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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Emporia News

Articles in database from Emporia News:    85

Daily Evening Dispatch is the title of a spicy, we ...
August 20, 1859, Emporia News (ID 3601)

Daily Evening Dispatch is the title of a spicy, well-conducted little daily just started in Leavenworth city by Josiah L. Hinton....

 

The Leavenworth Times, in giving a list of the Kan ...
August 27, 1859, Emporia News (ID 3603)

The Leavenworth Times, in giving a list of the Kansas papers that support the Wyandotte Constitution, displays a considerable amount of ignorance when it says The Herald of Freedom and the Kansas Press are on the Fence. The Herald was one of the first to take ground against it, while the Press supports it. The following is a list of those papers that favor the Constitution, so far as we are able to observe: The Lawrence Republican, Atchison Champion, Elwood Free Press, Manhattan Express, Topeka Tribune, Doniphan Post, Osawatomie Herald, Mound City Herald, Cottonwood Falls Press, Leavenworth Zeitung, Palermo Leader, White Cloud Chief, and Emporia News. The following papers, all Democratic, oppose the Constitution: Leavenworth Herald, Lawrence Herald, Lecompton Democrat, Atchison Union, Fort Scott Democrat, Iowa Point Dispatch, Junction Sentinel, and Wyandotte Argus....For the Constitution 13; against 8.

 

Mistaken. A few weeks since, in our classification ...
September 10, 1859, Emporia News (ID 3610)

Mistaken. A few weeks since, in our classification of the papers of the Territory, we placed the Democratic paper at Topeka, the Tribune, in the list of those favoring the Wyandott Constitution. This we have since learned was a mistake. But we are glad to be able to announce that W. W. Ross, the former editor of the Tribune, is about to establish a Republican paper at Topeka....

 

The Olathe Herald is the title of a new paper just ...
September 24, 1859, Emporia News (ID 3617)

The Olathe Herald is the title of a new paper just started at Olathe, Johnson County....

 

My connection with The Emporia News ceases with th ...
October 1, 1859, Emporia News (ID 3620)

My connection with The Emporia News ceases with this number. I have sold the office to P. B. Plumb and Dudley Randall....They are experienced printers and editors.... -- J. Stotler.

The first number of the Americus Sentinel has come to hand. R. M. Ruggles is the editor. It is "independent, not neutral." T. C. Hill is the proprietor.

 

A Change of Style. The readers of The News will ob ...
October 8, 1859, Emporia News (ID 3629)

A Change of Style. The readers of The News will observe that we have adopted the custom of putting our original matter on the first page, instead of the second....

Neosho Valley Register. This is such a paper as we like to see in southern Kansas. It is published at Burlington, which is the county seat of Coffey County, by S. S. Prouty, formerly of the Freeman's Champion at Prairie City, one of the early established presses of the Territory that worked for our cause and rights.

 

Kansas Editor "Hard Up." Our friend Martin of the ...
October 15, 1859, Emporia News (ID 3632)

Kansas Editor "Hard Up." Our friend Martin of the Atchison Champion has the following pathetic tribute to the "Almighty Dollar: "Some time last winter we requested one of our delinquents to bring us one dollar in a wheelbarrow to enable us to pay off our workmen; buy paper, ink and fuel; pay boarding; pay rent; and meet our current expenses. The dollar was forthcoming but, we add with sorrow, is now non est. It has departed, left, decamped, mizzled, absquatilated. It is no more. And we want another to take its place, and do the many wondrous things it did. Therefore, we hope some one of our delinquents will bring us another dollar, which well be thankfully received, and honorably mentioned. He can bring it in a wheelbarrow or in his pocketbook, as he pleases."

 

All persons having business of a personal or priva ...
October 29, 1859, Emporia News (ID 3642)

All persons having business of a personal or private character with P. B. Plumb, senior editor of The News, will please address him at Cleveland, Ohio, until further notice. All letters on business with the office to be addressed to Dudley Randall & Co., publishers, Emporia.

 

*The Tribune is the name of a very handsome and ab ...
November 12, 1859, Emporia News (ID 3650)

*The Tribune is the name of a very handsome and ably edited Republican paper recently started at Quindaro by John Francis and J. P. W. Davis.

 

Half Sheet. Couldn't help it, reader. Our supply o ...
December 17, 1859, Emporia News (ID 3669)

Half Sheet. Couldn't help it, reader. Our supply of paper, which has been for four weeks expected, did not arrive and we were compelled this week to issue a half sheet or none. We have increased our mechanical force and, when our paper comes, we confidently hope to issue regularly and more promptly to the hour (Saturday morning.) than heretofore.

 

A second failure in getting our paper has caused u ...
December 24, 1859, Emporia News (ID 3671)

A second failure in getting our paper has caused us to appear in rather a unique style this week -- in what our "devil" terms a "holiday rig." We have some intelligence that our winter's stock of paper, ordered some two months ago, was frozen up in the Missouri River, and that which we have since ordered has not yet been received....Last week we published a half sheet, this week a whole sheet colored. Next week, if we can do no better, we shall use common wrapping paper, and when we can no longer procure paper of any description, we shall try a hand at printing on a shingle....

 

We copy, with some degree of pride, the...flatteri ...
December 31, 1859, Emporia News (ID 3673)

We copy, with some degree of pride, the...flattering notices which The News and its editors have received from the western press: "...Dudley Randall has become connected with the Emporia News in connection with its first editor, P. B. Plumb, Mr. Stotler retiring. Mr. R. was for some time connected with the Metropolitan, of this city, as superintendent of its job department....Kansas City Journal of Commerce."...

 

To Our Friends. We very much desire to enlarge The ...
January 14, 1860, Emporia News (ID 3683)

To Our Friends. We very much desire to enlarge The News in the spring, and increase our facilities for making a good paper. This will insure a heavy outlay for materials at the start, and an increased expense for paper and composition every week thereafter. To meet this, we want many new subscribers....If every one of our present subscribers will get us one single subscriber, our list will be doubled and we will enlarge early in the spring....

 

S. N. Wood has withdrawn from the Kansas Press, as ...
January 21, 1860, Emporia News (ID 3687)

S. N. Wood has withdrawn from the Kansas Press, as publisher, but still remaining the editor. His successor is Frank E. Smith, a printer who formerly worked in the office....

 

Some of our contemporaries are disposed to complai ...
January 28, 1860, Emporia News (ID 3689)

Some of our contemporaries are disposed to complain that freedom of speech and press is not allowed south of Mason & Dixon's line. We don't feel that way. So long as slavery exists, a rigid system of espionage will be required to prevent it from exploding. Our Southern brethren do well not to tolerate Northern men in their school houses or churches, and also to expel all southrons who will not consent to uphold the "peculiar institution." So long as slavery exists, force, tyranny, a muzzled press and pulpit is absolutely necessary, and men who do not subscribe to such things fully have no right to be found south of Mason & Dixon's line. Let them keep away. They have no business there. The South wants to be "let alone."

Home Papers. In calling attention lately to several Eastern papers, the prospectuses of which were published in The News, we did not design to influence our readers here in Kansas to overlook the importance and duty of sustaining home papers. The Lawrence Republican and the Leavenworth Times occupy the front rank of Kansas journals and should, one or the other of them, be taken by every Republican settler in the Territory. The Weekly Times has lately been enlarged, and with its advantages of location at the most important commercial point in the Territory, together with its facilities for obtaining telegraphic news, etc., presents the strongest reasons in favor of acquiring a large circulation in southern Kansas. The Daily Times is the only Republican daily in Kansas.

 

We have received the first number of the Kansas Ci ...
February 4, 1860, Emporia News (ID 3691)

We have received the first number of the Kansas City Medical and Surgical Review -- G. M. B. Maughs and T. S. Case, MD's, editors and publishers. From a review of the work, we pronounce it just the character to fill the want long felt by the profession here in the far West....Published bi-monthly at $2 per annum.

 

The proprietors of that spirited little daily, the ...
February 11, 1860, Emporia News (ID 3698)

The proprietors of that spirited little daily, the Leavenworth Dispatch, commenced the issue of a weekly on the 10th. Terms $1 per year.

 

The annual meeting of the Historical and Scientifi ...
February 25, 1860, Emporia News (ID 3704)

The annual meeting of the Historical and Scientific Society of Kansas was held at Lawrence on the 19th and 20th. The proceedings, as published in the Republican, show the society to be in a flourishing condition. The report of the librarian shows that the library now contains 244 bound volumes, together with various maps, &c. Also gives the names of 14 of the papers of Kansas that are contributed to the society.

An able address on the objects and success of the society was delivered by the president, Hon. L. D. Bailey. The annual address was delivered by Hon. S. A. Kingman upon the physical causes and developments of civilization.

On the second day the society proceeded to ballot for officers to serve the ensuing year: President, Thomas Ewing, Jr., Leavenworth; vice-presidents, S. A. Kingman of Hiawatha, F. N. Blake of Junction City, A. Wattles of Moneka, J. P. Root of Wyandott, Lyman Allen of Lawrence; recording secretary, Edward Clarke of Lawrence; corresponding secretary, Wm. Hutchinson of Lawrence; treasurer, B. W. Woodward of Lawrence; executive committee, James Blood of Lawrence, L. D. Bailey, D. W. Houston, Emporia, J. L. McDowell, Leavenworth, Josiah Miller, Lawrence....

 

The senior editor still being absent, and the juni ...
March 17, 1860, Emporia News (ID 3715)

The senior editor still being absent, and the junior being obliged to leave his post for a week or two, the News is left in charge of our friend J. R. Swallow.

 

Change. The Americus Sentinel, it is said, has cha ...
March 31, 1860, Emporia News (ID 3718)

Change. The Americus Sentinel, it is said, has changed hands, the office passing from T. C. Hill to S. L. Kenyon, which latter is to make a Republican paper of it....

 

The Americus Sentinel. In connection with the chan ...
April 7, 1860, Emporia News (ID 3721)

The Americus Sentinel. In connection with the change in the Sentinel...we stated what we had heard that the new editor would make a Republican paper of it. But in the...first number containing Mr. Kenyon's salutatory, we see that he does not take a position. He says: "Politically the Sentinel will reflect the sentiments of the editor and, so far as practicable, those entertained by the 'rest of mankind'."...We therefore infer that the paper is to be of the "milk and watery" kind -- such as marked the unenviable career of that journal during the first three months of its existence. There is now too much of the positive element in the existence of men and parties in this portion of Kansas to admit of any middle ground in politics....

 

The senior editor of The News, after an absence of ...
April 14, 1860, Emporia News (ID 3726)

The senior editor of The News, after an absence of six months, has returned to his post.

 

We have definitely determined to enlarge The News. ...
May 12, 1860, Emporia News (ID 3731)

We have definitely determined to enlarge The News. The enlargement will consist of the addition of one broad column in width to each page, and two inches in length....The enlarged sheet will be 26x38 inches in size, making it one of the largest papers in the Territory. This step will not only cost us a heavy outlay of money for new materials but will also add largely to our current expenses for paper, ink, composition, press work, &c. Now, to make The News thereafter remunerative to us, or even to make it sustain itself, we must have a large increase of subscribers, as well as advertisers....Now we know it is "hard times" -- we have "indubitable evidence" of the fact -- but, poor as the people are, there is not really one in a hundred in this section of country that cannot afford to take, and pay for, The News....

 

The Auburn Docket is the title of a new Republican ...
June 30, 1860, Emporia News (ID 3749)

The Auburn Docket is the title of a new Republican paper started at Auburn, Shawnee County....It is a handsomely printed, well edited sheet, and deserves success. D. B. Emmert, editor and proprietor.

 

The last number of the Iowa Point Dispatch announc ...
July 7, 1860, Emporia News (ID 3757)

The last number of the Iowa Point Dispatch announces that the publication of that paper henceforth ceases for want of adequate support.

 

Kansas Papers. The general business stagnation thr ...
August 11, 1860, Emporia News (ID 3782)

Kansas Papers. The general business stagnation throughout the Territory has had its effect on newspaper printing as well as selling dry goods. Within the past few weeks the following Kansas newspapers have suspended either permanently or temporarily, hoping to be able to come up again when times get better: Post, Doniphan; Dispatch, Iowa Point; Express, Manhattan; Chief, Paola; Herald, Mound City; Gazette, Grasshopper Falls. Several others are in a sinking condition and will undoubtedly be obliged to suspend before long until better times. Even our friends of the Topeka Record are so hard pushed that they have issued but a half sheet each week for many weeks past.

There have also been some changes in politics and proprietorship....Mr. Gill has retired from the Leavenworth Herald, leaving Mr. Fain at the head, who has taken down the Douglas flag and goes for Breckenridge. Mr. Henton of the Dispatch has given place to J. A. Green, who also takes down Dug's name and goes for Breck. The Atchison Union has changed hands, G. O. Chase, who started the enterprise, having sold out to Adams and Stebbins. As with the Leavenworth Democratic organs, so with the Atchison Union. Down goes Douglas, and hereafter the Union goes for Breckenridge.

There have been too many newspapers published in Kansas -- more than the population could be reasonably expected to support....

 

Of the Democratic papers in Kansas, the Junction S ...
August 25, 1860, Emporia News (ID 3788)

Of the Democratic papers in Kansas, the Junction Statesman, Lecompton Democrat, and Leavenworth Dispatch support Breckenridge and Lane; the Leavenworth Herald, Topeka Tribune, Fort Scott Democrat and Olathe Herald support Douglas and Johnson, but "draw it very mild" just now; while the Atchison Union, Wyandot Argus, Marysville Platform and Doniphan Post hoist the names of neither set of candidates but all sympathize with Breckenridge. So far as the Democratic press of Kansas is concerned, Breckenridge is decidedly ahead. The leaders of the party, too, and the regular hard shells who make up its active working force are all for Breckenridge. Whatever else may be said of them, the Breckenridgers are consistent and logical. This gives them great advantage over the "Douglas dodgers."

 

Jacob Stotler, editor and proprietor. Office, News ...
September 15, 1860, Emporia News (ID 3799)

Jacob Stotler, editor and proprietor. Office, News Building, corner of Commercial Street and Sixth Avenue.

P. B. Plumb, for some time past connected with this paper as editor, took leave of his many friends here on Tuesday morning last for the East. He will spend the fall and winter months in Bellefontaine, Ohio, in the pursuit of his legal studies....He has promised to contribute articles for our paper during the winter.

The Mound City Report is the title of a new exchange hailing from Mound City, Linn County. It was established on the ruins of the Linn County Herald.

The Wyandott Commercial Gazette has been resuscitated. It is said to be on a permanent basis now. McDonald and Taylor, publishers and editors.

A new paper has been started at Troy, Doniphan County, called the Doniphan County Dispatch, J. W. Biggers, editor and publisher. In politics, it is anything but Republican. It has a sickly look and will probably not live more than six weeks.

 

Mr. Taylor, the editor of the Wyandot Commercial G ...
September 29, 1860, Emporia News (ID 3805)

Mr. Taylor, the editor of the Wyandot Commercial Gazette, was brutally assaulted on the 8th by Lewis M. Cox, who is charged with being one of the kidnappers of a mulatto in that city. Cox also attacked a Mr. Heath of that city a few days before, for which he was fined $20.

 

We are happy to announce, to his many friends, tha ...
November 17, 1860, Emporia News (ID 3824)

We are happy to announce, to his many friends, that the editor, Mr. Stotler, who has been confined to his room by sickness for almost two months, is now fast recovering, and we trust that in a few days he will be again at his post.

 

The Westport Border Star, Kansas City Enquirer and ...
December 1, 1860, Emporia News (ID 3832)

The Westport Border Star, Kansas City Enquirer and Independence Herald have been merged into one paper, called the Kansas City Enquirer and Star, McCarty & Hodgson, editors and proprietors. We wish the Enquirer and Star success pecuniarily, but hope it will never make a single political convert.

Personal. After an absence from our office of nine or ten weeks on account of a severe spell of sickness, we are happy to announce to our friends that we are again able to be at our post....During our illness, our paper has been under the editorial charge of E. P. Bancroft and J. R. Swallow....Praise is also due to our printers, Charles Stotler, John Kitts and Frank McFadden, for their efforts. Although one of the number has been sick most of the time, by working night and day the paper has been issued regularly with one exception....

The Council Grove Press has changed hands, F. E. Smith having bought out Sam N. Wood. The paper will probably be discontinued. Mr. Wood has not received a very hearty support at the hands of the citizens of Morris County, according to his own figures.

 

The editor of this paper (Jacob Stotler) has been ...
January 12, 1861, Emporia News (ID 3848)

The editor of this paper (Jacob Stotler) has been favored by the Territorial Council with the position of assistant clerk of their body and will consequently be absent during their session. The paper will be under the editorial control of E. P. Bancroft during that time.

The Council Grove Press has been purchased by our friend A. I. Baker, who will hereafter run that "masheen" as editor and proprietor.

 

We have received the first number of a new Republi ...
February 2, 1861, Emporia News (ID 3861)

We have received the first number of a new Republican paper published at Leavenworth called the Conservative. It is published by D. R. Anthony, and edited by D. W. Wilder, the former editor of the St. Joseph Free Democrat, who was indicted at St. Joseph for publishing an "incendiary sheet." The Conservative is published daily, tri-weekly, and weekly.

 

P. B. Plumb returned from the East a few days sinc ...
February 23, 1861, Emporia News (ID 3874)

P. B. Plumb returned from the East a few days since....He is accompanied by H. G. Plantz....Plumb & Plantz have hung out their "shingle" and intend to practice law....

The Topeka Tribune has changed editors and politics. J. F. Cummings retires and is succeeded by Judge John P. Greer, who issues a Republican paper. Judge Greer was a member of the Wyandot Convention and also of the last Territorial Legislature, and is a man of ability.

 

The Kansas State Journal, a new Lawrence paper, ha ...
March 2, 1861, Emporia News (ID 3878)

The Kansas State Journal, a new Lawrence paper, has come to hand. It is well filled with excellent reading matter. Considerable of its space is devoted to local matters. Trask & Lowman are the editors and proprietors. Its editorials are well written and typographically it is not excelled in the state.

 

The enterprising people of Mansfield, in Linn Coun ...
March 30, 1861, Emporia News (ID 3893)

The enterprising people of Mansfield, in Linn County, are about starting a weekly newspaper in their village. R. B. Mitchell is proprietor and B. P. Ayers editor.

A change has occurred in the editorial management of the Mound City Report. Mr. Lyman, the former publisher, has become the sole editor....

 

The publication of the Lecompton Democrat has been ...
April 6, 1861, Emporia News (ID 3896)

The publication of the Lecompton Democrat has been stopped. Mr. Driggs has sold the office to a couple of gentlemen who propose removing it to Atchison for the purpose of starting a Democratic paper there, to be called the Bulletin. The Democrat has been a consistent political paper of much ability, but its support has been chiefly from the government officials, which being now withdrawn, it cannot longer live.

 

N. N. Smith has sold his interest in the Lawrence ...
May 4, 1861, Emporia News (ID 3907)

N. N. Smith has sold his interest in the Lawrence Republican to H. H. Moore. The change will be beneficial to the Republican and us readers.

 

John A. Martin of the Champion has started a spicy ...
May 11, 1861, Emporia News (ID 3913)

John A. Martin of the Champion has started a spicy little daily in Atchison called the Union Banner, in the columns of which he is doing good service for the country, liberty and union, against a remnant of the Border Ruffians of 1855-6-7 who yet remain in Atchison, and who are trying to get that city to indorse secession by the election of one of their number as mayor. Success to you, Martin. Your head and heart are both right, and we believe you will redeem Atchison.

 

No paper has been issued from this office for two ...
June 3, 1861, Emporia News (ID 3930)

No paper has been issued from this office for two weeks previous to this. We hate apologies and shall make none. We will only state that two weeks ago we had no paper, and last week we were short of hands. Our foreman, Charlie Stotler, went off with the Emporia Guards to Lawrence to handle a different kind of "shooting stick" from that used to "lock up the forms" with, and we were left in the lurch. Whenever any of our hands wish to go off to enlist in the cause of the government, we shall give them a patriotic slap on the shoulder and tell them to go, paper or no paper. Our subscribers shall lose nothing by our temporary suspensions, as we will fill up the 52 numbers for which they pay us at the end of the year.

 

Rev. H. H. Moore, formerly connected with the Lawr ...
August 10, 1861, Emporia News (ID 3962)

Rev. H. H. Moore, formerly connected with the Lawrence Republican, has been elected chaplain of the Third Kansas Regiment, and has withdrawn from the Republican. Friend Speer is left alone in the Republican now.

 

Kansas Papers. Several of the Kansas papers have h ...
August 17, 1861, Emporia News (ID 3968)

Kansas Papers. Several of the Kansas papers have had to succumb to the hard times, and others look as though they had some very bad disease, and would not survive long. The Manhattan Express looks miserably. It can scarcely be read at all....Among the survivors we are glad to see our sprightly friend, the Burlington Register, again after a suspension of a few weeks....In speaking of the effect the hard times has had on Kansas papers, the Register says:

"The Osawatomie Herald appears semi-occasionally. The Council Grove Press has just announced that it will suspend for two months. The Auburn Docket and the Americus Sentinel have gone up for good. The Olathe Herald and Mirror we have not seen for several weeks....The Emporia News seems to be the only paper in southern Kansas that can regard the hard times without blinking, but even that staid old affair has had to succumb a little to the demands of that tyrant or some other influence, for it has stopped for two or three weeks at a time during the present season. In northern Kansas, the White Cloud Chief, which has been published about four years, notifies its patrons that it will be compelled to suspend if they do not furnish the editor with means to purchase stock. The Manhattan express appears on half sheets. The Grasshopper Falls Gazette and Oskaloosa Independent have ceased visiting our sanctum for several weeks past, from which we infer that they have 'burst their boilers'."

We can assure friend Prouty that we have had to "blink" and use our wits in a great many ways to keep up, but our temporary suspensions have been principally caused by our inability to get printers....

The New York Independent is now the best paper of its kind in the country. It has eight large pages of reading matter, and very few advertisements, and in all that reading matter every week there is nothing uninteresting. Every week there is a sermon by Beecher, Greeley, Whittier, Mrs. Stowe, and many of the greatest writers of the country are its contributors. The subscription price is $2. The postmaster will send the names of any that may wish to subscribe. As a family paper it has no equal.

 

We are compelled to issue a half sheet this week b ...
September 21, 1861, Emporia News (ID 3983)

We are compelled to issue a half sheet this week because we had not paper enough for a whole issue. We have sent for paper, which will be here, if nothing happens, in time for next week....We were unable to raise money at the proper time to send for paper, and it cannot be had without cash. A few personal friends will accept our thanks for their efforts in behalf of the paper.

 

Last week's issue completed the fourth volume of T ...
October 5, 1861, Emporia News (ID 3989)

Last week's issue completed the fourth volume of The News....The paper has been kept up these four years under many difficulties. Had it not been for the prospect ahead -- for the "good time" coming, but which has never come -- we would never have made the sacrifices necessary to publish a paper in this country. The first number was issued on the 6th of June, 1857. At that time there was but three buildings on the town site, none of them completed, and but one of them occupied, while there was but two or three cabins within sight of the town. Notwithstanding the people have been pecuniarily depressed all the time, and have been scourged with one year's drouth, and a portion of the time have suffered from the consequences of civil strife, we have but to look back to the spring of '57 to see that our progress, in the way of improvements, have been very considerable. Instead of thousands of acres of wild and naked prairie, we now have fields fenced in, which have undergone the civilizing touch of the plow share, and have turned off their booming crops of corn and wheat. Our prairies are dotted with farm houses, and in many places the primitive log cabin has given way to residences that would grace some of the older states of the West. Villages have sprung up in every direction....

Ed. F. Schneider has withdrawn from the editorial chair of the Leavenworth Daily Times, which place he has filled with ability for the last 18 months. He has been appointed major of the Home Guard regiment which is now being organized in the state.

Our esteemed young friend, John A. Martin, has been appointed lieutenant colonel of the Home Guard regiment, and has associated with him G. I. Stebbins as editor and business manager of the Atchison Champion. John Martin is one of the best writers in the state. He is also a fighting man when occasion requires it.

We have received the first and second numbers of The Smoky Hill and Republican Union, printed at Junction City. It has at its head the name of G. W. Kingsbury as its editor and proprietor. It is filled with choice selections and spicy editorials. We hope "King" (that's what "the boys" call him) will succeed with his new enterprise, reserving to ourselves the opinion that any man who embarks in the newspaper business these "awful" times is certainly not possessed with a desire to make money.

 

The News appears this week somewhat diminished in ...
November 30, 1861, Emporia News (ID 4012)

The News appears this week somewhat diminished in size. As our subscribers have a right to know the reason, we shall give them in brief. Within the last three months advertisements to the amount of $300 per annum have been withdrawn by the Emporia business men. We have also lost about $200 worth of the same kind of patronage from Kansas City on account of the war. We have on our books accounts amounting to at least $250 for legal advertising in this and surrounding counties which we expected to have collected at the late courts, and which would have enable us to publish our paper this winter, at least, without resorting to the humiliating expedient of cutting down its size. Dear reader, what amount of that $250 do you suppose we pocketed? Nineteen dollars and a half! We have been printing the paper at a cost of about $35 per week, and during the summer, for six weeks at a stretch, we have not received money enough to buy salt to pickle a jaybird. Our printers have trusted us till we are ashamed to ask them to set another type. Their long-neglected bills haunt us by day and night. We were compelled last summer to borrow money at ruinous interest to buy paper with, and have now come to the conclusion that it will ruin any person to print a large paper principally on "tick." By this decrease in the size of the paper we are enabled to get along with a less number of hands, and also to save a very considerable sum in our paper bills. It will cut down our expenses at least $12 per week. These are our reasons for cutting down our paper, and we know our subscribers will say we have done right. It is better to print a small paper than no paper at all....

 

*The Leavenworth Daily Inquirer is the name of a n ...
March 22, 1862, Emporia News (ID 4057)

*The Leavenworth Daily Inquirer is the name of a new paper at Leavenworth. It is intensely Democratic in politics, is well printed, and edited with ability. When it was first started, it was denounced as a traitorous sheet, and the people held a meeting to take means to dry it up, but it didn't dry. It is still going and looks tolerably healthy. If it in the least sympathizes with the rebels, the Missouri would be a good place for it; but if not, let it alone. Simply opposing the administration don't constitute rebellion.

 

...A train left here on Monday last for the mounta ...
April 12, 1862, Emporia News (ID 4071)

...A train left here on Monday last for the mountains, consisting of seven wagons belonging to Dr. Armor, two belonging to W. B. Davis, and one to A. G. Procter. They are loaded with pork, flour, butter, eggs, cheese, etc., which these gentlemen are taking to the mountains to sell. Among the articles is the old Americus Sentinel printing material, which Dr. A. is taking out to dispose of....

 

We are glad to receive the weekly visits of the Ka ...
June 21, 1862, Emporia News (ID 4108)

We are glad to receive the weekly visits of the Kansas City Journal of Commerce, which was compelled to suspend about a year ago. It is revived by the proprietor, D. K. Abeel, one of the most enterprising and energetic newspaper men in the West. We hail the re-establishment of the Journal as a sign of the return of prosperity to Kansas City....

*The Leavenworth Inquirer was squelched by Provost Marshal General Barstow, on Sunday evening, the 15th, by order of Gen. Blunt, and its editors and publishers placed in the guard house. It was an infamous rebel sheet, always puffing and eulogizing rebel leaders and their cause, defaming and belying the administration and the cause of free government. In our humble opinion, this step was not taken too soon. The paper was a disgrace to Leavenworth, and the free state of Kansas. Taylor, the editor, was of the Toombs, Stevens, Cobb, Breckenridge and Vallandigham school, and would have been in the rebel army had he been in the South. He and Adams, one of the publishers, were notorious Border Ruffians in '56, and lent their aid to drive out and kill Free State men. We believe in freedom of the press, but license don't mean freedom. The Inquirer has met a just retribution for its traitorous course.

 

*The Leavenworth Inquirer is out again, but Taylor ...
June 28, 1862, Emporia News (ID 4119)

*The Leavenworth Inquirer is out again, but Taylor, the old traitor, still remains in the guard house -- which is as it should be. The publishers are the same as before; while the editorial control of the paper is to be under a Mr. Pratt, of the Wisconsin Third Regiment, and it is to be Union.

 

The printing office is almost deserted. None but t ...
August 30, 1862, Emporia News (ID 4157)

The printing office is almost deserted. None but the editor and the foreman, E. P. Harris, left. War is a dreadful disease....Charles Stotler and T. D. Childers have laid down their "sticks" and left....

 

We have received the first and second numbers of t ...
September 27, 1862, Emporia News (ID 4183)

We have received the first and second numbers of the Bulletin, a new daily evening paper just started in Leavenworth by The Bulletin Printing Company -- H. Buckingham, A. N. Hamilton, and G. F. Prescott, three of the best practical printers in Leavenworth. The Bulletin is a straight-forward Republican paper....It is a large seven-column paper....Price daily $5; tri-weekly $3; weekly $1....

 

With this number, The News enters upon its sixth v ...
October 25, 1862, Emporia News (ID 4219)

With this number, The News enters upon its sixth volume with as bright a prospect as ever of weathering it through the storm.

We want wood 2.5 feet long on subscription. Bring it immediately. Don't forget your promises.

 

There will be no paper issued from this office nex ...
November 1, 1862, Emporia News (ID 4229)

There will be no paper issued from this office next week for the following reasons: The editor and foreman have vegetables to take care of, and other work to do to prepare for winter. We also have a lot of job work on hand which we have been putting off through the political canvass, because we had not time to print then, and it was utterly impossible to secure help, the war having taken all the printers from this region. And then, too, we want a little rest. We have worked day and night for the last four weeks to get out our paper regularly during the canvass, and print the tickets and handbills for some seven or eight of the surrounding counties....

The politicians wanted the editor to go out stumping. For the good of the cause, we thought we had better stay at home. We have been busy most of the week printing election tickets. We have circulated the tickets in Lyon, Chase, Greenwood, Morris, Butler and Hunter counties, in consequence of which we have seventeen dollars and twenty-nine cents....We never made a speech in our life, and never want to. We preach our sermons every Saturday (publication day). P.S. We forgot to say, for the benefit of creditors, that the seventeen dollars and twenty-nine cents is all engaged....

 

John A. Martin of the Atchison Champion has been p ...
November 15, 1862, Emporia News (ID 4241)

John A. Martin of the Atchison Champion has been promoted to the colonelcy of the Eighth Kansas Regiment, in Mitchell's brigade.

Sol Miller of the White Cloud Chief has been elected to the state senate from Doniphan County.

D. B. Emmert of the Bourbon County Monitor has been elected clerk of the district court of that county.

 

We have missed two issues of The News in the last ...
November 29, 1862, Emporia News (ID 4249)

We have missed two issues of The News in the last three weeks. We hope our subscribers will look over these unavoidable delinquencies....Two of us have had the work to do in the printing office and post office. Besides the paper, we have had a lot of county printing to do, the proceedings of the Christian state convention, held here some time ago, and also the minutes of the Neosho Valley Baptist Association, and other extra work, and it has been impossible to procure the services of an additional printer....

...Paper that cost $5.50 per bundle last summer, we have now to pay $6.75 for. In all the large cities, publishers have been compelled to raise the price of their papers some 25 percent. We shall continue to publish our paper at the old prices....

Mr. Ickes, an old typo who formerly lived near Waterloo in this county, but for the last two years has been in Colorado, stopped in town several days this week and gave us a "lift" on the paper. He is bound for his old home in Iowa to spend the holidays.

 

The most painful duty of our life devolves upon us ...
January 17, 1863, Emporia News (ID 4286)

The most painful duty of our life devolves upon us this week in announcing the death of Charles Stotler, brother of the editor of this paper. He died at the hospital at Fayetteville, Ark., of a wound received at the battle of Prairie Grove while bravely fighting for his country in the defense of one of Gen. Blunt's batteries. He enlisted in Company C, Eleventh Kansas, under Major Plumb last August....Charles Stotler was born in Clinton County, Ohio, in February 1837, where he lived until he came to Kansas in March 1859. He learned his trade in the office of the Clinton Republican at Wilmington, being an apprentice when we were foreman of the same office....

 

*Leavenworth Inquirer Destroyed. This sheet, which ...
February 21, 1863, Emporia News (ID 4311)

*Leavenworth Inquirer Destroyed. This sheet, which has poisoned the air of Leavenworth with its traitorous breath for several months, growing more bold and disloyal as it grew older, had to succumb to outraged public opinion on the 10th. Mob law is always to be deprecated. But, if there ever was an instance when it was justifiable, this one certainly is. It had been muttering treason, and threatening bloodshed to what it termed "Abolitionists," ever since its rebel editor was released from prison last summer. It had gone so far as to call a public meeting of rebel sympathizers to send delegates to a proposed Rebel Peace Convention at Louisville, and thus place Kansas on a par with rebel Illinois. The people of Leavenworth decided that this should last no longer. We wish there were a few Anthonys and Jennisons distributed throughout some of he Northern states. Some are needed in Cincinnati and Columbus, Ohio, and Chicago, Ill. One bold dash like this carries more terror to their rebel hearts than the loss of a battle. They ought to be taught, in every free state, that they cannot promulgate their rebel sentiments on free soil. We clip the following account of the affair from the Evening Bulletin:

"The citizens, under the direction of Colonels Anthony and Jennison and Capt. Hoyt, proceeded quietly to the office, and so demolished it so that it can never be of any use hereafter. A small portion of the material was thrown out of the window and burnt. There was but little excitement; had any resistance been made, blood would have been shed. After those in the office came out, Col. Anthony made a brief statement of facts connected with the affair, as follows: He said that last evening while returning from a visit to a friend in another portion of the city, near the Inquirer office he met a few of the boys singing 'Old John Brown,' but injuring or molesting no one. He persuaded them to go home, and they left. A short time after, while going to his boarding house, Mrs. Dexter's (nearly opposite the Inquirer office), he overheard John P. Mitchell say: 'There goes D. R. Anthony, the leader of the gang. Shoot him!' At that moment several shots were fired at him as he entered the door, but none took effect. The Colonel came out and was crossing the street towards them; they immediately ran upstairs into the Inquirer office; he fired three shots at them. He afterwards retired to his room, and then several shots were fired which took effect in the building. A portion of them entered the house, went up to the head of the stairs and fired through the wall of a room which was occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Blaine, the ball going within a few inches of the head of Mrs. B. Colonel A. then stated that he had been opposed to mobbing the Inquirer, and had used his influence to that effect. He denounced J. P. Mitchell and Policeman Hathaway for inciting those about the door of the office to fire on him while alone, after he had succeeded in getting his friends to leave. Colonel Jennison was loudly called for and took the stand. He briefly reviewed the event that had just taken place; he felt its responsibility and was prepared, with others, to meet it; he had prevented the office from being destroyed long ago. He thought the time had come when traitors should be cleaned out. If arrested, as he thought they might be, he should expect to answer to the civil authorities; he believed they would be sustained by all good citizens and by the nation. Colonel J. further said he was yesterday informed that some traitors were after him, but he thought nothing of it until late last night he found them on his track while alone, but avoided them, and succeeded in reaching home. He regretted the destruction of innocent types and presses, and was opposed to the destruction of the office until they made it a rebel fortress, and fired into a boarding house regardless of the injury to innocent women and children. None but cowards would do that."

*The Democratic paper at Atchison, the Standard, has been removed to Missouri. There is a disease called Loyalty in Kansas which is very fatal to traitorous sheets.

 

The paper which we use to print The News on now co ...
April 4, 1863, Emporia News (ID 4330)

The paper which we use to print The News on now costs $11.50 per bundle (40 quires) in Leavenworth, and $12.00 here. Less than a year ago it cost us $5.50.

 

There will probably be no paper issued from this o ...
June 6, 1863, Emporia News (ID 4353)

There will probably be no paper issued from this office next week. We have tried in vain, both in Lawrence and Leavenworth, to get help. We have a large lot of job work which has been waiting two months, and we know no way but to stop and do it....

 

Last week we were unable to issue our paper becaus ...
July 18, 1863, Emporia News (ID 4369)

Last week we were unable to issue our paper because a young gentleman, who was to bring paper from Leavenworth, did not arrive, although he had been out some 12 days. This week we waited for his return until Thursday and, fearing he was going to disappoint us again, we went to Council Grove and borrowed a bundle of paper from Sam Wood....

 

We have received a copy of a new paper called the ...
July 25, 1863, Emporia News (ID 4375)

We have received a copy of a new paper called the Jeffersonian, published, as it appears in its heading, at Grasshopper Falls. The editor don't seem to very much relish the name of "Sautrelle," which the Legislature gave the place last winter, and insists that it shall be "Grasshopper." Sensible. The Jeffersonian is full of snap and vim, and makes one of the principal planks of its platform opposition to Jim Lane....

 

M. M. Murdock is about to start a new paper at Bur ...
August 15, 1863, Emporia News (ID 4388)

M. M. Murdock is about to start a new paper at Burlingame. He has purchased the Americus Sentinel material....

 

Col. John A. Martin has been on a visit to his hom ...
August 22, 1863, Emporia News (ID 4396)

Col. John A. Martin has been on a visit to his home in Atchison. He is now in Rosecrans' army as commander of the Eighth Kansas.

We have received the first copy of the Fort Scott Monitor by Emmert & Hayward. It is the largest paper in the state and is full of interest.

 

Withdrawal. A few weeks ago, my name was submitted ...
September 5, 1863, Emporia News (ID 4415)

Withdrawal. A few weeks ago, my name was submitted to the people of the district as a candidate for representative. I now withdraw it. The following are some of the reasons for doing so: I don't want the position. It was not my request or my desire to be a candidate....I have as much business on hand as I can attend to, and it pays me better than a seat in the Legislature would, provided I were elected....I do not think the editor of a political newspaper ought ever to run for office. It destroys his independence....The canvass would require a dirty, personal political fight, which I have no taste for whatever. There is only one shape that the politics of this district can assume this fall that would induce me to run, viz.: If by any means the ex-Honorable Charles V. Eskridge should be a candidate for representative, and it is thought best by the people of the district that I do so, I will run against him. -- Jake Stotler.

 

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi ...
September 12, 1863, Emporia News (ID 4422)

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still waging with great bitterness. Anthony was arrested a few days ago by one of Ewing's detectives. He was immediately released, and Ewing disclaimed having any hand in the matter. The quarrel is purely a political one and has been going on for years between the cliques in Leavenworth, both professing to be Republican. The charge that Ewing is a copperhead is simply ridiculous, and the Anthony party do not believe it themselves. On the Abolition question, Anthony has the advantage, the sympathies of the people being with him.

 

Our esteemed friend John J. Ingalls has become one ...
September 19, 1863, Emporia News (ID 4425)

Our esteemed friend John J. Ingalls has become one of the editors of the Atchison Champion. He is one of the best writers in the state.

 

E. P. Harris, who has been foreman of this office ...
September 26, 1863, Emporia News (ID 4434)

E. P. Harris, who has been foreman of this office for nearly three years, is about to bid us adieu. He has worked for the interests of The News with no less zeal than the proprietor himself. Night and day has he labored for the accommodation of our patrons. We feel almost lost without him. He has stood by us through thick and thin, in the darkest hours of The News. Wherever he goes, we can recommend him to the craft and to newspaper men as a first class, educated printer, competent to manage an office of the largest size, and a warm-hearted friend and true gentleman.

*The Lawrence Journal. Below we publish the circular which has been issued to the people by Hovey E. Lowman, the remaining editor of that sterling paper, the Lawrence Journal. The Journal...was the most ably edited paper in the state. Its editorials were the fairest and most candid and reasonable; its miscellany was of the best and purest character; while its agricultural was of the very best the state affords. It always gave its energy to the best interests of the state, and its power was felt everywhere.

The Journal is to be started again, as is stated in the circular....We hope to see it have a good circulation in this part of the state. Read the following:

"Circular. Lawrence has again been sacked and burned by a horde from the border. Murder and blood mark their path. One hundred and fifty of our best and bravest men are no more. Two millions of our property lies in ruins, or swells the treasury of the border fiends.

"We mingle our tears in mourning over the dead martyrs to the cause of Liberty and civilization; their memories are enshrined in the hearts of all; but they have departed forever.

"The ground where stood our city is sacred to the friends of Free Institutions everywhere. Around it hovers a spirit that is undying. Like the fabulous bird, it will arise again from its own ashes.

"There is no agency more potent in soothing the sore spirit of an afflicted community -- none more effectual in restoring confidence and creating a feeling of safety, nor in directing thought and action in a time like this, than a public Journal.

"Having the fullest faith, from the noble response of the people from every town and hamlet in the country to the wants of our suffering citizens, that our efforts to aid ourselves will be appreciated, we have determined, immediately, to re-establish the Kansas State Journal -- to gather up the broken ruins of the old office and weave them into a fabric of power. We shall surround the Journal office with all of its former appointments, including a steam power press, a complete job office and book bindery, on the old basis, and on the same classic ground. There, at different times, three presses, established under the auspices and sustained by the friends of Lawrence and Liberty, have been destroyed by the same spirit that let loose the 'dogs of war' who made this last fierce, hell-born raid upon us. We partake of that feeling of pride which would see a fourth reared there to flourish.

"The Journal will retain its former size and quality of workmanship, and its columns will be infused with the same spirit; in advocacy of the same principles which have ever characterized it from its commencement. To our former patrons and friends we need not say a word. They know what the Journal office has been; that is the best criterion of what it will be. Our books and lists are gone. We wish to hear from every subscriber and patron of the Journal, and every friend of Liberty everywhere. We feel assured the efforts of those in behalf of this measure will make us feel that we are sustained in our endeavors to publish a paper worthy of Lawrence and of Kansas.

"We wish each of our friends to take this circular and exert himself to fill it with the names of our old and new subscribers and forward it to us without delay. The terms of the Journal will remain as heretofore -- $2 per year. Hovey E. Lowman."

 

*Out of the ashes comes to us again the Lawrence J ...
October 10, 1863, Emporia News (ID 4447)

*Out of the ashes comes to us again the Lawrence Journal, and truly welcome it is. Not one whit of its spirit crushed, or its vigor impaired, by its baptism of fire. Though somewhat smaller in its proportions than of old, the editor says it will grow bigger bye and bye. Mr. Lowman has purchased the same kind of presses, and the same complete outfit of printing material, as were formerly used in printing the Journal....

 

We hate apologies, but feel called upon to make on ...
December 12, 1863, Emporia News (ID 4494)

We hate apologies, but feel called upon to make one....Like other folks, printers will get sick. Week before last and the fore part of last week the editor was prostrate with quinsy, and the first three days of last week every compositor about the office was sick, so that very little type setting was done. Then, to throw us still further behind, an unredeemed tax list came in and had to be set. Such work cannot be put up more than one-half as fast as ordinary matter. For the above reasons, we are only able to issue a half sheet, and that not till this late date....

 

We don't know whether we shall issue a paper next ...
March 26, 1864, Emporia News (ID 4541)

We don't know whether we shall issue a paper next week or not....Our printers, L. G. Cook and Russ Randall, leave us Monday to enlist in the army, which leaves us entirely alone. There is not a printer to be had, even at Leavenworth. This is the second time The News office has been stripped of printers since the war commenced....

 

John T. Snoddy, one of the editors of the Border S ...
May 7, 1864, Emporia News (ID 4565)

John T. Snoddy, one of the editors of the Border Sentinel, died at his home in Mound City on the 21st. He...was a brigadier general of militia when he died. His disease was contracted while in the service of his country. He was at one time major of the 7th Kansas.

 

We have received the first number of a new paper j ...
July 2, 1864, Emporia News (ID 4589)

We have received the first number of a new paper just started by J. E. Olney at Hampden, the county seat of Coffey County....Mr. O. formerly conducted the Burlington Register.

 

Wm. Payne, editor of the Burlington Register, died ...
July 30, 1864, Emporia News (ID 4611)

Wm. Payne, editor of the Burlington Register, died at that place a few days ago. He had been in very bad health for some time....Mr. Payne was an eccentric and original writer and a very good man.

We are glad...that our old friend Prouty will again take charge of the Neosho Valley Register, he having resigned his quartermastership in the army.

 

The Lawrence State Journal has changed hands, Mr. ...
September 3, 1864, Emporia News (ID 4630)

The Lawrence State Journal has changed hands, Mr. Lowman having sold out to Wm. S. Rankin & Co. We are sorry to lose Mr. Lowman from the editorial corps of Kansas. He was the ablest writer in the state and, although we have often differed with him, we always regarded him as fearless and honest....

 

The News printing establishment has been sold to J ...
September 24, 1864, Emporia News (ID 4645)

The News printing establishment has been sold to Jont. H. Hunt....Mr. Hunt has had experience in the newspaper business....Jacob Stotler.

 

Published every Saturday morning...by O. J. and E. ...
October 1, 1864, Emporia News (ID 4655)

Published every Saturday morning...by O. J. and E. L. Hunt

Salutatory. We here make our best bow to the patrons of The News....Our motto is "Independent in all things -- neutral in nothing." This is our latitude for conducting The News, yet we are a Republican of the straightest sect. We fully endorse the administration and war policy of Abraham Lincoln....We...shall use our best efforts in favor of the election of Lincoln and Johnson....

The Leavenworth Bulletin. This paper, under the editorship of that earnest anti-slavery advocate, Col. D. R. Anthony, has wheeled in line for the regular Republican Union ticket. It is a first class paper, and since the defection of the Conservative, it will become the leading paper of the Republican party in Kansas....

 

The Burlington Patriot announces that...Lt. A. D. ...
December 26, 1864, Emporia News (ID 4679)

The Burlington Patriot announces that...Lt. A. D. Brown, formerly of the 5th Kansas,...has been engaged to assist in the publication of that paper. Lt. Brown is a No. 1 printer, of sound judgment and ability.

The proprietors of the Times have sold their interest...to P. H. Hubbel & Co. W. W. Bloss has retired from the editorial department.

 

The Paola Herald...has been purchased by McReynold ...
May 13, 1865, Emporia News (ID 506)

The Paola Herald...has been purchased by McReynolds and Kane, who have commenced the publication of a new edition under the name of Miami County Argus....

The Doniphan County Soldier has passed into the hands of J. H. Hunt, and will be known as the Troy Reporter. This paper has been christened and baptized several times under different names....

The Garnett Plaindealer is the name of a new paper started at Garnett by I. E. Olney. It commences...with all the prestige and character of the Hampden Expositor. It is being published on the same type and edited by the same editor.

 

To Printers -- A Printing Office for Sale Cheap. H ...
May 27, 1865, Emporia News (ID 509)

To Printers -- A Printing Office for Sale Cheap. Having made a successful run in business, I therefore propose to sell out the entire outfit of my printing office at Emporia, known as the Vanguard. Consisting of long Primmer, Brevier and other kinds of type; also a large quantity of job type and advertising display type. The press is new and is a splendid article, being a wooden frame of the best quality, made entirely of the Cornus Florida -- in other words, of the best quality of North Carolina Dogwood. Type in splendid condition, and the press working beautifully....I will dispose of the entire outfit, with the good will of the concern, and my entire subscription list, which embraces the entire tribe of Kaw Indians, and a large proportion of Sacs, and nearly all the refugee loyal Indians. Any one desiring to commence the printing business at Emporia will do well to see me. The whole thing will go cheap. -- F. G. Hunt. P.S. One of the conditions of the sale will be that the paper shall be run distinctly in the interest of the irrepressible Kaw Indians.

 

Jacob Stotler, David & Gilmore, editors and propri ...
January 20, 1866, Emporia News (ID 590)

Jacob Stotler, David & Gilmore, editors and proprietors.

We have received No. 1 of the Fort Scott Press....It is published by the Hayward Bro's....

No. 1 of the Council Grove Democrat is on our table. It is a curiosity in Kansas being as its name indicates on the Democrat side of the house....

 

The Leavenworth Times has again changed hands, P. ...
January 27, 1866, Emporia News (ID 594)

The Leavenworth Times has again changed hands, P. H. Hubbel retiring and Joe Clark and Willis Emery taking his one-third ownership. Clark and Emery are both practical and experienced printers, excellent writers....

 

The Fort Scott Monitor has been revived and comes ...
February 17, 1866, Emporia News (ID 600)

The Fort Scott Monitor has been revived and comes to us with a clean look and quite improved in appearance. W. H. Johnson is publisher, with Emmert & Johnson as editors. As the military establishment at Fort Scott has vanished, we do not see how two papers can live at that point....

 

The partnership...existing between Stotler & Gilmo ...
March 24, 1866, Emporia News (ID 606)

The partnership...existing between Stotler & Gilmore was dissolved on the 20th of March, 1866, by mutual consent. Mr. Stotler, having purchased the interest of Mr. Gilmore,...will continue the business....Jacob Stotler, D. S. Gilmore.

 

...We have concluded to enlarge The News as soon a ...
March 31, 1866, Emporia News (ID 608)

...We have concluded to enlarge The News as soon as the proper arrangements can be made. We shall have to send after some new type....We shall add one column to each page and lengthen the columns sufficiently to enable us to give six columns more matter than is now given....Some of our contemporaries have been enlarging lately, and we don't intend to be behind anybody. The country is growing, and we propose to grow with it....The additional cost will be from $30 to $40 per month....

 

We send out, this week, a good many extra papers c ...
September 15, 1866, Emporia News (ID 670)

We send out, this week, a good many extra papers containing the premium list....We hope persons who receive the paper and are not regular subscribers will do so. Our bona fide circulation is now within a dozen of 800, nearly all in southwestern Kansas. This is a larger circulation than that of any other country paper in the state....