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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Ellsworth Reporter

Articles in database from Ellsworth Reporter:    28

Vol. 1, No. 3. Published every Thursday by M. C. D ...
December 21, 1871, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1075)

Vol. 1, No. 3. Published every Thursday by M. C. Davis.

"Among our exchanges we notice the Ellsworth Reporter, an able and spicy six column sheet published...by M. C. Davis. We expect to see a rapid growth of our neighboring county, Ellsworth, as its resources are truthfully reported by the pioneer paper of western Kansas...." -- Salina Journal.

"We are in receipt of the initial number of a new 24-column visitor bearing the name of the Ellsworth Reporter, which is published at Ellsworth, Kan., by a desperate brother-in-law of the writer hereof. Editorially it has snap, boldness and ability; and mechanically and typographically it is clean as a pretty girl's face washed in buttermilk...." -- Moulton (Iowa) Independent.

"We have received the initial number of a neat and spicy little sheet called the Reporter, published at Ellsworth, Kan., with our old army comrade and bunkmate, M. C. Davis, as editor and proprietor...." -- Memphis (Mo.) Reveille.

"We acknowledge the receipt of a remarkably neat paper from Ellsworth, Kan. It is No. 1, Vol. 1 of the Ellsworth Reporter and it flies at its masthead the familiar name of M. C. Davis as editor and proprietor. We know that boy; we ought to know him. Mel was drummer boy in the old 15th during two or three campaigns, but when we got into the heat of the Atlanta affair the boy dropped his drum and shouldered a musket. Right in the heat of a July day, when a line of rock-hidden rebels raised a veil of blue smoke ahead of our skirmishers, we saw him borne to the rear with a knee full of musket balls. We wish the Reporter the greatest success imaginable...." -- Iowa Republican.

Local Job Printing. In his speech before the Kansas editorial convention, Mr. King made the following remarks which should be well considered by the business men of every town: "A man wrongs and cripples his home press whenever he sends away for any sort of printing that can be obtained in his own town. Whatever work the local printer can do in the line of his art, the community ought to give him, cheerfully and without solicitation, even though he may sometimes be unable to duplicate metropolitan style or metropolitan prices. All our railroads, banks, insurance companies, merchants and public officials should have their printing done at home. Not only are they in equity bound to do so, but they will, considering everything, find it also the most profitable to pursue. Thousands of dollars are annually sent out of this state for printing which ought all to be given to our own offices; printing that can nearly always be as finely and cheaply done here as anywhere in the country. The Kansas press richly deserve every dollar's worth of work that Kansas communities have to give, and the man who sends East for his cards, letter heads, handbills, blank books, etc., ought to be ashamed to look his local printer in the face."

 

We have been to several hundred dollars expense mo ...
February 22, 1872, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1107)

We have been to several hundred dollars expense more than we anticipated in establishing a news and job office at this point. We can now boast of one of the best country offices in the state. In putting in our presses, type and material we have expended about $2,000 and have run our face for a small part of the amount. In doing this, we have trusted to the promptness of those who are owing us and hope we shall not be disappointed. If those owning us from a nickel to $30 each would pay up before our next issue, we could pay all our debts and make some additions to our office and paper. We have no reason to complain; we have a good support and a majority of our patrons pay promptly but we now ask as a favor that every person who receives this paper and has not paid for it will return $2 by next mail....

 

"Tornado at Coffeyville. A tornado struck the town ...
April 18, 1872, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1128)

"Tornado at Coffeyville. A tornado struck the town of Coffeyville...Sunday night, doing great damage. The office of Ross's Paper was totally demolished. Maj. Ross himself escaped, but with severe bruises. Only a short time ago, he put in a new press and the day before had paid half the purchase money on the building. This calamity leaves him without a dollar. Besides the printing office, seven other buildings were destroyed and four damaged...." -- Lawrence Journal.

 

Western Kansas Plainsman is the title of a little ...
May 2, 1872, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1136)

Western Kansas Plainsman is the title of a little paper, same size as the Reporter, hailing from Russell, Russell County. Mr. Cornell, its publisher, has a deep pocket and considerable personal pride, which is a security that the Plainsman will live. The Reporter is no longer the frontier paper; no longer in western Kansas, and we are glad of it....

 

Valedictory....Dear reader, adieu! The time for sp ...
May 23, 1872, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1144)

Valedictory....Dear reader, adieu! The time for speaking the word has arrived and it is spoken. No one will ever know the reluctance with which it was uttered....We have parted with our entire interest in the Reporter office. We are all creatures of circumstances. We got our price and took it....Permit us to introduce to your most favorable consideration and generous support our friend and successor, Mr. G. A. Atwood, late editor of the Dallas Gazette of Iowa....Be as generous and lenient toward him as you have been to us and the Reporter will go on in the good work. Mr. Atwood has two of the requisites in which we were lacking: experience and capital. -- M. C. Davis.

Our Foreman. In parting with the Reporter, we necessarily sever our business relations with Mr. Montgomery, and in doing so part with one of the best "boys" that it has ever been our good fortune to meet....He has had charge of the mechanical part of the office and has never been found lacking in ability or disposition in the discharge of the tedious and laborious duties....

 

Salutatory. Having bought the Reporter office, we ...
June 6, 1872, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1151)

Salutatory. Having bought the Reporter office, we have simply to say that we located here because we believe in the grand future of Ellsworth city and county. We are ambitious to publish a live paper and therefore came to a live town.... -- G. A. Atwood.

Enlarged. You will notice that the Reporter is four columns larger this week. At the age of six months, the Reporter takes an advance step....

Our worthy mayor and ex-editor introduced us very handsomely to his patrons. Mr. Davis is so well known here that a favorable notice is not necessary. He made the Reporter a bright, lively paper and retires with the good will of all his former patrons....

 

Speaking about the Fourth of July, we are reminded ...
June 27, 1872, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1161)

Speaking about the Fourth of July, we are reminded of one memorable to us. It was spent at Gettysburg. The battle was over. The cannons had all been discharged the two days previous. Thousands were killed, among whom was our corps commander, Gen. Reynolds, and more thousands were wounded. That was a sorry Fourth to many homes throughout our land, but the Union rejoiced over the victory at Gettysburg. Shall we add how we spent the night of the Fourth? It was on the top of a freight car filled with Johnnie rebs, sitting in the chilly rain, waiting the long night for the train to start to Baltimore. On the way to Baltimore the next day, "we uns and you uns" fraternized. Those days are now but a memory to us. Seven years of peace have passed and shall not next Thursday be celebrated all over the union in a true patriotic spirit? Let no bitterness mingle with the joyful memories of the grandest day in our history, when the brave men of '76 signed their names to the immortal Declaration. (G. A. Atwood)

 

Several of our farmer friends have lately subscrib ...
September 5, 1872, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1181)

Several of our farmer friends have lately subscribed for the Reporter. We want every Ellsworth farmer to take the paper. If you have not the greenbacks, we will take gold.

 

Kansas City, as we learn from the Journal, has now ...
November 21, 1872, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1206)

Kansas City, as we learn from the Journal, has now a type foundry. The true policy of the West is the establishment of manufactories, and this one seems to us one greatly needed and one that deserves encouragement from Kansas printers. J. T. Renton has the new enterprise in hand.

 

The editor of the Plainsman has been arrested for ...
January 16, 1873, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1222)

The editor of the Plainsman has been arrested for libel on the editor of the Bunker Hill Republic. Bail was furnished and the Plainsman press continues its "plain talk."

The first number of the Kansas Monitor, published at Salina by Bowen and Hawkinson, is before us. It is a handsome sheet and the only Swedish paper in the state.

 

Henry King of the Commonwealth has been appointed ...
March 27, 1873, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1239)

Henry King of the Commonwealth has been appointed postmaster at Topeka.

 

Mr. Wilson of the Abilene Chronicle has sold his p ...
May 1, 1873, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1246)

Mr. Wilson of the Abilene Chronicle has sold his paper to the Abilene Journal Company. The people of Abilene rejoice at the prospect of peace and the Journal at the prospect of life. Brother Wilson fought a hard fight and now he has received his -- price.

 

We take pleasure in announcing to our readers that ...
June 5, 1873, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1259)

We take pleasure in announcing to our readers that we have sold one-half of the Reporter office to John Montgomery, who has been foreman of the office since it was first established....Hoping that by our united capital and concentrated effort the Reporter will still further increase in popularity and influence, we present this number, dressed in beautiful new type.

We come before the public this week as one of the proprietors of the Reporter, a position that we had no thought of ever occupying until within the last few weeks. In assuming the position as a co-laborer in the proprietorship of the Reporter in connection with Mr. Atwood, it affords me pleasure to say that, since our first acquaintance, I have found in him an able editor and a gentleman of good business capacity....Trusting and praying that the rich promises of future greatness for our young and prosperous city may be speedily realized, I am respectfully yours, J. Montgomery.

The new type on which the Reporter is printed is from the Johnson Type Foundry of Philadelphia, which makes the best printing material in the world. With the new type we are able to give a third more reading matter....

The Ellis County Journal has come to hand. It is the latest venture in Kansas journalism and is the frontier paper. Its first number is replete with good things for Ellis County. Editor, Charles G. Coutant.

 

The Barton County Progress has suspended progressi ...
June 26, 1873, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1265)

The Barton County Progress has suspended progression until the proprietor can find an "industrious, sober printer."

 

"Patent Newspapers. Hard times are filling Kansas ...
March 19, 1874, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1320)

"Patent Newspapers. Hard times are filling Kansas with patent outside newspapers. People everywhere should see to it that their home paper is not forced to fall into the hands of the patent combinations of the country, or they will be subject to one of the worst monopolies that ever existed. If the local papers can be controlled by some company at Chicago or New York, then they can use the people of the county just about as they please and, of course, they would use them for the furtherance of their own selfish schemes. There are companies in Chicago who print the outside of hundreds of country newspapers, and of course print them exactly alike, the company deciding for themselves what shall be favored or opposed. In this way, they reach the readers of all of these papers, teaching them just what they would have them to know. No paper can be controlled by these combinations that has a home support sufficient to keep it afloat. Otherwise it can, and if the home patrons of papers all over the country allow their local papers to be starved into this submission to the Eastern rings, they will find that they have encouraged the growth of such a monster as will strangle their liberties more effectually than has ever been done in times past. Here is a growing evil that will soon dictate the tone of thousands of local papers of the country and thus destroy the freedom of the press and the liberties of the people at the same time and by the same process. The only way to check the growth of this evil and force it back from whence it came is to accord a living support to all local papers." -- Abilene Chronicle.

 

The Great Bend Progress is dead but, in the words ...
May 14, 1874, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1342)

The Great Bend Progress is dead but, in the words of the poet, "nothing dies but that something may live," and from the ashes of the Progress there rises the Great Bend Register, published by a stock company and edited by W. H. Odell, who we know to be an excellent man.

Ex-Senator Ross, proprietor of the Kansas Spirit, works at the case when necessary. There is no reason why an ex-Senator should not set his own type.

 

I. F. Clark has disposed of his interest in the Mc ...
May 21, 1874, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1345)

I. F. Clark has disposed of his interest in the McPherson Messenger. Mr. McClintock is now the sole proprietor. He has changed the name of the paper to the Independent.

 

Good-bye....We have sold our interest in the Repor ...
July 30, 1874, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1369)

Good-bye....We have sold our interest in the Reporter to Major H. Inman, who will from this date occupy our place as editor. Mr. Inman is well and favorably known to many of our readers as an able, brilliant writer, as an earnest, outspoken man....John Montgomery, our worthy partner for a year, retains his interest in the paper....It is a pleasure to feel that there has never been the least disagreement between us, and it comes hard to break off our relationship.... -- G. A. Atwood.

 

Greeting. Journalism, like society, has certain co ...
August 6, 1874, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1371)

Greeting. Journalism, like society, has certain conventionalities....One of these usages is the valedictory and salutatory in a change of editorial control. In assuming the position,...the responsibility and obligations it imposes are fully recognized....Believing in the broad truths which characterized the necessity for the Republican party,...the Reporter in politics will adhere to those enduring principles that form the substructure of Republicanism in America today. At the same time, it will claim and contend for those reforms which the exigencies of the country demand in its progressiveness....In matters exclusively confined to the geographical limits of the county, the best men, irrespective of party, will be supported. Especially will it defend the interests of the working classes and the farmers.... -- H. Inman.

 

Anthony Shot. "At about ten o'clock this evening, ...
May 13, 1875, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1438)

Anthony Shot. "At about ten o'clock this evening, Col. D. R. Anthony, editor of the Times, and postmaster, and Wm. Embry, editor of the Appeal, met on the stairway of the opera house, and the Colonel asked Embry if he wished to see him. Embry replied: 'Just as you say, Col. Anthony; if you wish to see me, we will go downstairs.' The Colonel then stepped up one step and Embry said, 'No, you don't shoot me in the back,' and stepped up by his side. Anthony then struck Embry on the upper lip a blow, when three shots were fired by Embry, two of which took effect in Anthony's breast, one supposed to be fatal. At the present time (11 o'clock) there seems to be no chance that the colonel may live. He is still lying in the theater, and the doctors say he is steadily sinking." -- Journal of Commerce....

 

The Great Bend is a new sheet published at Great B ...
May 27, 1875, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1441)

The Great Bend is a new sheet published at Great Bend in the interest of Barton County, and issued gratuitously. These efforts are always commenced with the proper motives, but usually run into extravagant statements, and the result is generally disappointments to the immigrant who has been induced to give up a pleasanter home, perhaps, by specious arguments in those so-called land journals....

 

The Leavenworth Times says that Col. D. R. Anthony ...
June 3, 1875, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1443)

The Leavenworth Times says that Col. D. R. Anthony is now entirely out of danger, and the attendant physicians have no fears of a second hemorrhage. The hole in his breast made by the bullet is rapidly healing, and will be entirely closed in a short time. He will be able to sit up in about ten days.

He Didn't Subscribe...A man who does not take the Reporter came into town one day last week with 20 dozen eggs to find a market. He was met near the schoolhouse and asked the price of his things: "I reckon they're worth about 20 cents," he replied. Of course, the whole lot were quickly purchased, as 30 cents were freely offered through the paper for eggs. Enough was lost on this one trade to have paid for the Reporter for a year. Comment is unnecessary.

"Origin of Newspapers. Who thought of the newspaper first? It seems to have had its birth in...Italy, and the first paper of which we have any record was a monthly published in Venice by order of the government, in manuscript, as printing had not then been invented. It was called a Gazzetta, which word is a derivative of Gazzera, the name of a magpie or chatterer. In the Magliabechian Library at Florence are now to be seen 30 volumes of Venetian gazettes in manuscript, the last of which is dated in the Sixteenth Century. The Venetian conservatives clung to their script after printing was an accomplished fact. The epoch of the Spanish Armada, in England, was the epoch of the first English newspaper. In the British Museum are preserved several newspapers which were printed in 1588, while the Spanish fleet lay in the British Channel. The earliest of these is entitled The English Mercurie, which by authority 'was printed at London by her Highness's printer, 1588." So to the sagacious forethought of the great Queen Bess, and the wise policy of the great minister, Burleigh, the English-speaking peoples of the world are indebted for the model of our present necessity, the newspaper....In this early journal are the news of the day, and a well-written article designed to arouse and stiffen timid loyalty tells of a Spanish plot to murder the queen. There is an heroic poem too, called 'Elizabethe Triumphs,' by one James Asker; a critical article on an unfortunate author entitled 'Father Parson's Coat Well Dusted,' and various witty sayings, all printed in Roman letter." -- Washington Chronicle.

 

Peter Moriarty, late editor of the Republican at C ...
June 24, 1875, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1447)

Peter Moriarty, late editor of the Republican at Council Grove, is dead. His death was remarkably sudden. He was a practical printer from boyhood and had been the successful proprietor of several journals in different states.

 

The Western Democrat of Lincoln Center is dead. It ...
July 1, 1875, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1450)

The Western Democrat of Lincoln Center is dead. It will be rehabilitated, we are informed, as a Republican journal some time in July. The Democrat is the paper about which such a splurge was made at its birth some five months ago. It was, according to the statements of its projectors, to have a guaranteed circulation of 5,000, to be printed on a power press and, in short, to be the great controlling genius of the northwest and central portion of Kansas. Eminent political writers in the East were to contribute...to its columns weekly and it was, by its wonderful galaxy of talent, to wipe out of existence all the other papers in this portion of the state. Well, it has just lived one month less than we predicted for its life and, now that it is dead, we make the assertion that the only articles of any merit that ever appeared in it were taken from the state press without any credit.

 

We have received...the initial number of the Salin ...
July 15, 1875, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1455)

We have received...the initial number of the Saline Valley Register, published in Lincoln Center out of the ashes of the Western Democrat. The Register is a pretty little sheet of the right politics.

 

The Lincoln County Patriot, press, material, &c., ...
November 4, 1875, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1466)

The Lincoln County Patriot, press, material, &c., is to be removed to Rooks County and a new paper started there.

We have received the fifth number of the Lyndon Times, a weekly journal published in Lyndon, Osage County. It has a patent outside (which we condemn under all circumstances) and its inside badly printed. It is edited well, however, and all its articles are good....

 

The "Annals of Kansas." A new book by D. W. Wilder ...
December 2, 1875, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1469)

The "Annals of Kansas." A new book by D. W. Wilder, state auditor; Geo. W. Martin publisher, Topeka. Kansas is a classical ground; nearly every foot of her immense area has its legend, either of old Spanish conquest, Indian romance or Free State struggle. Around its history is centered the marvelous, the beautiful, and the terrible....The "Annals of Kansas" is her dictionary of dates, in which each important event is truthfully recorded from the time of Coronado's visit -- 1542 -- to the census of March of the present year. An immense amount of patient toil is exhibited in its compilation, and much research among musty old parchments, but the result is well worth the labor bestowed by its indefatigable author....We were as much surprised at the careful work portrayed in the compilation of the matter contained in the book as we were at its splendid typography and general style of makeup by its publisher.....

 

Russell County Record. After a suspension of two o ...
December 16, 1875, Ellsworth Reporter (ID 1471)

Russell County Record. After a suspension of two or three weeks to enable its proprietors to doff a patent outside, receive new type, &c., for a paper to be printed entirely at home, the Record comes to us again, improved and infinitely superior to the old issue.