Home

About

Newspapers

Communities

Search

Contact

Spotlight

First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Free Press

Articles in database from Free Press:    20

From Cawker City Free Press: "We have received Vol ...
October 17, 1879, Free Press (ID 1879)

From Cawker City Free Press: "We have received Vol. 1, No. 1, the Kansas Free Press, published at Smith Centre....Smith Centre needs two papers just as bad as the local chaser of this paper needs longer ears. The Pioneer is good enough for us sorghum chaps."

 

We take great pleasure in announcing that James A. ...
November 14, 1879, Free Press (ID 1888)

We take great pleasure in announcing that James A. Scarbrough...has taken a position on the staff of the Free Press as associate editor. This will probably be only temporary as Mr. Scarbrough will soon take editorial control of one of the leading papers in The Great North-west. We would gladly retain him if it were not for the fact that his abilities have made his field too wide and valuable for our pile.

The Toiler, our Greenback paper, completed the number of issues contracted for on Saturday last. We have this to say of Bro. Garretson, that he faithfully complied with the terms of his contract and left us with the good will of the Free Press....

 

Our elegant and accomplished young friend, Gen. Wi ...
December 19, 1879, Free Press (ID 1912)

Our elegant and accomplished young friend, Gen. Wirt W. Walton of Topeka, for two sessions chief clerk of the House of Representatives, and for three years assistant state superintendent of public instruction...has bought out a half interest in the Clay Centre Dispatch and has again become one of "us." Wirt is no stranger to the vexatious duties of the Lead Pencil Fraternity, having served a long and faithful apprenticeship as local editor of the Cowley County Courier long before he made himself great as a state official. Wirt is a good boy, a graceful and fluent writer....

 

Volume 1, No. 1, of the Smith Centre and Harlan In ...
January 2, 1880, Free Press (ID 1922)

Volume 1, No. 1, of the Smith Centre and Harlan Independent came to us last week clothed very nicely in a bran new suit....Wm. A. Garretson has not yet learned that the party whose cause he is sustaining is dead and buried....

 

How is this? K. C. Landers, general solicitor for ...
April 9, 1880, Free Press (ID 1955)

How is this? K. C. Landers, general solicitor for the Kansas Free Press, obtained 51 cash subscribers in two and one-half days last week. We challenge the state to produce an agent with a better record.

 

Charles Topliff, formerly an employee of the Free ...
April 16, 1880, Free Press (ID 1963)

Charles Topliff, formerly an employee of the Free Press and now connected with the Harlan Independent, gave us a very pleasant call on Saturday last.

The family of Will D. Jenkins, editor of the Pioneer, have been ill for several weeks. We are pained to learn that Mrs. Jenkins is very dangerously ill today....

 

...Capt. I. W. Stone has resumed an interest in th ...
July 30, 1880, Free Press (ID 2004)

...Capt. I. W. Stone has resumed an interest in the Free Press which was severed a year ago by circumstances over which neither of us had any control. The re-establishment of the old firm is very agreeable to both....

Notice is hereby given that Neely Thompson and Israel W. Stone have formed a co-partnership in the publication of the Kansas Free Press under the firm name of Stone & Thompson. Dr. N. Thompson assumes editorial control and I. W. Stone has charge of all business matters....

 

Notice. The co-partnership recently announced as e ...
September 10, 1880, Free Press (ID 2011)

Notice. The co-partnership recently announced as existing between Israel W. Stone and Neely Thompson under the firm name of Stone & Thompson in the publication of the Kansas Free Press has by mutual consent been dissolved. The publication will be continued by Israel W. Stone as publisher and proprietor. All business matters will be under the control of I. W. Stone. Dr. Thompson has been employed as editor....

 

Volume two. This number commences a new volume of ...
October 1, 1880, Free Press (ID 2016)

Volume two. This number commences a new volume of the Free Press....The circumstances under which we commenced our career were unpropitious....After a week of trial and disappointment, we discovered that we were to rely on our own unaided exertions if we meant to succeed. We were without money or credit, but at this juncture we found friends that we are proud to say are still our warm and devoted friends, who came to the front with offers of help....The first number of our paper was issued Oct. 3, 1879, with N. Thompson as editor and publisher and J. H. Sells as business manager. After months of toil...Mr. Sells withdrew himself...No man outside of a lunatic asylum ever could give any satisfactory reason why men of average intelligence, fair qualifications for professional or mercantile business, etc., should doom themselves to the brain wearing drudgery of an editor's life in a country town....Enough of grumbling. We are here, and here to stay....At No. 44, I. W. Stone purchased all the interest of Neely Thompson and is now sole proprietor and publisher....Dr. Thompson has the editorial chair and expects to keep it till his son is old enough to occupy it.

 

The Kansas Monthly for September is received....Fr ...
October 15, 1880, Free Press (ID 2021)

The Kansas Monthly for September is received....From its table of contents we extract the following: He Who Died at Azim -- a Poem; Reminiscences of Anti-Slavery Times, No. 2; Two Days Among the Mennonites; The Rain Supply of Kansas; The Indians as They Are; Sumner in Kansas; Weather Report for August; Wonderful Kansas; Corn Acreage; Public Lands in Kansas; Government Land Offices; Our Schools; Public Buildings. Specimen copy free. Terms $2.00 per year. J. S. Broughton, Publisher, Lawrence, Kansas.

 

We have made an arrangement to purchase a power pr ...
November 12, 1880, Free Press (ID 2028)

We have made an arrangement to purchase a power press which will enable us to print our paper at one impression, and lack $150 of the amount....Will not 100 of our subscribers who are now in arrears more than one year come up and pay us the amount....We will make this offer: all who will pay their arrearages and pay an additional year in advance, we will let them have the paper this year for $1.25....

 

James A. Scarbrough, long and favorably known as a ...
December 10, 1880, Free Press (ID 2041)

James A. Scarbrough, long and favorably known as a newspaper writer of considerable ability, and who was a short time associate editor of the Kansas Free Press, died in Atchison last Thursday afternoon, Dec. 2, 1880. A week ago, Will D. Jenkins of the Pioneer was instrumental in raising a small fund to bear Jim's expenses to Eureka Springs, Ark., in the hope that the change of climate, the medicinal waters, and complete rest would give him a little longer lease on life. Jim was universally beloved; he was a good true man -- too kind of heart to wrong a single human being; a little too easy in disposition to be just even to himself, and of that genial temperament that makes but few enemies....The funeral was very largely attended. The church, which holds above 400, was crowded....

 

...We are in receipt of the first number of the Je ...
December 12, 1880, Free Press (ID 2042)

...We are in receipt of the first number of the Jewell County Republican, a little newspaper baby that has just opened its eyes at Jewell City. It is published by H. C. Brown & Co. and edited by Col. W. W. Brown, late of Pennsylvania....Jewell City ought to support one good paper, and in the Republican we think they have one....

 

An Explanation -- When the Free Press came to Smit ...
December 17, 1880, Free Press (ID 2044)

An Explanation -- When the Free Press came to Smith Centre, certain promises were made to its editor. One was that I should have $300 cash to commence on. There was $147 raised, $127 of which was paid to Capt. McDowell to reimburse him for freight expenses, etc.; the other $20 remaining in the hands of W. B. Hardacre was paid into our hands. A few days thereafter, Stevens & Cannon paid $10. This $30 was absolutely all the money I had to start on. Something had to be done and I went to see Mr. Helm about it, as he seemed to be the one to whom all the parties interested in getting me here seemed to look to for instructions. He assured me of his intentions to help me, etc., but said that just then he was hard up and had no money. I built our little office, got started and worked on, hoping and looking like Micawber "for something to turn up." Finally things came to a crisis and I tho't I should have to stop. I went to Kirwin and Mr. Helm secured me $50; a few weeks afterwards he loaned me $20. This $70 he afterwards converted into a gift as a partial compensation for the disappointment I had experienced in not getting the money promised on starting. Of course, anyone who knows anything about starting a newspaper will understand that these small sums were but drops in the bucket, and that further pecuniary advances became necessary. Mr. Helm stated that he was just getting out of debt and could not raise any more money just then, but if I could borrow some until such time as he was flush he would help me. Capt. McDowell and Mr. Helm then signed a note with me as securities for $150. When this note was renewed the last time, McNall was substituted for McDowell, and this last note became due in November last. I had always paid up the interest, 3 per cent a month in advance, and told Mr. White, of the firm of Burr & White, to whom the note had been sent for collection, that I was prepared to do so again if the note was extended. This he said he could not do as he had been instructed by both Helm and McNall to sue at once if the note was not paid. This was the first positive information I had that I was to be punished for my obstinacy.

Another feature of this interesting chapter is to be explained also: I had secured Mr. Helm from any failure of mine to pay by giving a mortgage on my interest in the Free Press. This chattel mortgage Mr. Helm promised me upon his word of honor as a gentleman should not be recorded, and that no one but himself and myself should ever know it. He said his only object was to hold something for the $150 in case of my death or giving up the business, or something of that nature. In a very short time afterwards, he violated his plighted word and recorded it.

Mr. McNall now says that the mortgage has been transferred to him and he intends to foreclose with the intention of then absorbing the Free Press and bringing the Herald to Smith Centre.

This may be expected to happen about the time Webb (McNall) succeeds Tom in the land office, but certainly no sooner.

A Change of Base -- Hon. T. M. Helm once wrote to us (and we have the letter yet) that he would cut off his right arm sooner than send another Final Proof to the Pioneer. We have not heard of any such self-mutilation, but have no doubt of its occurrence, as the final proof notices have been taken from the Free Press and given to the Pioneer. The Free Press always defended Mr. Helm from the charge of using the land office patronage as a means of punishing political independence in newspaper men, but in this case candor compels us to say that the charge is amply sustained. As an explanation of this very extraordinary change on Mr. Helm's part, we will give a little inside history of the late senatorial campaign. We were first expected and required to support Webb McNall for state senator. This we declined to do. One reason for our refusal was that he could not, in our judgment, come anywhere near getting the nomination....Mr. Helm has made a serious political mistake, which is worse than a crime.

 

The publisher and proprietor has purchased, and pa ...
January 14, 1881, Free Press (ID 2050)

The publisher and proprietor has purchased, and paid for, a new power press upon which we will be able to print the Free Press at one impression; the cost of this press in Chicago is $800. Does this look as if the Free Press was on its last legs?...We shall continue to go on in spite of the "political bosses." Our office is not for sale or trade nor are we looking for a new location....

 

The Osborne Farmer copies the Pioneer's article on ...
April 22, 1881, Free Press (ID 2079)

The Osborne Farmer copies the Pioneer's article on the defunct Truth Teller, which closes by saying "Osborne city has no more use for two newspapers than Smith Centre has." This last remark was unwise to say the least. The Free Press came here about 20 months ago. It came to stay and help build up the county. It has been appreciated and we feel doubly grateful because that appreciation came early. The office is a paying one; its credit is good; the circulation of the paper is the largest in the county. It is not the Free Press that wants to sell out, or to move to New Mexico, or to California, Oregon, or anywhere else. It is here to stay....

 

We have upon our table No. 1, Vol. 1, of the Cedar ...
August 12, 1881, Free Press (ID 2110)

We have upon our table No. 1, Vol. 1, of the Cedarville Democrat. It is a handsome looking paper. We had the pleasure of meeting Dr. Wachter at the soldiers' reunion and were very favorably impressed with him. There is no democratic paper west of Beloit, and with proper effort we think the Democrat can get a very good circulation in Osborne, Rooks and Phillips.

 

Negotiations are in progress for the sale of the F ...
November 4, 1881, Free Press (ID 2132)

Negotiations are in progress for the sale of the Free Press to W. H. Nelson....A report has been circulated that W. P. Meadows is behind the purchase and that it is his money which is being used in the interest of the Pioneer. Such reports are entirely false. Mr. Nelson has purchased the Free Press as a business venture in connection with A. N. Brenneman, and Mr. Meadows nor his friends knew anything about the matter until the preliminaries had been arranged. The purchase of the Free Press has no political significance whatever in this campaign.

 

With this number our connection with the Free Pres ...
November 11, 1881, Free Press (ID 2135)

With this number our connection with the Free Press ceases. The material, subscription books and good will have been sold to W. H. Nelson, who takes charge as editor and proprietor.... -- Israel W. Stone.

In assuming editorial charge of this paper, we fully realize the importance of the step we are about to take....Above all, the columns of this paper are always open to everybody who has a good word to say for Smith County, or Kansas....We start out with a firm determination to tell nothing but the truth, with a good word ever ready for the deserving.... -- W. H. Nelson.

 

We are in receipt of the Greenwood Eagle, publishe ...
December 9, 1881, Free Press (ID 2145)

We are in receipt of the Greenwood Eagle, published by W. Scott Elliott, formerly of this place.