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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Fort Scott Democrat

Articles in database from Fort Scott Democrat:    50

Vol. 1, No. 1. J. E. Jones, editor.: To our patron ...
January 27, 1858, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3365)

Vol. 1, No. 1. J. E. Jones, editor.

To our patrons. In presenting to the public the first number of the Democrat, it perhaps is necessary and proper that we state something in regard to our future course as a journalist. We shall give our hearty support to the present Administration, not alone because Mr. Buchanan is President but for the reason that we honestly believe the principles of the Democracy of the Union...to be best calculated to develop the resources of the country, to merit respect abroad, preserve peace at home and insure to every citizen, rich and poor, the inestimable rights of a freeman. While we will not advocate slavery as an institution necessary to the well-being of the future state of Kansas, we shall boldly defend it, when occasion may require, where it exists or may be adopted by a sovereign state....We shall also defend the right of the people of a state to fix their own domestic institutions and settle them to suit themselves....

 

Vol. 1, No. 2. Published every Thursday morning by ...
February 25, 1858, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3376)

Vol. 1, No. 2. Published every Thursday morning by James E. Jones. Single copy $2 per annum; three copies $5; five copies $8. Advance pay in every instance.

 

Apologetic. We must again throw ourself upon the i ...
March 4, 1858, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3380)

Apologetic. We must again throw ourself upon the indulgence of our subscribers. We have found it impossible to procure a supply of paper and hence we are compelled to issue a half sheet.

Two companies of U.S. troops under the command of Capt. Anderson and Lieut. Ingraham arrived in this place in answer to a call made to Gov. Denver by some of our citizens. It is hoped and expected that they will be permitted to remain until the Kansas troubles are ended....

 

Published every Thursday morning by James E. Jones ...
May 6, 1858, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3402)

Published every Thursday morning by James E. Jones. James C. Hutchins, printer.

We regret to see the trivial and treasonable manner in which the last Lawrence Republican speaks of the killing of the U.S. soldier by the band of robbers who recently visited the Marmaton. The Republican admits that "the free state boys," as it calls them, were notifying pro-slavery men to leave the Territory, and seems to be jubilant because a soldier was shot, while acting with the marshal, in a posse, in trying to arrest them. Does the Republican mean to insinuate or assert that the wicked practice of driving men and families out of the Territory, for opinion's sake, is to be persisted in...?

(Moving office.) ...The office was ready for the reception of the press and types. Being of a military turn ourselves, we had no difficulty in enlisting a large number of Uncle Sam's soldiers in the laudable labor of carrying the heavy establishment down one pair of stairs and up another, and of hauling it from the one building to the other on a wagon drawn by our gallant friends in uniform. It has been rumored about town (for the purpose, doubtless, of inquiring our high standing with the temperance society) that we got the press across the Plaza by the aid of "steam," but this we regard as a wicked invention of "the Osages" -- those invincible managers of all mischief. The house we have erected, and in which we are now dotting down items for the benefit of "intelligent nations," and the white settlements in particular, is two stories high and is built of neat walnut weatherboarding. We think it an ornament to Bigler street, on which it stands. We occupy the upper story for our Sanctum. The office of the Fort Scott Town Company and the land and law office of our friend, Geo. A. Crawford, occupy the lower story. We feel very much at home up here in our easy chair....

*For the first time in the history of Kansas, the U.S. troops have been fired upon by men calling themselves American citizens and members of the free-state party. For the first time, a soldier of the government has fallen a victim to the rash fanaticism of his fellow countrymen. On the morning of the 21st, a band of men, supposed to be from the Osage, and believed to have been commanded by some notorious characters from that region, and numbering 35 men, commenced robbing the houses of pro-slavery men on the Marmaton, taking their horses, frightening their families, drawing weapons upon the men, and giving them notice to leave the Territory within a given number of hours under penalty of death....Some of the parties who were robbed came to town and made oath to the facts. Warrants were issued and Deputy Marshal Little, with Capt. Anderson and 20 of the U.S. troops, went to make arrests. They came upon the party about two miles above Jones and Denton's mill -- about eight miles from Fort Scott. The robbers fled and the marshal and his posse gave chase. When the former were hard pressed, they made for a belt of timber skirting a ravine, from whence they fired upon the troops, mortally wounding one of them, scratching Capt. Anderson on the leg with a ball, killing one horse and wounding two more....It is much to be regretted that an end could not have been put to their outrages by the arrest of the whole gang. The conduct of which they are guilty is reprobated, we hope and believe, by every good and true free state man. There is nothing that can excuse them. It will not do to say that free-state men were robbed and run out in 1856. One robbery or wrong of any kind never justifies another, except in the eyes of those who have a natural propensity for that mischief....

After many trials, indulgent reader, we have succeeded in obtaining a fresh supply of paper and are therefore prepared to resume the publication of the Democrat....We tried to buy, then to borrow, then to beg of our contemporaries in Kansas and Missouri, but we found our neighbors almost as well nigh "strapped" in the article of paper as ourself. After much delay we have been obliged to send to St. Louis....We have received an early supply from the house of L. and A. Carr....

We have received the Western Argus, published at Wyandott. Its political course will be democratic....The Argus looks neat and is ably edited. With Mr. Post, the commercial editor, we have a slight acquaintance. He is a New Yorker and a sound Democrat. We can vouch for his conservatism.

 

On Sunday night last, at about one o'clock, as our ...
June 2, 1858, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3415)

On Sunday night last, at about one o'clock, as our citizens were enjoying themselves as become a Christian community, a body of from 50 to 75 men, fully armed, rushed into town and surrounded the principal dwellings of the place....Capt. John Hamilton informed Deputy Marshal Smith that it was Sheriff Walker and posse from Douglas County in pursuit of men charged with complicity in the late horrible murders on the Marais des Cygnes. Marshal Smith was then introduced to sheriff Walker and politely requested him to show his authority, saying...that if he was proceeding legally he would cheerfully assist him in the performance of his duty. Mr. Walker than produced a warrant purporting to have been issued by Justice Hudson of Mapleton, ordering him (Walker) to arrest G. W. Clarke, B. F. Hill, Dr. Carter, remarking...that he had come down at the suggestion of Gov. Denver, and requested the assistance of all law abiding citizens. Gen. Clarke delivered himself up to the sheriff with the promise that he should be left in charge of Lieut. Shinn until the governor arrived. Dr. Carter was also taken into custody and disposed of in the same way. Mr. Hill was not found....But now came the "tug of war." Montgomery, who headed the band of outlaws that fired upon the U.S. troops, and who with his party of thieves had pillaged at least a dozen families within almost sight of the town, was recognized as being at the head of one division of the sheriff's posse....Marshal Smith was informed of his presence and went to work immediately to collect a posse to arrest him. Sheriff Walker refused to give him his assistance....The marshal then went among the ranks to get assistance, and met the same fate. Montgomery was among them, and seemed to be of them -- they were his protectors!...In the meantime, Montgomery and a portion of his men left town. Shortly afterwards, Sheriff Walker proposed that, if Marshal Smith would consent to let him take Montgomery before Judge Cato, that he would do so. ....Mr. Smith has since assured us that Montgomery was arrested and would be taken North immediately....

The Herald of Freedom publishes letters written by Conway and Whitman to Mr. Stearns of Boston, asking for donations of money for election purposes. We had supposed the East was too well aware of the use made of funds sent to these abolition gentlemen to be bamboozled further. Conway is the Leavenworth candidate for Congress, and thinks $500 would insure his election, and wants the Boston folks to forward the amount immediately. We have always been of the opinion that votes could be bought cheap in Kansas, but if $500 will elect Conway, it seems to us that they are held at ruinous rates.

"We observe a communication in the Fort Scott Democrat of the 13th inst., taking issue with several positions of our correspondent "Cherokee," in his account of the Fort Scott and Little Osage difficulties. Anything in any of those letters which do not agree with facts, or which justify the violence of Montgomery and his banditti, in their descent upon persons no way implicated in the Fort Scott difficulties, of course meet with our hearty disapprobation. We are frank to concede that, since we have observed Montgomery, with his band of robbers, riding over the country, carrying terror and devastation along with them, we are more than half disposed to think these men were in the fault at Fort Scott. The whole contest so far as Montgomery and his party appears, has been to pillage, rather than vindicate the rights of the people, or secure the triumph of a great principle." -- Herald of Freedom.

 

Gov. Denver arrived in town on Sunday last....The ...
June 17, 1858, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3420)

Gov. Denver arrived in town on Sunday last....The governor's mission among us was to restore peace, and if the people live up to his suggestions, we can see no reason why such an end will not be reached. The inhabitants of southern Kansas have suffered too much from jealousies and neighborhood quarrels, personal animosities have been taken,...and the result has been the complete estrangement of our people....

During the governor's stay at this place, we were pleased to make the acquaintance of Mr. A. P. Richardson of the Boston Journal, Lewis N. Tappen of the Philadelphia Bulletin, Mr. Babb of the Cincinnati Gazette, and Mr. McLaughlin of the Leavenworth Journal. These gentlemen are on a "tramp," picking up items, and will doubtless make Kansas bleed a trifle by some peculiar squeeze....

 

We are obliged to send to some of our subscribers ...
June 24, 1858, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3423)

We are obliged to send to some of our subscribers a half sheet this week. We have a supply of paper at the river, and have had for some time, but in consequence of the late rains, the roads have been impassable and we could not get our orders filled.

 

There is no excuse for the violation of the post o ...
July 8, 1858, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3426)

There is no excuse for the violation of the post office law in regard to writing upon newspapers. The law is explicit....We publish the following, from official instructions to postmasters: "Any word or communication, whether by printing, writing, marks or signs, upon a newspaper, pamphlet, magazine, or other printed matter, or upon the cover or wrapper thereof, other than the name and address of the person to whom it is sent, subjects the package to letter postage, prepaid....A pen or pencil mark, made for the sole purpose of attracting the eye to a particular portion or article of printed matter, does not subject such matter to letter postage."

 

The emigration to southern Kansas has not been ext ...
July 22, 1858, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3430)

The emigration to southern Kansas has not been extensive during the past season. The reported disturbances, one half of which was never realized here, has been a great barrier to the settlement of the county....

 

...James E. Jones, the editor of this paper, start ...
August 12, 1858, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3442)

...James E. Jones, the editor of this paper, started on a visit to his New York friends on Monday morning last, intending to be absent about six weeks....We find that he has left but very little "copy," a goose quill so blunted that it will scarcely do its office, and no free tickets to the next concert. There is a dull prospect of reward, and a liberal harvest of hard work ahead of us....

"We have seen the much talked of typesetting and distributing machine recently patented by a Mr. Alden, a practical printer....It has rotary motion and picks the types out of the case and deposits them in a proper position for justification....It will never come into universal use. It can only set the type with the rapidity of our best compositors, but then...it distributes the type at the same time that the setting operation is going...it keeps the cases full all the time. It might be used by advantage to book publishers, or even on weekly newspapers; but on a daily morning journal it would rather retard than facilitate the work. It often happens, in a daily paper office, that a piece of copy has to be cut up in what the printers call "takes" of four and five lines each, and divided between 30 or 40 men, every one of whom would probably accomplish as much in the few minutes that were allotted him by the machine....A good compositor will compose and distribute eight thousand ems in ten hours. This machine will do the same work in about six hours;...but it just as much requires the hand of a practical printer to operate it as though it were nothing more than a 'stick and rule.'...There is one other advantage which it has....It distributes pi after being set up with the same facility it does ordinary reading matter." -- New York Herald.

 

Dead. Last week, when we took up the quill tempora ...
August 19, 1858, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3444)

Dead. Last week, when we took up the quill temporarily to supply the place of the absent editor, we jocularly announced that, until his return, the Democrat establishment would be taken care of by "Devil, Incog and Co." Of course, everyone understood the first name in the firm to be an expression of the craft, representing only the little fellow who is generally an apprentice, doing up the odds and ends of the office work, such as carrying the papers about town, "rolling," &c, &c....This character in our typographical trio was represented by David Sanderson, who...generally went by the familiar title of "Little Davy."...Two days ago, he was at our elbow, in his little soldier coat, calling for "more copy" and taxing his energies to keep the works going until the return of the editor. Today, what is mortal of him is in his shroud....On Monday evening, just after dark, he ran to help a young woman draw water at the public well....While busy in this laudable endeavor, the great wheel and windlass swung from their high place and struck him on the chin and neck. He was held there until the young woman rolled them off him, when he ran reeling and bleeding, in speechless confusion, to the hotel. Dr. Bills sewed up his lip, and Dr. Osborn was also brought as soon as possible to his relief. It was evident that his windpipe, and perhaps his lungs and spine, were injured....In the morning, his mother was sent for, and in the afternoon his brother James. Through yesterday and last night he lived a thousand deaths....This morning, the rising sun saw him writhing in a terrible spasm...when all the rest of the world was waking into the life of a fresh morning, we saw the brave boy's spirit recede into the dark valley and shadow of death. With a friend's help, we selected the sweetest spot of all the village burial place....A word of prayer and exhortation by Rev. Mr. Bradford, a solemn gathering of the village of the living to the village of the dead, the rattling clod, the rounded grave! "Davy" had hosts of friends in town. They loved his fiery spirit, his intelligence, his ambition....

 

The editor being absent, the Democrat unavoidably ...
September 16, 1858, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3455)

The editor being absent, the Democrat unavoidably goes to press this week without editorial matter. He will be at his post again in time for our next issue.

 

Our paper is a little late this week, owing to the ...
October 14, 1858, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3466)

Our paper is a little late this week, owing to the scarcity of help in the mechanical department. In vain we rise with the sun and do up our editorial scribblings, if one of our brave typos shall be called to the discharge of other duties....During the past and present week, one of our best helpers has been called away to attend to the duties of deputy sheriff.

 

The editor arrived last night. After a pleasant jo ...
October 21, 1858, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3471)

The editor arrived last night. After a pleasant journey among his Eastern friends, he returns to his old quarters and will hereafter devote himself exclusively to the columns of the Democrat.

Mr. Post has retired from the editorial chair of the Wyandott Argus. He is the law partner of Attorney General Davis. The Argus has passed into the hands of Whittaker & Macauly, whom we welcome to the ranks.

 

Our warmest thanks are due the gentleman who so ab ...
October 28, 1858, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3476)

Our warmest thanks are due the gentleman who so ably contributed to the columns of the Democrat during our absence; and to our friend, G. A. Crawford, on whose broad shoulders (mentally speaking) most of the duties of editor have fallen....Our subscription list continues to improve....

 

If the Ossawatomie Herald, instead of reading us a ...
December 23, 1858, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3501)

If the Ossawatomie Herald, instead of reading us a caudle lecture because we chose to speak disapprovingly of its old friend, Capt. John Brown, will persuade Capt. Brown to give back to Mr. Powner, its proper owner, from whom it was stolen, the fine horse which he rides, said Herald can afford to wear the air of sanctity which it assumes.

Since the times are so very close, we have concluded to take a few more subscribers to read the editorials for the Democrat over the shoulders of the compositor. It is getting to be quite a fashionable practice in our office, and we are unwilling to give news in advance, unless at increased rates. Yearly patrons will be charged 25 dollars, with the privilege of questioning the compositor in regard to the propriety of the article, and who was its author.

 

We can hardly reconcile the conduct of a portion o ...
January 27, 1859, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3515)

We can hardly reconcile the conduct of a portion of the citizens of this territory. The prominent Republicans of this county in conversation say they condemn the action of the freebooters, but when called upon to aid in the arrest of those who rob and murder their neighbors, they shrink the responsibilities of good citizenship, and utterly refuse to give the officers of the law any assistance whatever to render life and property secure. Of the 200 men raised in this county to enforce good government, we have failed to meet one who favored the Leavenworth Constitutional movement, or who is in favor of the immediate organization of the Republican party. We do not pretend to say these men are all Democrats -- our knowledge of facts forbids it. A majority of them have heretofore acted with the Free State party, and we do not believe 25 Pro-Slavery men can be found in the ranks or a single individual but what will be perfectly satisfied to see Kansas a free white state....

 

The "swag-bag" published at Osawatomie squirms and ...
February 17, 1859, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3524)

The "swag-bag" published at Osawatomie squirms and utters horrible lamentations over the true statements made in the Democrat in regard to its friends. The "pimp" who scatters his deceased venom through its columns to poison perhaps a gross of subscribers, has stood by the thieves like a brother from the commencement of the plundering. We were first informed that he was pressed into service through fear, and now suppose that he considers himself so covered with infamy that an attempt at anything like honesty would be useless. The day is not far distant when the good citizens of Osawatomie will turn this THING over to the civil authorities. They will be obliged to do it to save their fair name. He has applauded, or at least has not condemned, any of the foul murders or assassinations that have occurred during the past year. Judging from his columns, noted thieves have access to his office, and is in full communion with him. The very individuals that entered the Free State Hotel at this place, and stole our friends clothing and watches, and robbed us of our scanty wardrobe common to a seedy type, furnished this miserable SUCOR with most of his news items. The account of the release of Rice, and the murder and robbery of Mr. Little that appeared in the "Swag-Bag" was "the story of the thieves," who went loaded from this place with any amount of stolen goods. Some fine linens -- just the thing for TYMPANS.

 

E. A. Smith, editor: The object that we have in vi ...
July 14, 1859, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3584)

E. A. Smith, editor

The object that we have in view in undertaking the publication of the Democrat is to furnish a good local paper to the people of Bourbon County and southern Kansas....In politics, we will support the principles of the Democratic Party, as laid down in the Tecumseh Platform....We hold that the question of slavery in Kansas is forever settled. The convention now in session at Wyandott will, in all probability, frame a constitution which will receive the sanction of the people....We will thenceforth support the fundamental doctrines of the National Democracy and oppose the deceitful and sectional issues of Republican-ism....But our columns shall be more especially devoted to the local interests of this portion of Kansas. Our columns shall ever be open to a free discussion of every topic calculated to aid in the thorough development of our great mineral and agricultural resources....Everyone who has been in this country during the past year must be aware of the difficulties which surrounded Mr. Jones while this paper was under his charge. The great financial distress which existed, together with the disturbed condition of his portion of Kansas, was sufficient to have crushed an enterprise of this kind. Now things are different. Peace has been permanently established, money matters are easier and better still, everyone has something to do....There is one thing absolutely necessary in order to insure success. It must be conducted on the cash principle....If a man can not pay for a whole year, he can subscribe for six months or three months at the same rate. Of farmers, we will take produce of every kind at the highest market prices. We want the where with to procure supplies of paper, ink, type, &c., and you want a local paper....

 

The Kansas State Register is the name of a new dai ...
September 22, 1859, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3615)

The Kansas State Register is the name of a new daily which has been started on the ruins of the Journal at Leavenworth.

Van Horn and Abeel have our thanks for their daily Journal of Commerce in exchange for the Democrat.

 

New papers. We have received this week the first n ...
October 13, 1859, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3630)

New papers. We have received this week the first numbers of the Sentinel, published at Americus, Breckenridge, County; and of the Watchman, published at Mount Vernon, Mo., by the former editors of the Carthage Pioneer (now defunct) and on the material formerly used by the Pioneer. Both of these papers are independent in politics.

 

This paper has now been in operation long enough t ...
October 27, 1859, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3639)

This paper has now been in operation long enough to be considered a fixed fact. Since it has been under our charge, we have never failed to issue it regularly although we have had a great deal in the way of sickness to contend with. We...urge upon our friends and the friends of Fort Scott the necessity of bestirring themselves for the benefit of this paper....We are aware of the scarcity of money, and therefore we propose to take farm produce of every kind at the highest market value. Corn, potatoes, pork, vegetables, &c. will be readily received. We would also remind merchants and others doing business in river towns of the benefits to be derived from advertising in this paper. It circulates extensively among the business men of southern Kansas, and river merchants are aware of the vast amount of trade accruing from this section of country....

 

For President in 1860, Stephen A. Douglas. Subject ...
December 8, 1859, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3663)

For President in 1860, Stephen A. Douglas. Subject to the decision of the Charleston Convention.

We are compelled to throw ourselves upon the indulgence of our subscribers during the winter months. The condition of our office is such as to render the cold weather almost unendurable. We can only promise that, at the return of spring, lost time shall be redeemed.

 

The bill abolishing slavery in Kansas has passed b ...
February 8, 1860, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3694)

The bill abolishing slavery in Kansas has passed both branches of the Territorial Legislature. As far as any practical result is to be attained, it virtually is a dead letter. There are not probably 50 slaves in the Territory, and these are, in the majority of cases, old family servants who have no desire whatever for the benefits of an act, the effect of which will be to take them from under the protecting care of an indulgent master or mistress and throw them upon their own resources for support. The proposed object of the bill is a myth, its real one -- political capital....

 

J. E. Jones, former editor of this paper, has been ...
March 1, 1860, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3706)

J. E. Jones, former editor of this paper, has been appointed register of the Pawnee Land Office in Lecompton....

 

We are informed that a new paper has been started ...
March 8, 1860, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3710)

We are informed that a new paper has been started at Mound City under the name of Hesperian. This paper bears something of a literary character, but is chiefly devoted to "woman's rights" and the "Union."

 

"Wanted -- a printer," says a contemporary. Wanted ...
March 22, 1860, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3717)

"Wanted -- a printer," says a contemporary. Wanted -- a mechanical curiosity, with brain and fingers; a thing that will set so many ems a day; a machine that will think and act, but still a machine; a being who undertakes the most systematic and monotonous drudgery -- yet one the ingenuity of man has never supplanted mechanically -- that's a printer.

A printer; yet for all his dissipated and reckless habits, a worker; at all times and hours by day and night; sitting up in close and unwholesome offices, when gay crowds are hurrying to the theatres; later still, when street revelers are gone and the city sleeps; in the fresh air of the morning, in the broad and gushing sunlight, some printing machine is at its case, with its eternal, unvarying click! click!

Click! click! the polished tubes fall into the stick! the mute integers of expression are marshaled into line, and march forth as immortal print. Click! and the latest intelligence becomes old, and the thought a principle, the simple idea a living sentiment. Click! click! from grave to gay, item after item -- a robbery, a murder, a bit of scandal, a graceful and glowing thought, are in turn clothed by the mute and impassive fingers of the machine, and set adrift in the sea of thought. He must not think of the future, nor recall the past; he must not think of home, of kindred, of wife, or of babe; his work is before him, and thought is chained to his copy.

You know him by his works, who read the papers, and are quick at typographical errors; whose eye must rest on this mute evidence of ceaseless toil. Correspondents, editors, and authors, who scorn the simple medium of your fame, think not that the printer is altogether a machine. Think not that he is indifferent to the gem of which he is but the setter. Think not a subtle ray may not penetrate the recesses of his heart, or the flowers he gathers may not leave some of their fragrance on his toil-worn fingers. But when you seek friend, companion, advisor -- when you want Judges, Governors and Presidents, O, ye people advertise: "Wanted -- a printer."

The Leavenworth Times gives a list of all the newspapers published in Kansas, from which we condense the following: There are 13 Democratic papers, 14 Republican and 1 Neutral. This does not include the Gold Region (later Colorado). Twenty-eight newspapers make a pretty good supply for a Territory of less than six years growth.

 

We will issue no paper next week, as we are about ...
April 5, 1860, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3720)

We will issue no paper next week, as we are about making a complete change in the size and appearance of the Democrat. Hereafter it will be issued on Saturday, not Thursday, for the reason that it will not only be more convenient for us, but it will also suit the different mails much better than our present publication day.

 

After a suspension of more than three weeks, we ar ...
April 28, 1860, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3728)

After a suspension of more than three weeks, we are able to present our readers with a paper, as we think, decidedly improved in appearance. It has cost a great deal of hard labor and some money, but we feel amply repaid in the improvement made for all our pains. We design making the Democrat THE paper of southern Kansas, asking only the liberal support to which we feel ourselves entitled from the citizens of Fort Scott and the surrounding country. The Democrat is published at a point farther south than any other paper in Kansas....

 

The Iowa Point Dispatch has suspended. Cause -- wa ...
June 30, 1860, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3752)

The Iowa Point Dispatch has suspended. Cause -- want of funds.

 

...A large list of subscriptions expire with next ...
July 21, 1860, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3762)

...A large list of subscriptions expire with next week's paper. As it is our determination not to depart from the "pay in advance" system, we shall be compelled to stop all those which are not renewed. We will take corn, potatoes, butter, eggs, chickens, coal, and in short anything which we can make use and, if hard pressed, we are sure that we will not refuse cash.

A new paper, The Independent, at Oskaloosa, Jefferson County, is on our table. It is a neatly printed and ably edited sheet.

 

Geo. F. Prescott, former editor of the Leavenworth ...
July 28, 1860, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3768)

Geo. F. Prescott, former editor of the Leavenworth Dispatch, has disposed of his interest in the establishment to the remaining partners of the Dispatch Printing Company, and retires to private life. Josiah A. Green will take his place as editor, and hoists "Breckenridge and Lane." The reason given for this change by the company is that their claims were slighted by the Douglas party, in giving the leadership to the Herald, instead of the Dispatch. When it is remembered that the Herald has always been an unflinching Democratic paper, and the leading journal of the party in the Territory, the claims of the Dispatch appear rather absurd; especially in view of the fact that its Democracy scarcely dates back six months....We take leave of Mr. Prescott, the retiring editor, with regret. Courteous and honorable in his deportment, and zealous in his advocacy of the "good cause," the best wishes of a host of friends will follow him.

 

The reading matter of our paper, this week, is set ...
August 11, 1860, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3781)

The reading matter of our paper, this week, is set up entirely in new type....In order to furnish some inducements to our friends to labor in our behalf, we will furnish the Democrat during the next five months at the following extremely low rates: Single copy .50, ten copies $4.50, twenty copies $8.00. Any person sending us a club of ten or more will receive a copy gratis.

 

The Mound City Report is the name of a new paper w ...
September 1, 1860, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3791)

The Mound City Report is the name of a new paper which takes the place of the Linn County Herald, defunct. It is published by T. E. Smith as trustee of the Mound City Town Company, and is edited by an editorial committee consisting of J. T. Snoddy, J. F. Broadhead, H. A. Smith, and A. Danford.

 

After a short but pleasant holiday, we are again a ...
September 29, 1860, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3804)

After a short but pleasant holiday, we are again at our post, ready to face the trials and troubles which all country editors have to contend with. And here we desire to return our thanks to C. W. Blair, T. R. Roberts and other friends who contributed to our columns during our absence. It was very properly stated last week that any continuance of the correspondence on past troubles in Kansas should be inserted as advertisements. We have no desire to rake up those old matters....A large number are still indebted to us for last year's advertising. They will confer a great favor by calling at the office and paying for the same, or giving their notes for the amounts.

 

We will take every description of farm produce in ...
October 6, 1860, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3807)

We will take every description of farm produce in pay for subscriptions. Anything that we can eat, drink, wear or burn will be taken at the highest market price. Bring along chickens, eggs, butter, potatoes, coal, and any other articles that you want papers for.

 

The Daily Leavenworth Dispatch has dried up. The w ...
October 13, 1860, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3813)

The Daily Leavenworth Dispatch has dried up. The weekly still continues, though somewhat reduced in size. Guess Breckenridge politics are not very profitable up that way.

 

One thousand bushel of coal wanted in payment for ...
November 17, 1860, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3826)

One thousand bushel of coal wanted in payment for subscriptions for the Democrat. We need coal; you need the paper; neither have money; so here we can make a fair exchange and both of us be gainers.

 

An Editor in Trouble. In his anxiety to visit the ...
December 8, 1860, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3834)

An Editor in Trouble. In his anxiety to visit the seat of war, Mr. Burlingame planned, and last Monday undertook, a journey to Montgomery's headquarters. In company with Jack White,...he had proceeded on his trip about five or six miles when their horse, probably thinking he had gone far enough in that direction, was suddenly taken with an elevation of the heels -- smashed a hole through the dashboard of the buggy, and came near doing ditto by the occupants' heads -- and by a series of kicks and throes, soon managed to disengage himself from the vehicle, and made tracks for town, leaving Jack and the Editor in undisputed possession of the dilapidated "rig." A walk back to the Fort served to complete Mr. B's disgust at item seeking on the prairies.

 

Printers, like all other classes of society, are c ...
December 22, 1860, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3838)

Printers, like all other classes of society, are capable of enjoying an occasional holiday....The printers of the Democrat office have determined to lay aside the stick and rule during the coming week;...and we are obliged, perforce, to suspend the publication for one week....

 

Since the organization of our government, it has n ...
January 12, 1861, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3849)

Since the organization of our government, it has never witnessed such a fearful state of gloom and despondency as now exists in every portion of the land. At Washington, a feeling of despair has fastened upon the hearts of the people, for with the dissolution of the Union comes political and financial ruin to them....State after state, in the extreme South, is rushing madly on to secession....

 

Our supply of paper from Kansas City having been s ...
February 9, 1861, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3866)

Our supply of paper from Kansas City having been stopped, and that ordered from St. Louis not having arrived, we have been suddenly brought to a standstill, and will be unable to issue a paper next week.

 

We have no apologies to make for the non-appearanc ...
March 9, 1861, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3883)

We have no apologies to make for the non-appearance of the Democrat during the past three weeks. It was caused by circumstances entirely beyond our control. We have been in the habit of receiving paper from Kansas City, as we required it; and the supply was stopped without giving us sufficient warning to enable us to procure it elsewhere. We have now made such arrangements as will insure us against similar accidents in the future. Our subscribers will receive their full number of papers....As the spring opens, and times get easier, we hope our friends in different parts of the country will make an effort to extend the circulation of the Democrat. We will take Bourbon County script in pay for subscriptions at $2 per copy....

The Union -- Our Position. Hitherto our paper has done battle, constantly and actively, for the Democratic party....We have stood in the fight unshrinkingly, and gone down only with the flag, when our cohorts were scattered, and the battle irretrievably lost....The principles of our party are as dear to us now as ever....But another question has arisen, more engrossing and absorbing than all others combined, which overrides party allegiance and absolves us from fidelity to partisan interests....We have but one duty, that is, TO OUR COUNTRY. No party dispensation can absolve us from our imperative duty to the Constitution and the Union of the States. We propose, therefore, to lay aside our party harness for the present. We do this because we believe it to be the first duty of every citizen, in view of the present disintegrated condition of the Union, to ignore all minor considerations until the Union is restored or reconstructed; or every possible effort made in its behalf....We are not willing to give up the Union for five hundred parties....

 

Our Position Once More. We thought, when a couple ...
March 23, 1861, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3889)

Our Position Once More. We thought, when a couple of weeks since we made the announcement that, so long as the great question of the preservation of the Union continued to override all minor party issues, the Democrat should be free to give and support any man and any party declaring himself or itself for the preservation of peace and perpetuity of the Government, that no one could mistake our meaning, or charge us with inconsistency. It appears, however, that we were mistaken. Already we have heard the charges of "turn-coat," "Lane Democrat," and "gone over to the Republicans" rung in our ears by those who should have been ready to face with us the storm which is now desolating our country. We have the satisfaction of knowing, however, that if these charges will apply to us there is scarcely a Douglas Democrat in Bourbon County who is not willing to share the obloquy. We have relinquished none of those principles....We believe just as firmly as we ever did that the people of a Territory have the same power over their local institutions as the people of a state; and in this we are opposed alike to the extremists of both sections....We have shown in the past how much we were governed by the hope of federal patronage when we cut loose from the Administration wing of the Democratic party and followed the great champion of the Constitution through the fierce and bitter struggle of 1860....We look for the establishment of a great Union party, organized under the leadership of all true patriots of both sections; before which present party organizations and party platforms will wither like grass before the scythe. When that time comes, we will be ready to come into party ranks and submit to party organizations, and not till then....

The Mound City Report has expired. The press and material has been purchased by R. B. Mitchell, who will publish the Shield & Banner at Mansfield, Linn County....

 

Secession. Last week we published a communication ...
April 20, 1861, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3898)

Secession. Last week we published a communication which spoke in high forms of Gen. Lane, one of the U.S. Senators from Kansas. Although we were in no way responsible for the same, yet a couple of our subscribers became offended thereat and ordered their papers to be discontinued. The following very gentlemanly note was received from one of these gentlemen. He was either -- as stated in the note -- in extreme haste, or he is a seceder -- from the English language:

"Mr. E A Smith Editor of the Black Republican paper at Fort Scott Kansas Sir you Will please discontinue the paper sent to ---- as We are Democrats and at the time we subscribed for your Paper we thought it Democratic but we have been wofully Deseaed yours in Haste."

In regard to the other note, we have nothing to say. It is couched in polite terms and we take no exception to it. As for our "Black Republicanism," we fancy we are quite as free from it as either of the gentlemen above referred to.

 

Suspension. On account of the enlistment of editor ...
May 25, 1861, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3921)

Suspension. On account of the enlistment of editor and jour. of this paper for the war, its publication will be temporarily suspended. In a few weeks our new office will be ready for occupancy, when the Democrat will again be resuscitated.

 

The Editor of this paper is off for the war. We ha ...
June 1, 1861, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3929)

The Editor of this paper is off for the war. We have presented the readers of the Democrat in this Extra a faithful record of the departure of our gallant troops for Lawrence....G.A.R.

 

From the difficulty of obtaining money for subscri ...
June 29, 1861, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3947)

From the difficulty of obtaining money for subscriptions and advertising, and the comparatively small amount of advertising patronage now received, we feel compelled to announce that, in all probability, our next issue will be reduced to one-half the size of the present one....We are under many obligations to Geo. A. Reynolds for his kindness in superintending the publication of the Democrat in our absence....We have made arrangements to continue the publication of this paper, whether we are at home or abroad. If we join the army and exchange the "shooting stick" for the "shooting iron," we will occasionally regale our readers with scraps of our experience in the field and camp....

G. A. Reynolds and family left for the East on Wednesday morning last. Mr. Reynolds is traveling for his health.

 

Readers, we present you this week with a paper red ...
July 6, 1861, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3952)

Readers, we present you this week with a paper reduced to one-half the size of our former issue....We do this because it would not pay to issue a larger one....No dead advertisements will now encumber our columns, and every inch of spare space shall be devoted to interesting reading matter....

 

The editor of this paper is going down to the Army ...
August 3, 1861, Fort Scott Democrat (ID 3958)

The editor of this paper is going down to the Army next week. The readers of the Democrat will hear from us frequently through the medium of its columns. If a big battle is fought, we want to be there to see.