed by the President That if He Wanted Mr. Bristow Ousted He Had But to Say the Word. Will Bristow Be Good?

Leavenworth, Oct. 25 -- (Special) ...By way of preface, the senator was irritated because President McKinley ignored his recommendation and appointed Ike Purcell to a land office position. He got on the train and went direct to Washington to find out why his man Tilton had been turned down. The first official he struck was the president.

"Why was my recommendation ignored in the land office appointment?" he asked the president.

"Because Mr. Bristow came here and said that an ante-election promise had been made to Purcell," replied the president. "I told him that if the promise had been given it should be kept. Bristow informed me that you were friendly to Purcell and that it would make no particular difference to you."

The senator then denied that any ante-election promise had been made to Purcell, and added an explanation.

The president expressed surprise that Mr. Bristow should misunderstand the senator's wishes.

"When you were working for the appointment of Mr. Bristow for fourth assistant postmaster general," continued the president to Mr. Baker, "I told you that I did not think he was big enough for the place. You were so earnest in your support that I concluded to stay by you, and I appointed him. Senator, if it is now your desire, I will call for his resignation."

Senator Baker asked the president to leave the proposition open for a while, and the president agreed to do so. The president told the senator that in the appointments to be made hereafter his recommendations would be followed....

Monday, Bert Walker went to work on the Osborne Farmer. Mr. Landis will find him to be a worker and as bright as a silver dollar....

 

If you will bring it now, we will take some good h ...
November 11, 1897, Downs Times (ID 3000)

If you will bring it now, we will take some good hay on subscription.

Do you want to bring us two or three dozen shocks of good corn fodder on subscription? If you do, take this for an invitation.

 

Good Bye. We are about to leave Kansas. This means ...
January 20, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3001)

Good Bye. We are about to leave Kansas. This means that we have disposed of the Downs Times plant and good will. Wm. L. Knotts of Beatrice, Neb., is the new owner. His brother, E. P. Knotts, will arrive here about the middle of next week to take charge of the Times....As a matter of sentiment, it is hard for us to leave Kansas, in whose splendid territory we have lived nearly all the time for the last 31 years. It has been our privilege to come in contact with most of her prominent men....We have purchased the Beatrice Daily and Weekly Times. We realize that the management of such an institution brings to us enlarged responsibilities; but, in our judgment, the additional revenues and other advantages will more than compensate for this....Cordially, W. S. Tilton.

"W. G. Christ is foreman of the Downs Times, but the Osborne Farmer says that his ancestry does not run back near as far as a casual glance at his name would indicate." -- Minneapolis Messenger.

 

A line from W. L. Knotts...states that E. P. Knott ...
February 3, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3002)

A line from W. L. Knotts...states that E. P. Knotts will not arrive in time to help with this week's issue.

Capt. W. S. Tilton and his son Hugh left Monday morning for their new field of labor at Beatrice, Neb. Downs will miss Editor Tilton, whose tireless energy and conscientious search for and publication of the news have made the Times better than ever before....His conducted a business on as independent principles as a bank and taught the people that a reputable newspaper is not a begging institution.

"Quincy R. Craft of Downs and Miss Carrie McKisson were married at the latter's home in Pioneer Township, Graham County, on Wednesday forenoon....The groom is well known through northwest Kansas and enjoys the highest esteem. For some time he was editor of the Downs Times, but is now engaged in the more lucrative occupation of stock feeding on his father's farm near Downs...." -- The Rooks County Record.

 

Salutatory. I have assumed the management of the T ...
February 10, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3003)

Salutatory. I have assumed the management of the Times as my predecessor announced I should do. I realize it will be no easy task to maintain the standard of excellence the paper sustained under my predecessor's control, but it shall be my aim to give the people of Downs and vicinity all the news in a readable form. In politics, the paper will be Republican, although we shall not feel called upon to settle all the national and state issues....Above all, the Times will be a Downs paper....Come in and see us. The latch string is always hanging out. -- E. P. Knotts.

"E. P. Knotts started this afternoon to Downs, Kan., to take charge of the Downs Times, for which his brother, Wm. L., recently traded. Ed is a nice young man and we hope that he will like the Downs people and that they will like him." -- Beatrice Daily Times.

Ye editor was the recipient of a most beautiful (?) valentine sent in by some of the fair residents the fore part of the week. While it was premature for Valentine Day, yet he feels complimented for being remembered so soon.

 

While en route to Logan to look after his business ...
February 24, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3004)

While en route to Logan to look after his business interests in that place, E. J. Garner, the popular editor of the Solomon Sentinel, made his parents in this city a visit. Mr. Garner was formerly a resident of this county and when everything looked encouraging started the publication of the third newspaper in Downs. He afterwards disposed of his interests here, and for the past year has located in Solomon, where he says the wave of prosperity has struck him....

 

Wednesday morning the household goods of W. S. Til ...
March 17, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3005)

Wednesday morning the household goods of W. S. Tilton were shipped to Beatrice, their son Ben accompanying them. Mrs. Tilton and family left this morning....Our loss however is gained by Beatrice, Neb., a beautiful city of 11,000 people where they have gone to join the Captain....

Taul Timberson (Harmon Wilson) of the Topeka Capital editorial staff passed through Downs last Saturday, and stopped off long enough to come in and shake hands with the Times force. Mr. Wilson is well known in northwest Kansas and has a state reputation for his "Swede" stories. He is an entertaining gentleman, a versatile writer, and has hosts of friends in Downs who are happy to know that he is doing so well in Topeka. He is a brother to Hewn and Brawn.

 

Valedictory. It is with the utmost regret that, af ...
March 31, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3006)

Valedictory. It is with the utmost regret that, after so short a stay in Downs, I write this valedictory. J. H. Smith of New Market, Iowa, a newspaper man of great ability, is my successor and I have no doubt that he will serve the people of Downs and community with careful consideration and conservative opinion as to what is best for their interests....Should you treat him with but half the courtesy and respect I have received, you can be assured he will do all in his power for the interests of the people of Downs and vicinity.... -- E. P. Knotts.

 

The family of J. H. Smith arrived in Downs Tuesday ...
April 7, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3007)

The family of J. H. Smith arrived in Downs Tuesday noon and have moved into the J. V. Hofer property on the north side.

Miss Florence Headley of the Gaylord Herald, one of the brightest young ladies in northwest Kansas, passed through Downs Tuesday en route to Beloit, where she will visit with her brother Bert of the Beloit Times....

Salutatory. It is customary for an editor in taking charge of a paper to publish a few lines introducing himself to his patrons and, sometimes, outlining the future policy of the paper; so in accord with this time honored custom we will briefly state: First, that we have purchased the Downs Times, and take it in an apparent state of prosperity....Second: It will be our aim to keep the Times a lively, bright local paper and be up to date on general news. Our interests are all in Downs....We don't like to quarrel, and won't fight, unless cornered.

We have no clubs to throw and will try to treat all with courtesy and like consideration. We have put in a large part of our life apologizing and think we are an adept in this particular line; so if you, at any time, feel aggrieved at us, just call and mention the matter and you will find us affable and ready to apologize to your fullest satisfaction. Politically we have decided opinions of our own and accord the same privilege to our neighbors. We believe that a man may be a Democrat or a Populist or Prohibitionist and be a gentleman and be honest in his views, and if we cannot endorse his judgment we must admire his zeal. We close by asking you all, old and young, to call and get acquainted, give us all the advice you please; and don't forget to tell us of any bits of neighborhood news that you may know. -- Resp. Yours, J. H. Smith.

The Osborne Farmer's issue last week was ten pages of bright, finely printed reading matter. Charlie Landis knows how to run a newspaper in all its various branches, and, with such efficient help as Tom Skinner and Bert Walker, he is getting out one of the best papers in northwest Kansas.

 

The new proprietor of the Downs Times, who comes f ...
April 14, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3008)

The new proprietor of the Downs Times, who comes from Iowa, is a former Kansan, having lived six years in Graham County. He will get through all right. A man who can stand six years in Graham County can consider himself prepared to brace anything. -- Topeka Capital.

 

Removal. The Times office will after today be in t ...
April 28, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3009)

Removal. The Times office will after today be in the building formerly occupied by the First National Bank of Downs. It is one of the finest rooms in town.

We invite the friends and patrons of the Times to call and see us in our new home. We hope the public will not be misled by the word BANK in gold standard letters over our front door. Our office devil is especially anxious about this; he fears that we may be burglarized, and that the "hell box" may be dynamited before the mistake is discovered. Please keep the above caution in mind and if you are looking for clean cash call on the State Bank of Downs one block north, but if you wish to make a deposit, why, come in.

"We have been watching our new neighbor, Editor Smith of the Downs Times, and are pleased to report that he is doing excellent work. Come up and see the best town on the North Branch, Brother Smith. We have a train up one day and down the next, and our account at the lunch counter is not overdrawn." -- Gaylord Herald. Some men we learn to love even before we see them. Of course we'll come up; that invitation touched our heart. When you mention lunch counters, watch out for us. We are very busy just now, Bro. Headley, but you'll see us bye and bye.

"J. H. Smith, an Iowa newspaper man, has bought the Downs Times. His first paper shows ability and experience. He is probably a descendant of Capt. Smith of Pocahontas fame as he shows himself to be a fighter -- anxious for war in the following: 'The outlook for war with Spain is still growing brighter'." -- Oberlin Eye.

Gone to Concordia. W. E. Christ, who has been foreman in the Times office for the past year, severed his connection therewith last Saturday to accept a position on the Empire at Concordia. This is a decided loss to the Times and a disappointment to his many friends here....

Enlist. The register for the enlistment of United States soldiers is now at the Times office....

The growth of the Times subscription list the past week has been very encouraging and gratifying to us....

 

Bert Headley, foreman of the Beloit Times, passed ...
May 5, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3010)

Bert Headley, foreman of the Beloit Times, passed through town Monday on his way to Gaylord.

 

Lebanon has a new paper, the Argus, edited by G. C ...
May 19, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3011)

Lebanon has a new paper, the Argus, edited by G. C. McNeice. It is well edited and shows a very liberal patronage.

 

The editor of the Times left for Omaha Tuesday mor ...
June 2, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3012)

The editor of the Times left for Omaha Tuesday morning to attend the opening exercises of the great Trans-Mississippi Exposition.

 

A typographical tourist called on us last Friday a ...
June 23, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3013)

A typographical tourist called on us last Friday and offered his services, but our office being full we could not give him a "sit." We recognized him as a weary who called on us two and a half years ago in Iowa, when we grub-staked him and sent him on his way full of lunch counter chuck. This time he asked for nothing and we suppose he was in a better fix. He said he hadn't had a sit since he was in Iowa, but had continued to walk the earth in hopes.

 

H. D. Wilson (Tall Timberson) of the Topeka Capita ...
June 30, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3014)

H. D. Wilson (Tall Timberson) of the Topeka Capital passed through Downs last Saturday on his way to Alton to "visit friends," as he informed us, but it transpired later that he went there to get married. Mr. Wilson and Miss Topsie Campbell of Alton were married at six o'clock Monday morning and took the train at once for Topeka. Mr. Wilson's two sisters, Misses Hattie and Ruby, were on the train Monday and made life a burden to their brother Herman until they reached Beloit, by labeling him at every opportunity with a card bearing the words "I Am Happy." Herman found the solitude of the smoker preferable to the attention his two mischievous sisters attracted to him. Mr. Wilson was at one time employed on the Downs Times.

 

E. J. Garner, editor of the Ottawa County Democrat ...
July 14, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3017)

E. J. Garner, editor of the Ottawa County Democrat, says he is not running a Pop paper but is supporting "the entire ticket as nominated at Atchison."

 

Walter Smith, the Times' "man about town," left on ...
August 4, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3019)

Walter Smith, the Times' "man about town," left on Monday morning for the Trans-Mississippi Exposition at Omaha. He will also extend his visit to New Market, Iowa, his former home.

 

J. W. Huff of Victor, Colo., one of the oldest set ...
August 11, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3020)

J. W. Huff of Victor, Colo., one of the oldest settlers of Downs and at one time one of the most prominent business men, visited a part of last week....He was one of the instigators of the Downs Times and is still one of its readers.

Editor Headley of the Gaylord Herald accused us last week of clipping an item from his paper and giving it credit to the Lebanon Criterion. Possibly we did, but we publicly apologize to the Herald, and also to the Criterion.

 

Last week we sent out a number of statements to de ...
August 18, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3021)

Last week we sent out a number of statements to delinquent subscribers and next week we will continue the work, sending a statement to every person whose subscription is dated back as far as 1896....If you can't pay us all the account, try to raise a little of it and we will be satisfied that you are all right and wait until you are in shape to meet it in full....We must collect from those who owe us or quit business. You can't blame us for collecting, can you?

 

J. W. Eckman, editor of the Osborne News, spent a ...
September 1, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3022)

J. W. Eckman, editor of the Osborne News, spent a few hours in Downs Tuesday....The Eckmans are giving the Populists a splendid paper and the Pops should give it a hearty support.

 

Some persons last week took to heart what was said ...
September 29, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3023)

Some persons last week took to heart what was said in the columns of the Times about the outside appearance of a certain church. While the article in question was not written by the editor, we feel just as responsible for its appearance as though it had....People who have clubs to throw must use their own leverage. The Times is not used for personal flings.

 

The company making up the Times excursion left Tue ...
October 13, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3024)

The company making up the Times excursion left Tuesday in a special coach and were as bright and happy looking carload of freight as we ever saw. They will return Saturday evening....Sixty-six went.

W. H. Whitmore of Lehigh, I.T., who was at one time a resident of Downs and editor and proprietor of the Downs Chief, came in among his old acquaintances last week....Mr. Whitmore is still in the newspaper business, doing a prosperous business....

Bert Headley of the Gaylord Herald passed through Downs Tuesday on his way to Newkirk, Okla. Bert says the newspaper business in Gaylord is better now than it has been for years.

 

To Omaha and Back. Mr. Editor: With your permissio ...
October 20, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3025)

To Omaha and Back. Mr. Editor: With your permission I will endeavor to give a short sketch of our recent trip to Omaha....I thank you for your kindness in making it possible to see that which is gratifying to every thinking person. As for the fair, the fish exhibit was most gratifying....Mr. McKinley was the first president I ever saw....Our trip to and from Omaha was full of incidents of a happy kind...I noticed before I returned home that many a gray hair had been added to your brow, and I ask myself why is this? The furrows of care had become more visible and a far away look shone from your troubled eyes. I ask myself why is this? The answer came -- watching over the careless ways of more than a score of young people bent on having fun at any cost. For one, I thank you, Mr. Editor, for the interest you had in us...and declare unto you that no party of young people ever had a more agreeable and patient guide than the editor of the Downs Times. -- Pearl Enterline.

Dear readers, won't you kindly look at the address on your paper this week and see by the date following your name how your account stands as to subscription, and if yours is behind won't you please come in and pay up? A large number of you are from one to five years in arrears; this money would be a great help to us; it is due; won't you come in and pay it?

 

The editor's home was a scene of confusion last Sa ...
December 1, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3026)

The editor's home was a scene of confusion last Saturday night for about four hours. Sunday, Nov. 27, was the birthday of our oldest hopeful; he was 21; some of his acquaintances found it out and planned a surprise for him....Walter was a little surprised, but pleased....And thus our boy was launched into the first year of his manhood.

 

Since purchasing the Alton Empire, Bro. Ford has r ...
December 15, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3027)

Since purchasing the Alton Empire, Bro. Ford has redoubled his efforts to make his paper one of the best local papers in the state....

 

Business Is Business. After January 1, 1899, as he ...
December 29, 1898, Downs Times (ID 3028)

Business Is Business. After January 1, 1899, as heretofore we will publish all church and Sunday school notices, obituaries and marriage notices of reasonable length, and GAR notices, free of charge. All notices of lodge meetings, insurance company notices and all other notices in which individuals or companies are financially interested will be charged for at regular rates of five cents per line.

The Misses Boyd of Belleville, editors of the Freeman, passed through Downs last Thursday on their way to Logan....

 

New (?) The Smith County Journal last week, in men ...
January 5, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3029)

New (?) The Smith County Journal last week, in mentioning the Times editor, says: "Mr. Smith is a newcomer, but he has picked up the ways of Republican editors with a promptness that is amusing." We thank the Journal for the compliment but will say that, while as to our residence in Downs we may not be classed among the old settlers, we have spent nearly nine years of our happy life in Kansas and in what is now the Sixth District; we lived six years on a homestead, one year on a tree claim, have planted 40 acres to trees, some of which is now nice timber; we have shucked corn, bound wheat, helped thresh in Osborne, Smith, Jewell, Phillips, Norton, Russell and Graham counties; we have also worked on the section as a railroad hand, taught school, clerked in a store and had a scrap or two in northwest Kansas. We have been the direct cause of six good families moving into the state, all Republicans, (two have turned Pop, sorry to say). We have raised a family, one son who is a voter and another who soon will be and "more acomin' on." Say, what does a fellow have to do to gain citizenship in this district?

 

Vol. 1, No. 1 of the Cawker City Ledger came to ou ...
January 12, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3030)

Vol. 1, No. 1 of the Cawker City Ledger came to our desk this week with G. L. Hudkins as editor....

The editor has been in Topeka the entire week and the work being in the hands of the boys will account for any shortcomings, mistakes, etc. And besides that we have been busier than usual.

 

Walter Smith, the Times rustler, was instructed in ...
January 19, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3031)

Walter Smith, the Times rustler, was instructed in the initiatory degree in Odd Fellowship last Thursday night. He thinks the goat had not been exercised for some time previous and consequently was a little wild.

The Ledger, the new Cawker City paper, says one citizen of Cawker subscribed for 500 copies of the Ledger. That's a stunner! It beats anything we've got by something over 490.

 

J. W. Garner, ex-editor of the Ottawa County Democ ...
January 26, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3032)

J. W. Garner, ex-editor of the Ottawa County Democrat, and family came up to Downs yesterday for a few days visit with relatives and friends.

 

Editor Topliff of the Criterion has had his faith ...
February 2, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3033)

Editor Topliff of the Criterion has had his faith in the resurrection restored by receiving a copy of the Ledger, a new paper published at Cawker.

 

Volume XIX. With this issue of the Times we open t ...
February 9, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3034)

Volume XIX. With this issue of the Times we open the Nineteenth Volume....We find that the subscription list of the Times has been making an almost continuous growth and now reaches almost the 1,000 mark. This we are desirous of reaching within the next 30 days; we must have nearly 100 new names to make it....We expect to print extra copies each week for the next month and these are for free distribution....We expect to begin a series of illustrations in the near future....Cuts are now being prepared by an engraving house and as soon as received will appear. Should any person who is at leisure wish to make a few dollars by taking subscriptions for the Times, we will pay you a good commission, furnish blanks, clubbing lists, etc., if you will call at this office.

 

The Editor's Loyalty. "The Western Advocate has ju ...
February 16, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3035)

The Editor's Loyalty. "The Western Advocate has just refused a proposition for 600 inches of advertising space to be filled by a big Chicago mail order department store. We refused this business for two reasons: To protect our home merchants from unfair and illegitimate competition; and to protect our readers from impositions which these big department houses practice upon their mail order customers. We believe the trade of the country belongs legitimately to the business men who pay the taxes and help build up the country. We believe it is money in the pockets of the people to spend their money at home. We need business, but we are going to try and worry along without the business of those big mail order houses in eastern cities." The above was first printed in the Mankato Advocate and copied by the Beloit Call. The Times received probably the same proposition and likewise refused it for the same reasons given by the Advocate. We believe in supporting our own merchants and patronizing home institutions, and always work to that end; yet, we have merchants who send to Chicago for cheap stationery carrying the stationer's advertisement on the back of every envelope, which does a double injury to the home printer.

 

L. C. Headley, the astute editor of the Gaylord He ...
March 2, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3036)

L. C. Headley, the astute editor of the Gaylord Herald, was in Downs last Saturday. Headley is a nice man and our admiration for him came near causing us to do a magnanimous act. We were passing Geo. Magee's restaurant and someone called us in and there sat Headley on a high stool eating like all wonder, and it at once occurred to us that we should, and of course would, pay for his dinner, and we advanced and shook hands with him with that intention -- but then we noticed the splendid array of ham sandwiches, bologna sausage and dried apple pie that surrounded his plate, we thought of the amount to pay and our heart failed us. But we had a good talk. He was on his way to Kansas City to visit his daughter who is going to school there. Later -- Mr. Headley returned Tuesday evening and stopped overnight with J. E. Putman....We stood the butcher off for five cents worth of meat and took him home with us for dinner yesterday.

Last Saturday, J. P. Rathburn and J. R. Turnbaugh came into the Times office. Ordinarily this would not have been surprising but there was something about Rathburn's eye that aroused our suspicion, and when he abruptly asked to see a copy of the latest issue of the Times we hesitated, but told him we would try to get a copy and hand it to him as he was leaving town. He said "alright" and started for the door, saying that he would go out and fill up on joint whiskey while we looked for the paper and would call in again. We stopped him and got the paper. He took it and read an item to the effect that he, J. P. Rathburn, contemplated taking unto himself a w---. Then he stopped and said, "you just say to the fellow who wrote that, that I want him to either come to the wedding or the funeral." Then he went out to look for trouble elsewhere. We understand that some words passed between him and Forline later. Boys, there is more than one good-looking widow in the land.

 

This week we received a copy of the Oklahoma State ...
March 9, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3037)

This week we received a copy of the Oklahoma State Register marked for exchange. It is a red hot rantankerous Pop paper, but is well edited, spicy and newsy. We noted that E. J. Garner has bought a half interest in it and is local editor and business manager. Success to you, Jim.

 

Next week we will print 300 extra copies of the Ti ...
March 16, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3038)

Next week we will print 300 extra copies of the Times; the edition will be illustrated with numerous cuts of prominent visitors, our own churches, several of our fine residences, and Methodist ministers who have served in Downs....Parties desiring extra copies should leave their orders at this office soon for we expect the entire edition to be sold early in the week.

If we ever catch the fellow that spits tobacco juice on the plate glass of the Times office we'll show him a warm time, and don't you forget it. Our windows have never been very clean but we don't want such filth as that puked up on them.

 

The Lebanon Argus was a year old last Friday. The ...
May 11, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3039)

The Lebanon Argus was a year old last Friday. The last issue was a beauty.

"No thoroughbred should desert the case for public office. Subscribed, R. M. Pickler." On entering the Times office Monday after dinner, the foreman found the above lines in the "stick," which shows that the author, the popular Judge Pickler, still yearns for the print shop. Although honored above that of his countrymen, his soul is hungry for that richness that satisfies, but that is obtainable only in the variety-of-life of the editor. Yet we see the point in the Judge's lines. They were intended for a sideswipe at the Times man for accepting the honorable and lucrative position of township trustee.

Downs' population -- 953.

 

The biggest trust on earth has been discovered at ...
June 1, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3041)

The biggest trust on earth has been discovered at last. It is the country newspaper trust. It trusts everybody, gets cussed for trusting and trusted for cussing -- and finally gets busted for trusting. It's a fact, the country newspaper trust is the biggest trust on earth or any other place. -- Exchange.

 

Billy Christ, formerly a typo on the Times, is try ...
August 10, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3043)

Billy Christ, formerly a typo on the Times, is trying his hand at farming near Beloit.

"Harmon Wilson telegraphed the home folks Wednesday morning that he was the father of a ten-pound boy and is mighty proud of it." -- Beloit Call.

Mrs. H. M. Fletcher and family were out from Kansas City, Kan., last week visiting at the home of F. A. McAllister....

 

The Cawker City Ledger has been using considerable ...
August 31, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3044)

The Cawker City Ledger has been using considerable space in trying to sandpaper Alrich of the Record. We know nothing about their quarrel but we doubt if the Ledger's readers will enjoy that class of literature.

 

A. B. Robinson of the Cawker Ledger was in Downs o ...
September 7, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3045)

A. B. Robinson of the Cawker Ledger was in Downs on business yesterday.

C. W. Landis went to Kansas City last week and bought a brand new news press for the Farmer. Charlie's lines are cast in pleasant places and his cup of joy is filling up.

 

R. T. Weld, a typo on the Colby Tribune, is visiti ...
September 14, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3046)

R. T. Weld, a typo on the Colby Tribune, is visiting the Trombla boys this week.

" 'The Jewell Republican man kicks because when he opened the Phillipsburg Dispatch a bedbug crawled out,' says the Minneapolis Messenger. 'What did he expect to crawl out -- an octopus?' Which brings to mind that the Capital recently received a letter from a Kansas lady who made complaint that a certain well-known daily published in the East brought bed bugs to her home. She said that they were all very fond of the paper, but found it necessary to 'de-bug' it every time it was received before it was taken into the house, and she wished that means might be devised to abate the nuisance. For some reason or other, bedbugs are partial to newspaper offices." -- Harmon Wilson.

We would like to have a few more good samples of corn to put in our window.

The editor of the Times, being also township trustee, has been very busy this week. He has been obliged to act as road overseer, bridge commissioner, and has had a force of ten men and teams to "boss" while they were working out the railroad road tax. All of this was comparatively easy, but when we were called upon to perform the last rites and ceremonies and otherwise officiate at the interment of a deceased sorrel colored canine about three miles from town we became troubled in spirit.

 

W. L. Knotts, former editor of this paper, is prac ...
October 12, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3047)

W. L. Knotts, former editor of this paper, is practicing law in Stillwater, Oklahoma.

"Walt Whitmore, formerly a newspaper man at Downs, last Thursday was elected vice-president of the Indian Territory Press Association. He is editor of a paper at Lehigh." -- Beloit Times.

 

It is amusing to note the efforts of the Democrati ...
October 19, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3048)

It is amusing to note the efforts of the Democratic editor of the Cawker Ledger to manage the Republican postmaster of that town. Brother Hudkins, who was postmaster under the Cleveland administration, doesn't seem to understand why Alrich, the present incumbent, doesn't run the post office as he (Hudkins) wants him to; and Alrich evidently thinks that the Republicans are reasonably independent of Democracy and Popism these days and does business according to his own ideas.

 

We suppose it was a Western editor who wrote: The ...
November 2, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3049)

We suppose it was a Western editor who wrote: The melancholy days have come; the saddest of the year. The printer's pants are thin in front, and thinner in the rear.

 

Yearly turkey gobblers will be accepted same as ca ...
November 16, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3050)

Yearly turkey gobblers will be accepted same as cash at the Times office on subscription. And we'll not question the age either.

 

Rev. A. L. Drummond has resigned his position as p ...
November 30, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3051)

Rev. A. L. Drummond has resigned his position as pastor of the Christian church of this place, having accepted a call from the church at Downs....He will leave about the first of the year. -- Smith County Pioneer.

 

The following from the Culbertson (Neb.) New Era m ...
December 14, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3052)

The following from the Culbertson (Neb.) New Era may be construed into dire threat: Some people who do not like The Era maybedamthankful that we are not rich enough to make it a daily.

The Times office is under obligations to Q. R. Craft for valuable assistance this week. Quinn is what may be correctly called an all-around man; he is equally at ease in a mail car, post office, on a farm or in a print shop; is a fluent speaker, a brilliant writer, a faithful and consistent Baptist, and something of a politician.

 

The editor of the Times has received some very hea ...
December 21, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3053)

The editor of the Times has received some very hearty congratulations over the post office appointment, but none heartier than that from Charlie Lindensmith. Charlie said that, while he was a prohibitionist and could not support us, he would stand by the nomination.

 

The Times family are enjoying a visit from Mr. and ...
December 28, 1899, Downs Times (ID 3054)

The Times family are enjoying a visit from Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Perry and Miss Mable Lochrie of Diagonal, Iowa. Mrs. Perry and Miss Lochrie are nieces of Mrs. Smith.

 

...
January 4, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4684)

The Cawker City Ledger is now published twice a week. Mr. Hudkins' enterprise in the newspaper line deserves the success he is receiving. Twice-a-week editions seldom live long in small towns but we hope this one may prove an exception.

J. H. Smith resigned the office of trustee of Ross Township on Wednesday, and C. K. Ware was appointed....Carry your troubles to him.

 

...
January 11, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4685)

It has always been considered necessary for an editor to occasionally rip somebody up the back, but the regular order was reversed here this week; Dr. Ebnother ripped the editor of the Times up the back in the most realistic manner possible, and the editor has been off duty as a consequence. A carbuncle about the size of a coal bucket was the cause of the trouble between them. The doctor claims the cutting was justifiable, and the editor claims that he came out of the affray feeling better than when he went into it, even if one man did hold him while another used the knife on him.

 

...
January 18, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4686)

The Bellaire News is the latest newspaper venture; Vol. 1, No. 1 bearing date Jan. 12, 1900, came to us marked "X" this week. It is a neat six column folio and presents a very creditable appearance. C. F. Hutchinson is business manager and publisher, and Vinsonhaler and Hill editors....

 

...
January 25, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4687)

The Cawker City Ledger has abandoned its Tuesday edition and will henceforth be a weekly....

"The Downs Times is printing more good local news than it ever carried before. That paper was never more worthy of patronage than right now." -- Harmon Wilson in Topeka Capital. It is the ambition of the editors of the Times to make it the best local paper in northwest Kansas, and from the many compliments we have received we are encouraged to believe that our efforts have not been unavailing. The subscription list is the greatest it has ever been in the history of the paper and is still making a steady and very gratifying growth.

 

...
February 15, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4689)

Last Friday, a tramp printer hit the town and soon managed to get his hide full of booze but was dead broke when nightfall came. He loafed around from store to store, wherever there was light and fire until about 9 o'clock, when he entered the Downs Hardware Co.'s store and used language that caused Roy Mills, the only clerk in at that time, to suppose that he came in to hold him up and rob the store. Roy managed to communicate with the outside world and "print" was taken out. Later, Roy swore out a warrant and had the fellow arrested and taken to Osborne and jailed. He was brought back Monday by Deputy Sheriff Watson, but as evidence was not thought sufficient to hold him he was discharged.

 

...
February 22, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4690)

1880 -- Twentieth Anniversary -- 1900

With this issue, Vol. XIX, No. 52, is changed to Vol. XXI, No. 1. On Feb. 8th, 1894, although the numbers began dating back to 1 again, the volume was not changed; so Volume XIV ran two years. That issue states that Editor Fletcher had been attending a North Central Kansas editorial meeting at Beloit, and those who have enjoyed Beloit's entertainment know how hard it was to get down to minute print shop particulars within a week afterward.

...For a fifth of a century, the Times has made its weekly visits without interruption to hundreds of homes in Osborne and adjoining counties, following many in their removal to distant states....The Times is improving, at least our friends tell us so. It now has advantages in power machinery not usually found outside of a good county seat town....When the Times first knocked at your doors, the terminus of the north branch was Logan, the south branch Alton. There was not a stone, brick or iron clad structure in town....No other business house has continued uninterrupted these twenty years.

"We understand that Editor Smith of the Downs Times complains that Osborne hotels fail to furnish him a bedfellow when he puts up in that town overnight. In the kind of weather we have had lately, his complaint is not without reason." -- Gaylord Herald. That word "understand" is all that saves Headley from a libel suit.

 

...
March 8, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4691)

The Downs Times was twenty years old last week. The present editor is getting out a better paper than his predecessors, and unlike some of the former editors of that town is not quarreling with his neighbors. -- Cawker City Record.

 

...
March 15, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4693)

Just as white print paper reaches the highest price it has touched in ten years, there comes a request from the Post Office Department for editors to not use old printed papers for wrappers. We think we will stick to the old papers until the railway postal clerks kick. If they can stand it, postmasters can.

"Since removing to Downs from Smith Center, Rev. Link Drummond has commenced wearing brown silk lined gloves. It was a mighty good thing for Link that he quit the print trade when he did, or he might not be wearing gloves at all." -- Phillipsburg News.

"I stepped into the Times office one day last week -- I think the people I found there called it press day -- and I guess it was, because never did I see as much riffraff of stuff pressed into as many places....The presses were all smeared with oil and ink, and underneath was a pressed mass of corruption of all kinds, from chunks of coal to smeary paper, old rags, and dilapidated bits of wood called quoin or some such thing. The shelves looked as if a tornado had gathered up every kind of loose matter in the town and deposited the mass in true tornado style. The stove is of a gray greenish color striped up and down with fantastic colors of red, dark red, yellow and saffron colors, caused, I suppose, by the complexion of the background, but resembling in the aggregate tobacco juice.

"The editor's spittoon, and by the way, it is the same one Fletcher used years ago with the same ashes in it, sits solemn and ghostlike near the Editor's table and receives uncomplainingly the same refreshments as in years gone by. The Editor's table is marked with lines running perpendicular, horizontal, longitudinal, crisscross, and all delicately traced with ink and grease with just enough of a variety of dirt to harden the strange and versatile appearance of the work.

"I was about to leave when a gentleman came in, dressed in black, and as he took a chair I thought I could stand it if he could so I waited for the press. Pretty soon the people began to move around as if they had all at once got in a hurry, and one of them I took to be the Editor, owing to the crafty look I thought he had, but I have since learned that his name is Craft -- but, as I was saying, I knew something was going to happen. Craft grabbed a lot of papers and shoved them up on top of the press when a young woman got up on the side on a box and then an assistant took hold of a crank and began to turn, when the young woman on the side quietly slipped one of the pieces of paper down, when all at once something grabbed it and it disappeared. I rushed around to the other side to see what had become of it, when it came out at the bottom and started west, slipping along under black inky rollers, when something kicked it and it started back east with the intention, no doubt, of getting to where it started, when a thing with long fingers grabbed it, jerked it out of the press and slammed it down on a box.

"They were taken from the box where a number had gathered together in the Editor's name and were carried to tables and spread out, where they were folded and put into a large box and carried to the Post Office by the Editor, who said they were for the town people.

"It pays to go into a printing office to learn how much that is useful can be extracted from such awful surroundings. As I was ready to leave, as a last effort in the way of cleanliness, I asked the Editor when he intended to clean house, and in making my inquiry I casually glanced in the direction of the stove and spittoon and some other things, but as he did not seem to comprehend my meaning, I thought to myself, what would Jesus do?" -- Sharps and Flats.

The Cawker City Ledger changed hands last week. Mr. Hudkins retires and will devote his entire time to the real estate business, and Ed Hill of Beloit takes charge....

 

...
April 5, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4695)

J. I. Scott, former editor of the Downs World, and a son-in-law of S. B. Farwell, was in the city Friday. He has been located for two weeks on the Farwell farm in Corinth Township.

The Hiawatha World is the first country weekly in the United States to introduce the typesetting machine. Ewing Herbert has just given an order for the Mergenthaler Linotype. It will cost him $3,500.

J. H. Smith, the newly appointed postmaster, assumed the duties of the office April 1st.

 

...
April 12, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4696)

The People's Sentinel at Glen Elder has changed hands, Editor Baker selling out to D. L. Timbers, a school teacher.

 

...
April 26, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4697)

Jim Garner, editor of the Oklahoma State Register, paid Downs a visit this week. Jim shows unmistakable signs of prosperity and is well pleased with his business and also with the country.

 

...
May 3, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4698)

Ex-editor Baker, of the Glen Elder Sentinel, passed through town Saturday.

He has purchased an interest in the Smith County Journal and will assist his brother on that paper.

 

...
May 24, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4699)

Last week's Osborne Farmer contains the account of the death of Frank H. Barnhart, the founder of that paper. Mr. Barnhart died...May 13 in McMinnville, Ore. He was well known through Osborne County and had many admiring friends in and around Downs.

The Times office tenders thanks to E. R. Powell for a very large and beautiful bouquet of roses which he was thoughtful enough to bring in yesterday. Most people think it the best time to bring roses for the printer after he is dead, so we all the more appreciate an occasional flower while we live.

 

...
May 31, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4700)

The editor of the Riverton (Neb.) Review got into a scrape with a citizen, who went after the editor with a shovel, striking him over the head. His recovery is doubtful. Editors shouldn't fight when there is such a big country to run in. -- Smith County Pioneer. The editor of the Review ran for a county office once and ever after he swore he'd die before he'd run.

E. J. Garner has severed his connection with the Oklahoma State Register, published at Guthrie, and has started a new paper -- the Cimarron Valley Clipper at Iowa City, Okla.

Quincy R. Craft, census enumerator, will enter upon his duties tomorrow morning....

 

...
June 7, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4701)

At Smith Center -- Last Friday, the junior member of the firm took a little vacation and attended the North Central Kansas Editorial Association at Smith Center. He had a most excellent time...Going by train to Gaylord, he took the hack line to the Center, driving through a beautiful and well improved country....The published program was carried out and was very interesting. And added thereto was an address by Col. D. R. Anthony of the Leavenworth Times. Harmon Wilson of the Topeka Capital was also there and did his part in making things interesting. In the evening, a banquet at the elegant residence of

J. R. Burrows closed the day....

 

...
June 21, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4702)

Rev. Link Drummond was in town this morning on his way home from Smith Center, where he had been to perform the marriage ceremony for a young couple who wanted the job done right. He came down to take the 6 o'clock morning train, which was taken off about six months ago -- an evidence of forgetfulness which one would hardly expect in anyone except a citizen of Downs. -- Gaylord Herald. The Elder knew that the change had been made and had ordered a "special" to meet him at Gaylord, but on account of a scarcity of engines at Downs he was compelled to remain until the evening train. He got to Gaylord in the night and, in trying to arouse the hotel keeper, who had been asleep for several days on account of slack trade, made considerable noise and Lew Headley, hearing the racket, supposed a joint had opened up and came rushing down to get in on the first round. Now imagine his disgust when he found one little preacher there in the street. The Elder, always solicitous for the good of others, began an exhortation when he saw Lew, but soon found that he was talking to a streak of dust made by Headley as he went back to his slumbers. It's no wonder he tried to say something mean about Downs and her citizens. Link says they only open the post office at Gaylord every third day.

 

...
July 12, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4703)

Mord Smith of the Times and P.O. force went to Stockton Tuesday evening and will work for the News for a short time.

 

...
July 19, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4705)

J. B. Whitney, who until a few months ago had been engaged for two years in a printing office at Seward, Neb., is renewing old acquaintances in Downs. He was foreman of the Times under the reign of Editor Fletcher and is a pretty swift all-around man in a print shop....

H. M. Fletcher, former editor of the Times, is laying off from his duties as postal clerk on the Santa Fe and is looking after the threshing of his wheat in Covert Township.

 

...
July 26, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4707)

Bert Whitney helped the Times in the rush of job work yesterday.

Seward A. Jones has bought the Beloit Call, the Populist organ of Mitchell County, for $17,500. Twelve years ago, Seward began writing his love letters to Miss Kate Hubbard of the Glasco Sun, through the columns of the Scottsville News. He was then a very neat job printer. His rise as a journalist has been steady and rapid.

Distinguished Editorial party Visits Downs -- Atchison has her fishing ponds over at Iatan and Topeka her climb to the top of the statehouse, but neither has a Waconda Springs of the great spirit, overlooking the majestic Solomon. And realizing that no one is truly traveled who has not drank first-hand from this healthy pool and also seen Downs and her contributing territory at the close of a big harvest, a party of talented and successful newspaper writers spent the day last Sunday in our vicinity. Following is the personnel of the company:

E. W. Howe, editor of the Atchison Daily Globe, accompanied by Miss Mateel Howe, his daughter. Miss Frances L. Garside, associate editor of the Globe. Miss Nellie Webb, society editor, Globe. J. E. Rank, city editor, Globe. Mrs. Lillie Hethrington and her daughters, Mrs. Dr. Todd and Miss Gale Hethrington, Chas. E. Styles, passenger agent, C.B.U.P. railway. Frank P. McLennan, editor of the State Journal, Topeka, accompanied by Mrs. McLennan.

It may be that Mr. Howe, even after a trip to Paris, has not fully recovered from writing those "lay sermons" last March nor Mr. McLennan from the worry occasioned by printing them, and felt the need for a tonic more bracing than the waters of the Missouri and Kaw, but be that as it may, Downs was heartily glad to see them and being chaperoned by that accomplished entertainer, Charlie

Styles, we are sure they all had a good time. It was Mr. McLennan's first trip to our city but Mr. Howe had attended one of our anniversaries in the 80's.

The trip was made in Supt. Rathburn's private car, driving from Waconda to Downs, where the car awaited them. Arriving at the Springs at 9 o'clock a.m., several hours were spent at the old Indian shrine, presumably in cutting their names in the rocks and sitting in the natural formed lover's seats -- the men saying sweet things to the ladies and the ladies seeing which could drink the most mineral water. They took dinner with Lafe Smith and after dinner enjoyed music, some vocal selections by Mr. Styles being especially mentioned. The drive up the beautiful, level valley to Downs afforded these observing people a sight of as fine river bottom land, wheat fields and well-kept farms as can be found, though had it been a few days later, since the rains, the atmosphere and general appearance would have been improved.

After supper at the Lipton Hotel, acquaintances were renewed and new ones formed and Messrs. McLennan and Howe and Misses Garside and Webb visited the Times office. Miss Garside has been with the Globe fifteen years and is indispensable help. The Globe has a reputation worldwide for its humor and quaint philosophy. The Globe and the State Journal are the leading evening papers of the state. Mr. McLennan also is a man whom it is a pleasure to meet, his successful newspaper career giving an inspiration for closer application and better productions.

 

...
August 2, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4708)

A. B. Collins, who operates the type setting machine on the Beloit Call, was renewing old acquaintances in this city last Thursday.

One of our compositors, Miss Katherine Stump, is enjoying a pleasant visit from her friend, Miss Anna Arndt, of Alma.

Among the representatives of the press in the city Friday (for the celebration), we observed H. C. Buffington and wife of the Logan Republican;

E. A. Ross and son Fred of the Burr Oak Herald; Ward White of the Phillipsburg News; J. Q. Royce and wife of the Phillipsburg Dispatch; C. W. Landis and B. P. Walker of the Farmer; and Ed Hill of the Cawker Ledger.

George E. Dougherty arrived from Topeka Friday morning and is teaching shorthand at the Assembly (chautauqua at Lincoln Park). He also assists the management in typewriting the correspondence. Mrs. Dougherty and the children are also at the park.

Ben Tilton, recently returned from the Philippines and a son of Capt. W. S. Tilton of the Beatrice Times, was a welcome visitor to the celebration.

 

...
August 9, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4709)

While in Downs on the 27th, we enjoyed a visit with Editor Smith, who is also postmaster, and by the way is one of the best ones that ever happened. Mr. Smith is giving the people good service, and is wearing the same sized hat as before. His son looks after the newspaper and is doing a good job of it. He is one of the nicest young men we have ever had the pleasure of meeting. The Times office was thrown wide open to the fraternity that day. We always feel at home in a print shop. -- Phillipsburg News.

 

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August 16, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4710)

The Times has received many kind words on the workmanship of the high school catalogues. It is a good key to the work of one of the best educational institutions in the state and every patron of the district should call at H. H. Welty's office and secure one to preserve.

Bert Whitney went to Concordia Monday evening and has accepted a position as foreman on the Blade.

About 60 pages of typewritten evidence was taken Saturday...before A. W. Snyder, notary public, to be used in the district court of Wapello County, Iowa.... The evidence was taken by Q. R. Craft and transcribed by Geo. E. Dougherty on Dwight Harrison's Smith-Premier typewriter.

 

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September 7, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4714)

G. L. Hudkins is again proprietor of the Cawker City Ledger, having taken charge last week.

Editor Baker has again taken charge of the Glen Elder Sentinel. Baker sold the Sentinel to a school teacher several months ago.

Editor and Mrs. H. D. Wilson passed through Monday....The boy, Lyle, made several Downs acquaintances; he inherits his mother's good looks and his father's observing eye. 'Tis said that Harmon is already training him to meet the trains at Topeka.

"Ed Hill has given up the Cawker City Ledger and his father has taken charge of the paper and will continue its publication. We are of the impression that he will make a success of it -- we hope he will. It was a generous impulse that prompted him to buy the paper for his son, that he might have a start in the world and take a place in the affairs of men to which he is entitled by nature and education. It was a laudable ambition on the part of the father. The son has not for a moment appreciated the spirit that prompted the father to act -- it is not the first case of the kind on record. The boy prefers to acquire a record as a 'swift young man' -- he has attained his ambition. He has got on the toboggan slide, and is needless for men of experience to waste any time in guessing where he will land. The editor of the Kansan is sorry that Ed Hill has taken the course he has -- we are much more sorry for his splendid parents." -- Concordia Kansan. Mr. Hill has disposed of the Ledger to its former owner, Mr. Hudkins, but we copy the above with feelings of sorrow for Ed and sympathy for his father. A young man may make a record in a few months that it will take years of his life to overcome. How important is the start!

Geo. H. Wilson...dropped in for a few minutes chat....Mr. Wilson is acquainted with the trials of the printer, having set type and rustled copy for the World one winter.

 

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September 13, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4711)

W. R. Baker, who has been connected with the Smith County Journal for some months, will sell his share in the paper shortly and remove back to Glen Elder.

"Irvin Hogue, editor of the Greenleaf Sentinel, was here last week and attended the old settlers' reunion, accompanied by his wife. H. S. Hogue, father of Irvin, started the first and only paper at Gettysburg when it was an aspirant for county seat honors. The paper was published several years, until the question was settled...." -- Graham County Gem. H. S. Hogue edited the Gettysburg Bugle back in '79 and a part of '80 but, when Terrell "stole the county seat" and took it to Milbrook, he gave up the unprofitable fight. During those days, we were on a homestead out in Indiana Township, Graham County, and "writ items" for this paper from Bow Creek. Those were times that tried men's souls. We stayed with it six years and then concluded to leave the glorious land of promise, seeking one of realities.

 

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September 20, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4713)

The Phillipsburg Herald is warned of the danger of continuing a beer "ad" in the paper. A whisky "ad" drove the young and handsome editor of the Cawker Ledger out of business. Now that his father, Joseph Hill, has taken charge and cleaned up the advertising columns, the Ledger is on the road to prosperity.

Harmon Wilson tarried in the city Sunday evening to extend the glad hand to a host of friends...on this limited layoff it is impracticable to review the nooks and corners from which in '94 he gathered materials for bright, pithy paragraphs for the Times, embellished by his original and attractive expressions. The Times is proud of its pilots past, but none have a brighter future than Harmon.

 

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October 4, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4715)

Mord Smith, who has been working on the Stockton News for the past few months, returned Sunday morning.

 

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October 11, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4716)

Seward A. Jones, the enterprising editor of the Beloit Call and now one of the extensive publishers of the Union, was in the city....Mr. Jones has recently accepted a contract with Rev. Gilluly to print a monthly paper, The Baptist Visitor. With his plutocratic position as proprietor of an establishment turning out the Royal Neighbor, Dairy Age, and other work constituting a business of over $4,000 a month, Mr. Jones is as modest as when editor and employee as well of the Scottsville News.

Miss Effie Cole goes to Beloit this evening to take a position as spacer on the type setting machine in the Beloit Call office. Miss Cole took her initiatory lessons in the printer's craft in this office and is an apt pupil. The Call's force is so crowded that their type-setting machine has been running 24 hours a day for some time and Mr. Jones contemplates getting another. They cost $3,700.

 

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November 15, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4718)

Editor Woolman of the Glen Elder Independent runs a ranch in Hayes Township, Mitchell County.

C. W. Eckman, who wields a steady pen in editing the Osborne News, has lost much of his venerable appearance by removing his whiskers.

 

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November 22, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4719)

The Downs Times has moved from where it was to where it is now and put in a new gasoline engine. The Times is a mighty good newspaper and seems to be making some money. It would seem that the Smiths, who run it, really belong in Smith County, but they are evidently doing very well over there in the corner of Osborne (county). -- Gaylord Herald.

 

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November 29, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4720)

The country editor sometimes does a little business outside the newspaper line to help keep the wheels going round. The Ledger man of Cawker City delivers baled hay, and the Eagle Optic man sells liquid lice killer on the side.

This week, the Downs Times comes to you all home print. We believe you will find it to compare favorably with any local paper in northwest Kansas. It has cost us money and labor to bring the Times up to its present standard of excellence. We hope it may be appreciated; we believe it will be.

An exchange advertises its plant for sale and, in describing the advantages of the location, says "there is but one person in the city who writes poetry and he is very old and cannot live much longer."

Fred Hulaniski, who used to run the Saturday Evening Lamp in the cellar under Chris Knapp's present location, is making so much money out of his Ouray, Colo., mining speculations that he has paid his subscription to the Atchison Globe four years in advance.

 

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December 27, 1900, Downs Times (ID 4721)

The boys who have been furnishing the power for the Potter press in printing the Times' big weekly edition, since discarding the water motor, vote the new gasoline engine a great success. Each press day quite a number of visitors call to observe the busy force mailing "the old home paper," which is now turned out at the increased speed of over 1,000 an hour.

(With drawings of "The Improved Newspaper Press, manufactured by C. Potter, Jr. & Co." and "Our new Fairbanks-Morse gasoline engine.")

 

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January 3, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4722)

S. E. Ruede of the Marysville Democrat was down from Osborne last Friday renewing old acquaintance. He visited the Times office and the post office....S. E. is altogether the most voluble, versatile, vocabulous visitor we ever met.

J. C. Postlethwaite of Jewell City was elected president of the State Epworth League last Thursday. Geo. E. Dougherty, formerly of this city, is secretary.

 

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January 10, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4723)

The two great family journals of the west, the Kirwin Independent and the Alton Empire, appear to have a great dislike for the humble editor of the Times. The former calls us a "carpet-bagger" and the latter a "hawkeyed scoundrel." This is, indeed crushing.

T. E. Skinner, the very competent foreman of the Osborne Farmer office, is taking one of his infrequent layoffs....

 

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January 17, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4724)

A merry, happy crowd of young folk captured the editorial home last Saturday night -- a surprise party to Mord before his starting away. The hours until midnight were spent in the jolliest possible way. Oysters, brought in by the boys, was one of the numbers on the program....

Q. R. Craft severed his connection with the post office force in Downs last Saturday and on Monday took his departure for Washington, D.C....

Eastward Bound -- It was pretty hard to leave for an indefinite period. Knowing every man, child and baby in the vicinity, we love Downs and her people. No other town on the map can take its place....H. M. Fletcher, former editor of the Times, is building a new residence on Howell Heights in Kansas City, Kan....It is on the corner of Seventeenth and Wood Avenue with a large window fronting on either. -- Q.R.C.

 

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January 24, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4725)

P. G. Chubble of Beloit has purchased a half interest in the Western Call.

Count Hulaniski, who used to run a sort of a Sunday Sun paper in the cellar of Chris Knapp's meat market, called the Saturday Evening Lantern, was in Concordia recently and the Kansan says: "F. J. Hulaniski, an old-time newspaperman of this part of the state, now Ouray, Colo., was in the city last Wednesday and made the Kansan office a call. Count Hulaniski, as he was usually called, was one of the warmest propositions as a newspaper skinner there was in the state when he was in action. He had a paper in Bull City, now called Alton....He went to Colorado about ten years ago and landed at Ouray with the magnificent amount of 25 cents in his pocket, which he spent as soon as he could find the opportunity for a drink of whiskey and a package of smoking tobacco. He owns a newspaper out there and has become rich as a mining promoter. He is now on his way to New Orleans to spend the winter, in company with his daughter."

 

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January 31, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4726)

Mord Smith went to Stockton last Thursday evening, where he will work on the Stockton News.

 

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February 7, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4727)

Ex-editor C. W. Eckman says Hoy Smith, his successor in the Osborne News office, hasn't an enemy in the world. He cannot say as much when he has been an editor a month.

 

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February 28, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4728)

Miss Katherine Stump of the Times force left last Sunday for a two weeks visit in Alma. Miss Effie Cole has taken her place at the case.

The following letter, handed to us by E. L. Getty, will be of interest..."Dear

Bro. Getty: ...The Whiteheads concerning whom you ask are the same persons who formerly lived in Downs, and whose sons at that time were interested in a printing office there....Charles Nicklin, because of mental disorder, was compelled to retire from the ministry and is now proprietor of a wholesale printers supply house at Los Angeles, Calif. William Nicklin lives near Sharon, Pa., and I think is engaged in farming. He has been unfortunate in the loss of his left leg....Thomas Nicklin I have never met...." -- Will Schermerhorn.

 

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March 28, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4729)

Archie Collins rode his wheel up from Beloit last Friday morning and remained until the 8:15 train. Archie has quit his job as foreman of the Beloit Call office on account of a $4.00 per week cut in wages....

 

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April 11, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4730)

The Times came near getting into serious trouble lately. A man was going to sue us for $5,000 damages for saying he was sick when he wasn't. This is no joke.

We notice in the daily papers that Mrs. S. E. Ruede of Marysville has applied for a divorce. Mr. Ruede is well known in Downs and Osborne. At one time he was an employee of the Times.

 

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April 18, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4731)

We received a copy of the Chickasha Telegram published at Chickasha, I.T., by Knotts Bros. It is the newsiest sheet we have yet looked over coming from that new country. The Knotts boys are known in Downs, being for a short time editors of the Times at this place.

Ed Headley, chief of staff on the Plainville Gazette, passed through Downs Monday on his way to Gaylord to visit the home folks a few days. Ed, like the rest of the Headleys, is a good printer, and as steady and reliable as a wooden clock....

C. W. Landis, the able and brilliant editor of the Osborne County Farmer, has leased the paper to T. A. Skinner and B. P. Walker, who have both served for many years in the Farmer office as foreman and assistant editor, respectively. Mr. Landis has accepted the position of assistant cashier in the First National Bank....

 

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April 25, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4732)

George Dodge of the Beloit Gazette was in Downs last week, soliciting orders for 1902 calendars, and job work on the side. We wonder how Dodge can insist on Beloit merchants patronizing home print shops and then send his son out to solicit job work in other towns where they have as good, or better, equipped offices than he has.

Miss Effie Cole went to Mankato this morning, where she has secured a job setting type on the Advocate.

 

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May 2, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4734)

The fierce strife that has existed for years between Lew Headley, party of the first part, and the Stockton editors, parties of the second part, regarding railroad extension has been dispelled by Tully Scott breaking in and building a railroad from Lenora to Oberlin.

 

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May 16, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4735)

O. G. Miller, representing the American Type Foundry Co., was in Downs Monday and sold the Times a large amount of job type. When you want the latest in job printing, remember that we can do it.

 

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May 23, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4736)

Some time ago we sent the name of a citizen living in a neighboring town, who had taken the Times for several years and had not paid up, to a collection agency. He paid the bill and wrote us accordingly, and in conclusion said: "I never saw you that I know of but I would have liked to saw you when I got that ledar from Chicago. I ensure you I would have goten acquainted with you."...If you take the Times, you will certainly have to pay for same.

 

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June 6, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4738)

Capt. Tilton of Beatrice, Neb., formerly editor of the Downs Times was in Downs about 30 minutes Saturday morning. He was the orator at Osborne for Decoration Day and just stopped between trains here....

 

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June 13, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4741)

Editorial Association -- The following program has been arranged for the North Central Kansas Editorial Association, which meets at Cawker City...June 17 and 18. Monday evening -- Music. Address of welcome, Mayor G. L. Hudkins of Cawker City. Response, W. H. Nelson, Smith County Pioneer. Music. Paper, early meetings of the North Central, John Q. Royce, Phillipsburg Dispatch. Recitation and music. Paper, the paragrapher on the country newspaper, Bert Walker, Osborne Farmer. Music. Luncheon. Tuesday morning -- Drive to Waconda Springs. Paper, women as journalists, Florence Headley, Gaylord Herald. Paper, the legitimate scope of a country newspaper, S. C. Landis, Kirwin Independent. Paper, how to win out with a country paper outside the county seat, A. B. Kimball, Scandia Journal. Paper, does all home print pay?, J. H. Smith, Downs Times. Paper, an ideal summer meeting, S. A. Jones, Beloit Call. Paper, economy in country newspaper offices, W. L. Chambers, Stockton Record. Reception by Cawker City people.

 

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June 20, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4742)

Mord Smith of the Times force went to Kansas City last Friday, where he remained until Tuesday with his friend, Albert Tamm.

Drummond's Department. Edited by A. L. Drummond in the interest of the Christian Church, Downs, Kansas. By courtesy of The Times, the writer has been granted space in this newspaper in which to set forth the plea of the Disciples of Christ, and for such other religious purposes as he may deem fit and proper. For this courtesy, the editor has my sincere thanks on behalf of the people I have the honor to represent. My reason for asking this favor is that advertising pays....The success of any public enterprise depends more or less on the efficacy of printer's ink. The fundamental fact in God's plan to save the world through the Gospel is that the Gospel must win its way through being advertised: "Go ye into all the world and preach the Gospel to every creature."...

 

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June 27, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4745)

We notice that W. S. Tilton, formerly editor of the Downs Times now editor of the Daily and Weekly Beatrice Times, Beatrice, Neb., is making a red-hot fight for the post office at that place. Here's hoping he may win.

 

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July 11, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4747)

An Angel's Luck -- Not that the junior editor of this paper wishes to pose as an angel, but referring to the luck it was good enough for an angel. Hannibal Craney sold numbers and had a drawing for his fine driving horse which he valued at $200. The drawing came off Friday evening at George Magee's restaurant. The Times man had thoughtlessly bought two numbers and thought so little of the matter that he had forgotten what they were, so when it was declared that 128 had drawn the horse, the book was referred to to find the lucky man. Hannibal called "128, W. H. Smith." The surprise was so great that we nearly fell down. After the first spasm of joy had worn off and someone asked what we intended to do with the animal, we began to wonder what the deuce we would do with a fast horse. It was the first and only horse we ever owned, and it was no great wonder that we were beginning to feel embarrassed....Ed Page, a well-known traveling man who had a few blank tickets, came up and said he would give us the currency and take the animal off our hands, and then we began to see the bright side of life again. The deal was quickly made and we had something that we could manage better than we could a 2:40 pacer. The horse is a fine one and valuable to a man who has use for one of that kind, and Page appeared to be quite satisfied with his bargain. We understand that he has since sold the horse to Joe Burrow of Smith Center.

Will Duden is the new "devil" at the Times office.

 

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July 25, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4748)

We notice that Geo. E. Dougherty, at one time editor of the Downs Times now of Topeka, had the honor of addressing the National League Assembly in California last week.

 

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August 8, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4750)

Shorthand is a feature of the Assembly (Lincoln Park Chautauqua), as it was last year. It is surprising how interesting the study seems to be under the instruction of Prof. Geo. E. Dougherty of Topeka. Professor Dougherty is the author of the system he teaches. He is also in charge of Epworth League methods. He has just returned from California, where he went as a speaker on the program of the International Epworth League Convention at San Francisco. He was also on the program of the big Epworth League rally at Salt Lake City en route to San Francisco.

 

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August 15, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4752)

The local editor of the Times left this morning for a ten days visit with friends in Iowa, returning by way of Kansas City. It is his first vacation for three years. During his absence, the Times will be managed by the office force....

Topeka Capital: "There has been considerable comment because in every issue of the Downs Times for some past time there has been two columns of matter devoted to church work, the department being conducted by the Rev. A. L. Drummond, a local preacher. Recently the Times stated that this space was paid for by the preacher at the paper's regular advertising rates. Drummond, before entering the ministry, was one of the best-known printers of the northwest and, of course, it was while knocking about print shops that he learned the real value of judicious advertising."

 

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August 22, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4753)

J. E. Garner (Jim), who some 20 years ago was cutting bait around the "island," and who later graduated from the office of the Downs Times as a first-class printer, and who still later edited at different times several important newspapers in Kansas, is now editor and proprietor of the Cimarron Valley Clipper at Coyle, Okla. This week we received from him a bag of about the finest peaches we ever saw, the product of that enchanted land....

 

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August 29, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4754)

An amiable editor prints the following at the head of his local columns: "It is not our purpose or desire to offend anyone. Should any reader of this paper feel aggrieved at anything which appears in its columns, if he will bring his copy of the paper to our office and point out the offending paragraph, we will cheerfully take our shears and cut it out for him." -- Olathe News Herald.

 

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September 12, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4755)

A. L. Drummond, a Christian Church preacher, uses two columns in the Downs Times every week in the interest of his church and pays for them at regular advertising rates. -- Mail and Breeze. Link, at one time, before he got into the gospel business, lived here and knows the value of advertising. If he is as good at saving sinners as he was bending brass rule to make fancy job work, St. Peter will take in a good many tickets after while with Drummond's OK on them. -- Goodland Daily News.

The Cawker City Ledger, in writing up the Osborne celebration, says: "Oh, yes, there were several of the newspaper men there. We saw Royce with his manly presence, Davies with his wooden leg, King with his 'love lit eyes,' Smith with his 'you can't equal the 27th gait,' Baker with his good clothes, Arnold with his far-away look, Hoch with his 'don't work on Sunday' hobby, Root looking for a chair, Young with his 'wish I was postmaster' look, and the Osborne editors all wearing smiles that showed they were proud of their home."

 

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September 19, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4756)

Ed Headley and his sister, Miss Florence Headley, passed through Downs Saturday evening en route to Ponca City, Okla., where they take charge of the Daily Courier, a paper that L. C. Headley bought the week before when he visited that country.

L. C. will dispose of his property in Gaylord, as soon as opportunity offers, and resign as postmaster and join his children on the Courier. Ponca City is a town of about 4,000 people and has the usual amount of whoop and hurrah of a Western frontier town. Mr. Headley has been through all these scenes and his past experience will no doubt be useful to him, both in accumulating lucre and in giving his town a first-class daily paper. But the Sixth District will feel like a fellow with a tooth freshly pulled without Headley.

 

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October 10, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4757)

Russell Record: "Miss Effie Cole of Downs has 'accepted a position' as compositor on The Record."

John Parks of Beloit, erstwhile state printer and editor of the Call, has struck it rich again. Some fellow in Colorado stumbled onto a hole in the ground that he thought was valuable and found that the owner was Parks. Parks had forgotten it but, when the fellow offered him $40,000 for it, he took it.

 

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October 17, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4758)

Miss Florence Headley of Gaylord passed through Downs Wednesday morning en route from Ponca City to her home, where she will take charge of the Herald while her father is looking after his interests in Oklahoma.

 

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October 24, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4759)

The Normal Arena, edited in the interests of the Downs Commercial Institute by Rev. F. W. Gardner, has made its second appearance.

Jim Garner, who edits a paper in Coyle, Okla., and is booming that country for immigration, is sending out specimens of fruit that are calculated to make the average Kansan's mouth water.

Who Is She? The Times has concluded to give a $20 gold watch away to the most popular young lady in Osborne or surrounding counties. The contest will begin next week and end Tuesday evening, December 24....The watch is now on exhibit at Terry's Jewelry Store and is guaranteed in every particular by Mr. Terry.

 

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October 31, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4760)

Get in line and cast your vote for whom you think is the most popular lady.

"The most surprising thing that has happened to this office in a whole lifetime occurred one day last week when a lodge insisted on paying for the publication of some resolutions. It dazed us so we haven't got over it yet, and if we didn't have to use the money to buy bread and molasses we'd keep it as a souvenir.

The only way we can account for it is that the lodge is a ladies' lodge, the RNA." -- Gaylord Herald.

 

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November 7, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4761)

Three weeks from today is Thanksgiving. Turkeys are accepted and receipted for the same as cash at the Times office in payment of subscription.

"The more an editor weighs, the less likely deadbeats and Johnny Toughs are to get fighting mad at what he says." Jewell Republican. This paper is edited by a slim man and a fat man, but if you have any grievance against the Times you'd better "jump" the fat man. The slim editor has a fighting record of 44 revolutions per minute.

 

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November 14, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4762)

The Farmer Office Sold -- "A deal has been recently consummated whereby C. W. Landis disposes of his interest in the Farmer printing plant to P. H. McKechnie of Beloit and Chas. Hillebrandt of Osborne. The new firm will take possession Dec. 1....T. E. Skinner will remain with the new firm but Mr. Walker will retire....Mr. McKechnie has been employed on the Beloit Call for a number of years...." The above, taken from last week's Farmer, conveys the unwelcome news that C. W. Landis has left the profession. A few months ago, Mr. Landis leased the Farmer and accepted the position as cashier in the First National Bank of Osborne....Mr. Landis has made the Farmer (one of) the best newspapers in northwest Kansas and his general personality has made it a general favorite with neighboring editors....

 

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November 21, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4763)

Hereafter the Times office will be better equipped for doing job work. This afternoon we will put in operation a new Gordon job press. It is a very fine machine with all the modern attachments costing in the neighborhood of $290....This is quite a sum to put into a job press and will run us short on money. We hope our readers will notice the tags on their paper and if in arrears step in or send the amount due us....

 

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November 28, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4764)

Gone. Lew Headley dropped in on us Tuesday evening and said "goodbye Smith." Lew was on his way to a strange and untried land -- Ponca City, Okla. Were we sorry to see him go? Yes, thousands of people in Kansas are sorry to lose the Headleys and the Gaylord Herald. For 20 years they have given Gaylord the best local paper in the district. About a year ago Sandy Barrow sold the Kirwin Globe and stepped out of the fraternity and now the Globe is gone. The Globe and the Herald, two of the old reliable papers, have gone into history, and the old fellows who are left think of their passing with deep regret, and are prone to wonder if they will ever look upon their likes again. Miss Florence Headley is still in Gaylord and will remain there in charge of the post office until Mr. Parker, the new postmaster, can complete his arrangements for taking charge, which will likely be a month, when she too will join the family in Ponca. The Herald, as a paper, including books and subscription list, was sold last week to the Smith County Pioneer, but the Herald plant is still in Gaylord and will be sold cheap to anyone wishing to start another paper in Gaylord or elsewhere.

 

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December 5, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4765)

Speaking of the demise of the Gaylord Herald, John Conway in the Champion has the following: "Gaylord is now a corpse, its soul is gone. Comes hereafter to Gaylord nothing but the obituary and lodge resolutions. Unless the present generation mark its burial place by a headstone, the antiquarian in other years will be unable to find head or 'tale' of Gaylord."

 

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December 12, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4766)

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Levi Alrich at Cawker City burned to the ground last Saturday morning.

Elder Drummond returned last Saturday morning from Oklahoma, where he had been enjoying life for two weeks prior with relatives and friends. Pete Drummond, who used to be in these parts when a boy, is editor of the Daily and Weekly Enid Eagle and is said to be making a great success.

 

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December 26, 1901, Downs Times (ID 4767)

The Times Watch Contest closed Tuesday evening....It became quite spirited before the close, and while the contest was always a friendly one, it plainly showed the Kansan's desire to win out. The bulk of the votes for the leading candidates was held back until the afternoon of the last day, when the editor in charge was taxed to about his capacity for a few hours....At about 7:30 with Loren Pugh, bookkeeper at the bank, and D. H. McCormic and Jess Scott, as assistants and referees, the votes were canvassed and the results declared as follows: Mary Lees 12,415, Jessie Allen 8,996, Blanche Headley 3,799, Grace

Latta 2,403, Ella Hill 900, Minnie Ise 255, Maud Enterline 230, Mrs. Katie Chapin House 216, Mabel Goodnow 175, Mrs. Steerman 75, Mrs. J. A. Slothower 35....We started the contest with the sole thought of procuring a few new subscribers and collecting in some back accounts, but it grew far beyond our most sanguine expectation....

 

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January 2, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4768)

Allen DeLay of Topeka is visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jos. DeLay, this week. This is his first visit to Downs for five years.

 

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January 9, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4769)

Readers of the Times will read with regret that W. S. Tilton, formerly editor of this paper, lost out in the post office race at Beatrice, Neb.

Archie Collins, editor of the Jamestown Optimist, was in Downs over Sunday. While here he made arrangements with Jimmie Jones to come down and act as one of his typos.

 

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January 16, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4770)

Capt. Tilton Writes. Friend Smith: I regret to see in the Times that I was a candidate for postmaster of Beatrice and got licked. Really, I was not a candidate for the place, and I wish you would say so to my old neighbors who read your splendid paper. Really, I came to Nebraska to get out of politics. That I have not been able to do so is not my fault. They have picked me up twice, the first time without my knowledge or consent, for chairman of the county committee. I am staggering along the best I can under this load. While I might take most anything that is free, except free silver at 16 to 1, I have reached the conclusion that a newspaper man can't afford to be a candidate, unless it be to avoid starvation. How on earth you people down there ever got the post office story, I can't tell. There is absolutely nothing to it. Cordially yours, W. S. Tilton.

 

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January 23, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4771)

Bert Walker was in Downs last Saturday a short time between trains. He was on his way to Smith Center where, we understand, he will go to work on the Pioneer.

 

...
January 30, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4772)

Hereafter, the Times will go to press every Thursday morning at 7:45 a.m. and people wishing to insert anything in this paper should hand it in before that time. The change of time in going to press is done so as to send the Times out on the rural delivery routes and will enable us to get it to the readers on the day it is printed.

 

...
February 20, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4773)

With this issue the Downs Times starts in on its 23rd year. Having survived the trials and tribulations of droughts and booms and absorbed several contemporaries, it begins to feel like it was a solid institution....It has passed the thousand mark in circulation....In the past four years, we have increased our circulation over 400. And we can also boast of the best paying list in Kansas. The people who take the Times value it enough to pay for it.

Bert Walker, formerly editor of the Osborne Farmer, is now employed on the Smith Center Pioneer.

"Miss Effie Cole, who has been employed as compositor in this office the past four months, left for her home at Downs Tuesday morning....Miss Cole is a good compositor, steady and industrious, and an estimable young lady." -- Russell Record. Effie visited in Downs over Sunday but is now in Mankato working for the Monitor.

 

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March 6, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4775)

Walt Whitmore, who used to make some of them jump sideways when he was editor of the Downs World (Chief,...was fatally stabbed at Checotah, I.T., on February 28. Although the dispatch says K. W. Whitmore, it is without a doubt our Walt....

 

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March 13, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4776)

W. H. Smith, local editor of the Times, met with quite a painful accident last Friday by getting a finger in the cog wheels of a job press. The third finger on the left hand was pinched off at the first joint and the thumb hurt considerably. Dr. Shearer dressed the wound, which is doing as nicely as such a thing can do, yet is quite painful. Walter has been running a job press for 15 years but this is a lesson he has never taken before.

The Downs Normal and Commercial Institute have bought Prof. Frank Kizer's printing outfit and will hereafter do their own printing.

 

...
March 27, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4777)

Frank Whitmore of Portis, a son of Walt Whitmore, says that the story concerning the stabbing of his father in the Indian Territory is false.

Owing to a break on our power press last Thursday, we did not get the Times into the post office until afternoon. This is the first time in four years that we have failed to have the paper in the office before noon. We believe in being punctual.

 

...
April 10, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4778)

Miss Effie Cole went to Beloit Monday morning, where she has accepted a position as typo on the Gazette.

Our list of subscribers is gradually growing. The list has passed the thousand mark.

 

...
May 8, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4779)

C. H. Wolters handed us a printer's stick last week which he said was the last remnant of the old Downs World, which he had the honor of being proprietor for a period of six months. Chris says he came nearer starving to death during that six months than at any time during his life.

 

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June 5, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4780)

Geo. Dougherty of Topeka was in Downs over Sunday....Mr. Dougherty is secretary of the State Epworth League and was in Beloit and Jewell City, in company with E. L. Getty, the latter part of last week arranging a program for their meeting this year which will be held in Beloit during the chautauqua.

 

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June 19, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4781)

About the biggest undertaking we have heard of in a long time has been taken up by Rev. Gardner, who is managing the Downs Business and Normal Institute. He has commenced printing 5,000 sixteen-page books. It will take 40,000 impressions to complete the printing, then will come the stapling, binding, etc., and as the press on which the printing will be done is a hand lever press it will take...days to complete the printing.

 

...
June 26, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4782)

Married. At the home of Mr. and Mrs. Frank M. Wells in Downs on Wednesday, June 25, at 6:30 a.m. occurred the marriage of their daughter Grace to Walter H. Smith....Walter Smith is the oldest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Smith of Downs, and is junior editor of the Downs Times of which he assumed control two and a half years ago, and under whose management the Times has grown and prospered until it is one of the leading Republican papers in the Sixth Congressional District. He is the son of the writer and modesty forbids enlarging on his ability or his prospects in life, but parental pride prompts us to say that he is a bright and prosperous young business man who enjoys the confidence of his associates in business and in society....The wedding was a quiet home affair....After the ceremony and congratulations, a lovely breakfast was served, when the entire company accompanied the bridal pair to the depot, where they boarded the westbound passenger for a two weeks' outing in Colorado....

 

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July 3, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4783)

Arthur DeLay returned from Topeka Friday morning, where he went to attend the marriage of his brother, Allen....

Regarding the marriage of Allen DeLay, which occurred in Topeka last Wednesday, we reproduce a clipping from the State Journal. Mr. DeLay and his bride are expected to arrive in Downs in a few days and will make their future home here. "A pretty wedding solemnized at Westminster Presbyterian Church Wednesday night was that of Miss Minnie Laura Todd, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John S. Todd, 1325 Garfield Avenue, and Mr. Allen Joseph DeLay of Downs. The ceremony was performed at half after 8 o'clock, the Rev. Maurilla Todd of Minnesota, assisted by the Rev. Charles M. Sheldon and the Rev. A. M. Reynolds...."

Old Dixie Dunbar, a printer who has traveled the United States over and over and visited nearly every print shop in it, is in Downs this week. When he first came to town, he appeared and said he was broke and we bought him his dinner. Since then he has sprung a little money and is on a protracted drunk.

Appreciated. The junior editor of the Times run onto the boys at Phillipsburg on his way west and received the following nice notices which he will appreciate:

"W. H. Smith, editor of the Downs Times was an agreeable caller at this office yesterday morning. At 6 o'clock a.m. Mr. Smith figured in a nice little affair in Downs, being joined in marriage to Miss Grace Wells....We loaned Walter our planer, shooting stick and mallet to take along, and he left town about as happy as a young married man could be...." -- News.

"W. H. Smith, editor of the Downs Times and his new wife passed through this city Wednesday of this week....Mr. Smith is a son of Postmaster Smith of Downs, and is associated with his father in the publication of the Times. His wife is the daughter of Mayor Frank Wells and is a very handsome lady and the daughter of one of the nicest men in Osborne County...." -- Dispatch.

 

...
July 10, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4784)

Lew Headley, editor of the Ponca City (Okla.) Courier, dropped in on us Sunday evening while on his way from Gaylord to his home in Oklahoma. He intends sending one of his boys up next week and have him revive the Gaylord Herald.

 

...
August 7, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4785)

Goodbye: It will perhaps be a surprise to the readers of the Times to learn that we have sold the Downs Times. It may be a source of regret to some and a source of gratification to others; to all alike we say goodbye.

It is not necessary to give our reasons for this move but we do wish to say that it was not caused by a lack of patronage from the business men of Downs nor because the Times was not a paying business concern. Since our taking charge of the paper nearly five years ago the...circulation has nearly doubled.

While we very much regret to leave the Times, it is a satisfaction to know that we turn it over to a man of ability and experience...Mr. Allen DeLay, late of Topeka, but who grew up in Downs, is now editor and proprietor. We wish for him the same courteous treatment that we have been accorded....Respectfully, J. H. and W. H. Smith

 

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August 14, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4786)

The Times office will be "at home" soon. We now occupy the entire first floor of the Bates building, and when we get entirely settled will boast of one of the neatest and best equipped offices in the western part of the state.

E. P. Knotts, at one time manager of the Downs Times is now proprietor of a large store in Salt Lake City.

"J. H. Smith and son, W. H. Smith, disposed of their Downs Times last Saturday to Allen DeLay, who took immediate possession. Mr. DeLay recently returned from Topeka, where he had been running a job printing establishment....The junior Mr. Smith will be retained by the paper." -- Osborne News.

 

...
August 21, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4787)

What They Have To Say. Osborne Farmer: "J. H. Smith & Son...sold their entire plant and good will to Allen DeLay, the capable and efficient son of Joseph DeLay of Downs...." Western Call: "...The new proprietor and editor is a man who grew up in Downs and is an experienced hand at the business...." Phillipsburg Dispatch: "...We do not know the cause of the change, but we do know that the new proprietor will have to hustle if he gives the people as good a paper as the Smiths have been giving them...." Gaylord Sentinel: "...Old Man Smith, who is the retiring editor, has made the Times one of the best newspapers in the West and we are sorry to see him quit the business...." Smith County Pioneer: "...the senior Smith will continue to run the post office, while the son will seek other fields...."

 

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September 11, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4788)

The new Kansas magazine "Push" is out. It is a humorous publication gotten up by Tom McNeal and Albert T. Reid of Topeka. The magazine is up to all that is claimed for it. Some of the best writers in the state have contributions in the initial number. Harmon Wilson has some Swede dialect sketches under the head

"Observations of Knute Olafson," which are full of homely philosophy and quaint humor.

The (business) college printing office put out some bills for Marrs & Hogue Saturday.

Warren Zimmerman, who for some time past has been conducting a Portis department for the Osborne Farmer, with this week takes a regular position in the Farmer office....

 

...
October 2, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4789)

(tabloid format)

When you do your housecleaning you would do well to call at the Times office for old papers to place under your carpets.

Walter Smith, former editor of the Times, filled his brother Mord's place in this office during the latter's absence at the Atchison corn carnival.

 

...
October 23, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4790)

I verily believe that Job never owned a printing press. -- Rev. F. W. Gardner, college printing office.

 

...
November 6, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4791)

The October number of the Institute Echo appeared last week. Curtis Cole, the owner and manager of the office, informs us that the October number will be the last one issued.

The report was circulated around town last week that Rev. W. F. Gardner had resigned the presidency of the Downs Normal and Business Institute, but we are reliably informed that the report is untrue.

 

...
November 13, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4792)

F. M. Steves, editor of the Topeka Fulcrum, a prohibition paper, goes after his recent co-workers, Emmerson and DeLay, and calls them Judases. He also says that he is "not Jesus and ain't going to forgive 'em." The whole game seems to be that Steves is sore because his paper has been refused by the Prohibition central committee as the official organ of the party and another, a new sheet edited by Emmerson and DeLay, has been chosen instead of the Fulcrum. John T. Wilson up by Bloomington has his name mixed up in the affair as having subscribed for the old paper, but received the new one instead. (This man DeLay came to Topeka some time about the first of August. I never saw the man and never heard of him until about the first of July when a letter came to me postmarked at Lawrence and addressed to Lansing and then forwarded in some way to Washburn college, Topeka. It was forwarded to my address and upon opening it there was nothing in it but a ten dollar check from some man in Lawrence. No, it's a fact, I sent it back to the Lawrence man. -- Ed.)

 

...
December 25, 1902, Downs Times (ID 4793)

O. G. Miller, the American Type Founders man, was in town Friday. The Times office sold him several hundred pounds of "hell."

 

...
January 1, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4794)

Article taken from The Times of Ceylon, written October 29, 1902, and sent to the Downs Times by Tom G. Nicklin:

"The American Invasion, a Talk with T. G. Nicklin, who is finishing a two years' exploitation tour -- T. G. Nicklin, who is traveling around the world in the interests of the American Type Founders Co., is just now on the island. He comes to see to what extent the manufactures of his company are at present in use here and to spy out the land generally for a type and machinery invasion. Mr. Nicklin is a practical printer, having been owner of a newspaper office for 10 years, and is in every way fitted for the work of advising printing houses as to their requirements and of showing the advantages of the numerous labor saving contrivances which are so rapidly being put forth in the United States. He is just now staying at the Bristol Hotel and is transacting business from there.

"Mr. Nicklin hopes to return to New York next February; he will then have been two years away on tour. He has visited in turn Hawaii, New Zealand, Australia, the Philippines, China and Japan....He was specially struck by the dailies of the Antipodes. The New Zealand papers he considered particularly cleanly and neatly got up and some of the Coronation issues of those papers were masterpieces....

"In Australia he spent a long time and visited all the important towns, putting in stocks at Melbourne and Sydney, and opening agencies in some of the other towns. In the Philippines, which he visited next, Mr. Nicklin had much to relate....From one office there, that of the Manila Freedom, he took out 10 tons of old type and provided new stock -- fitted it, spick and span, from top to bottom, type machinery and all. Mr. Nicklin found in Manila a wonderful lot of old type and machinery which had been brought there from Spain and France many years ago. His company furnished the new Government Printing Office of Manila and he says that it is today the most up-to-date of any such establishments in the entire Orient. It has Linotypes, Dexter self feeders for cylinder presses and the rest of the modern contrivances....Mr. Nicklin remembered that in one place the compositors were using wooden 'sticks' in which one line of type only could be composed at a time, and the compositor had to put that line down in the 'galley' before commencing to set another! These primitive appliances notwithstanding, the natives of Manila are very fair compositors. There were four very good dailies there printed in English. There were also three in Spanish and three in Tagala, the dialect spoken by the natives.

"Mr. Nicklin next referred to China. He had called at Hong Kong, Canton, Macao, and Shanghai. He found at Hong Kong that a large part of the letter press job printing work was in the hands of the natives, the English newspaper presses being, of course, the property of the colonists. The same remark applied to Shanghai, where one of the largest printing houses was the property of a Chinaman....In both places Mr. Nicklin was able to do good business with the natives.

"The conversation naturally turned here to the reputed conservatism of the Celestial and how far that was a bar to progress in the printer's art. Mr. Nicklin had found no difficulty in this respect. The Chinaman printer everywhere was of an inquiring turn of mind and was, he found, always ready to learn and quick to adopt the new, provided it could be proved to his satisfaction that the new was better than the old.

"The next question led to a comparison between China and Japan. How far did the artistic temperament of the Chinaman show itself in printing? Was he particularly good in display work? Strangely enough, Mr. Nicklin had noticed nothing of the kind. 'China, you know, is the birthplace of printing, but printing has evidently made little progress since then, owing possibly to the want of a stable, sympathetic government. They did not seem to do much litho work nor colour printing, but they were ready to learn. On the other hand, Japan had a great deal of litho work and colour printing, but little in the way or artistic letterpress work. However, the Japanese are making very rapid progress in that direction as they are in every other.'

"Mr. Nicklin related an experience he had of a Chinese dinner, of some 20 courses -- bamboo sprouts and birds' nest soup and the rest of them -- and remembered with gratitude the courtesy of his host in providing spoons and forks alongside the chopsticks!

"He will leave for India in a few days."

On Sunday evening, Rev. Gardner preached his last sermon at the Congregational Church. He has resigned his pastorate and contemplates starting a newspaper here.

 

...
January 15, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4795)

Changes in the Times -- Readers of the Times will readily observe several changes in the paper this week. The enlarged size will first be noticed, and a glance at the contents will disclose the addition of the Portis department. This department has been conducted with considerable success in the Osborne Farmer during the past year, and has been managed by Warren Zimmerman of Portis. We are very glad indeed to offer our readers and advertisers these additional advantages.

We also wish to call attention to a change in the management of the paper. Mr. Zimmerman has taken an interest in the Times and hereafter the editorial card will read, DeLay and Zimmerman. We propose to print as good a paper as possible and shall use every means at our disposal to gain as large and liberal patronage as business principles will command. We consider the running of a newspaper a business proposition and in all instances shall treat it as such. Our space is for sale. We print all the news obtainable through legitimate sources. We hold no ill will toward anyone -- news is what we want, and, even if some may not like our way and denounce the Times at every opportunity, we will be glad to print news about them for the benefit of their friends who do like our paper.

If anyone has any dirt to throw at us we would much prefer that they step around in the back alley where we can all take a turn without hitting someone else. We haven't a bit of war paint on but propose to stand up for ourselves -- no one else will -- and if we are called upon to print something about someone that isn't really "nice" it is extremely likely that we can do it.

The Times remains Republican in principle, but as to just how much of the world it plans to turn upside down -- right side up (take your choice) -- we leave for the future to tell. Co-operate with us and we will do you good. -- Most respectfully yours, DeLay & Zimmerman

"The editor is up to his eyes in the work of fixing up a home. He has bought the Stevens property in the south part of town, and expects to move there next week. The idea of a country newspaper man owning a home of his own is probably a new one....We have braced our nerve to the undertaking, and propose to own a home of our own, and finally amount to something...." -- Alton Empire.

"Downs is threatened with another newspaper. Rev. Gardner, the Congregational minister there, has resigned and is said to be at the head of the scheme." -- Smith County Pioneer. Yes, and the Times is mighty glad Bro. Gardner is starting another paper. We've been here nigh onto five months and about all we've heard from a few sources has been 'new paper deal.' Friend Gardner is all right and we wish him success.

 

...
January 22, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4796)

Warren Zimmerman of Portis, who had been employed on the Farmer part of the time, went to Downs Monday morning to take the position of local editor of the Times. -- Osborne News. Just a week ahead. He arrived Monday of this week.

What we are after just now is news. If you happen to know of an item, send it in or telephone No. 5, this will reach the Times office....

The Times goes to press every week on Wednesday evening that the papers may be promptly delivered on the rural routes. Parties with news will please have all matters in before Wednesday noon hereafter.

 

...
February 5, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4797)

The Downs Semi-Weekly News, by F. W. Gardner, made its first appearance Wednesday morning. In its editorial columns the announcement is made that the paper will be non-partisan and will stand for the interests of Downs and this vicinity. We are pleased to see Mr. Gardner enter the field of newspaper work in this place.

This week the Times office printed some mammoth circulars for Trombla Bros., one of the big business firms of the city. These circulars contain four full pages the same size as the Times and are profusely illustrated with cuts of different materials. It costs something to get out a bill of that kind but the results derived will no doubt prove beneficial to Trombla Bros., both from an advertising and remunerative viewpoint. It always does, at least.

E. L. Whitmore, who is associated with his father, W. H. Whitmore, in the operation of the Lehigh Leader, published at Lehigh, Oklahoma, passed through Downs Tuesday morning on his way to Portis....

 

...
March 5, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4798)

Cawker Record: "...About the middle of next month, we will have a new press to be run by a gasoline engine. The paper will be six column, six or eight pages, to be determined by the extent of advertising patronage which at present is next to nothing. The press will be the best of its size in the state and comes direct from the factory. No better press is made for the finest kind of book and job work. This will be an expensive addition to our office, which our readers will appreciate by the improved appearance of the paper, and local merchants can show their appreciation by increased advertising to attract buyers to our city."

Agnes Smith went to Stockton Friday evening to assist editor Young in his newspaper office. Miss Smith is an excellent typo....

Charley Hillebrandt, editor of the Osborne County Farmer, passed through Downs Tuesday morning on his way to Beloit, in which city he was united in marriage to Miss Mable Strawn. ...It was in Charley's office in Osborne that the writer took his beginning lessons in practical newspaper work....

 

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March 19, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4799)

This week Walt Whitmore's paper, the Lehigh Leader, reached our exchange table. From the appearance of the neatly printed sheet, it must be a money maker for Whitmore.

 

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March 26, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4800)

The Emporia Gazette is just a puttin' it on. Editor White has purchased the privileges of the Associated Press wire and with the assistance of a Linotype will publish and eight page daily.

 

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April 2, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4801)

Mrs. Alice G. Young, who has recently been appointed editor of Our Messenger, the state paper of the WCTU, published at Beloit, assumed her new duties Tuesday. Mrs. Young has been connected with the paper as a contributor for several years....

 

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April 9, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4802)

J. B. Whitney, at one time foreman of the Times office, has recently purchased the Randall News....

 

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April 23, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4805)

A soap manufacturer was once asked why he did newspaper advertising altogether, and didn't use sign boards, etc. He said that, in his experience, he had found that the man who does not read the newspapers never uses soap.

"It is said concerning a Kansan who died a few days after having passed middle age that he never made an enemy. It isn't necessary to state that he was never connected with a newspaper." -- Harmon Wilson.

 

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April 30, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4806)

Miss Effie Cole is enjoying a needed vacation and the Times office is short her splendid services. Miss Cole left this morning for a month's visit at Russell.

"Bert Walker of the Pioneer is taking a vacation and the first part of the week was spent with Ed Sample in Topeka...." -- Smith Center Messenger. Bert was formerly employed on the Times.

 

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May 7, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4808)

Will Miller, representing the Great Western Type Foundry at Kansas City, was in Downs Tuesday.

 

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May 21, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4810)

The papers along the line from Concordia west that use "ready print" either came out about half size, if they happened to have any blank sheets of paper around the shop, or were a few days late on account of the flood holding up the Central Branch.

 

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May 28, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4811)

A man came in the office one day this week and said he was suffering from a thorn in the flesh. There was nothing especially unusual about that as there have been numerous beggars around lately suffering from all sorts of ailments -- largely imaginary -- to enlist the sympathy of generous hearted people; and, by the way, we know absolutely that every poor devil who has "made" the town lately has struck this shop for a handout of some sort. Sometimes it's only an exchange the poor fellow wants. What does he do with it? Well, sir, if he gets a paper (and he always does) and can read, that paper is carefully read inside and out, advertising and all. He's one man who never fails to read the ads carefully. If it is wintertime, the next thing he does is to carefully line his clothes with it to keep out the cold. In the summertime, the tramp uses his exchange for a bed. If he can find a dry corner of a boxcar where he can spread his "bed" and retire unmolested he'll sleep a long peaceful sleep that no man with the cares of the business world on his shoulders can ever hope to enjoy in a bed of swans' down surrounded by lace curtains and luxury. But to return: we looked up from the pointed end of a lead pencil and was surprised to see a neighbor standing nearby with a five cent piece in his hand. He laid it down on the desk and continued: "I'm cleaning house and want a bundle of old papers to put under the carpet."...

For many years, Sharps and Flats has been a contributor to the columns of the Times. He has not corresponded regularly, but his odd sayings have appeared at intervals to the delight and pleasure of many readers of this paper. We do not say all readers, because we have heard rumors that there were people who differ from Sharps and Flats on some questions. He has a peculiarity of wishing to know why things are, and has asked us questions on subjects that we really know nothing about, and might add that we never met anyone who did fully understand them. If the reader knows some of the conditions surrounding the foundation for the remarks made by this man, his writings always have a point to them.....Several people have told us that they liked to read Sharps and Flats; that they enjoyed the extra attention required sometimes to understand just what he meant. We are pleased to add the variety to our columns that the writing of this man affords, and further to announce that he is not desirous of injuring anyone's feelings and as far as he knows will gladly eliminate any objectionable matter.

The Phillipsburg Dispatch calls the Kirwin Kansan editor a liar; the Kansan man has a notion that his reputation for telling the truth is just as good as -- or a little better than -- the Dispatch editor's. This is act VII, scene I.

Walter Smith left Friday morning for Guide Rock, Neb., where he will have charge of a newspaper for a few weeks.

 

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June 11, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4812)

Walter Smith arrived Saturday evening from Guide Rock, Neb., to spend Sunday with his wife and parents. He has charge of a Guide Rock newspaper and intended to go back to his work Monday but missed the train and could not leave until the next morning.

 

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June 18, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4813)

Postmaster Smith of Downs, an old newspaper man, knows a good thing when he sees it, and is thoughtful enough to acknowledge it. The following note is, therefore, highly appreciated: 'Publishers, Gazette, Beloit, Kan. Dear sirs: For the people of Downs, I wish to thank you for your very kind and thoughtful act in sending us the Gazette extra yesterday evening. It brought us the first reliable news of the disastrous flood....Your enterprise is commendable....J.

H. Smith+?. -- Beloit Gazette.

 

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June 25, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4814)

Over in Mankato, the two newspapers are having a "heavy doin's." The editor of the Monitor has sued the Advocate man for calling him "an overgrown booby with no more brains than a week-old squab."

 

...
July 9, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4816)

W. H. Nelson, who for 22 years has been connected with the Smith County Pioneer, sold his interest last week to his partner, V. Hutchings....Mr. Nelson is the postmaster of Smith Center and is connected largely with the telephone exchange of that town.

 

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July 30, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4818)

Over 100 pictures of Downs and country in the anniversary souvenir.

(Advertisement) Have you any friends? Send each one a picture book. Over 100 pictures of Downs and country, 46 pages. $1.50 per dozen, 15 cents per single copy. Books on sale at all leading stores in Downs. Send 15 cents in postage stamps to the Times and get one. It's a beauty. Everybody wants one.

Warren Zimmerman, editor of the Portis department of the Osborne Farmer, was among the crowd from that place here Monday.

Bert Walker was among the Smith Center crowd who took in the doings here Monday. Bert is employed on the Pioneer and is one of the brightest newspaper men in the state.

 

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August 6, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4819)

People say the Times souvenir is all right. Have you seen it? Price 15 cents.

Miss Effie Cole resigned her position on the Times force Saturday night. On Sunday night, she started for Warrensburg, Mo., where she will spend several months with her grandparents. Effie has been working at this office for quite a while and was an efficient helper, but was obliged to give up her work on account of her health.

F. W. Gardner moved his family into the old creamery building Monday. The second story will be used as living rooms and the printing office will be operated on the first floor.

 

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August 13, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4821)

Greeting -- With this issue of the Times the paper comes under a new management. For the past year Mr. DeLay has given the people of Downs and the surrounding country a good newsy paper, and it will be our aim to keep the Times up to its present high standard and, if possible, give our readers a better paper than before. To do this we must have the support of all, and we trust that this support will be forthcoming. At all times we shall endeavor to work for the best interests of Downs and her contiguous territory, and we trust that our efforts in this direction may not be in vain. We expect to take full control about September 1st, and invite you all to come in and get acquainted. In the meantime the office force will have charge of the office and attend to all business.

-- R. T. Weld.

 

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August 20, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4822)

R. T. Weld, who has been the efficient mechanical foreman in this office for several years, this week purchased the Downs Times,...and will take charge of the paper at once. The paper is one of the best paying properties in central Kansas and with Ray's ability as a printer it will be kept up to its present high standard. We regret to have him leave us but wish him unbounded success.... -- Colby Tribune.

"The Patriot is in receipt of a boom edition of the Downs (Kansas) Times, compliments of Miss Lissie Green, formerly of this city but now a compositor on that paper. It is a 6x9 folder of 54 pages and over 100 illustrations with a writeup of the town and country. The workmanship exhibited in this booklet proves beyond a doubt that the Times has expert printers on the force." -- What Cheer (Iowa) Patriot.

"The Downs Times was sold last week to R. T. Weld, who was foreman of the Colby Tribune prior to the purchase of the Times. A. J. DeLay, the retiring editor, will go to California to seek a new location. Walt Smith will have charge of the paper until September 1...." -- Osborne Farmer.

 

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August 27, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4824)

Mrs. Allen DeLay, who was the music teacher in our college last year and had been employed to fill that position again, has resigned....Mrs. DeLay was a very fine musician and gave entire satisfaction....

 

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September 3, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4826)

Miss Julia Newlon is learning the printing art at this office.

 

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September 17, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4827)

Harmon Wilson, at one time a typo on the Times, but who is now one of the valuable writers on the Topeka Capital, is sick with typhoid fever.

Nearly everybody in town put up a stove or two the first of the week except the Times office. When a printing office puts in a new stove it is seldom taken down until it is necessary to put in a new one.

Lew Headley, formerly editor of the Gaylord Herald,...was recently elected alderman from his ward at Ponca City, Okla.

 

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September 24, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4829)

W. B. Gaumer, editor of the Phillips County Post, was in the city between trains Tuesday evening and made this office a pleasant call. He was going east on a business mission.

His Life Work Is Finished. Topeka Herald, September 18th.

Harmon D. Wilson died this morning at 4:40 o'clock of typhoid fever at his home on Taylor Street. He had been seriously ill for about four weeks. From the first, his illness was regarded as most serious. Violent hemorrhages occurred and only the most heroic work of his physician and nurses prevented his bleeding to death. Finally the hemorrhages were stayed and he seemed on the road to recovery. Two days ago he took a turn for the worse. He became delirious and it was necessary to use force to keep him in bed....

Harmon Wilson has not been a well man since the great flood in June. Like every other local newspaper man, he worked overtime in getting up copy. Often he worked all day and half the night in wet clothes. Once he went up to Silver Lake and walked back, up and down the bottoms, to write a story of the conditions as he found them.

Six weeks ago he got an assignment from the passenger department of the Santa Fe at Chicago to write a story of a new road just being opened in the Indian Territory. John Strickrott, the photographer, went with him. They went over the hot and dusty line in a railroad velocipede with the thermometer ranging above 108 in the shade -- and no shade -- with alkali water to drink.

One morning on his return, Wilson started to write his story of the trip. He rose at 5:00 o'clock and without removing his nightgown seated himself at the typewriter. He never ate breakfast, anyway, so he worked on until noon. Then a lunch and back to work until evening. Still in his night clothes, he ate a hasty meal and went back to finish his work. At 9:00 o'clock he finished it -- above 12,000 words -- and, thoroughly weary, he tumbled into bed. That story of the Santa Fe passed the censors with practically no revision and will be published soon. The little booklet will have a pathetic significance to those who knew Mr. Wilson best, and will stand as a tragic monument to his indomitable energy. A few days later, both he and Mr. Strickrott were down with typhoid.

The death of Harmon D. Wilson removes a young man of brilliant promise from the newspaper field in Kansas -- a promise already partially fulfilled.

He was born in Troy, Kan., nearly 32 years ago. As a boy, his great ambition was to be a railroad man. He always declared that a man's destiny is largely shaped by force of circumstances. In his own case, he hung around railroad shops and with railroad men and looked forward to the time when he could become a brakeman or engineer, and yet, in spite of his mental protests, he drifted into the newspaper business. It was the sharpest disappointment of his life -- this giving up of railroad work -- and it will always remain an inscrutable mystery why he should protest against his newspaper calling, for which he was so well fitted.

As a lad, Wilson went into the office of S. H. Dodge, editor of the Beloit Gazette. There he learned every detail of the printer's business from devil to foreman. The friendship between "Old Man" Dodge and Harmon Wilson was one of the beautiful incidents in this tragedy of human life. Like a father, the bluff editor of the Gazette has watched over his young friend's career, never stinting practical encouragement and advice. On the other hand, Wilson gave Dodge credit for "teaching him all he ever knew." The writer talked with Dodge in his office not long ago and heard again the story of Wilson and the Chinaman -- a funny story, which is familiar to every citizen of Beloit. Almost with tears, Dodge told of his great pride in Wilson's upward career and of what he hoped he might yet accomplish.

When he was 21, Wilson took hold of the Alton Empire and ran it for two or three years. Then he went back to Beloit -- to the Gazette -- and later forsook the newspaper business for six months while he was in the Beloit post office, under civil service rules. But the newspaper microbe was in his blood and he could no more withstand it than he could fly. So he went to the Downs Times for two years and then back to his first and always his best newspaper love, the Beloit Gazette. After a time he went to Atchison and, with Ferd Lawless, ran a job office for two years. Then in the fall of 1897 he came to the Capital, where he has since remained. It is not generally known that his "Kansas News and Comment" column on the Capital was really but a small part of his work. He did most of the editorial paragraphing and much assignment feature work besides.

On June 27, 1898, Mr. Wilson was married to Miss Topsy Campbell of Alton. Their home life has been ideal. One son, Lyle, was born to them four years ago.

...The writer of this -- then on the Capital force -- will always cherish the memory of his first introduction to Wilson. The latter was in uniform -- he played a saxophone with Andy Manifold's band here during the first fall festival. Away in the middle of the night he came up to the local room to get acquainted with the boys, for it was known that he intended to come to the paper. Frank Jarrell was on the city desk and showed Wilson around.

It was only an accident that mails were made that night, for Wilson told so many funny stories that everybody quit work to listen. Later the writer worked for months in the same room with Wilson. If he could put down here words that would express in faint measure his appreciation of Harmon Wilson's unfailing optimism and his original views of life and its complexities, it would not seem so cruel to give it all up. But this cannot be done, and those who knew him most intimately can only look forward to the time when the Great Mystery shall be solved for us all.

The body will be taken to his old home in Beloit on the Union Pacific at noon tomorrow. Short and simple services will be held at the house at 10:00 o'clock to which friends are invited. Dean Kaye will offer a prayer and James Moore will song a solo -- that is all.

A large number of Alton people went down to Beloit Monday to attend the funeral services of Harmon Wilson.

Miss Lissie Green, who has been employed on the Times for some weeks, left last Thursday evening for her home in What Cheer, Iowa.

 

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October 1, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4831)

(Advertisement) Bargains! It will pay to investigate. No. 1. A good two-story brick store and office building...; No. 2. 1,240 acres 3.5 miles from good railroad town...; No. 3. House of five rooms in the city of Downs...; No. 4. House of five rooms...in Downs,...; No. 5. If you are interested in Thomas County lands, write us... For particulars of above bargains address R. R. Weld, Downs, Kan.

 

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October 8, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4832)

Bert Walker will give up his position here with the Pioneer and go to Topeka as soon as a man can be found to take his place. He has contracted with the Capital to do special work for the paper along the same line as was done by the late Harmon Wilson....If the writer of this item were compelled to go out and pick up a man to take Wilson's place as an interesting, clean cut, clever paragrapher along the lines demanded by a newspaper, Walker would have been the man selected. During his stay here for several years he has made warm friends of the people and whole newspaper crowd in this part of the state. -- Smith County Journal. Bert has many warm friends in Osborne County who are glad to learn of his success in being able to secure so good a position. At one time, Bert was editor of the Osborne Farmer and did himself credit while acting in that capacity.

"Rev. A. L. Drummond delivered his farewell sermon at the Christian Church last Sunday evening. There was a good crowd out to hear him. Link has a good hold on the members of the church here that any minister might well be proud of...." -- Smith County Journal. Elder Drummond will take charge of the Norton church.

Mr. and Mrs. Allen DeLay have returned from Oregon and at present are stopping at Topeka....

 

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November 12, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4833)

Some of our citizens, as well as a number of our exchanges, have been rubbing it in on us some of late on account of publishing an account of an elaborate wedding and forgetting to mention the names of the contracting parties, minister, etc. It is a joke all the way 'round. A certain club of young ladies in the city got out invitations and arranged for a wedding among themselves -- just practicing, you know, and it is said to have been a most enjoyable affair. It was written up for the Times and the joke still went on. If you were fooled, it is one on you.

Miss Leslye Hardman, a member of the Times force, has been sick the past week....

Rev. F. W. Gardner will sever his connection with the News with the issue which will appear today, having sold the plant.

 

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November 19, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4835)

W. B. Gaumer came down from Phillipsburg last week and has now assumed control of the News. We welcome Mr. Gaumer and trust that our relations with him may be as pleasant as they have been with Mr. Gardner, the retiring editor. Mr. Gaumer has added new material to the plant and expects to enlarge the paper. Downs is large enough and has enough business to support two good newspapers and we wish Brother Gaumer success.

Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Gaumer moved down from Phillipsburg last week and are occupying the Henry Jones property on west Blunt Street.

 

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December 17, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4838)

Our presses have been kept busy the past week printing The Echo, a three column quarto edited by the Downs Normal and Commercial Institute. This little paper is devoted to the interest of the college, giving the history and aim of the institution and general information relative to the several courses of study. It also contains nice halftones of the college building, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Berkman, Mr. Fred Berkman and Miss Margaret Lutz. The paper will be widely circulated and will no doubt be the means of bringing many students to the institute....

The little volume which his newspaper associates are compiling from the writings of Harmon D. Wilson will be out this week. It is without question the handsomest book ever produced in Kansas. It is printed on extra quality paper, in large clear type with wide margins and the cover is a particularly artistic thing. Albert T. Reid's drawings for the volume are unquestionably the best work this talented Kansas artist has ever done. The book is made up of selections from

"The Troubles of a Worried Man," 15 or 20 of the "Ornery Boy" sketches, some of the Swede dialect stuff, a few of the remarks of "The Hon. Timothy Tugbutton," and about 35 pages of Wilson's best verse. There are full page drawings of "The

Worried Man," the "Ornery Boy" and "The Hon. Timothy Tugbutton." The frontispiece is a full page drawing of Wilson at work at his desk in the Capital office. The drawing was made from a photograph taken the week the Rev. Chas. M. Sheldon ran the Capital. The Wilson book should be in every Kansas library....The first edition will be 1,000 copies, and each copy will be numbered. Sealed bids for No. 1 will be received by J. E. House up to December 20. The highest bidder takes it. Orders for the book should also be sent to Mr. House. It will be sent prepaid to any address for one dollar. Mr. Wilson was at one time foreman on the Times and had a large acquaintance here. Many of these books will be sold in Downs.

 

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December 24, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4840)

We have received a copy of the Harmon Wilson book and will always prize it as thoughts from a bright mind. While we were not personally acquainted with Harmon Wilson, yet we always enjoyed reading anything from his pen and profited thereby....

 

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December 31, 1903, Downs Times (ID 4842)

John Gaumer of Kirwin visited his son, W. B. Gaumer, at this place the first of the week.

 

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January 21, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4844)

Miss Leslye Hardman of the Times force left last Thursday morning for a ten days' visit with relatives in Kirwin and Phillipsburg.

The Cawker Ledger went wild last week over the organization of an oil and gas company. The Stockton Record was about equally as bad on railroads.

Word comes from Glen Elder that Editor Baker of the Sentinel and Editor Woolman of the Independent engaged in a fight other than through the newspapers the first of the week.

 

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February 4, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4847)

Allen J. DeLay, former editor of the Times, arrived from Topeka Friday morning on a combined business and pleasure trip. Of late, Mr. DeLay has been employed on the Topeka Daily Capital but we understand he expects to go to Oregon in a few months where he will engage in the newspaper business.

 

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February 18, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4849)

E. W. Hoch of Marion, who is a candidate for the Republican nomination for governor, spoke to a good sized crowd in the opera house Friday evening, and was well received by his many Downs admirers. The Ladies' Band furnished some good music, which was highly complimented by the speaker. Mr. Hoch is a forcible speaker and in his condemnation of the Machine made his views very plain and was enthusiastically applauded....

 

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February 25, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4851)

Warren Zimmerman of the Osborne Farmer force was in Downs between trains Saturday morning.

The Lebanon Times has been sold to Geo. N. Hawkins and Geo. A. Hill, two Lebanon men. The paper will continue as a Republican organ.

 

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March 3, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4852)

J. J. Parker, editor of the Stockton News, was in the city on a business mission Tuesday. This office acknowledges a very pleasant call.

Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Craft returned Friday evening from a several months' visit with their children, Mr. and Mrs. Q. R. Craft at Washington, D.C....

 

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March 10, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4854)

Hoy Smith, formerly one of the editors of the Osborne News, has bought the Wamego Times.

J. H. Smith received word the first of the week of his reappointment as postmaster at Downs for the ensuing four years.

 

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March 24, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4857)

Some four years ago, J. H. Smith had his picture taken with an enlarged ear of corn on his shoulder. A halftone was made and it was first printed in the Times, then the Topeka papers and numerous Kansas weeklies reproduced it. It next got into the Chicago and New York papers and so on. Every little while, he receives a letter from some part of the United States asking for a photo that they may reproduce it. Last week he received a letter from a farm journal at Battle Creek, Mich., asking that he forward his photo at once and in return would put his name on their list for the coming year.

"R. T. Weld of the Downs Times was in Cawker Friday on business connected with his paper, which is acknowledged by newspaper men to be one of the best in the Sixth District." -- Cawker item in Beloit Call.

 

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April 7, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4861)

W. B. Gaumer sells the News -- On Monday of this week Chas. W. Norton of Sterling, Kansas, took charge of The News of this city, having purchased the plant and business from W. B. Gaumer, who has owned it for the past few months....Our business relations with Mr. Gaumer have been very pleasant and we are pleased to know that he contemplates remaining in Downs. . . .

The Osborne News changed hands this week, Elliott Eckman selling the entire plant, together with subscription list and good will, to a company composed of several Osborne businessmen. Warren Zimmerman, who was connected with the Times for a short time, will do the political and editorial writing and have general charge of the office....We are informed that the paper...will look at things

politically from a Republican standpoint, which, by the way, leaves the Demo-Pops without a political organ in Osborne County. Only a few short years ago, Osborne County was overwhelmed with Populist papers.

 

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April 14, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4863)

Word was received last Wednesday by Mr. and Mrs. Joseph DeLay that a baby boy had arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Allen DeLay in Topeka....Mr. DeLay was a former editor of the Times, and Mrs. DeLay at that time was the teacher of music at the college....

W. B. Gaumer has stored his household goods. He is undecided as to his future business career.

 

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April 21, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4865)

Banker Gaumer was a brief caller at this office last Saturday evening. He told us that, in the disposition of his Downs paper, he secured a farm down in Oklahoma. He also expressed himself as being a little dissatisfied with newspaper work.... -- Phillipsburg News.

 

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April 28, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4867)

Miss Katherine Stump went down to Cawker Monday to help Robinson get out this week's Ledger.

Allen J. DeLay arrived from Topeka last Thursday morning to look after business matters and visit his parents a few days before departing for the West. Mr. DeLay, together with Mrs. Ellen Hardman and daughter Leslye, expect to leave this evening for Eugene, Ore., where Mr. DeLay will assume the duties of city editor and manager of a daily newspaper....Miss Leslye Hardman, who for the past 18 months has been assisting in the work of the Times office, will be his assistant. Miss Hardman is a young lady with rare ability in newspaper work and her services will be greatly missed in this office....

W. B. Gaumer has decided to remain in Downs permanently and Monday a deal was made whereby he purchased a half interest in the A. W. Snyder Real Estate Agency....Prior to Mr. Gaumer's removal to Downs, he was engaged in the newspaper and real estate work at Phillipsburg....

 

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May 26, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4874)

"B. and W. Woolman, editors of the Glen Elder Independent, are going to discontinue their business in that city and move their plant to Portis and publish a paper called the Portis Independent." -- Osborne Farmer.

Editor Weld has been absent this week attending business affairs in Lincoln, Neb., and Kansas City. The office has been in charge of the regular force assisted by Bert Jones.

 

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June 9, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4876)

W. Woolman of Glen Elder was in Portis last Thursday making arrangements to start a paper at that place. Mr. Woolman informed us that he would get out the first issue next week....

Mord Smith, who for the past 18 months has been in Washington, D.C., working for a newspaper syndicate, arrived home Tuesday morning for a month's visit with his parents. He expects to go to Denver next month, where he has been transferred, and will remain there until December, when he will again go to Washington....

The editor of the Glen Elder Independent, who will move his plant to Portis next week, says: "We do not make this move in order to better ourselves financially, for we have succeeded and could still succeed in that line, but we do it in the hope of finding a more congenial atmosphere wherein to breathe."

 

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June 23, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4879)

The first issue of the Portis Independent reached this office Saturday. It is a very creditable sheet and the businessmen have filled its columns full of advertising.

Mrs. Allen J. DeLay, who is visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph DeLay, expects to leave in about three weeks for Eugene, Ore., where her husband is located. We understand she will be accompanied by the Hardman girls, Misses Jessie and Suza.

W. C. Bradford, traveling salesman for the Oliver typewriter, was in the city the first of the week. We believe in having the best, hence we will hereafter do our writing on an Oliver....

 

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June 30, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4883)

Last week's Lincoln Park Chautauqua souvenir edition of the Downs News was a very pretty example of workmanship. The halftones printed up in good shape and the reading matter was breezy.

James Breakey has vacated the Stark property and has stored his goods. The property will be occupied by R. T. Weld and bride.

 

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July 7, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4885)

Bert Walker, who writes "Kansas Men and Matters" for the Topeka Capital, was shaking hands with his old-time Downs friends last Friday morning. He was going to Osborne to spend a few days with friends. Bert has a good job with the Capital -- one of the kind that makes a man fat and prosperous....

 

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July 14, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4886)

L. L. Alrich, editor of the Cawker Record, is very sick and his recovery is doubtful.

 

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July 28, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4889)

The Times office turned out a very neat little 12-page paper for the Downs Normal and Commercial Institute this week.

Billy Coates, who has been the local rustler on the Osborne Farmer for some years, resigned his position last Saturday night....

"We are reliably informed that another change will take place in the Osborne Farmer. Bert Walker, now of the Topeka Capital, is the new proprietor. For many years he was connected with the Farmer, one of the best newspaper properties in this section, and he has never been entirely satisfied since he left there. He came from Osborne and took a situation on the Pioneer, leaving here to accept a better position on the Capital." -- Smith County Pioneer. Mr. Walker will arrive from Topeka the latter part of the week and will take possession of the Farmer Monday morning.

 

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August 25, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4893)

Miss Pearl Renfro has given up the printing business and accepted a position in Terry's Jewelry Store.

Our presses are being kept busy these days turning out letter, note and bill circulars, envelopes, statements, cards, circulars, booklets, and various kinds of job work. With good workmen and plenty of the very best material we are able to turn out work promptly and in such manner that it cannot fail to give satisfaction....

 

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September 22, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4894)

We received a letter from T. G. Nicklin this week, requesting a copy of the Times. Mr. Nicklin will be remembered by the older residents of Downs as the first editor of this paper, having established it about twenty-five years ago. He is now located at Prescott, Arizona.

 

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October 6, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4895)

Count Fred Hulaniski -- J. W. Nicholas handed us a copy of the Colorado Springs Telegraph in which we find the following dispatch:

"Ouray, Colo., Sept. 29 -- The suit for divorce by Mrs. Hulaniski, wife of former County Judge F. J. Hulaniski, one of the best known newspaper men on the western slope, will never come to trial. The attorneys for Mrs. Hulaniski last night announced that a settlement had been reached and that an order will be entered this afternoon in the county court withdrawing the suit. The grounds of settlement will not be made public."

The above has reference to Count Fred Hulaniski, the long haired, old time newspaper man of Downs. All old-timers remember him. He had an office under Chris Knapp's meat market and published a paper called the Saturday Night Lamp. It was printed on pink paper and had a field by itself. If, in the eyes of the editor, a person needed a roasting he got it handed to him without the use of gloves, and in extreme cases he opened his old jack knife and whittled out a cartoon that would do justice to the occasion. That kind of work didn't last long so he picked up his shirttail full of type and pulled for Colorado. Our people heard very little of Hulaniski until he made a trip to Florida four years ago in his special car and spent the winter. In Colorado he struck it rich in mining and is reputed to be worth thousands.

Mrs. Alice G. Young returned Tuesday morning from Wichita, where she attended the state WCTU convention. Mrs. Young was again elected editor of Our Messenger, the state WCTU paper.

 

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October 13, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4897)

W. B. Gaumer is in Phillips County this week selling old line insurance.

Miss Katherine Stump went to Osborne Monday evening, where she has accepted a position on the News.

W. B. Gaumer was recently appointed a Missouri Pacific immigration agent....

 

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October 27, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4899)

Mrs. E. D. Craft took her departure last Saturday evening for Santa Ana, Calif., where Mr. Craft is stopping for the present. Mr. Craft is in love with that country and expects to buy property there and reside.

Our Messenger, the state WCTU paper, which has been printed by the Beloit Call, will be printed at the Dispatch office at Clay Center the ensuing year. Mrs. Alice G. Young has been retained as editor and it will be mailed from the Downs post office.

 

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November 10, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4901)

Miss Katherine Stump left on Wednesday evening of last week for Concordia, where she will work in the Kansan office.

Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Craft have purchased a residence and business house in the city of Los Angeles, Calif., and have concluded to reside there....

 

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November 17, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4903)

Kip Botkin, who has been employed on the Osborne News for some years as local man, and who was a candidate for county treasurer on the Independent ticket at the late election, has taken a position as bookkeeper in the First National bank at Osborne....

 

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November 24, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4907)

The Times is compelled to issue a 12-page paper this week on account of election returns, an extra amount of advertising, etc....

 

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December 8, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4909)

the Downs Times which a year ago was to be put out of business by an opposition sheet, appeared last week as a 12-page paper, filled to the brim with advertising. There must be a reason or the iconoclast can't get his work in. We speak from experience. -- Phillipsburg Dispatch.

Mord Smith, who has been working in Downs for the past few months, left Tuesday morning for a trip through Oklahoma. He expects to spend the winter down in that country.

 

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December 15, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4910)

A son was born on Saturday, December 3, to Mr. and Mrs. Q. R. Craft, 743 Dearborn Place, Washington, D.C. Enoch Craft, who may be remembered by Downs friends, now attends kindergarten. Little Ruth, nearing her second birthday, was desperately sick during September and October from an attack of cholera infantum. She now appears to be fully recovering.

 

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December 22, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4913)

Mord Smith, who has been in Oklahoma during the past two weeks, returned home Wednesday evening and will remain until the first of the year.

The Osborne Farmer appeared last week as a 12-page paper and was filled brim full with good reading matter and advertising....

Miss Effie Cole, who has been employed as a typo on the Russell Record during the past year, arrived home Tuesday evening. We understand she will not return to Russell.

 

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December 29, 1904, Downs Times (ID 4917)

The Times has enjoyed a good business during 1904. In fact, this has been about the most prosperous year for the paper since it was established a quarter of a century ago.

"Miss Effie Cole, our favorite compositor, packed her grip and started for home, Downs, Monday night. We hope she will have a pleasant visit. She knows that a 'yob' is always ready for her here." -- Russell Record.

 

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January 26, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4921)

W. B. Gaumer, at one time a Downs editor, has been appointed deputy sheriff of Phillips County....We hope he makes more money out of his new appointment than he did out of his Downs newspaper venture.

 

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February 24, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4924)

The Times was much later last week than we had any idea it would be. Our papers were shipped from Kansas City on time, but were held at Atchison three days and did not arrive here until Saturday morning.

 

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April 6, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4931)

The abuse being given John Q. Royce, appointed bank commissioner by Governor Hoch a few days ago, will not worry him; he is a newspaper man and couldn't live without it. -- Globe.

 

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April 20, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4935)

Wm. Ransom spent Sunday with his wife and baby at Phillipsburg. Mr. Ransom does not expect to move to Downs for a couple of months yet as his wife is engaged in the millinery business and will close out her stock before moving. Chas. Mann also will not be able to move his family for some time.

 

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April 27, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4939)

For a long time, it has been a common custom among newspapers to print "resolutions" of lodges and other societies free of charge....Hereafter, the Times will charge 5 cents per line for resolutions the same as other local notices.

 

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May 4, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4942)

...W. B. Gaumer has resigned as undersheriff. Mr. Gaumer is a special agent for the Royal Union Mutual Life Insurance Company...and his business is increasing so rapidly that he finds it necessary to spend all his time looking after it. -- Phillips County Post.

 

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May 11, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4943)

Mord Smith, foreman of the Colby Tribune, arrived last Friday evening and remained over Sunday with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Smith.

 

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May 18, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4945)

Chas. W. Norton has commenced hitting the high places at Kirwin. Last week he used nearly a quarter column in his Kirwin Argus clipping Nick Naylor's wing feathers.

 

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May 25, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4946)

Warren Zimmerman, who has been editor of the Osborne News during the past year, has severed his connection with the paper and will go to Chandler, Okla., where he has bought a half interest in the News. W. W. Miller, ex-superintendent, will have editorial charge of the Osborne News.

 

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June 1, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4947)

Miss Katherine Stump, who is a typo on the Kansan at Concordia, spent Tuesday in Downs.

 

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June 8, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4948)

Chas. W. Norton, editor of the Kirwin Argus, was in town last Friday night packing his household good preparatory to moving them to Kirwin. Mrs. Norton and little Forest arrived in Kirwin last week and the family will soon be "at home" again.

W. H. Ransom moved his household goods down from Phillipsburg the first of the week and...they will set up housekeeping in the residence recently vacated by A. B. Dillon.

 

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June 15, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4950)

A Kansas editor makes this frank remark: "Ten years ago we entered the newspaper business poor but honest. We are still poor."

 

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June 22, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4952)

Speaking of "yellow" journalism, did you notice the Kirwin Argus last week?

"One of the nicest and cleanest papers that reaches our exchange tables is the Downs Times. It is always uniformly inked and the impression is always right." -- Logan Republican. Thanks, brother. We always try to make the Times readable.

Lafayette Wright, son of J. A. Wright, editor of the Smith County Messenger, died at his home in Lebanon June 11. He was 24 years old...his sudden death was caused by lockjaw.

 

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June 29, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4953)

Chas. Mann went up to Phillipsburg last Friday morning and returned in the evening accompanied by Mrs. Mann and the children. They have rented the Garanflo property....

 

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July 6, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4954)

Norton, who moved from Downs to Kirwin to run a paper, has got along to the point where he calls his loathsome contemporary a liar. -- Osborne Farmer.

Alta Clack, our faithful typo, is taking a few weeks' vacation. Miss Veva Kennedy is working in her place.

 

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July 20, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4955)

Last week we received a copy of the Chandler (O.T.) News. It is edited by Warren Zimmerman and is one of the neatest sheets we ever read.

Chas. W. Norton, editor of the Kirwin Argus, roasted the management of the Lincoln Park Chautauqua to a dark brown last week for sending to eastern Kansas to have their annual catalogue and other printing done. He concludes his article by saying: "An institution of this kind must depend upon the newspapers for its support and, when its managers ignore them, it is fair and proper that they retaliate in the same spirit...."

 

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July 27, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4957)

Last week we told you we were not going to get out much of a paper this week and we have kept our word.

Miss Effie Cole, a typo on the Stockton Record, is spending the week in Downs.

 

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August 3, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4961)

The Kirwin Argus is all home print. Fact is, Norton is putting out a mighty good paper for a town the size of Kirwin.

Geo. Shook, editor of the Jennings Echo, was shaking hands with old time friends in Downs last Thursday. Mr. Shook is an old Downs boy and this was his first visit here in several years.

 

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August 10, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4962)

R. T. Weld has purchased the Mrs. Lukens lot, just across the street from J. E. Putnam's, and has commenced the erection of a residence.

The more we read the Osborne News, the more we are convinced that W. W. Miller would make a better school teacher than editor.

A special car left Lincoln Park last Saturday evening carrying the members of the North Central Kansas Editorial Association. The editors will visit Kansas City, Pueblo and Colorado Springs and expect to be gone about 10 days. All the Downs newspaper men were so busy that they could not spare the time to make the trip.

 

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August 17, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4965)

The chautauqua graft....

The above is from the pen of Chas. W. Norton, a three-ply jackass who once edited the Downs News. Scarcely a word of truth is contained in the above article and we simply reproduce it with comments to save such a slanderous article from gaining momentum among newspaper men and others who possibly are not acquainted with the author and his past record and of conditions at the Park. Both chautauquas are all right and we hope they will continue to gain in goodness with age.

Here is a good item that is going the rounds of the Kansas press: "An editor in Ohio, who started about 20 years ago with 15 cents, is now worth $100,000. His accumulation of wealth is owning to his frugality, strict attention to business, and the fact that an uncle died and left him $99,998."

 

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August 24, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4967)

An exchange has adopted the following schedule of rates to govern the articles published in his paper: "For telling the public that a man is a successful citizen when everybody knows he is as lazy as a government mule, $2.75; referring to a deceased citizen as one who is mourned by the entire community when he knows he will only be missed by the poker circle, $10.60; referring to some gallivanting female as an estimable lady whom it is a pleasure to meet, when every business man in town would rather see the devil coming, $8.10; calling an ordinary pulpit pounder an eminent divine, 20 cents; sending a tough sinner to heaven with poetry, $5.

 

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September 7, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4969)

A young editor arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. R. T. Weld last Thursday and evidently intends to run things.

 

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October 12, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4971)

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. W. Norton, editors of the Kirwin Argus, passed through town last Friday evening....The Nortons have just closed a most successful piano contest and are now figuring on giving away an automobile.

The Times is turning out some mighty fine job work these days. With our new type faces and an up to date stock we can do you a job that you will be proud of....

 

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October 26, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4973)

Walter Smith, the head man on the Downs Times was in town Tuesday, being on the regular jury panel. He was excused from service in the Ward case because he said that he had talked to John Ford of the Alton Empire about the affair. And thus is Ford's blighting influence gradually extending over the county. -- Osborne Farmer.

Robert Good, editor of the Jamestown Optimist, issued a 24-page souvenir booklet last week telling of Jamestown....

J. W. Weld of Grand Island, Neb., an uncle of the editor, arrived last Wednesday evening and is engaged in erecting our new office building.

The Times will soon move into new quarters. Last week we commenced work on a building just west of the Union State Bank and will push it to completion as soon as possible. The front half of the building will be two story, the second floor to be occupied by Dr. O. T. Gaston, the dentist. When we get settled in our new home, we expect to put in considerable new type and otherwise improve our plant.

 

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November 16, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4977)

We expect to begin moving this afternoon to our new building just west of the Union State Bank. When the Times is again settled and has everything arranged in order in the new quarters, we invite you all to come in and see us.

This week we received a letter from Harry Montague, who for several years has been living at Guthrie, Okla. He is employed on the Oklahoma State Register, the leading daily newspaper of the territory.

The Colby Tribune, one of the best newspapers in the Sixth District, has just moved into a new building and put in a new Babcock newspaper press. This is the paper on which Mord Smith is foreman.

 

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November 23, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4978)

Dr. O. T. Gaston, the dentist, has moved to his new rooms on the second floor of the Times building. He has his office nicely furnished and is ready to serve all comers.

This issue of the Times is gotten out under difficulties owing to the fact that the entire office force has been busy since last Thursday moving the plant into the new Times building just west of the Union State Bank. We have everything moved and are now about settled....

 

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December 14, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4979)

The biggest issue of any paper ever printed was that of a Kansas paper last week. Three million copies of the Appeal to Reason, a socialist paper printed at Girard, was sent out. It took five solid mail trains to carry them. All the people of the town that could be lured to work were employed in mailing them. The editor says he refused $20,000 worth of advertising. It was an effort worthy of a better cause. Wherever the plan of doing away with individual ownership has been tried since the world began, it has been a failure....The worker will never consent to be yoked with the drone and divide even. -- Jewell Republican.

 

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December 21, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4981)

Following is a list of those who have erected new residences or business

houses or made improvements...R. T. Weld, $1,000...J. H. Smith, $1,000...Weld

& Gaston, $1,000...(a long list).

 

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December 28, 1905, Downs Times (ID 4982)

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Rankin of Stillwater, accompanied by Mrs. Sarah Garner, mother of the editor of the Clipper, and Miss Nellie Garner, a niece, were guests of the Clipper people last Friday and Saturday. They recently moved from northwest Kansas to the Payne County seat and are pleased with our country and climate. -- Cimarron Valley Clipper, Coyle, Okla., Jim Garner's paper.

 

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January 4, 1906, Downs Times (ID 4986)

The newspapers and merchants of this part of the state will have to lift their hats to Downs. The town has two weekly newspapers and last week both of them were issued in regular city style containing about 16 pages each. These editions are a great advertisement for the push and energy of the business men of the town... -- Smith County Journal.

"Both the Downs papers, the Times and News, did themselves proud last week. The Times in particular did things up right. It contained 20 pages filled with choice reading matter and well gotten up ads. The News, while it did not make a special effort, was a most handsome paper. It contained a beautiful colored supplement and the press work on the whole paper was faultless...." -- Osborne Farmer.

The Lenora News says Downs has two of the best weekly papers published in the state. We can find dozens of people right here in Downs who claim they are the worst.

George E. Dougherty, a former editor of this paper, now running a business college at Topeka, was presented with a handsome roll top desk for Christmas by about 100 of his pupils and former pupils.

 

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January 25, 1906, Downs Times (ID 4988)

Jas. F. Gray, the lawyer editor of the Kirwin Kansan, made this office a pleasant call last Saturday.

 

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February 1, 1906, Downs Times (ID 4990)

Miss Effie Cole left Sunday for Stockton, where she has accepted a position as typo on the Rooks County Record. Effie is one of the best typos that ever stepped into a printing office.

Bert Headley, editor of the Gaylord Sentinel, was married the other day and in the wedding notice said, in part: "This is the first instance in several years of newspaper work that the writer has dared to tell the truth about a wedding for fear of getting licked and does so now with keen relish. The groom is an editor and is not a popular and accomplished leader in society. In fact, he doesn't know as much about it as a rabbit. His hair is red and the freckles on his face crowd each other for room. In the dusk it is hard to distinguish him from a telephone pole. He has never considered that the future looked very bright or promising -- it has always kept him too busy paying his board bills to have any dreams about future greatness. He is just a common sort of a fellow and claims distinction only in that he is a Kansan from the sole of his clumsy feet to the top of his head. The bride is the youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. N. J.

White and was born and raised in the Solomon Valley. Judging from the job she has taken on her hands, she is a young lady of more than ordinary nerve."

 

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February 8, 1906, Downs Times (ID 4992)

Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Rupe have sold their Clyde Herald, and the Cawker Record says this leaves Mrs. Emma B. Alrich, associate editor of the Record, as senior newspaper woman in the state. Here's long life to Mrs. Alrich.

W. H. Nelson, formerly editor of the Smith County Pioneer, has been elected president of the State Telephone Association.

 

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February 22, 1906, Downs Times (ID 4993)

With this issue, the Times begins its 27th year of existence....It has contributed its share toward making the city what it is today, and now has more than 1,600 subscribers....The paper has been under the present management for almost three years, and during that time it has received the liberal support of the progressive business men of Downs.... -- The Editor.

Down at Sealing, Dewey County, Okla....G. W. Smith, who married one of the Jackson girls, living north of Downs, lives there and publishes the Sealing Guide....

Walt Whitmore, who used to publish a newspaper in Downs during the balmy days of Populism, has sold his Lehigh newspaper and is now looking for a new field....

 

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March 8, 1906, Downs Times (ID 4995)

Misses Leslye Hardman and Lennie Bandt arrived from Phillipsburg....We acknowledge a pleasant call from Miss Hardman, who at one time was a faithful and competent employee at this office.

 

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March 22, 1906, Downs Times (ID 5000)

Quincy R. Craft, who is connected with the forestry department in Washington, D.C., has written to Downs parties for a picture and short write-up of the Downs city park. It will be published, among other things, in pamphlet form and a hundred thousand copies scattered throughout Kansas and other Western states....

To our readers. This week the Times changes from a patent inside to an all-home-print form. We find this change is necessary in order to give our readers all the news and at the same time accommodate our heavy advertising patronage....The continued story, which started a few weeks ago, is necessarily omitted, but we have secured a much better one...which begins in this issue. It is a story of 24 chapters and we will give about a half page each week....We believe the change in form will enable us to issue a much better paper....

 

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March 29, 1906, Downs Times (ID 5001)

Walt Whitmore, the old time editor of the Downs Chief, passed through Downs yesterday morning en route to Portis for a short visit with relatives....Mr. Whitmore recently sold his newspaper property at Lehigh, Indian Territory, and is looking for a new location, but not in Kansas. Kansas, he says, is too slow for him.

 

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April 19, 1906, Downs Times (ID 5003)

An Ex-Times Editor Writes. Editor Times: I enclosed a check for $2 to advance my subscription and help pay for that new type. Your ad setter is an artist, and the general appearance of the whole paper is fine.... -- H. M. Fletcher, Kansas City, Kan.

Last week we received a copy of the Council Grove Appeal, edited by D. F. Foor and W. C. Coates. Billy Coates was the local man on the Osborne Farmer for a long time....

Miss Fern Kennedy is following in the steps of her older sister and is learning to be a typo in the Times office.

 

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May 17, 1906, Downs Times (ID 5005)

Mord Smith, who has been the efficient foreman of this office for the past 18 months, will leave this office this week to return to Downs, where he will be his father's deputy in the post office. There is sorrow around the office this week because of his departure.... -- Colby Tribune.

 

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May 24, 1906, Downs Times (ID 5007)

The Jamestown Optimist was awarded the contract for printing of the Lincoln Park chautauqua programs for the coming season.

Lew Headley, the old time editor of the Gaylord Herald, passed through Sunday morning en route to Gaylord for a short visit with his son, Bert, and wife. Mr. Headley is editor of the Ponca City (Okla.) Daily Courier, has a fine business and is making money.

 

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May 31, 1906, Downs Times (ID 5009)

Wm. L. Knotts, at one time publisher of the Downs Times died in a hospital at Kansas City on May 12. Death was the result of a fall down a stairway. At the time of his death, Mr. Knotts was editor of the Herald, published at Sulphur, I.T. Deceased lived at Downs between eight and nine years ago. Col. W. S. Tilton sold him the Downs Times taking in exchange the Beatrice Times.... -- Osborne

Farmer. W. L. Knotts was owner of the Times but never lived here. A brother, Ed Knotts, had charge of the paper but Knotts only owned it a few weeks, when it was sold to J. H. Smith.

 

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June 21, 1906, Downs Times (ID 5012)

Walt Whitmore is now manager of the Purcell (Indian Territory) Register, a new newspaper venture.

 

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June 28, 1906, Downs Times (ID 5013)

J. W. McKay, who is visiting...relatives at Portis, was a pleasant caller....About 17 years ago, Mr. McKay was employed on the Times. He is now located in western Minnesota....

 

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July 12, 1906, Downs Times (ID 5015)

Col. Joseph A. Wright, editor of the Smith County Messenger and lately nominated by the Populists for lieutenant governor, was in Portis last Friday....He tells us he will not make a vigorous campaign outside of Smith County....

 

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August 23, 1906, Downs Times (ID 5021)

R. T. Weld is up from Topeka a few days this week. His hearing is no better, although the condition of the ear is improved and the specialist with whom he is treating gives him some encouragement. It will probably be some time before he will be able to hear to any extent.

 

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September 20, 1906, Downs Times (ID 5026)

The campaign was opened in Osborne County Monday afternoon when Governor E. W. Hoch (newspaper editor from Marion) and Congressman W. A. Reeder addressed an audience of possibly 250 people in the opera house....Governor Hoch is a favorite in Downs and his speech was roundly applauded....

 

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October 4, 1906, Downs Times (ID 5027)

We are in receipt of an interesting pamphlet from Washington, D.C., entitled "Progress of Forestry in 1905." It is edited by Quincy R. Craft, a former Downs man, now editorial clerk of the Forest Service.

 

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October 11, 1906, Downs Times (ID 5029)

R. T. Weld, who has been having trouble with his hearing for several weeks, went to Kansas City last Thursday evening, where he will take a course of treatment. A letter from him states that his condition is much improved.

 

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October 25, 1906, Downs Times (ID 5030)

Last week A. W. Robinson sold the Cawker City Ledger to A. P. Gregory....

The Cawker papers do not get the support they should. In looking over the Ledger last week, we find it carried 143 inches of home advertising. The Times of the same date carried 488 inches of home advertising....A look at the two towns -- Downs and Cawker -- ought to convince the most skeptical that advertising, along with a few other good traits, pays.

 

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November 1, 1906, Downs Times (ID 5032)

R. T. Weld came home Sunday morning from Kansas City, where he has been receiving treatment for his hearing from Dr. Isaac C. Soule, a specialist. Mr. Weld has partially recovered his hearing and hopes to soon hear as good as ever. He will return to Kansas City next week to receive further treatment.

 

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November 8, 1906, Downs Times (ID 5034)

We take pleasure in announcing that W. H. Smith, who was formerly proprietor and under the present management has been local editor of the Times, has this week purchased a half interest in the plant.... -- R. T. Weld.

At 9:30 last night, the Times received the following telegram from the Atchison Daily Globe: "Hoch is elected by about three thousand...." (Hoch was the editor of the Marion weekly newspaper.)

Bert Headley, one of the brightest young newspaper men in Kansas, has sold his interest in the Gaylord Sentinel to L. R. Meadows. The plant is now owned by Meadows & Keller.

Some of the business men of Glen Elder are sore at Editor Baker and will start a new paper. Baker is standing by the law and some of the backwoodsmen are going to show their displeasure. In our estimation Baker is publishing a splendid newspaper and before the "insurgents" get through with him they will likely sit up and notice things.

 

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November 15, 1906, Downs Times (ID 5035)

It will soon be 27 years since the Times was established and we have a copy of each week's edition on file in the office....Only last Saturday, two gentlemen from Butler County were in Downs looking up a pedigree of a stallion owned by Manley Chase some 20 years ago. Records had been lost and it was necessary to procure the pedigree of the Chase horse before some of his descendents could be registered. We turned to the files and in a few moments the gentlemen found what was worth a great many dollars to them.

 

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November 29, 1906, Downs Times (ID 5036)

R. T. Weld returned home from Kansas City Monday evening. Under the treatment of Dr. I. C. Soule, his hearing is greatly improved and it is probably but a matter of a short time until he will hear as well as formerly.

 

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December 27, 1906, Downs Times (ID 5038)

The Osborne Farmer of last week consisted of 12 pages and contained more local reading matter than any other two papers in the county. Not a line of plate matter appeared. The Farmer under the management of B. P. Walker is a winner in more ways than one.

 

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March 28, 1907, Downs Times (ID 5055)

A. W. Robinson, until a few months ago editor of the Cawker City Ledger, has purchased the LaCrosse Republican.

 

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April 11, 1907, Downs Times (ID 5057)

We have received a copy of the LaCrosse Republican with the request to exchange. It is a neat sheet, edited by A. W. Robinson, formerly editor of the Cawker City Ledger. We are going to exchange, even though Robinson always did try to make us believe Cawker City was a real live town and was possessed with a class of citizens superior in every jump in the road to those living in Downs.

Cawker City is to have the third paper and will be dubbed The Cawker City It. It will be a stock company of 250 shares of $10 each, making a total of $2,500. The mission of the paper is to boom Cawker City, the Lincoln Park Chautauqua and

Waconda Springs. "It" may be a good thing, but we have known of several newspaper stock companies in times past where the stock had depreciated 50 percent in value inside of a year. However, this may be an exception to the rule.

R. T. Weld went to Kansas City last Thursday to take a course of treatment for his hearing....

"Our old friend and former editor of the Farmer, Col. W. S. Tilton, must be prospering at Beatrice, Neb. He has just bought a fine new press and folder for his office...." -- Osborne Farmer.

 

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April 25, 1907, Downs Times (ID 5060)

The editor of the Cawker City Record has lived in Cawker some 30 years and has the distinction of putting 14 competitors out of business. A man with a Record like that should also have a Ledger as a matter of convenience, don't you know.

A ton of print paper was delivered to this print shop last Friday, the price paid for same being a great advance over our previous shipment....John D. (Rockefeller) cannot hold a candle to the paper trust.

 

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May 9, 1907, Downs Times (ID 5064)

A. P. Gregory, principal of the Cawker City schools and editor of the Ledger, was in town a short time last Saturday, accompanied by his little son. He didn't stay long. A person holding down two jobs, as does Mr. Gregory, is compelled to go sideways a great deal of the time to keep from flying.

B. P. Walker, editor of the Farmer, and Tom Skinner, his office foreman, passed through Downs last Friday evening en route to Kansas City, where they purchased a newspaper folding machine and a great deal of other needed material for the Farmer office.

 

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June 20, 1907, Downs Times (ID 5071)

W. G. Smith, editor of the Seiling (Okla.) Guide, quite well known here, especially up in the Twelve Mile country, is prospering down in Oklahoma. He has just added to his office equipment a gasoline engine, a costly cylinder press, and other machinery.

 

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August 8, 1907, Downs Times (ID 5077)

Crosby and Bert Walker meet. A week ago last Thursday, in Downs, we met our old friend, Bert Walker, editor of the Osborne Farmer. We have wanted to meet Mr. Walker for many years, as we have heard he was one of Osborne's old bachelors. We confess we were completely surprised in his looks. He is a large man with a good shaped head and a pair of small, fine shaped hands; his hair is slightly tinged with gray; he wears good clothes and we think he is handsome. In looking at his well shaped head, he reminded us of Ex-President Grover Cleveland and, as we all know, Cleveland was away and beyond 45 when he met that pretty little woman he married. We still think there is a chance for Bert. -- Smith County Smatterings by Crosby (Sedley Chapin).

 

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August 22, 1907, Downs Times (ID 5079)

We had the pleasure last Friday of a brief visit with Q. R. Craft, who is connected with the forestry department at Washington, D.C. He is making a tour of this section of Kansas, doing some field work and collecting data for use in the forthcoming report from the department with which he is connected. Twenty years ago, we knew him when he was assisting his father with publishing the Downs Times and when he was working overtime trying to make a printer out of himself.... -- Smith County Journal.

"My Dear Crosby: You do me far too much honor. You cause hope to spring and bubble forth like mighty geysers from my humble breast. As a penalty for what you said, I have placed you on my list of 'comps,' which I assure is very limited, and you will be expected to read the Farmer every week. That will be punishment enough for one sentence. With kindest regards, sincerely, B. P. Walker." -- Smith County Smatterings.

 

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August 29, 1907, Downs Times (ID 5081)

Last week the Times refused to run a page ad for a merchant in a neighboring town simply because we thought it was the right thing to do. The merchants of Downs are liberal advertisers -- they believe in it. They do not do it in order to "help the editors along" but they believe it pays them big dividends. And so it does....But what we started out to say was this: We turned down a $10 ad because we knew fully well that it would take a certain amount of business from this town that belonged here. In the second place, the merchants of this town give this paper good support and we think it our duty to stay by them, boost them, and do everything else honorable to bring them more business. This is where the Times stands first, last and all the time, even though it costs us several ten dollar Williams.

 

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September 5, 1907, Downs Times (ID 5082)

Quincy R. Craft...started Monday morning on his return trip to Washington,

D.C. This was his first visit to Downs since he left here six years ago....He writes articles on forestry most of the time and it is necessary for him to "grind" out just about so much copy every day....This is one reason he didn't put in all his extra time visiting while here. He studied tree growth, what soil was best for certain varieties, took pictures of trees, etc., and when he left he had a whole grip full of "thunder."...He took a great many views of trees in and surrounding Downs.

In a new building constructed for his rental at 118 Eighth Avenue, Topeka, George E. Dougherty occupies the entire second floor with his business college and sub-rents the third floor. His present quarters enable him to better develop a series of evening socials with music and literary exercises. The typewriting room is lighted by skylights, and economy of floor space is effected by the use of long desks, of Mr. Dougherty's design, at which operators sit alternately on either side. Indentations in the desk at the points where the operators sit make it possible not only to fully utilize every square inch of the desk but to render conveniently accessible all papers frequently used.

 

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October 10, 1907, Downs Times (ID 5089)

Elder Drummond, who now devotes his salaried moments to the sins of the world and the good of the church, was once one of us, an editor and printer. While thus wasting his talents in this city he gave us a brief of his experience that is worth a record. He acted as editor of the Norton Republican and employed his brother John at a salary to do the work. When he owed John salary enough, he turned over the proprietorship to him and hired out at the same salary. In time the sum equaled the value of the paper again, when the ownership was once more assumed. Thus they seesawed back and forth as printer and proprietor until a little gleam of sunshine came into their lives and they saw bread and butter at the base of another rainbow. Link was invoiced with the junk of this office when we bought it in 1884. He was the one who first showed us that mysterious genus of the entomological world known to the wise as 'type lice'. -- Norton Champion.

 

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October 24, 1907, Downs Times (ID 5092)

For nearly two years now, the price of print paper has steadily advanced, at the same time the subscription price of the Times has remained the same. Every five weeks, when S. J. Hartman, who represents the Kansas City Paper House, walks into this office for an order he tells us of an advance in the price of paper over that of what he quoted us upon his previous visit....Upon his last visit, Mr. Hartman told us his house had only a limited supply of paper on hand and that their manager at that time was in the north making arrangements with the mills for a big shipment, but that when it was ready for distribution another big advance was certain. The paper trust has the shops of this country on its hip, and like the Standard Oil monopoly it is under one management and is in a position to do as it likes....It looks as though it would be absolutely necessary to raise the subscription price of the Times to $1.50 a year....We will make our announcement next week, but the advance will not take place until the first of next January.

 

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October 31, 1907, Downs Times (ID 5094)

On and after January 1, 1908, the subscription price of the Downs Times will be $1.50 per year....All renewals and new subscriptions between now and January 1st will be taken at the old rate of $1 per year....Weld & Smith, publishers.

 

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November 21, 1907, Downs Times (ID 5095)

The first issue of the Glen Elder Globe reached our desk last week. It is small but neat in appearance and is fairly well patronized. It is launched for the purpose of putting the Sentinel out of business, is edited by a Beloit ex-preacher backed by the whiskeyites.

 

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December 19, 1907, Downs Times (ID 5097)

We have a great many subscribers on our list who have stuck to this paper through thick and thin. One of them is F. H. Deck....Mr. Deck tells us that he subscribed for the Times before it was first published. He met Tom Nicklin, the founder of the paper, one day and Nicklin told him that he was going to start a paper here and had ordered the material. Mr. Deck subscribed then and there and during all these 28 years he has never missed a copy....

"How much money will it take to make me your champion subscriber?" said Geo. Vos upon stepping into the Times office late last Saturday evening. We looked up his account and informed him that $8 would pay him up to October 1915. "All right," said Mr. Vos, "here's your money. Give me a receipt." This makes Mr. Vos our champion subscriber, being paid more than a year ahead of any other of our

1,600 subscribers. There may not be much glory attached to being called a champion subscriber, but there is a little money in it. Mr. Vos saved $4 by this little transaction, and there is money in it for each and every one, even if he pays but a year in advance.

Col. Major Jeltz, the Kansas City-Topeka colored editor, was in Downs a short time last Friday and had Wm. Ward drive him to Osborne. The Major wanted to buy some whiskey, as usual, but what he really needed was a new hat.

This office is badly crippled with its work this week on account of one of its valued typos, Clara Mitchell, being on the sick list.

...We get 10 cents per single column inch for our advertising space....

 

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December 26, 1907, Downs Times (ID 5100)

Doctor John Dykes of Lebanon came over to this place last Friday and caused a warrant to be sworn out for the arrest of G. C. and J. M. Mays, publishers of the Lebanon Times, on a charge of criminal libel.... -- Smith County Pioneer.

When it became evident that the subscription price of the Times must be raised to $1.50 a year, we figured that by January 1st we would be short at least 150 subscribers....We have 50 more subscribers than when we made the announcement two months ago....

 

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January 9, 1908, Downs Times (ID 5105)

Besides those which come through the post office, the Krohn boys have 137 customers who take the Kansas City Star and Times.

"Ben Tilton, son of the editor of the Times, arrived in the city Monday afternoon to spend the holidays. Ben was a member of Company C, of the Fighting First Nebraska, which with the Twentieth Kansas bore the brunt of the campaigning and fighting in the Philippines in 1898 and 1899....He is located in business in Oklahoma City, Okla., and is a member of the job printing firm of Fisher & Tilton...." -- Beatrice (Neb.) Times.

Col. Major Jeltz was in town again the latter part of last week. Besides his State Ledger, published at Topeka, occasionally, he claims to own a paper at Kansas City and Los Angeles and at present he is promoting a scheme to start his fourth paper at Osborne. He intends to put the Osborne Farmer out of business because Walker said the Major was a good hustler for subscribers but a better hustler for whiskey. He had his usual jag on when here....

 

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January 16, 1908, Downs Times (ID 5106)

Miss Lottie Rudy has concluded to learn the printer's trade and began work in the Times office Monday.

J. R. Green, editor of the Kirwin Argus, was in Downs Monday....Besides publishing one of the best weekly papers in this part of Kansas, Mr. Green is marshal of his town, but as Kirwin is not in the wild and woolly class any more, he does not find it necessary to make many gun plays.

 

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January 30, 1908, Downs Times (ID 5108)

The Times has just installed a new and latest improved Chandler & Price job press and otherwise rearranged the machinery in the office. We now have four presses in our office and are certainly fixed to get out any kind of a job, no matter how large or small.

 

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February 13, 1908, Downs Times (ID 5111)

We can't help but say a good word for advertising....We inserted a two-line local in the Sunday edition of the Kansas City Star. We wanted a printer and so stated. The two-liner did not appear in a conspicuous place, but was only one of the several thousand of "want" ads that appeared that morning. At 10:30 that morning we had a call from Kansas City. A printer wanted a job. We hired him on the spot and at 8:00 o'clock the next morning he had his sleeves rolled up and was hard at work in the Times office. His name is Chas. R. Newberry....In all we heard from nearly 30 persons, and all because of a two-line local. Still, there are people who think nobody reads ads.

This office has been a busy place during the past week. Besides attending to getting out the Times and turning out an extra heavy run of commercial printing, we also got out a 40-page folder for the Fountain Suburban Homes Corporation of Fountain, Colo. It was a big job, but we sort of like to go up against something like this once in a while just to see what we can do. ...There are six printers at work in this office and it takes a big run of work to swamp them....

 

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April 2, 1908, Downs Times (ID 5120)

A. P. Gregory has sold his Cawker City Ledger to Robert Good, editor of the Jamestown Optimist, and possession will be given May 1st. Mr. Good is secretary of the Lincoln Park Chautauqua and we understand he will dispose of his Jamestown paper and move to Cawker....Good is a Democrat....

 

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April 9, 1908, Downs Times (ID 5122)

The last Peoples' Party organ in the state of Kansas has flopped -- flopped right into the lap of the Republican Party too. It happened last week when Old Joe Wright announced in his Smith County Messenger that he had carried the banner four years longer than the people themselves demanded....

"And is THAT Bert Walker," said a young lady last Friday when the Farmer editor was pointed out to her, "why, he's nice looking!" We have just been wondering what sort of a looking critter she had pictured in her mind for the Village Deacon.

 

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April 16, 1908, Downs Times (ID 5124)

A mile northeast of Webster, on the main highway, unoccupied and uncared for, stands the "haunted house." Webster is the headquarters of Medley, the peddler who is so well known all over western Rooks and eastern Graham counties; the point where one on whose nobility of character it is a pleasure to reflect -- Frank Hiddleson -- ran a store in the middle of the '80's; and the town from whence Colonel Hoyt moved the Webster Eagle, which became the Downs Globe, the first newspaper venture of that successful journalist, Ben T. Baker....

 

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April 30, 1908, Downs Times (ID 5126)

Times Buys New Typesetter -- The first of the week C. M. Leigh of Chicago, a representative of the Unitype Co. of Brooklyn, was in Downs and sold the Times a Simplex type setting machine.

We have been figuring on getting a typesetting machine of some kind for several months and investigated the proposition pretty thoroughly. Last week, the writer went to Emporia, where he watched the operation of several makes and came to the conclusion that the Simplex was the thing for the country printing office. It is an expensive affair, costing $1,750 f.o.b. Brooklyn. By the time it is installed our pocketbook will be short in the neighborhood of $1,800, which will leave it thinner than the slice of ham you get in a sandwich. It will be installed July 1. This machine not only sets type faster than any three persons can set it by hand, but it also distributes the type. It is a wonder and will enable us to get out a much better paper than at present, and with less expense....Downs is an up-to-date and growing town. The Times wants to keep abreast....

 

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May 7, 1908, Downs Times (ID 5130)

Link Drummond, an old-time newspaper man and later pastor of the Christian Church in Downs, has written a book and has it on the market now. It is entitled, "Sermons and Addresses by Drummond and His Scissors."...

 

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May 14, 1908, Downs Times (ID 5134)

Miss Vernie Ray, who for a year and a half has been employed in this office, resigned her place last Saturday night, having decided to quit the printing business for all time....

A compliment like the following from the pen of John Q. Royce in his Phillipsburg Dispatch is truly appreciated: "The Times...is a handsome paper, well edited, a bright newsy sheet and full of advertising throughout its entire eight pages. While all of the above is merited, yet Downs has another 'cracker Jack' newspaper in the News, which is also home print, ably edited, sparkling with bright editorials and newsy locals and chock full of advertising all the time. The editors and publishers of those papers are fast friends and, when they go away for a trip, they put two gowns in one grip and travel together. Downs should be proud of her newspapers and the heavy patronage which the merchants give them show that they do appreciate their efforts."

...A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Bert Headley of Ponca City, Okla., a week ago Friday. Bert Headley was formerly editor of the Gaylord Sentinel....

 

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May 21, 1908, Downs Times (ID 5135)

W. B. Gaumer of Phillipsburg...has given up newspaper business for keeps and devotes all his time to real estate....

 

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May 28, 1908, Downs Times (ID 5136)

Troubles of an editor: Six weeks ago a man stopped his subscription to the Times because he could not afford to longer take it. He stood us off for our pay. Since then he has smoked nearly $10 worth of cigars and paid $3 dog tax....Following is a letter we received this week from a delinquent we asked to pay up: "Well, I do feel sorry for you poor fellows so you haven't brains enough to stop your dinky old paper when the time is up.+?...Another subscriber whom we tried to be as easy as possible with got mad when we sent a statement for our money and wound up a long letter by saying: "Everything I can say against your paper, I'll do so."...These are only a few of the experiences we have encountered since the post office department denied us the privilege of extending credit for more than one year to subscribers....

 

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June 18, 1908, Downs Times (ID 5138)

We received 2.5 tons of print paper last Thursday from the mill at Grand Rapids, Minn. This is the largest shipment of paper this office has ever received at one time, and it has caused our bank account to resemble that of a farmer's wheat field that has been hit by a hard hail storm -- it's all shot to pieces.

 

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June 25, 1908, Downs Times (ID 5140)

Theo. Weld and daughter...came down from Kearney, Neb., last Thursday evening and spent a few days with the former's grandson, R. T. Weld, and family....

We received a good bunch of news items from Route No. 4 out of Cawker City last week but, owning to the fact that the writer's name was not sent along, we could not use them....It is an iron-clad rule in this office that nothing appears in print unless we know the author....Sign your articles. No one will know your identity except the publishers.

 

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July 9, 1908, Downs Times (ID 5141)

It is a hard matter to get the best of some newspaper men in any kind of a combat. An Iowa editor had a fight with a delinquent subscriber and here is his report in the next issue: "There was a blow. Somebody fell. We got up. Turning to our antagonist, we succeeded in winding his arms around our waist and by a quick maneuver threw him on top of us, bringing our back, at the same time, in contact with the solid bed of the printing press. Then, inserting our nose between his teeth and cleverly entangling his hands in our hair, we had him."

 

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July 23, 1908, Downs Times (ID 5143)

Quincy R. Craft, who has been in Ogden, Utah,...looking after forestry work, dropped in Sunday and visited with his relatives and many friends....While out West, he took time to make a short visit with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Craft, who reside in Los Angeles....When he went to Washington some seven years ago, he knew nothing about the work....He has several times been promoted and now draws a salary of $1,800 per annum....

 

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July 30, 1908, Downs Times (ID 5145)

Among the editors who were here (for the celebration) were J. W. Coleman, city editor of the Atchison Globe; B. P. Walker, Osborne Farmer; E. N. McFadden, Osborne News; J. J. Parker, Alton Empire; Robert Good, Cawker City Ledger; Ben T. Baker, Smith County Journal; and Leon J. VanLaeys of the Topeka Capital.

 

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September 3, 1908, Downs Times (ID 5151)

B. F. Yost, clerk of the court, has bought a half interest in the Osborne News.... -- Osborne Farmer.

 

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September 24, 1908, Downs Times (ID 5152)

While tearing down the old house formerly owned by Chas. Oldson, Guy Rogers found sticking to one of the rafters a copy of the Downs Times published May 11, 1882....We have a copy of every issue since it was founded 29 years ago. There are something over 1,500 copies and they fill three large-sized boxes. In those 1,500 papers can be found a pretty complete history of Downs....There are other files of the Times in Osborne County. Mrs. A. Z. Blunt used to keep a file. J. K. Mitchell of Osborne not only has a file of this paper but he has one of the several other papers.

 

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October 22, 1908, Downs Times (ID 5156)

Last Saturday, E. H. McFadden sold his half interest in the Osborne News to a company of Osborne Democrats. B. F. Yost still owns a half interest in the paper, but we understand it is for sale. Walt Rice tells us that E. H. McFadden will be retained as local editor for the time being but the policy of the paper will be Democratic. Travers and Towne will probably do most of the heavy editorial writing.

 

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October 29, 1908, Downs Times (ID 5158)

...Bartley Yost...sold his interest in the Osborne News last Saturday to the Democrats, and he is frank to admit that his newspaper experience cost him several hundred dollars....As he had to leave for Washington at once, he was compelled to sell at a sacrifice.

 

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December 31, 1908, Downs Times (ID 5166)

We have given our readers more than their money's worth this year. There are 52 weeks in a year but this issue is the 53rd one we have gotten out in 1908.

Walt Whitmore, the old-time Downs editor, stopped at the Lipton last Thursday night....Mr. Whitmore is editor of the Purcell (Okla.) Register and it is one of the best paying weekly newspapers in the state. When Whitmore was in the newspaper work at Downs, figuratively speaking, he was "up against it." There was nothing doing and a newspaper man was in the same class as a church house mouse. One time, Whitmore approached Dick Utt and said: "Well, Dick, the stuff is all off. My 'ready prints' come COD this week with $3.50 charges attached. I can't raise the money and will have to suspend publication.' Mr. Utt pulled $3.50 from his pocket and handed it to Whitmore and the Downs Chief's life was saved -- for the time being. Mr. Whitmore is prosperous looking now and shows no effects of starvation.

 

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February 11, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5177)

The Stockton News has died, leaving Stockton with but one paper.

Col. W. S. Tilton...who sold out 11 years ago and bought the Beatrice (Neb.) Times, has sold his paper to the Express of that city.

 

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February 18, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5180)

J. J. Parker has sold his Alton Empire to O. A. Schoonover of Oxford, Neb....

 

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February 25, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5182)

Postmaster Smith has resigned -- There has been a rumor in the air for the past two or three weeks to the effect that Postmaster Smith would soon resign and that C. K. Ware would likely be appointed to fill the vacancy. Last night word was received from Washington confirming the rumor....It is said that officeholders sometimes die but never resign. Here is an exception to the rule. Postmaster Smith had to do one or the other so he chose the latter way out....

J. J. Parker of Alton has sold his paper, the Alton Empire, to O. A. Schoonover of Oxford, Neb., and the latter has taken control. Mr. Parker will remain with him this week until he "gets on to the ropes." Mr. Parker has not fully decided as to his future, but his friends among the newspaper boys of this county hope that he will not stray very far away. He is a good newspaper man and has given Alton a fine paper.

 

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March 4, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5185)

The publishers of this paper have sold the plant to J. J. Parker of Alton, and the change in management will take place next Thursday morning after the paper has been issued.

Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Parker of Alton are moving to town. They will occupy the Harlan property in the north part of town.

There have been three newspaper changes within the past week. Seward Jones has sold his half interest in the Concordia Daily Blade to Lynn W. Bloom of Topeka. Wm. Woolman has turned the Portis Independent over to his son, Henry, and W. R. Baker, formerly of Glen Elder, has bought the Woodston paper, and having leased the Stockton News, he will consolidate the two at Stockton.

 

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March 11, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5187)

Farewell. Today the ownership of the Times passes into the hands of J. J. Parker and it is with no little regret that the time has come for us to write a last goodbye. We have watched the paper grow from what might be termed a white elephant to one of the most prosperous papers in northwest Kansas. This change of conditions was not brought about wholly by us, but because the town has grown to be a live one....Mr. Parker, our successor, is one of the best newspaper men of Kansas....After coming to this part of Kansas, he entered the employ of John Q. Royce, then editor of the Phillipsburg Dispatch, and a great deal of the time he had complete charge of that great weekly. Later he went to Stockton and bought the News, and from there he went to the Alton Empire....Weld & Smith.

Our Introductory. For several years, we have regarded Downs as one of he most progressive towns in this section of Kansas....We wish to say that this city has been very fortunate in having two excellent papers....We have chosen Downs as a place in which to make our home, and we feel satisfied that we have made no mistake....We wish to state that there will be no change in the political complexion of the paper...the principles as set forth by the Republican party will be upheld.... -- J. J. Parker.

 

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March 18, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5188)

Weld & Smith, former publishers of the Times, and the present publisher feel very grateful to the newspaper boys over the district for the many fine compliments paid them in mentioning the change in ownership of this paper....

We have retained Walt Smith to do the local rustling for the Times for a few weeks....

 

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March 25, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5189)

Col. Maj. Jeltz, the Topeka colored "newspaper" man, was declared insane last week and sent to the asylum. He used to come to Downs about every so often and rope in a lot of suckers for $1 each. They would subscribe for his paper and that would be the last they would see or hear of Jeltz and his paper until he made the rounds again.

 

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April 1, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5191)

F. M. Learned, who came here three weeks ago to work in the Times office, went over to Kirwin last Saturday and closed a deal with J. R. Green for the Kirwin Argus....

 

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April 15, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5195)

Billy Gray, one of the old-time printers of Kansas, passed away last Wednesday at his home in Kirwin, where for upwards of 30 years he worked at his trade. He was of the old school of printers, but not of a roving disposition....He was pretty well along in years and for a year or more had been in very poor health. He was the mainstay of nearly every newspaper Kirwin ever had.

 

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April 22, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5197)

For the past month, we have employed Walt Smith to assist in rustling local news for the Times, but this week we have taken entire charge....

The subscription list and good will of the Kirwin Argus has been sold to the Kirwin Kansan, and the Argus plant will be moved to Woodston, where the Argus will be established by F. M. Learned....

 

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April 29, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5199)

Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Mann most royally entertained the following guests at an excellent dinner Sunday: Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Ransom, Miss Sylvia Rarick of Portis, Dr. F. A. Mills of Foss, Okla., and Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Parker. The occasion was the eighth wedding anniversary of this estimable couple....

The Stockton Review installed a new Cranston press this week.

 

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May 27, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5203)

Last week, Walt Smith purchased the Herington Times and will take possession June 1....Besides being a good printer, he is a clever writer, a man of sterling worth to any community....For the past 10 years, he has been associated with the Downs Times a portion of the time as part owner....

 

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June 17, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5207)

Mord Smith, who has been the faithful and efficient foreman of the Tribune for two years, left Sunday night for Kansas City. He will visit his parents at Lansing for a few weeks, taking a much needed rest....We wish him well wherever he may go. -- Colby Tribune.

 

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July 1, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5211)

Howard Ruede, local scribe on the Osborne Farmer, has written many columns of exceptionally interesting sketches concerning the early history of Osborne County. The two issues of the Farmer contained a review of the newspapers established and changes in management. We furnished some data concerning the Times...the article as used in last week's paper is substantially correct. "...The Times was started...by Tom Nicklin....It took a man with great faith in the country to start a paper in 1880 after a winter which was one of the driest in the history of the county -- no snow or rain sufficient to even lay the dust having fallen between October 1879 and May of the following year...."

If you want postcard views of Downs, place your order with the Times. About fifteen different views, including residences, churches, business houses and street scenes, will soon be printed at this office.

Brother Alrich, the old soldier editor of the Cawker Record, is working hard to make the old soldier day at Lincoln Park Chautauqua a success.

 

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July 15, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5214)

We dislike very much to make apologies...but the editor of the Times has no printer this week; we are attempting to do the work of two men, and shall continue to do so until we can secure a competent man....

The electric light plant was out of commission Tuesday night, which meant quite a loss to this office. If there are no lights tonight, the Times may be one day late, for we cannot do all the work shorthanded in daylight hours.

 

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July 22, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5215)

The new foreman of the Times office, Chas. E. Wilson, who came here last Thursday from Fort Leavenworth, where for some time he had been employed in the army college, has undoubtedly seen as much, and very likely more, of the world than any other individual in this section of the country. He was born in Lancashire, England, and came to this country when 10 years of age. When a small boy he lived in Rio Janeiro with his parents....His mother lives in Philadelphia, Pa., where for a few years he resided, having been employed in some of the best printing offices in that city. Mr. Wilson has traveled over 60,000 miles on the sea, though not as a sailor, and has made two trips around the world. He is a veteran of the Spanish-American War, and for years existed in tropical jungles under the equator. He was among the first to go to the Philippines during the war, as a member of the 10th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, where he served for a time in General Lawton's division in the campaign of Northern Luzon....He subsequently served in the 30th Infantry, U.S. Regulars, during the occupation of the island of Mindoro....Also served in 18th and 13th regiments of U.S. Regulars. Served with the Kansas famous soldier, General Frederick Funston....

One day late next week. People engaged in newspaper work...like to take advantage of a little recreation during the Downs anniversary celebration, which will be held the first three days of next week. The editor of this paper was never known to miss a ball game unless something unusual happened to interfere, and we haven't the nerve to ask our employees to pass up the tournament games....We know everybody will be so busy celebrating that they will not expect a very newsy paper next week, nor will they care if the Times reaches them one day later than usual.

F. M. Leonard, formerly of Neosho Falls, who worked in the Times office two weeks in March, is publishing an excellent paper at Woodston....

 

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August 19, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5220)

Mrs. Geo. Dougherty and daughter, Gladys, of Topeka arrived last week....Mr.

Dougherty...arrived Friday....Mr. Dougherty finds that Downs has made much progress since he left here. He has built up a nice business in his training school and is very much in love with the work.

 

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August 26, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5222)

Miss Clara Mitchell, who has been employed in the Times office for two and one-half years, gave up her place Saturday night. She worked very steady and concluded she was entitled to a rest....She has been a very faithful and competent typo in this office....

Miss Emma Nunn has accepted a place in the Times office as a compositor. For the past nine months, she has been employed in the office of the Glen Elder Sentinel....She takes the place of Miss Mitchell....

 

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September 2, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5223)

A great many people...will regret to learn of the death of Mrs. W. S. Tilton who, with her family, moved to Beatrice, Neb., from this place about 12 years ago. Mr. Tilton was publisher of the Osborne Farmer...and later published the Times....Deceased was born at Jenny Lind, Ark....She was 49 years of age and leaves a husband and 10 children....

The Times is shy one compositor this week, Miss Edith Sellers being away for a week's vacation.

 

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September 16, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5225)

Charles Wilson, who for several weeks held down the job of foreman of this office, left Sunday morning for Atchison, having accepted a position with the Baker-Vawter Printing Co. of that city....

 

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October 7, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5228)

O. A. Schoonover of the Alton Empire stopped off here Sunday evening on his way home from Kansas City, where he had been to see about buying a new press on which to print his paper.

 

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October 14, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5229)

The Stockton Review of last week contained more than a column writeup of the Western News, which was established in January 1876, a history of that paper's career. The Western News is no more. Herbert Baker, who for several months undertook to manage the business for Sam Carrol, purchased the material and shipped it to Logan, where he will launch a new paper. Concerning our connection with the Western News, the Review pays the following compliment to the Times editor and wife who certainly appreciate the favor: "In July 1903, the News was sold by Young to J. J. Parker of Phillipsburg. Under the management of Mr. Parker, assisted by his wife, who proved to be an able helper in local work, the News improved and was known as the ideal country weekly...."

 

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October 21, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5230)

Harry Clark came down from Stockton Sunday evening to assist with the work in the Times office. Tuesday morning he received a telephone message from Palco, stating that his sister was very sick....We have it to do this week, or the greater portion of it, at least, and we fail to recognize the job as a snap.

 

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December 30, 1909, Downs Times (ID 5239)

Volume 1, No. 2, of the Lebanon Argus, published by Percy F. Root, formerly of Agra, reached our desk last week....

 

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January 20, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5241)

Horace G. Goss is the new publisher of the Osborne News, having assumed control of the plant last week....

 

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January 27, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5243)

The Times building is pretty well filled up, so much that we believe it unwise to install a folding machine. Then another reason is lack of finances. We realize that there is a great saving of time each week by using a machine instead of folding by hand, but at present our force can handle a circulation of nearly 1,200 in 2-1/4 hours and that is pretty fair time....

 

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February 10, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5245)

J. J. Parker of the Downs Times was in Stockton last Friday taking orders for calendars. Parker is making a fine paper of the Times. -- Stockton Record.

"J. J. Parker of the Downs Times was in this city Thursday evening. He was taking orders for a fine line of calendars and wall pockets, which he is selling for future delivery." -- Stockton Review.

 

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March 3, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5249)

Horace G. Goss, editor of the Osborne News, was a Downs visitor....He has made arrangements to install a Junior typesetting machine in the near future.

 

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March 17, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5251)

Walt Smith's Herington Times came very near going the fire route on Tuesday of last week....Had it not been for quick action on the part of the fire company, Walt would have sustained a total loss of his printing plant. From his paper, which was issued on time, we quote as follows: "...Upon close examination our Linotype and presses were found to be little damaged and that was what counted. All of our paper stock, or nearly so, was destroyed and all the new type we had put in since buying the Times went the route...."

 

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March 24, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5253)

The Times has repeatedly given notice that it will not carry a subscriber on its mailing list longer than one year without remittance. The new postal laws will not permit a weekly paper to carry subscribers indefinitely as formerly....To some we have sent statements for two or three years' subscription, and not a response have we received....We are adding new subscribers to the Times list every week, and we want your assistance. By joining our army of readers now, you will be in line for the large illustrated edition of the Times which is now under way....

 

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April 7, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5256)

Walt Smith of the Herington Times is evidently enjoying a nice business. The building he occupies is to have an extension of 20 feet in order to afford more room for his rapidly increasing business....

E. J. Garner...recently purchased the Noble County Sentinel, published at Perry, Okla., and of course is publishing a Democratic paper....

 

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May 19, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5261)

We have found it more difficult to rustle local news matter this week than we have at any other time since locating in Downs....The editor of the Times has, for the past two months, done the work of two men. Besides Mrs. Parker's assistance on local work, we have been assisted in the office by two lady compositors, and for the past four or five weeks there has been enough work to keep two men busy all the time. We have averaged better than 14 hours a day during this period and thus far managed to keep the job work up in good shape and at the same time have given our readers a live local paper.

 

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May 26, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5263)

The price of brooms has made a big jump in the last few months, but that doesn't bother a printing office. A print shop only buys one broom and that is when it starts in business. The condition of the broom depends upon how long the office has been established. -- Scottsville Advance. Generally speaking, the foregoing is true, but we want to state, and truthfully too, that during our management of the Times, covering a period of a little over a year, we have purchased three brooms, and this office is swept every morning. There is no

reason why a printing office cannot be kept looking respectable most of the time. That is not all; we long ago departed from the custom of using one towel until there was danger in dropping it on the floor for fear it would break.

 

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June 16, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5267)

Geo. Oldson, Jr., aged 13 years, commenced "deviling" in the Times office last Thursday. He has set over a column and a half of type for this week's issue and, if he continues to improve for three or four years, as he has the past week, he will make a first-class printer.

 

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June 23, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5269)

Horace G. Goss, who had been publishing the Osborne County News for the past few months, gave up the struggle last week. Harry Clark of Woodston and Warren McClellan of Michigan...made arrangements for the plant Monday....Harry Clark is a pretty good printer for so young a boy and Warren McClellan is a specialist in rustling subscriptions. The boys propose to run an independent paper and this move takes from the county the only Democratic organ it contained.

"Every week we receive a certain Sixth District newspaper. It is printed in a county seat town and from a standpoint of workmanship none can excel it. It is printed nicely, has lots of local news, and its advertisements are well put up. But all the excellent workmanship and effort on this newspaper are ruined every week by one persistent habit its editor seems unable to shake off. He cannot refrain from writing filthy and coarse stuff. Almost every issue of his paper contains one or more locals of such a character that no well respecting father would think of reading in his family circle. The days of the smutty newspaper are past. An editor cannot be too careful what he puts in his paper....The editor who has to be smutty to say something funny has missed his calling. The stockyards and the section are still open to him....The decent, fair and particularly the clean newspapers are the ones that endure." -- Osborne Farmer.

We take pleasure in reproducing the above article for it voices our sentiment precisely. We may be mistaken, but we think not, when we infer that the publisher alluded to by the Farmer has slopped over two or three times recently in complimenting a certain correspondent who at one time contributed news to this paper. They are both of the same caliber, and the publisher who eliminates from his columns the coarse, smutty dope such as these people delight in writing will, in our opinion, have no cause for regret. We have been censured by some because we refused to publish all the rottenness this correspondent saw fit to write, but we have gained friends and an increase in business by dropping such correspondence entirely. We have heard publishers say they did not consider they had a right to change in any manner, or eliminate entirely, the copy sent in by a correspondent, but our opinion is entirely opposite....

 

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June 30, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5270)

The Osborne News, though four pages shy last week, was an improvement over former issues. The new publishers are handicapped somewhat, for Mr. McClellan is not a practical printer. In fact, soliciting subscriptions is the only experience he ever had in newspaper work, but he is catching on admirably.

 

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July 7, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5272)

This week we have accepted a clothing advertisement from Jacob Rothschild of Cawker City. We are forced to this issue because both clothing stores in this city refuse to advertise in the Times columns. Meibergen Bros. have given us a reasonable and satisfactory explanation for their action, but from the Carney Clothing Co. we have been unable to get a satisfactory word. We shall not in any manner antagonize either of these clothing firms except to rustle outside clothing business which we can easily obtain at a living rate per inch for all the space we have for sale. We shall be loyal to Downs merchants just as long as they are loyal to us, and thus far have very little room for complaint....Advertising is our stock in trade. No merchant turns down business, no matter from what source it comes. We have turned down business because it conflicted with advertising of home merchants. At the present time we have no reason for accepting advertising of a general nature, and we trust such a time will never come. We will not use space advising our people to trade in any town outside of Downs, except as may be done through legitimate advertising. Our subscription list is open for inspection by any advertiser at any time, and we have the proofs in this office to show conclusively that the Times circulation is greater now than at any time in the history of the paper. One can never tell about circulation statements. We have often seen figures in newspaper annuals which certainly lied.

Mrs. Roy Buckingham, who was formerly Miss Effie Cole, has been assisting at the Times office a few days the past week. It seems very natural to have Effie with us again, for about six years ago she worked for us at the Western News. Mrs. Buckingham is excellent help in a print shop, as she is a rapid and accurate compositor, and is of valuable assistance on ad and job work.

 

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July 21, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5275)

George Gray, foreman in the Times office, visited friends in Osborne Sunday.

Early in the week we planned on issuing four extra pages, but a rush of job work prevented us from doing so. We are compelled to turn down some good advertising but there is a limit to the amount of work that can be turned out in two or three days. We are not neglecting the local news feature, however, though our pages are crowded very much.

 

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August 11, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5278)

Walt Smith..., who purchased the Times at Herington about 14 months ago, sold the paper about 10 days ago to H. L. Harris and Perle R. Barton of Iola....

The Osborne News has again changed hands. This time the plant was sold by N. C. Else to a man by the name of Hadley of Kansas City, Kan. He is the publisher of a prohibition paper, which he will issue from the News office....

If any of our exchanges know of a lady compositor who could be secured for a few weeks, we would be glad to hear from them....

 

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August 25, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5282)

Charlie Wells has purchased of O. A. Schoonover the Alton Empire, a paper we published three years prior to locating here....

 

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September 1, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5285)

Mrs. Harmon Wilson and son Lyle and Fred Campbell of Topeka arrived yesterday morning for a visit with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. P. H. Campbell. Mrs. Wilson will leave Friday for Oklahoma City, where she has purchased a newspaper (The Legal News). -- Alton Empire. Mrs. Wilson has been employed on the Topeka Capital ever since her husband's death....

We are certainly laboring under difficulties in this office these days. We have been snowed under with job work, and not a printer have we been able to hire. Miss Sellers is taking a month's vacation and Tuesday evening Miss Nunn was taken sick. The editor of this sheet has been doing the work of two or three people for the past two weeks and we will still stay with the job. Mrs. Parker has been of great assistance in rustling local news....

 

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September 8, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5286)

Hugh Burnett arrived here Saturday morning to take the place of foreman in the Times office. We hope we will be fortunate enough to keep him for some time, and thus give us an opportunity to look after our home interests more closely besides giving better attention to our growing mail order printing business.

 

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September 29, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5288)

...We received a proposition from Montgomery Ward & Co., that firm desiring to use a series of advertisements in this paper. We have not reached the point of making contracts for that class of advertising, yet so long as it does not conflict in any manner with goods our advertisers handle it is poor policy to reject it. We can sell what extra space we have to merchants in towns closer by.

 

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October 20, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5290)

...The Smith County Journal has purchased a Junior typesetting machine. The day of hand composition (ending) for the majority of country papers is close at hand. The Times will undoubtedly install a machine within a few months.

 

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October 27, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5291)

The Stockton Review is another paper in the Sixth District to install a Junior typesetting machine.

At the state meeting of the WCTU, held in Hutchinson this week, The Downs Times was awarded the contract for printing Our Messenger, a monthly eight-page paper, the official organ of the WCTU, with a circulation of 7,000. We submitted a bid in competition with a large number of other offices and made plenty of allowance for good wages in handling the contract. In addition to the Messenger, it will bring several hundred dollars worth of job printing. The Times office is already one of the best equipped offices in the country, but we will add new equipment right away, making it still better. Mrs. Alice G. Young of this city will edit the paper....No woman in Kansas is better qualified for the job.

 

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November 24, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5293)

This week Dr. Gaston is building an addition to his building, in which the Times is located, in order to furnish room for new equipment. A new machine for folding, pasting and trimming the Times and Our Messenger has been added to our already well-equipped office, besides a complete new dress of type and other material for the Messenger...the first issue of which is to appear Dec. 1. The circulation of this paper will reach beyond 8,000 this month. We hope to land another publication by Feb. 1, and if successful will be obliged to install a typesetting machine, and we may do so earlier.

 

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December 8, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5296)

Since last week's Times was published, six people have been kept very busy. Commencing Thursday morning, several columns of type were set for Our Messenger, the official state paper of the WCTU...eight pages were made up, 9,000 copies of the paper printed, folded and mailed. The folding machine, which folds, pastes and trims any size sheet, failed to arrive and is yet sidetracked somewhere...making it necessary to fold and trim the entire edition by hand, besides stapling a good percent of the edition. The mailing was no small task.

There were over 500 packages for as many towns, ranging from two papers to as high as 100 papers to a package, and it took six mail sacks to handle the edition. The press work commenced Friday noon and the last piece of mail was wrapped precisely at 12:00 o'clock Monday noon....This week's issue of the Times is far from its usual standard, but when the folding machine is installed the work of issuing the Messenger will be lessened by almost half.

 

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December 15, 1910, Downs Times (ID 5298)

Last Friday we sold a half interest in the Downs Times to Paul C. Rankin, who for the past two years has been connected with the Fort Scott Republican. Prior to that time, Mr. Rankin was associated with the Ottawa Herald, Coffeyville Journal, and Garden City Telegram. He is a thoroughly experienced newspaper man and an excellent citizen.... -- J. J. Parker.

In associating myself with Mr. Parker in the publication of the Times, it is with the idea of cooperating with him in keeping the paper at its present high standards as a newspaper, representative of Downs and this section.... -- Paul C. Rankin.

The props were knocked out from under the supposition about the number 13 being unlucky Saturday afternoon when the judges in the Times corn contest awarded the first prize of $7 to Fred Tetlow, whose exhibit was marked "No.13." There were 22 other contestants....

 

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January 5, 1911, Downs Times (ID 5303)

George E. Dougherty, one of the early editors of the Times, has been for some years the head of one of the leading business colleges of the state...The following item in the Topeka Capital will be of interest to his friends here: "In the December issue of Phonographic World, the editor...speaking of a visit to that famous school, the Iron City Business College, says, 'The George E. Dougherty, Topeka, Kan., typewriter instruction book is used.' Mr. Miner says that in his trip among the business colleges, he found Mr. Dougherty's text in use by a number of them...."

E. W. Howe, who founded the Atchison Globe 33 years ago and whose personality has made it one of the best-known papers in the United States, retired from it with the issue of Dec. 31....

 

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January 19, 1911, Downs Times (ID 5306)

Bert Walker, the Village Deacon of the Osborne Farmer, was in Downs Thursday morning on his return from a month's visit in California. The Atchison Globe of Thursday pays this tribute to Mr. Walker: "...While old Bert Walker has the reputation of being the laziest newspaper man in Kansas, he manages to make the Osborne Farmer about the best country weekly in the state....Old Bert Walker is a printer, as have been most of the Kansas editors who have acquired fame. In a certain country printing office where he used to work before he became fat and plutocratic, he would string up some 14,000 ems of leaded brevier, and bet odds that he would have fewer errors in his string than any man in the office, or even money on every galley or column that he wouldn't have an error....Old Bert is as classy about his writing as about his printing. Whenever you hear of a lazy man becoming a marked success in his line, you will find something like old Bert: a swift and careful workman, but who moves so easily and with so little lost motion that he seems to be easygoing...."

 

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February 9, 1911, Downs Times (ID 5309)

Our birthday -- The Times had a birthday this week and with this issue it begins its thirty-second year as an exponent of life in Downs and this part of the fertile valley of the Solomon. When, early in the year 1880, The Times was first issued, the town of Downs had not become one of the important towns of Kansas but even at that time it was teeming with possibilities, many of which have been realized, and in the growth of the town to its present size and importance, the Times has always aimed to keep step with the progress of Downs and to be a faithful mirror of its activities.... -- Parker & Rankin.

 

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February 16, 1911, Downs Times (ID 5311)

E. J. Garner, now editor of the Noble County News at Perry, Okla., but formerly of Downs, has written the Times, congratulating the paper on its 32nd birthday: "Accept my congratulations upon the success you are making in the publication of the Times....It was 28 years ago that the undersigned was a member of the Times force and we are always glad to get the paper....My brother, T. N. Garner, lives northwest of Downs."

"J. J. Parker of Downs, Kan., is visiting at the home of his father, John L. Parker, in this village, who has been very ill, but is better at this writing....Mr. Parker...was a printer in Ovid about 20 years ago." -- Ovid (Mich.) Register-Union.

 

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February 23, 1911, Downs Times (ID 5312)

Next week Our Messenger will again be issued from this office, which means that the Times force will be exceptionally busy for several days....We have been enjoying an excellent job business both from home people besides having delivered several mail order jobs.

 

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April 6, 1911, Downs Times (ID 5317)

Cedar is to have a new newspaper named the Enterprise....L. R. Meadows of the Gaylord Sentinel is fathering the proposition, and Elmer E. Grogan will edit the Enterprise.

 

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April 13, 1911, Downs Times (ID 5319)

...The Times is again named as one of the official county papers and readers will receive the official county news as they have for many years past.

J. J. Parker commenced excavating yesterday preparatory to building a six-room modern cottage on his lots just east of Wm. Hopper's residence.

 

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May 4, 1911, Downs Times (ID 5321)

Paper towels, which are so highly recommended by Dr. S. J. Crumbine, author of "Swat the Fly," have been in printing offices since Benjamin Franklin's time at least.

 

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May 25, 1911, Downs Times (ID 5324)

E. J. Garner...recently editor of the Noble County (Okla.) Sentinel, has sold the latter paper and will embark in the real estate business in Perry, Okla.

 

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June 1, 1911, Downs Times (ID 5326)

Announcement to Times readers -- Unless something should interfere with my present plans, I will change my residence from Downs to Salina about June 20 in order to take up a line of work which came unsolicited to me and which, I believe, I cannot afford to overlook. Although the new line of work will necessitate a change in residence yet I expect to keep in close touch with Downs and this section. I shall retain my interest in the Times and I shall always have a strong interest in Downs and its present and future advancement. J. J. Parker, with whom I have been associated in the publication of the Times for the past six months and who was, prior to that time, sole owner of the paper, will have charge of the Times. The excellent paper he published is sufficient guarantee to the readers of the Times that a subscription to it means a live, up-to-the-minute paper filled with news of this section every week.... -- Yours sincerely, Paul C. Rankin.

 

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June 8, 1911, Downs Times (ID 5329)

T. A. McNeal, state printer and editor of the Mail and Breeze, was in Downs Friday morning on his way to Osborne to deliver the commencement address to the high school....

George A. Hillebert of Wynnewood, Okla., has written for a copy of the Times and recalls that 24 years ago he was employed on the paper. He is now in the drug business...

 

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June 22, 1911, Downs Times (ID 5332)

Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. Rankin left here Saturday morning for Salina, where they now reside. Mr. Rankin has assumed the editorial management of the Salina Evening and Semi-Weekly Journal, as the successor to Paul A. Lovewell, who recently went to Topeka as one of the editors of the Merchants' Journal....Mr. Rankin purchased an interest in the Times last December....The position tendered him by Senator Bristow came unexpectedly and unsolicited....Mr. Rankin still retains his interest in the Times and will keep in touch with Downs all the time.

 

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July 6, 1911, Downs Times (ID 5334)

On Tuesday morning, July 4, at 3:30 o'clock, Mrs. W. H. Ransom passed away at her home in this city after a serious illness, her death being due to peritonitis....Her girlhood and lifelong friend, Mrs. C. E. Mann, is prostrated with grief as the two were like sisters....Mrs. Ransom was born near Canton, Ohio, Nov. 21, 1882, and came to Kansas with her parents when she was two years of age. The family first located at Glade and later moved to Phillipsburg....On Nov. 11, 1900, she was united in marriage to Wm. H. Ransom in Phillipsburg....To this union were born two daughters, Maxine, aged seven, and Mary, aged four....

Fred Meyers, who until recently was employed at the Journal office at Smith Center, came here Sunday evening to assist Ransom & Mann for a short time.

 

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July 20, 1911, Downs Times (ID 5338)

...A. A. Robertson of Cook, Neb., arrived in this city for a short visit with old-time friends....In 1879, the Robertson family came here from Atchison County, Mo....At one time, the smell of printer's ink attracted his attention and he commenced "deviling" in the Times office for Geo. Dougherty when the paper was printed on a G. Washington hand press. Later he worked for Mr. Craft, and for a short time was employed by Col. Tilton on the Osborne Farmer. He finally gave up the printing business and for several years clerked for Skinner Bros. and John Wolfert. Later he purchased Conductor George Collins' interest in the general mercantile business of W. O. Davis & Co....

The Portis Independent, which for a year or more has been published by C. C. Clardy, was sold last week to W. C. and L. A. Smith.

 

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August 17, 1911, Downs Times (ID 5341)

The Downs Times had a very elaborate writeup of the big floods, accompanied by several large halftones of the railroad bridge under water. It was a very enterprising piece of work and does great credit to the hustling proprietor, J. J. Parker. -- Stockton Record.

 

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August 24, 1911, Downs Times (ID 5342)

This is the date of the Farmers' Union picnic five miles south of Downs. Tom McNeal, editor of the Mail and Breeze; Monroe McAuliffe, state president of the Farmers' Union; and Ira Bickell, county lecturer, are to address the people....

 

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September 28, 1911, Downs Times (ID 5343)

At the state convention of the Kansas WCTU, now in session in Kansas City, Kan., the Downs Times was awarded the contract for printing Our Messenger, the official state paper, for the year 1912. This office was also awarded the contract for printing 1,500 copies of the state minutes, each book to contain 200 pages.

Miss Maude Franklin, formerly an employee of this office, went to Stockton Monday, where she has a position in the Review office....She is trying out on the Junior Linotype....

 

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October 5, 1911, Downs Times (ID 5344)

Miss Edna Bays of Cawker City has accepted a position as compositor in the Times office....Miss Bays has been employed by Robert Good of the Cawker Ledger the greater portion of the time for the past three years.

Harry Root, a representative of the Topeka State Journal, who has made this territory regularly for at least a third of a century, was in this city Monday evening....

 

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October 19, 1911, Downs Times (ID 5345)

There was more excitement at the Times office Monday morning than any other place in town, we think....Up until Monday morning, we had never known a horse, and a blind one at that, to hanker for print shop love or gore, but Joe Richardson has a blind horse that did his level best to start something Monday morning. He was hitched to the ice wagon, and while his owner was delivering ice in the Van Noy restaurant, a train pulled past and frightened him. The horse made one or two lunges and landed through a rear window of the Times office. One rack was badly broken and several cases of type badly pied. The horse's head and the thills of the wagon entered the building, and for a few moments there was plenty of excitement....

M. E. Haworth, who has been employed in this office since the first of the year, has accepted a position on the Salina Daily Union....It will be up to the boss of this ranch to do a little more rustling, which means anyway from 14 to 16 hours a day to handle the work for a while at least.

 

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November 2, 1911, Downs Times (ID 5347)

During the noon hour Sunday, or between 12:30 and 2:00 o'clock, some sneak thief or thieves effected an entrance to the Times office, either by cutting a screen door to the shed on the west side of the shop or by use of skeleton key applied to the front door, and stole two $5 bills from a drawer in the desk. To most people, and to the newspaper fraternity in particular, it will seem almost incredible that a newspaper man would have so much money at one time....

 

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December 7, 1911, Downs Times (ID 5350)

No. 1, Volume 1 of the Osborne Evening News...came to us as quite a surprise. The first issue was published Saturday, Dec. 2....We wish brother Edwin C. Hadley success in his new venture....

 

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December 28, 1911, Downs Times (ID 5354)

This week we take advantage of the lull in advertising and issue only four pages because we are exceedingly anxious to go to press with Our Messenger one week earlier than usual. Our readers will find pretty good local news service, however....

Merle Cushing injured his left foot in the pedal of the big job press at the Times office last Monday morning, and has since been laid up for repairs....We miss the lad at the office....

 

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January 25, 1912, Downs Times (ID 5358)

Newspapers published on Thursday will have five publication days in February. The Holton Signal calls attention to the fact that this unusual event has not happened since 1872 and will not happen again until 1940.

Volume 1, No. 1, of the University Daily Kansan, published at Lawrence, reached us a few days ago. It is a four page, six column paper filled to the brim with good reading matter....

 

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February 1, 1912, Downs Times (ID 5359)

This office has certainly been well favored for the past two weeks with orders for job printing and it keeps rolling in regularly. We are under obligation to Mrs. Lillian Mitchner of Topeka, state president of the WCTU organization, for several big orders for blanks of various kinds and folders, ranging from 2,000 to 20,000 impressions. We certainly appreciate these orders which, together with the publication of the Times and Our Messenger, besides local job printing, have kept our force very busy, and that is what we want. We can handle all that comes our way.

 

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February 8, 1912, Downs Times (ID 5361)

E. B. Morris, who for the past two years has been employed by Robert Good of the Cawker Ledger, has accepted a position at Seneca....

 

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February 15, 1912, Downs Times (ID 5363)

The Osborne Farmer looks mighty neat in its new dress of type each week, this being possible since the installation of a Mergenthaler typesetting machine. There are a few papers set on a machine which show us no improvement over hand composition, and in some instances the latter makes a better appearance, but the Farmer's new dress each week will be properly fitted.

We noticed in the Smith County Journal last week that W. H. Nelson and his son Arthur would once more take hold of the Smith County Pioneer. Billy Nelson has been at the helm of that paper a good portion of the time for the past 30 years and his many friends will welcome him back to his first love.

Printer wanted -- A first class, all around printer, capable of taking charge of any work in a country office, will be given a job in this office.

Miss Maude Franklin, who for some time has been employed as typo at the Review office in Stockton, returned to her home in Downs Sunday night and is back at her old place in the Times office.

 

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March 7, 1912, Downs Times (ID 5366)

J. W. Huff tells us that it was 40 years ago Tuesday, the 5th of March, since he located in Osborne County to stay, having driven in with an ox team. He says he hauled from Clyde the first newspaper circulated in Osborne County. It was called the Arlington Argus, and was printed at Clyde by John Kelly for Calvin

Reasoner. Mr. Reasoner got out a boom edition setting forth in glowing colors the beauties of Arlington, a townsite laid out a short distance west of where Osborne is now located....

 

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March 14, 1912, Downs Times (ID 5368)

Denton Harmon, a printer whose home is in Larned, arrived in Downs Sunday evening. He is a machine operator and is handling the Linotype at the News office this week.

Last week's issue of the Cawker Record completed the 29th year for that paper under the continuous management of L. L. Alrich, and the 39th year of the paper's existence....

 

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March 21, 1912, Downs Times (ID 5370)

The Beloit Gazette has ordered a Linotype and will soon do away with hand composition.

 

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April 4, 1912, Downs Times (ID 5372)

The proper division of words is carefully looked after in most printing offices where the type is set by hand, but the machine composition turns out many miserable divisions of words, and in most cases it seems to be no easy matter to avoid such custom.

Miss Edith Gerard, reporter on the Osborne Evening News, spent Sunday in Downs with Mrs. S. E. Hays and family.

 

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April 18, 1912, Downs Times (ID 5374)

S. A. Lantz, who has been employed at the Times office much of the time during the past six months, started Monday for Las Animas, Colo., where he will do carpenter work this summer.

 

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May 2, 1912, Downs Times (ID 5376)

C. C. Courtner of Osage City is a new printer in the Times office. He hopes to locate here if conditions all around are favorable.

 

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May 16, 1912, Downs Times (ID 5378)

Bert Headley, one of the brightest newspaper men and all-around printers in Kansas, has purchased an interest in the Smith County Pioneer.

 

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May 23, 1912, Downs Times (ID 5379)

Mord Smith, youngest son of ex-Postmaster J. H. Smith of this city, closed a deal two weeks ago for the purchase of the Herington Sun....

The printers throughout the country will be compelled to raise prices on most classes of job printing as a result of an increase of 10 to 20 percent in prices of practically all paper used in job printing.

 

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May 30, 1912, Downs Times (ID 5381)

(Picture of W. H. Ransom, clerk of the board of education.)

 

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June 6, 1912, Downs Times (ID 5382)

Common print paper prices will take another big jump skyward the first of June. Reason is that the paper mill employees demanded an eight hour day instead of twelve, and got it. That made a half more help necessary, and the mill owners promptly passed the sting on down to the poor editors. The paper on which this is printed costs more than double what it did two or three years ago. So don't

grumble at the small price of three cents an issue that you pay for your home paper. -- Smith County Pioneer.

 

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June 13, 1912, Downs Times (ID 5383)

Editor Meadows of the Gaylord Sentinel received the appointment as assistant sergeant at arms at Chicago next week..."in token of the appreciation of the national committee for the brave fight he made for the government forces during the late unpleasantness when the fire-eating Roosevelt boosters used the steam roller so heartlessly at the county convention (in Smith Center)."

Ed Kysela of Marysville, who for about a year has been employed in the Stockton Review office, and Fred Myers of Smith Center, who had also been working in the Review office for a few months, have purchased the Wakefield Pointer. ...Mr. Kysela worked on the Osborne News for a while two years ago, and Mr. Myers worked in the News office in this city for a while last summer.

We very much appreciate the many items voluntarily telephoned to this office each week, and we trust that more of our readers will get the habit. This action proves conclusively that our efforts in rounding up local news by freely using the telephone have brought forth good fruit....

New telephone books are being printed at the Times office.

 

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September 5, 1912, Downs Times (ID 5392)

Miss Harriette Turtle has decided to be a full-fledged printer and has taken up work in this office.

Miss Maude Franklin went up to Stockton Sunday, where she has accepted a position as typo on the Record office. Miss Maude has been employed in the Times office for some time....

 

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September 12, 1912, Downs Times (ID 5393)

We have the agency for the royal typewriter. Let us figure with you on a proposition that will not only save you money but place in your hands the best machine on the market.

The Smith County Journal is to have a home in a fine new building by the first of the year. It will be modern in every way.

 

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September 26, 1912, Downs Times (ID 5394)

At the state convention of the WCTU which is in session at Salina this week, Sept. 24-27, the Downs Times was again awarded the contract for printing Our Messenger, the official paper for the WCTU of Kansas, this making the third year for this work to come to the Times office....The Messenger list is close to 12,000, or 4,000 more than when we first landed the contract two years ago. In view of the fact that our bid was higher than that submitted last year, we rather believed that the Messenger would move to some other city, but in the executive meeting there was no disposition to make a change, though other bids

were lower. The printing of the Messenger in Downs is quite an item, not alone in greatly adding to the receipts of this office, but to the post office, besides doing much to advertise our city, as the paper circulates in every part of Kansas and other states as well.

 

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October 10, 1912, Downs Times (ID 5396)

The Portis Independent is now published by Edwin C. Hadley of Osborne, and his first issue, which appeared last week, showed a marked improvement in many ways.

 

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January 23, 1913, Downs Times (ID 5404)

Mord Smith, son of ex-Postmaster Smith, formerly of Downs, sold his paper, the Herington Sun, last week to a Kansas City newspaper man who for several years has been employed in the Star office.

 

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February 13, 1913, Downs Times (ID 5408)

Bro. L. L. Alrich, the veteran editor of the Record, after having gone through the Civil War without a wound, having fought the forces of evil all his life and escaping without a scratch, after having spent an ordinary lifetime in the printing business without accident, last Thursday afternoon carelessly left the end of his finger sticking in the press while printing his paper, and the machine bit the end off. It was the third finger of his right hand and the amputation occurred at the first joint. Bro. Alrich had only about ten minutes' work to finish printing his edition, but as the accident took place about 5:00 o'clock in the afternoon, he did not finish the job till next day. -- Cawker Ledger.

 

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March 13, 1913, Downs Times (ID 5412)

The Times force has certainly been mighty busy since last publication day, the Messenger having been printed and mailed Thursday and Friday, and a splendid run of job work since. With our head local rustler off the job, the boss of this ranch has not had time to bother with spring fever or any other ailment -- simply dig in and work early and late. If any farmer thinks he puts in long hours, we would like to have him follow us just one week.

 

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April 3, 1913, Downs Times (ID 5416)

Miss Kate Fenner, who has been a faithful and efficient employee at the Times office for about a year and a half, will give up her place here Saturday evening and go to her home in Kirwin....

 

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April 17, 1913, Downs Times (ID 5419)

The Downs News of last week threw a sickly fit because of the fact that a goodly number of our citizens did not support John Wolfert for councilman, but instead chose to write in the name of A. W. Hefley. The editor of the Times was one of twenty citizens who worked for Mr. Hefley and personally we wish to state that we offer to no man or set of men any apologies whatever for working in the interest of so good a citizen. On the night of election, the writer was charged with being responsible for bringing Mr. Hefley into the race. We refused to shoulder the responsibility and still deny the allegation. The writer of the News tirade undoubtedly took a shot at us when he stated that one of the instigators "denies any part in the affair," if so we promptly brand that statement as absolutely false. The News said the fight on Wolfert was unfair, but never for a moment do we believe that paper would fail to say that the caucus at the opera house was a fair deal, while the fact of the matter is it was rotten to the core. Don't talk about fair play and pull off such a stunt as that, of which men afterward said they were ashamed to be found on the side of the victors in that ruse or were there because they were afraid to do otherwise. What a sweet scented state of affairs!...

C. N. Akens, the new publisher of the Portis Independent, is turning out a newsy paper and it is well patronized by Portis merchants.

 

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May 1, 1913, Downs Times (ID 5421)

At no time have we ever assailed the character of anyone, but because we expressed adverse criticism regarding some certain methods employed relative to the city election, the Downs News took the matter so seriously as to devote two and a half columns to personal abuse of the Times editor. The News publishers know full well that they overstepped the bounds of justice and facts....

 

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May 8, 1913, Downs Times (ID 5422)

Since the last issue of the Times was printed, Our Messenger has been printed and mailed and several jobs of commercial work have been completed. With only one all-around man on the job, together with two typos and a kid, we think one big week's work has been done in this office.

 

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June 5, 1913, Downs Times (ID 5425)

Merle Cushing and his uncle Louis Johnson are camping out this week along the Solomon east of town....Merle is the coming printer in this office and has been as steady as clock work for the past two years, when not in school, and was in the office evenings after school, and he is entitled to an outing.

 

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August 7, 1913, Downs Times (ID 5430)

Miss Carrie Jones, who has been a faithful employee at this office since last spring, gave up her work here last Saturday and will spend a few weeks at home getting ready for school work. Miss Carrie will teach the Paradise school this winter.

 

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October 16, 1913, Downs Times (ID 5432)

At the state meeting of the WCTU, held at Winfield last week, the contract for printing Our Messenger, the state paper of the organization, was awarded to the Manhattan Nationalist. For three years the paper has been printed at this office, but the bid from Manhattan was much less than our price and the executive board felt that the lowest bid should be accepted. It is all right with us, for it is never profitable to do work for a less remuneration than cost for material and labor. We will now have more time to care for our other work. Alice G. Young will remain as editor of Our Messenger and not a woman in the state could be found that would so ably do the work.

 

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November 13, 1913, Downs Times (ID 5436)

Major Jeltz of Topeka has been working Downs people this week in the interest of his newspaper printed in Topeka. He is one of the most conspicuous colored men in the state.

 

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November 27, 1913, Downs Times (ID 5437)

Wardie White of the Phillipsburg Dispatch asks through the columns of his paper that those who owe on subscription come in and pay up. He says he does not like to send out duns -- it is too expensive. Neither do we, Brother White, but believe it is more expensive to let the other fellow carry your money around for a few years without any interest coming your way.

 

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January 1, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5438)

E. W. Bank, who for the past two years has been operating the Linotype machine in the Osborne Farmer office,...has a better paying position in the office of the Salina Journal.

 

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February 5, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5441)

A historian writing in the Burlington Independent is relating some interesting newspaper experiences of 50 years ago. He says of the late Sol Miller of the Troy Chief: "Miller devoted his whole life to the paper. He was one who did not care for any kind of notoriety, and while his paper had a national reputation, few men ever saw him outside his home town. One time...he was in Topeka on business and stopping at the old Tefft House. The state editorial association was also in session....It was resolved by the body to go and call on him, and they did. He finally appeared at the window of his room in his nightgown, after a number of yells for him, and said: 'If you fellows would put in more time trying to make a newspaper worth reading than roaming around the country eating state victuals, you would have more subscribers and better incomes.' Then he closed down the window and went back to bed."

 

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February 12, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5442)

The death of J. Earl Evans, editor of the Scottsville Advance, occurred last Thursday morning. Last summer, Mr. Evans had an attack of typhoid fever and he never had regained his health. For the past year, Mr. Evans had been postmaster at Scottsville. He was a young man who had made good and had a bright future...only 30 years of age.

Miss Ida Lowry of Beloit, who assisted with the work in the Times office the past month, returned home Saturday evening, which leaves us with one typo besides the Times editors, both of whom can stick some type.

 

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March 5, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5443)

Several weeks ago, this office submitted a bid for printing "The Rooter," the Downs high school annual to be issued this year, and secured the job. Being unable to locate a competent printer to begin work right away in order to complete the work on time, we surrendered our claim to the work....

 

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March 12, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5444)

C. O. Bourdette, at one time employed in this office, has accepted a position with the Osborne News. He and his wife tried vaudeville stunts for a while last fall....

The Osborne Daily News has gone forward to its former size, four pages. Editor Hadley proposes to keep his page up to the standard....

 

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March 19, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5445)

An elegant line of commencement cards may be seen at the Times office. City or country schools can select something suitable from our new sample line....Country schools should place an order two weeks before cards are really needed in order to make allowance for shipment of goods and the work of printing....

 

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March 26, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5446)

A letter...bore the sad intelligence of the untimely death of a well known Downs Citizen. Archibald Bates Collins was born in St. Marys, Kansas, December 3, 1870. The following year he came with his parents to Osborne County. The Collins homestead was the land...two miles east of Downs. Archie Collins was not only a schoolmate but a seatmate, and many lessons were studied from the same books in a little schoolhouse over in Oakdale....Arch was one of the brightest boys in the Downs schools in the 80's....Mr. Collins began his career as a printer early in life at the office of the Downs Globe, a weekly newspaper edited by Ben T. Baker, now the talented owner and publisher of the Smith County Journal. Later he worked for Walt Whitmore, editor of the Downs Chief. He also spent some time in the World and Times offices. He edited the Cawker City Times and was married in that city some twenty years ago. He also worked on the newspapers in Beloit and Scottsville and then graduated into daily newspaper society. We visited with Arch last winter in Ogden. He was then manipulating a Linotype in the Examiner office and was regarded as one of the swiftest and most accurate operators in the Mormon state. A. B. Collins died at Bakersfield, California, March 13, 1914....Demise was due to gangrene which developed following an operation for hernia. -- D.C.

When Mark Twain in his early days was editor of a Missouri newspaper, a superstitious subscriber wrote to him saying that he had found a spider in his paper, and asking him whether that was a sign of good luck or bad. The humorist wrote this answer and printed it: "Old Subscriber: Finding a spider in your paper was neither good luck nor bad luck for you. The spider was merely looking over our paper to see which merchant is not advertising so that he can go to that store, spin his web across the door, and lead a life of undisturbed peace ever afterward."

 

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April 2, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5447)

William Allen White, Arthur Capper, Henry Allen, Ewing Herbert, W. Y. Morgan and ten other Kansas editors will occupy Lawrence pulpits Sunday, May 10, the first day of Kansas newspaper week, and taking for their text "The Press and the Pulpit," will discuss the newspaper as a social force equaled only by the church and schools.

 

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April 9, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5448)

We have been asked two or three times this week to devote a column or so to a couple of deals about which considerable might be said that would cause several fellows to sit up an take some notice. As we have said before, if any citizen or any dozen citizens wish to enter their protest regarding any measure whatsoever pertaining to public welfare, space can be had in this paper for that purpose. You do not necessarily need to sign your name for publication, but we must know the identity of the writer before using any contribution. We have been charged with saying and doing many things of which we are not guilty. We are not taking any chances in making false accusations against any person. ...We have at various times assailed that which the public generally knows to be corrupt, and to our detriment so far as dollars and cents go....

 

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April 16, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5450)

Maurice McDonald of Longton, Kansas, arrived here Thursday evening to accept a position as an all-around printer in the Times office. Until last December he was in charge of the job rooms of the Salina Journal, having been employed there about three years.

 

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April 23, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5452)

We must ask our correspondents to refrain from using pay locals in their communications unless paid for at the regular rates. It is an injustice to us and to those who pay the regular rates for local advertising.

 

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June 4, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5455)

Maurice McDonald of Longton, Kansas, who for the past few weeks had been employed in the Times office, started Friday morning for Ambrose, N.D....Before coming here, he had a position from that place and finally concluded to go up there....

 

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June 11, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5456)

B. P. Walker, editor of the Osborne Farmer, who received a nice phat appointment from Governor Hodges as a member of the state irrigation board, desires to hold his job and his petitions are being circulated. The members of the board will hereafter be chosen by election....

 

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July 2, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5459)

Copy for the new yearbooks for Hill Academy is now in the Times office and the work will be pushed forward as rapidly as possible. Work will be commenced this week on the Lincoln Park Chautauqua programs and the books will be ready for distribution July 15.

 

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July 16, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5461)

The Times office force is too small to handle the volume of work in the office at this time. We have been "snowed under," as it were for two weeks....We could use more help but it is not easy to get. M. L. Parsons, a good all-around printer, came up Friday from Blue Rapids to help out with the work.

 

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August 20, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5463)

Tom McNeal, editor of the Farmers Mail and Breeze, and State Supt. W. D. Ross, who were speakers at the Old Settlers' picnic yesterday, favored this office with a visit.

Governor Hodges has a notion that he would like to muzzle the Kansas press, and has made his threat that if re-elected he will introduce a bill or have one introduced providing for a strict censorship in order to dope out only such news as such a board deems advisable. But Hodges is not going to be re-elected, so there is no use in getting excited....

"E. B. Smith, for the last year and a half foreman at this office, has purchased a half interest in the Osborne News and will move there and take on the new duties about September 1st...." -- Smith County Journal.

 

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October 15, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5470)

At the state WCTU convention last week in Fort Scott, the Downs Times was awarded the contract for printing Our Messenger, the official paper of that organization, for the coming year. The paper was printed in this office for three years and last year a very much lower bid than ours resulted in changing place of publication to Manhattan. This contract brings a nice run of job work from district and state officers. The December number will be issued from this office. Mrs. Alice G. Young was re-elected as editor, and no better choice could have been made....

We notice that the Cawker City Ledger...carried a quarter page advertisement for the Bon Marche of Concordia. That is progressiveness of the right sort. The day has passed when a local newspaper can turn down legitimate advertising....

 

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October 29, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5472)

Many hearts in Downs and vicinity were greatly saddened to learn of the death of a former highly respected citizen, Mrs. E. D. Craft, who passed away at her home in Los Angeles, Calif., on October 21, after an illness of several months.

During the time that her husband was pastor of the Baptist church here, she was a real helpmate....Being the wife of the first pastor after the town was started,...there were many real pioneer hardships to endure....At the close of the pastorate here, the Craft family moved to a farm just south of town that is now owned by their son-in-law, Del Cox. After about 10 years of residence there, they moved back to town and Mr. Craft purchased the Downs Times plant from George Dougherty. He and his family published the Times about four years. The son, Q. R. Craft, and the daughter, Mrs. Cornie Cox, also Mrs. Craft, were valuable help in the newspaper work. After another period of about eight years on the farm, Mr. Craft and wife moved to Los Angeles, which has since been their home....

 

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November 5, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5474)

On the second page of this issue appears a biographical and historical sketch of the life of the late Mrs. E. D. Craft, which was furnished by Q. R. Craft of Ogden, Utah.

Obituary of Mrs. E. D. Craft -- Ruth Briggs Woodman Craft was born May 4, 1845, on the Woodman homestead near Hamilton, Madison County, N.Y. She was the youngest child of Mr. and Mrs. Brownell Woodman....Mrs. Craft graduated from the Hamilton Union Schools and taught briefly. On Oct. 19, 1869, she was married to Emory Dean Craft of Carmel, N.Y., with whom she became acquainted while he attended Madison University (now Colgate University), at Hamilton. They resided in Addison, Vt.; Moriah, N.Y.; West Haven, Vt.; and Pine Plains, N.Y., where Rev. Craft held Baptist pastorates, and in October 1879 moved to Downs. They built the stone house on DeLay Street, one block east of Morgan Avenue, the first stone building in this city. In 1880, they removed to the farm one and a half miles south of town, which had been bought for them most faithfully "sight unseen" by Elder Balcom, whom they had not known before, except as the Baptist pastor at Cawker City. From 1888 to 1891, Mr. Craft was publisher of the Times, and during that time many bright and uplifting paragraphs appeared, which, unknown to the public, were penned by Mrs. Craft....One of her more widely published poems was "Kansas, a Coquette" -- "Our Kansas is a sly coquette, Who binds us 'gainst our will. She can, at pleasure, storm and fret, And blow dirt in our eyes, and yet, We turn and love her still. Love her! Why, what else could we do?...About 1901, Mr. and Mrs. Craft built a house on Division Street, where they resided until their removal to Los Angeles, Calif., about 10 years ago, where they have since resided at No. 1554 East 23rd Street....Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Craft: Cornelia Grace, the wife of J. D. Cox of this city, and Quincy R. Craft of Ogden Utah....Funeral services were conducted...from Bethel Baptist Church, Los Angeles, of which she was a member....

This week the Times carries a page advertisement from the Iowa Cash Store of Cawker City, and a quarter page from Carons of Beloit. Both advertisements came unsolicited and at first we were inclined to not accept them, though such a course seems unbusinesslike. Space in the Times is a portion of our stock in trade and, when outside advertisers come across with 10 cents per inch straight for this service, it is virtually throwing away $15 per week. The Times is one of the best papers in this section of the country and ought to be so well filled with home advertisements all the time that space for outside firms would not be available. However, we wish to state that we thoroughly appreciate the patronage extended by home people, and like home merchants we believe it is not always just to turn down business from outside customers.

 

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November 12, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5475)

Edwin C. Hadley, who for the past four years has owned and published the Osborne News, has sold his interest to his partner, E. B. Smith, who recently joined him in the business....Mr. Smith is now sole proprietor of both the daily and weekly News....

 

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November 19, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5478)

Mrs. William Duden has rented her residence in the south part of town to Paul C. Rankin....It will be good news to the many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Rankin to know that they are coming back to Downs. For the past three years, Mr. Rankin has had the editorial management of the Salina Evening Journal and they have made their home in Salina. We will be very glad to have our business partner, Mr. Rankin, back on the job in the Times office.

We received some communications this week through the mail that were not signed....We do not make a practice of using any anonymous communications and kindly request that all who send in news items for the Times sign their names.

"The old-fashioned merchant, who is quite sure that advertising doesn't pay, nevertheless becomes very much excited when the local paper runs a mail order ad. This, of course, is because he hates to see his mail order brethren wasting their good money." -- Exchange.

 

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December 3, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5480)

There was an election in Cawker City last Saturday for the purpose of settling the post office fight between F. H. Higley and Robert Good....The winning contestant was to pay the expenses of the election. Saturday was an ideal day and there was a pretty large vote....Mr. Higley received 290 and Mr. Good 241. According to the agreement...the name of Mr. Higley will be recommended by Congressman Connelly for appointment as postmaster of Cawker City. In this contest, our choice was Mr. Good, but he failed to land by a small margin....

Concerning the post office election in Cawker City, the Record says: "A week ago, a petition was circulated and signed by nearly all the business men of this city (Republicans and Democrats) in which they agreed to limit the voting to Democrats only, but Mr. Connelly and Mr. Good would not agree to that, so all qualified voters in the precinct will be allowed to express their choice."...

 

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December 10, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5481)

Miss Blanche Feser, who for the past two years has been the faithful typo at the Times office, severed her connection with the paper last Saturday and...went to her home in Concordia for a short rest before going to Charles City, Iowa, to take a course in Linotype operating....We never knew her to be out of temper and she was an exceptionally good and swift compositor....It will soon be a thing of the past for anyone to obtain employment as a hand compositor, and Miss Feser decided wisely....

 

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December 17, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5482)

(Drawing of Linotype printed on front page) Miss Mergenthaler. The new compositor at the Times office.

G. M. Harris, an expert Linotype machinist-operator, has been in Downs this week setting up the machine for the Times. In addition to his ability in this line, Mr. Harris is proprietor of the Newport cafe in Salina, one of the best in central Kansas.

For sale: Type racks and cases. Bargain for some newspaper office. Write Times, Downs, Kansas.

"The Farmer's Own Forty Acres." This is the heading of a new department which the Times expects to start this coming week....A farm section edited by the farmers.

 

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December 24, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5484)

Miss Ida Lowry of Beloit, who had been assisting at the Times office for some weeks, returned home Thursday evening.

 

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December 31, 1914, Downs Times (ID 5486)

Downs was visited by a poet Saturday in the person of Ben J. Gunn of Girard, who was selling a booklet containing three poems from his own pen. One was on Masonry, another on Odd Fellowship, but the main poem was a life of Abraham Lincoln in verse. Mr. Gunn has been in the newspaper business in southeast Kansas for over 20 years, but he gave up that work recently and has been selling his poems since. He has visited 67 counties in Kansas and expects to complete the canvass of the state early this spring. Then he will go to Illinois. Poetry is known as rather a precarious art but Mr. Gunn says he is finding it more productive of financial results than country newspaper work in Kansas. He has sold over 1,200 copies of his booklet since election day and he expects to visit every state in the union with the booklet.

 

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January 7, 1915, Downs Times (ID 5488)

The bursting of a water pipe Friday night flooded the cellar of the J. J. Parker residence to the depth of 14 inches and caused a great deal of inconvenience to Mr. Parker. He had been working late at the Times office and had gone home about 1:00 o'clock. As he entered the house, he heard a particular noise...and found that it came from a leak in the water supply line in the cellar....Prompt action prevented the damage from amounting to a great deal and the indications are that it will be covered by $20 or $25.

 

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January 14, 1915, Downs Times (ID 5489)

An Osborne County man has set a new precedent in Kansas by refusing to be present to be installed in a lucrative office to which he was elected...The...man is B. P. Walker, editor of the Osborne County Farmer and a member of the state board of irrigation. Mr. Walker was appointed to the board when it was created by the 1913 legislature and he was elected again at the last election. The Topeka State Journal has the following news story...."Bert P. Walker...believes the work of the irrigation board is a failure in that ancient methods are employed. He wants the board abolished or the work transferred to the state agricultural college. In March 1913, Walker was named by Governor

Hodges as a member....The Osborne editor is a Republican....In the recent election, he was elected for a two-year term, as were Daniel Dyer and George Ward. The three men were to be inaugurated as state officials...Monday noon....Walker has told friends he will not be present to take the oath. Neither will he provide the state with a bond...."

B. P. Walker of the Osborne Farmer was in Downs Saturday on his way home from Topeka, where he had been in consultation with Governor Capper on matters pertaining to the irrigation board.

"The fellows that are roaring about high taxes have a perfect right to, but their troubles would vanish...if every man feeding at the public crib was as genuinely honest as B. P. Walker, secretary of the state irrigation board at a salary of $2,000 per annum. Mr. Walker says the plans inaugurated by the last legislature and put in execution by the board appointed by Governor Hodges are the same ancient methods tried out and disproven 20 years ago...." -- Del Cox in "Across the Raging Solomon" column.

 

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January 21, 1915, Downs Times (ID 5490)

Who pays printer's bill? Under this heading, the Phillips County Post makes some pertinent comments on the cost of advertising...: An advertising expert was asked the other day, "Who pays for all the advertising your firm does?" Without a moment's hesitation, the expert replied: "Our competitors and the people who buy from them." This sounds fishy when you hear it the first time, but just pause for a moment and consider the logic of the ad man's reply. In the first place, the man who advertises judiciously does more business in a week than his competitor does in a month. Granting, of course, that the competitor advertises but little or none at all. Which of the two merchants can sell on a closer margin of profit, the man who sells ten dollars worth before nine o'clock in the morning? The man who has many sales has no shop-worn goods on hand, his goods are always clean and fresh. The buyer notices this and comes again, because he gets fresher goods at a smaller cost. The merchant who advertises can sell more goods and turn his dollars oftener than the man who does not use newspaper publicity. Hence the surplus trade he gains thereby is lost to his competitor, who in turn must charge more for his stale goods in order to exist. Who pays the printer's bill in the long run? The live merchant's competitor who doesn't believe in advertising -- he's the chap that pays the bill and doesn't know it.

B. P. Walker of Osborne was in Downs Friday morning on his return from Topeka, where he had been on business connected with the state board of irrigation. Mr. Walker says that a number of the articles published relative to his attitude toward the board were misleading but that he feels that the board cannot accomplish much worthwhile under the present law. What is needed, he thinks, is a law that will give the board an opportunity to develop the resources of the section of the state where irrigation will pay without handicapping it with politics. He has made some recommendations to Governor Capper....

 

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January 28, 1915, Downs Times (ID 5491)

A little lady, whose arrival is an event of big interest to the newspaper folks of the state, arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. B. P. Walker of Osborne Tuesday morning.

 

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March 11, 1915, Downs Times (ID 5495)

Lee Meadows has been kept quite busy the last few weeks in retaining the editorship of his paper, the Gaylord Sentinel. Some of his newspaper friends have been disposing of it for him and he finds it quite annoying to be without the paper so long as he is still writing the stuff that goes into it and taking care of the paper house bills.

"Walt Whitmore of the Lehigh (Okla.) News intends quitting the newspaper business and will engage in farming on the Pacific coast. Whitmore was the foreman of the Record office in 1883 after this editor bought the old Free Press, and later published a paper at Downs, and at Harlan." -- Cawker City Record.

"One of the greatest griefs in a country newspaper office is that everybody under the sun, who wants anything in the paper, sends it in on Wednesday evening or Thursday morning. We receive enough copy on Thursday morning to sink a battleship. The general impression is that, if you get copy in before the press starts, that's all that's necessary." -- Jewell Republican.

 

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April 8, 1915, Downs Times (ID 5499)

Killed by an engine -- The community was shocked the last of the week by news of the tragic death of Raymond T. Weld, now of Russell but for some five years prior to 1909 one of the owners and editors of the Downs Times. Mr. Weld was struck by a freight late Thursday evening while on his way home from the Record office, where he was foreman, and death was instant.

...The Record office is south of the Union Pacific tracks and Mr. Weld lived on the north side. As he reached the crossing, a freight train was standing on the switch track....He walked to the west end of the train and around the train, stepping on the main line just in time to be struck by the engine of the west-bound fast freight. The crossing bell rang the warning of the approaching train but, on account of his deafness, he was unconscious of it and walked into the jaws of death....The accident occurred about 8:25 in the evening but the yard was well lighted....He was held in high esteem as a man and as an editor....During his residence here, he suddenly lost his hearing, which handicapped him in handling the news feature of the business, and six years ago he and his partner, W. H. Smith, sold the Times. For some years past, he has been foreman of the Russell Record. Mr. Weld was 36 years of age. He is survived by a widow and three children, two sons, aged nine and five, and a daughter, aged three.

Here is where Downs comes in: Ross A. Willard, Linotype operator at the Times office, is a distant relative of Jess Willard, who knocked out Jack Johnson in the 26th round of the battle for the world's heavyweight championship at Havana Monday. Their grandfathers were brothers....

 

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April 22, 1915, Downs Times (ID 5502)

The Times wants some clean cotton rags and will pay a good price for them.

 

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April 29, 1915, Downs Times (ID 5504)

Tipton will soon have a newspaper. Lester Kerr and Charles Wells have opened a print shop there and will tell the world of the glories of Tipton.

 

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May 6, 1915, Downs Times (ID 5506)

The first issue of the Tipton Times, the new paper which C. W. Wells has started in the thriving town to the southeast, has been received at this office and it reflects the spirit of the community in fine shape. It is a four column, eight page paper, and besides having a nice assortment of local news, it carries a good line of advertising. Mr. Wells is an experienced newspaper man and, if the community appreciates his efforts, the Times will live long and prosper.

"Miss Blanche B. Feser...is helping at the Times office this week. Miss Feser is competent to do most anything to be done in a print shop and her services are indeed appreciated, as without them it would be almost impossible to publish the paper this week." -- Tipton Times.

 

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May 13, 1915, Downs Times (ID 5507)

A former Downs boy...Harry A. Montague, is a Linotype operator for the Oklahoma Printing Company and in addition he is quite successful in the bee business.

 

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June 17, 1915, Downs Times (ID 5511)

C. R. Etter, who has been employed for the past few weeks in the Times office, left Tuesday night for his home in Butler, Mo., accompanied by Mrs. Etter and their little daughter.

 

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July 15, 1915, Downs Times (ID 5514)

Muskogee Red, who stuck type at the Messenger office last week, told us that in all his years of experience with printers, he had never yet been beaten out of a cent by any of them. And Muskogee Red has probably known as many printers, in Kansas, at least, as anyone. That speaks well for the down-trodden fraternity. -- Minneapolis Messenger.

Charles A. Blakesley of the Kansas City Star, writer of "Starbeams" and "Kansas Notes," died at his home in Kansas City....His daily work won him a national reputation and his "Starbeams" always twinkled with good humor, so natural and spontaneous that thousands of readers turned to his departments before reading the big front page stories. Mr. Blakesley was 41 years of age....

 

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August 5, 1915, Downs Times (ID 5516)

Among the newspaper men of this section who attended the celebration last week were: W. H. Wright, formerly editor of the Lebanon Times; B. P. Walker of the Osborne Farmer; Robert Good of the Cawker City Ledger; Tom Skinner of the Osborne Farmer; Lee Meadows of the Lincoln Republican; C. W. Wells of the Tipton Times; and F. M. Learned of the Woodston Argus.

 

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September 16, 1915, Downs Times (ID 5520)

Andrew Redmond, one of the last of the well known tourist printers, was in Downs Saturday morning, looking for work. He has been traveling for several days but has been unsuccessful in getting located for the winter. Time was when the tourist printer could drop into almost any shop and find a job for a few days but the advent of the Linotype has changed conditions in this respect. Muskogee Red, as Redmond is better known, is a good printer but his taste for liquor has been responsible for much of his wandering. Of late years, he has been trying to get a strangle hold on this appetite with only moderate success.

 

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October 14, 1915, Downs Times (ID 5523)

An echo of the post office fight in Cawker City was heard last week in district court when Robert Good, editor of the Cawker City Ledger, was allowed $1,500 damages in his suit for slander against J. W. Higgins, a banker of Cawker City. Mr. Good had sued for $9,250....

F. E. Sprague, representing the Clay Center Engraving Company, has been in Downs this week arranging for the publication of a booklet showing business houses and residences in Downs as well as public buildings....After the books are printed, the cuts will be turned over to the Times for reproduction later. Anyone wishing to have the plan explained to them may get in touch with Mr. Sprague by telephoning this office.

 

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October 21, 1915, Downs Times (ID 5525)

Theodore Mueller, a deaf mute printer, was in Downs last Thursday morning on his way west to help in threshing. This summer he has been helping in the harvest and threshing and he has worked at his trade only when he could not work outside on account of the rain. Mueller is exceptionally well read and he puts in his spare time profitably. Just now he is studying German and Spanish and he is getting considerable pleasure out of the study.

 

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October 28, 1915, Downs Times (ID 5526)

Move to Kansas City -- Last week we closed a deal in Kansas City for a half interest in a job printing establishment...which enjoys a very profitable business. We were compelled to make a pretty sudden move in order to take advantage of what seems to us an unusually good proposition, possession of which will be gained November 1.

....Our partner, Paul C. Rankin, will continue the publication of the Times ....There are reasons why we decided to make this change, chief among which is the outlook for a larger and more profitable business....The latchstring to our home in Kansas City, 2550 Holmes Street, will be out for all our friends at any time.... -- Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Parker.

Mrs. N. M. Hardman of Agra has the first copy of the Downs Times ever printed and recently she sent this to F. M. Wells....The paper was secured by Mrs. Hardman's husband as it came from the press, and it has always been carefully preserved....

Failure to fully generate a kerosene burner in the stove at the Downs News office was the cause of considerable inconvenience Friday morning. The burner had been left burning but, because of the heat not being sufficient for the oil supply, the oil ran over and, when discovered, the stove was in flames inside and out. The room was filled with smoke but aside from covering everything with soot no serious damage resulted.

 

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November 25, 1915, Downs Times (ID 5528)

W. A. Wright, formerly editor of the Lebanon Times, was in Downs last Wednesday night on his way to Stockton to assist the Review of that city in getting acquainted with its new Linotype.

 

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December 23, 1915, Downs Times (ID 5533)

Paul C. Rankin received a message Monday afternoon, telling of the death of his grandmother, Mrs. S. J. Rankin, at Topeka....The death of her husband in the battle of Antietam left her a widow with five children....

 

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December 30, 1915, Downs Times (ID 5534)

The authorship of the original song of "John Brown's Body" is claimed by F. E. Jerome (formerly of the Cawker City Free Press), who is also the author of several Kansas songs, notes L. L. Alrich of the Cawker City Record. As related...by Mr. Jerome, the latter was 11 years old in 1861 and on June 12 Dr. Brown (now of Topeka) made a speech at Leavenworth in which he said that, though dead, John Brown's soul would "go marching on." Jerome immediately composed these two verses: "John Brown's body lies slumbering in the grave, John Brown was noble, loyal and brave. His mission on earth was to rescue and save, And his soul goes marching on. The Rebels in the South can never make it pay, While John Brown's soul speeds on its way. For freedom and right will surely win the day, As his soul goes marching on." Jerome sang these two verses that night (June 12, 1861) at the Leavenworth theater to an audience which was in part composed of Kansas cavalrymen....Jerome was called before the curtain several times to repeat the song.

 

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January 6, 1916, Downs Times (ID 5535)

A country dog with a friendly disposition and a first-class appetite has adopted the Times office and is doing his best to forget himself in the meat scraps the boys in the Times office have been foraging for him. Apparently he would be willing to learn the case and try to pick up the Linotype, but as there is no crying need of a dog around the office, the Times would be only too glad to restore him to his owner.

 

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December 9, 1916, Downs Times (ID 5532)

Regarding country correspondence in the weekly newspapers, Judge Ruppenthal makes this most excellent point: "I do not know anything to recommend to young people for education and culture value as excelling correspondence for a good local newspaper. A good paper will not endure trash or twaddle, and if a youth writes something good from week to week, he will be more alert and wide awake to see and hear all things, especially good, and to repeat and commend only good. He will learn to suppress that which can only hurt and condemn the evil. He will strengthen his perception, his memory, his use of vigorous English."