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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Freedom's Champion

Articles in database from Freedom's Champion:    168

*Valedictory....This week the old "Squatter Sovere ...
February 20, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3372)

*Valedictory....This week the old "Squatter Sovereign," wishing to fix at once upon the mind of him who chances to give it a hasty view, the principles it heralds, nobly assumes the title of Freedom's Champion....The world ever moves on. The old "Squatter Sovereign," most renowned for sustaining "Border Ruffian" outrages, at once furled the black flag of Slavery and at the top of its columns waved that for a "Free State." Today it prints FREEDOM upon its forehead, and rushes out to rally and lead its army on to battle for the Right....The death of our foreman, together with our own bad health, induced us to disconnect ourself with the paper. Yet with regret do we part with the many friends made in the short time we occupied the Editorial Chair....O. F. Short.

First words. The undersigned having purchased the office of the "Squatter Sovereign"....From first to last there is a labored and unflagging effort to place the Free State men of Kansas in the wrong, despite of truth and justice....(most of page unreadable) Jno. A. Martin.

 

A good journeyman printer can obtain steady employ ...
February 27, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3378)

A good journeyman printer can obtain steady employment at this office. He must understand press work to obtain the situation.

Wanted. A few cords of good dry wood will be taken on subscription at this office.

 

Freedom's Champion Series, Vol. 1, No. 3.: *He Hat ...
March 6, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3383)

Freedom's Champion Series, Vol. 1, No. 3.

*He Hath His Reward. H. Rives Pollard, for a long time associated with the Leavenworth Herald and notorious for his drunken and lawless ruffianism, his participation in the mobbing of Phillips and his efforts to drive Free State men from Leavenworth, because they were Free State men, has finally received his reward at the hands of the tool of southern slavery, President Buchanan, in the shape of a lucrative consulship. What must honest, peaceful, and order-loving democrats think of a President who removes and degrades such men and officers as Geary, Stanton and Walker, and elevates such villains as Pollard, Calhoun, Henderson and McLean?

The Sumner Gazette and Atchison. The larger portion of the Sumner Gazette of the 10th was filled with articles intended to injure Atchison and traduce certain of our citizens which it names....We notice the articles of the Gazette for the purpose of...laying down here and now the rule which shall govern us in our dealings with our neighbors and contemporaries. That rule shall be this: to do what we can to advance the moral, social, political condition of the people of Atchison and Atchison County; and as we are a citizen of the town of Atchison...we shall labor to impress others...and induce all that we can influence to settle here with us and aid in making history what is now only logical deduction;...but whilst we shall do this, we shall not wantonly assail either the efforts or the character of gentlemen earnestly and honestly engaged in efforts to build up other points, but on the contrary shall bid them good speed....

The Kansas Zeitung. This paper, the organ of Free State Germans of Kansas, and the only German newspaper in the territory, has passed into other hands. Dr. Kos retired from the editorial control of the paper with the last number. The Zeitung is published in the Champion office....

County nominations for delegates to the Constitutional Convention. F. G. Adams of Atchison....

 

Notice is hereby given that all accounts due the o ...
March 20, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3389)

Notice is hereby given that all accounts due the office of the Squatter Sovereign are transferred to Jno. A. Martin, and payment of the same to him immediately is requested, as the books must be closed up. O. F. Short.

No Paper Last Week. During three days of last week, we were engaged in removing Freedom's Champion office into our new rooms directly over the Kansas Valley Bank of C. Street, and found it utterly impossible to get out a paper, as we were also very much crowded with job work. As it is the first time this winter that a paper has not been issued while others have been suspended for months at a time, we hope it will be overlooked....We print over 2,000 copies this week, and our edition is constantly increasing....

We have received the prospectus of a new paper soon to be started at Emporia with the title of the Central Courier. It is to be edited by W. C. Holden and will be Republican....Emporia already has one Free State journal, the Kansas News, and for a town of that size we should think it was enough. Kansas is overrun with papers, published in paper towns, merely for the name of having a paper published there. However, we wish the editor abundant success.

Single Copies. In order that there shall be no difficulty in future about the price of single numbers of Freedom's Champion, we announce the prices at which they will hereafter be sold. These rates will be strictly adhered to....We consider the paper worth fully the amount....Persons who have been accustomed to purchasing newspapers in the East, where paper, ink, and labor cost comparatively nothing, are too apt to think that Western papers can be afforded at the same price....We have labored, and shall continue to work incessantly to render our paper worthy of the patronage of our citizens, but whenever it ranks so low as to be of less value than a dram of whisky, or a glass of lager beer, we shall relinquish its publication at once. We do not believe in working for nothing. The price of a single copy of the Champion is 10 cents; 3 for 25 cents; 7 for 50 cents; or 20 for $1...

 

We have received the prospectus of a new paper soo ...
March 27, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3391)

We have received the prospectus of a new paper soon to be started in our neighboring town of Sumner under the title of The Sumner Telegraph. It is to be printed half in the English and half in the German language; and will be edited and published by Jos. Pfeiffner, an intelligent and well educated young German. Its editor announces that it is designed for the support of "Free Soil, Free Speech, and Free Press throughout the Union."...

The Crusader of Freedom comes to us in the form of a quarter sheet. Mr. Redpath says that he has formed a partnership with R. St. Clair Graham, and the paper will resume its original size in a few weeks. He also states that he will refuse to support any ticket or any man who does not announce himself as Republican. He is very bitter on Lane, whom, he says, has nearly ruined him; and he states that, should Lane or any of his agents attempt to renew the disturbances in the Territory, he will oppose him resolutely.

Dreadful. The Minneola (!) Leader, a paper formerly coming from Centropolis, but now, although printed in the same office, and on the same spot, hailing from Minneola, is raving at those who dare intimate that Minneola is not the Capital of Kansas....The Leader had better drop the name of that place, for the curse of an outraged constituency rests upon it....

County officers. Probate judge: F. G. Adams 484, J. Bennett 289; Adams' majority 195.

*Government Pap. The Palmetto Kansan, Frank Marshall's paper; the Leavenworth Herald, pro-slavery; and the Herald of Freedom, pretended Free State, are the only papers in the Territory that receive Government pap in the shape of a fat advertisement of the mail routes. "Birds of a feather will flock together."

Since we have commenced the publication of Freedom's Champion, we have received many flattering notices and good wishes from our brethren of the Free State press of Kansas, and fully as many unflattering ones from the Pro-Slavery journals. To the former, we return our thanks....To the latter we also tender our acknowledgements, and shall endeavor, by an unflagging and stern opposition to their infamous cause, to always meet with and be worthy of their disapproval....We had not intended to publish these notices at first; hence many of the papers were mislaid or lost. But we finally concluded...to give what we have left an insertion in order to let our friends at home see what is thought of our paper abroad, both on the Free State and Pro-Slavery side. So here goes:

The Squatter Sovereign has been purchased by John A. Martin, who has discontinued it and now issues Freedom's Champion....Mr. Martin is a very young man. He worked in our office several weeks as a printer. He gave many indications of great latent talent and executive ability....Crusader of Freedom.

...John A. Martin, at one time a compositor in this office, emigrated to Kansas some months ago, and we see with pleasure that he has become an editor, having purchased the Squatter Sovereign. Those who are at all familiar with the Kansas struggle will not forget the Squatter Sovereign. It was established at the pro-slavery town of Atchison in 1855, and was conducted for some time by Stringfellow & Kelley. It soon became notorious as the instigator and promoter of the Border Ruffian raids on Kansas, and advocated the extermination of the abolitionists by fire and sword....The men who owned the town sold out to the Free State party, and the paper went with it. From a truculent pro-slavery sheet, it gradually changed its politics, until now it is one of the most thorough Free State papers in the Territory....Pittsburg Daily Commercial Journal.

Freedom's Champion. This is the title of a new paper, edited and published in Atchison, Kansas, by our young friend and former associate, John A. Martin, son of James Martin, formerly of Brownsville but now residing in Kansas.... -- Brownsville (Pa.) Times.

Freedom's Champion. We have received the first number of this paper, published at Atchison, which takes the place of the Squatter Sovereign. It is a sterling Free State paper, and the number before us pours hot shot into the Border Ruffian ranks at a fearful rate. -- Geary City (K.T.) Era.

**The Squatter Sovereign is no more. It is now numbered among the things that were. O. F. Short, in a brief valedictory, announces its decease. Once the big cannon through which the heaviest of the Pro-Slavery discharges were sent, it is now silenced forever. It had been taken possession of a year or so ago by the enemy, and its batteries turned against its first friends. But it has at last been sunk "in the swamps." The Free State men of Atchison now are shooting weekly through another cannon, which is labeled "Freedom's Champion." -- Weston (Mo.) Argus.

 

A Visit to Leavenworth....After registering our na ...
April 3, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3394)

A Visit to Leavenworth....After registering our name at the hotel, our first move was to Melodeon Hall, where the Constitutional Convention is in session....The press is well represented in the convention....T. Dwight Thacher of the Lawrence Republican; Mr. Ross of the Topeka Tribune; J. M. Waldon of the Quindaro Chindowan; and P. B. Plumb of the Kansas News are all present as delegates....

 

Scarcity of Printers in Kansas. We do not know of ...
April 17, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3397)

Scarcity of Printers in Kansas. We do not know of a State or Territory in the United States where printers are so much in demand as in Kansas. We see no less than seven or eight of our Territorial exchanges advertising for Typos. We have had an advertisement in our paper for three weeks for a printer, and we now want two. The Herald of Freedom advertises for four; The Crusader of Freedom wants four; the Geary City Era wants one; the Palmetto Kansan wants two; the Sumner Gazette wishes one; the Sumner Telegraph, a new paper, wants two; the Atchison Zeitung, German, wants one; and several other papers have been obliged to suspend publication owing to a want of compositors. Yet the Kansas papers pay higher wages in comparison to the labor performed than any other papers in the United States. The wages in almost every town in the territory are 35 cents per thousand ems, yet the typos are scarce here, although we know that there are many in the East who are suffering from want of employment. Let them come out this way.

The Kansas Zeitung...has passed into the hands of L. Soussman. The Zeitung is the only German paper published in the Territory. It is an able advocate of the Free State cause, and to the Germans of the States who wish a reliable Kansas paper, published in their own language, we would recommend the Zeitung. Address L. Soussman, Publisher, Atchison City, K.T.

 

No paper will be issued from the Champion office n ...
April 24, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3399)

No paper will be issued from the Champion office next week, nor soon thereafter, unless we receive better encouragements from those whose interest we have been striving to advance, without benefiting ourself....We have published The Champion at a less expense than any other one who has ever been connected with the office for, being a practical printer ourself, and performing the duties of both editor and typographer we have thus dispensed with the services of one who would otherwise have to be employed....We have barely managed to make the paper pay for itself, leaving us nothing for our own labor, and we are not disposed to do it longer. We called upon our citizens last week to aid our enterprise, but they made no response....Should we meet with the encouragement we should have, the next number will appear two weeks from this date, and will be in an enlarged form, with a new head, and considerably improved in appearance. Otherwise it will not appear.

*Outrage at Kansas City....On Tuesday, the 16th, Col. Titus...made an unprovoked attack on Gen. S. C. Pomeroy of this city. Gen. Pomeroy was in Kansas City attending to some business connected with the Emigrant Aid Society, of which he is the agent, and was coming out of the court room when he was approached by Titus and some others. Titus, as soon as he came near, struck Gen. Pomeroy on the neck with a large club. The General threw up his hands to ward off the blows, when he received a severe blow which shattered his arm and rendered it useless. He receives several blows and was beaten most shamefully, as the first blows rendered him incapable of self-defense. Titus' companions stood by and never interfered to prevent the assault....The affair originated in an article published in the Squatter Sovereign while Gen. Pomeroy had control of that paper, and which accused Titus of acting the part of a coward in Nicaragua; a reputation which was universally accorded him before, but which this affair conclusively proves him to be....After the affair terminated, the citizens...had Titus arrested, but when brought before the court he challenged the persons summoned as jurors, until he got such as he wished. He was then put on trial, but the jury were unable to agree, two of them saying that they would only have fined him a few dollars had he killed Gen. Pomeroy. These outrages are becoming quite common in the towns in Missouri. It is unsafe for a citizen of Kansas to go into one of them. They are filled with all the ruffians and villains who have been driven out of the territory by an outraged and indignant community....

 

At the earnest solicitation of many of our friends ...
May 8, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3403)

At the earnest solicitation of many of our friends, and with the hope and promise of receiving a support which will justify its publication, we again issue a paper, and enter upon the wearisome and trying duties of a newspaper publisher. We do this with the full understanding that, should that support be withheld, the paper stops....We had thought of enlarging our paper with the present number, but from various circumstances have been unable to accomplish the object....

*The Herald of Freedom. Since we have entered upon our editorial career in Kansas, we have strictly refrained from making any attack on the Herald of Freedom, for the reason that we wish the good will of our brethren of the press....We have never, except in one instance, even noticed the shortcomings of the editor of the Herald, although his readiness to sacrifice principle for mercenary ends, and his custom of abusing and vilifying the character of every one who differs with him in policy, or mentions his derelictions, has been a subject of almost universal comment by the Kansas press....Commencing with a strained and egotistical self-gratulation on his own paper and its standing, he states that its name is original with himself, and that since its commencement several papers in the Territory have endeavored to "steal its good name" and rob him of his "good reputation." All those papers having the word "Freedom" in any way connected with their title, he says have plagiarized the name of the Herald. As to the name of a paper, we had always considered it common property, and from the number of papers under the title of Herald, Times, News, &c., this seems to be the common opinion of the press. We leave our readers to judge whether our title is in any way similar to that of the Herald of Freedom....Had we ever wished to adopt Brown's tactics, or ruin his paper, we would have named our sheet the Herald of Avarice, and followed his line of policy....Brown says that the Champion "will strut its hour on the stage, but its editor will learn in time that it has nothing to gain by running a tilt with the Herald of Freedom."...If anyone would learn the art of polite cursing, they should study the Herald of Freedom. Its contempt of principle is only equaled by its most stupendous egotism, and its cowardice matched only by its treachery. It lives on contempt and slander, and is fast hastening to a dishonorable grave....

 

We present The Champion to our readers this mornin ...
May 15, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3407)

We present The Champion to our readers this morning in an enlarged form, with a new heading, and in a somewhat new style....The enlargement has put us to a great expense, and we should have a large advertising patronage and numerous subscriptions to justify it....We have devoted almost 20 columns this week to reading matter. Our reading columns now contain as much, if not more, than any other paper in the Territory....

Judge Perkins has retired from the editorial chair of the Leavenworth Journal and has been succeeded by McLaughlin & Hutchinson, who, we understand, are both practical printers. Since the Journal was taken from the hands of the notorious Henderson, it has pursued a manly, independent course and, although we do not agree with its politics, we are free to admit that it is one of the ablest opposition papers in the Territory. We like its bold denunciation of the Lecompton swindle and its authors. The Journal has hoisted the name of Stephen A. Douglas for President in 1860, but we hardly think he will get the nomination of the Democratic party....

 

Our friends McLaughlin & Hutchison have commenced ...
May 29, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3414)

Our friends McLaughlin & Hutchison have commenced the publication of a daily evening paper at Leavenworth, the first number of which made its appearance on Monday evening last. It is a neatly printed sheet, rather larger than either the Ledger or Times, and is edited with ability. We wish it the most abundant success in everything except its Democratic principles....

 

We have received the first number of the Kansas We ...
June 12, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3416)

We have received the first number of the Kansas Weekly Press, published at Elwood in this Territory. It is published on the ruins of the Advertiser....It is published by Whitney & Tompkins and edited by P. B. Tompkins. While we regret the retirement of our friend Russell, who had, during his connection with the Advertiser, won the good wishes and friendship of all who knew him, we nevertheless welcome the new editors to the fraternity....

We have also seen the first number of a neat little sheet recently started at Grasshopper Falls and called Grasshopper. It is well edited and creditable to the place but, from the number of papers springing up in the territory, we are inclined to believe that some of them will lead the ephemeral life of a "Grasshopper." Only think of a population of about 40,000 sustaining over 40 papers....The West is a great place for newspapers -- they all live, yet none of them pay.

Origin of Newspapers. From the first day of the meeting of the Long Parliament may be dated the beginning of journalism. The earliest English newspaper that has been discovered is a quarto pamphlet of a few leaves, comprehending a summary of parliamentary proceedings for an entire year. It is entitled The Diurnal Occurrence, or Daily Proceedings of both houses in this great and happy parliament, from 3d November, 1510, to 3d November, 1511. More than one hundred newspapers, with different titles, appear to have been published between this date and the death of the king, and upward of eighty others between that event and the Restoration. Occasionally papers were issued after the civil war began, limited to local or special occurrences, as News from Hull, Truths from York, Tidings from Ireland. The most regular newspapers were published weekly at first, then twice or thrice a week. The impatience of the people soon led to the publication of daily papers; and Spalding the Aberdeen annalist mentions that in December 1652 "daily papers came from London, called 'Diurnal Occurrences,' declaring what is done in Parliament." In the Scottish campaign of 1650, the army of Charles and that of Oliver Cromwell each carried its printer along with it to report progress and, of course, to exaggerate successes. It is to this circumstance that the first introduction of newspapers into Scotland has been attributed to Oliver Cromwell. -- Wolfe's England's Greatness.

A Compliment. Since we commenced the publication of The Champion, we have received many complimentary notices but none so flattering as the following. Our readers will pardon the seeming egotism in publishing it when we state that it is the notice of an old and valued friend, the editor of the Brownsville (Pa.) Clipper, with whom we served our apprenticeship....Mr. Hurd is the editor of one of the ablest Republican papers in the Keystone State.

"Freedom's Champion. This is the name of a Free State paper in Atchison, Kansas, published and edited by our young friend Alex Martin, who, we observe, has been elected a member of the State Legislature from Atchison county. Young Martin is scarcely twenty-one, served his apprenticeship in our office, was a good, faithful, trusty boy; never lost a day in a term of three years; became an adept in the typographical profession and, occupying his leisure moments with his books and pen, he acquired that valuable knowledge of history and of politics which has rendered him a pungent and effective writer, an evidence of which we find in the editorial columns of the last number of his Champion...."

 

The press of Kansas exercises a great influence ov ...
July 31, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3437)

The press of Kansas exercises a great influence over political movements and men and, as the Republican party will soon take the field, we have examined our exchanges with the view of seeing what position the various newspapers will take on the question.

We find that a very large majority of the former Free State press have openly expressed themselves in favor of the immediate organization of the Republican party, or will join with it as soon as it is formed. The Leavenworth Times, Lawrence Republican, Topeka Tribune, Emporia News, Prairie City Champion and Sumner Gazette, together with our own paper, have openly advocated its immediate organization. The Geary City Era, Ossawatomie Herald, Elwood Press, and the Grasshopper at Grasshopper Falls will run up the Republican banner whenever the people deem it expedient to do so. The Quindaro Chindowan has been suspended, but when revived will favor the Republican movement. Thus we have twelve of the most able and influential journals in Kansas on the Republican side....

Opposed to this organization we have the Herald of Freedom, the Minneola Statesman, the White Cloud Chief, and the Leavenworth Ledger. The Herald of Freedom will join the side which it thinks will be the most powerful. The Leavenworth Ledger is the N.Y. Herald without that paper's talent and energy. It will be found on the side which pays best. The Minneola Statesman is the sucking calf of the Herald of Freedom. It pulls at the same teat the Herald does, and the Herald takes good care of its blatant follower....The White Cloud Chief opposes the organization because, in doing so, it upholds its principles. Its editor is a supporter of the American party. He is the only one of these papers which is not opposing the organization from mercenary views, and hence the only one whose opposition is entitled to any respect or attention.

The Democratic papers in the Territory are as follows: Kansas Herald, Leavenworth, administration; Inquirer, Iowa Point, administration; Argus, Wyandott, administration; Palmetto Kansan, Marysville, administration; Democrat, Fort Scott, administration; National Democrat, Lecompton, administration; Evening Journal, Leavenworth, Douglas.

Of these, three will breathe their last in a short time, and the others live and are sustained on Federal pap. If this was withdrawn, they would probably all kick their last. The Herald is probably the only one that could support itself without government patronage. The Leavenworth Journal is the only one of these which has not been identified with the pro-slavery party....

 

The Leavenworth Herald publishes a list of what it ...
August 7, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3439)

The Leavenworth Herald publishes a list of what it calls the "leading papers" in Kansas Territory and, with becoming modesty, places itself at the head of the list. Its editor was a leader when he headed Border Ruffian forays against the people of Kansas, led a gang of murderers and thieves to destroy the peace and property of our citizens, and it would be cruel to tell him that the times have changed since then, he is now one of the defeated and subdued and cannot either lead or treat. His party is in a miserable minority and, like whipped dogs, can only whine.

 

Norman Allen retired from the proprietorship of th ...
August 21, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3446)

Norman Allen retired from the proprietorship of the Lawrence Republican with the last number of that paper, and has been succeeded by T. D. and O. S. Thacher, under the firm of T. D. Thacher & Co. T. Dwight Thacher has been the principal editor of the Republican since its first issue. He is a ready and vigorous writer, and a warm and devoted friend of Freedom....

 

Gold! Gold! Gold! The gold fever is raging in ever ...
September 18, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3456)

Gold! Gold! Gold! The gold fever is raging in every town in Kansas and along the Missouri river. Later accounts only tend to confirm the first reports, and it is now definitely settled that gold is not only found in Kansas, but that it exists in such quantities as to prove profitable to engage in searching for it. Large numbers have already started for the mines. A company of twenty will leave Atchison in about ten days. Companies are also forming in Kansas City, Leavenworth, Doniphan, Sumner, St. Joseph and other points. Pike's Peak is about twenty miles south, and Cherry creek is about the same distance north of parallel on which Atchison is located, and as this city is the most westerly point on the Missouri, it is also the nearest and best outfitting point for the gold region. Colonel Fremont's route, which runs almost directly west from this place to the Republican Fork of the Kansas, is the best and nearest route to the gold mines. A complete outfit can be obtained at this city.

 

The Topeka Tribune has been revived. It is now pub ...
October 2, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3462)

The Topeka Tribune has been revived. It is now published by J. F. Cummings, and edited by Farnsworth & Cummings....Its politics we can't make out. It is Free State, but whether Republican or Democratic we don't know....

 

Winter is fast approaching and the river will soon ...
October 16, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3469)

Winter is fast approaching and the river will soon be closed. To enable us to continue publication of the Champion regularly during the season when navigation is suspended, we must have a large supply of paper, ink, and other materials, and to obtain these we must have money. Our books show a large standing debt due us by different patrons, for advertising, job work, &c. We have also permitted the subscriptions of many living in Atchison to run on without stopping the paper at the expiration,...because we knew money was hard to get....Now we are in great need of money....Will not those indebted to us come forward and pay up?...

The Elwood Press has changed hands again. It is now published by Jno. L. Merrick & Co., and edited by Ed. Russell, formerly of the Advertiser. Mr. Russell is a fluent and intelligent writer....

 

Wanted. One dollar to supply us with paper, ink, f ...
October 30, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3479)

Wanted. One dollar to supply us with paper, ink, fuel, pay our rent, our workmen and our landlord, and supply our office with the little necessaries which usually attend the publication of a weekly paper. Will some one of our delinquents bring the said dollar to us in a wheelbarrow -- or in his pocket book, it don't matter much which.

 

...The Elwood Press has again changed hands, it ha ...
November 13, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3484)

...The Elwood Press has again changed hands, it having been purchased by our old friend, Geo. Larzelere....

 

An apology perhaps is due to our readers for the l ...
November 20, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3488)

An apology perhaps is due to our readers for the large space occupied by the publication of the ordinances of the city during the past six or seven weeks. The city charter requires these to be published and we were compelled to yield much of the space usually devoted to general reading matter to them. They will be completed in another week, however, and until then we musk ask the indulgence of our readers. We are aware also that during the past month we have not given our paper that attention we should under other circumstances. Sickness has been almost constantly in our office and we were compelled to devote much of the time we should have given to our editorial department to other matters, and supply the place of one or more of our workmen....

*Kansas Newspapers. Most of the newspapers hitherto established in Kansas have led rather an ephemeral life. Few of those now published have reached the middle of their second volume. Since the organization of the Territory, forty newspapers have been established and of this number twenty yet survive. Of the others, fourteen are dead, and six have been temporarily suspended, though it is doubtful whether they will ever be revived....The following list gives a succinct history of the Press of Kansas, up to the present date:

Doniphan County -- White Cloud has a Chief, Free State, and American. Iowa Point has an Inquirer, pro-slavery Democratic. It is reported that a new paper will be established in Highland soon. Elwood had an Advertiser, Free State, which suspended, and the materials are now used in the publication of the Press, Republican Free State. Geary City had an Era, Free State. The publication has been abandoned. Troy will soon have a Democrat. Palermo has a Leader, Republican Free State. Doniphan had a Crusader of Freedom, Republican, and a Constitutionalist, pro-slavery, but both have been suspended.

Atchison County -- Atchison City had a Squatter Sovereign, first radical pro-slavery, and the central organ of the pro-slavery party; afterwards it became Free State. The paper was merged into Freedom's Champion, Republican Free State. The Zeitung, German Republican and Free State, is also published in Atchison. Sumner had a Gazette, which has suspended.

Leavenworth County -- Kickapoo had a Pioneer, border ruffian pro-slavery, which has been suspended. Leavenworth had a Times, Republican Free State; a Journal, Douglas Democratic; a Ledger, Democratic; a Herald, pro-slavery Democratic; and a French paper, L'Estafette du Kansas, or Expressman of Kansas. The Young America, fossil-Whig, was formerly published here. The Staats Zeitung, German Republican, has suspended. Delaware had a Free State, which suspended long ago.

Quindaro had a Chindowan, but its publication has been abandoned for the present. The name in English signifies Leader. Wyandotte had a Citizen, pro-slavery Democratic, which has been suspended. The Argus, pro-slavery Democratic and the Gazette, Republican Free State, are now published there. The Register, Free State, was formerly published here but died.

Douglas County -- Lawrence has a Republican, Republican Free State, and a Herald of Freedom, Free State. The Free State was formerly published here. Prairie City has a Champion, Republican Free State. It is temporarily suspended.

Shawnee County -- Topeka has a Tribune, Republican Free State. It has been suspended for some time, but has lately revived. Tecumseh had a Note Book, pro-slavery, which died of starvation; and a Settler which has been temporarily suspended.

Franklin County -- Centropolis had a Statesman, Free State; the paper is now established at Minneola, but has not been published for some time.

Breckenridge County -- Emporia has the News, Republican Free State.

Lykins County -- The Herald, Republican Free State, was published at Ossawatomie but has been temporarily suspended.

Bourbon County -- The Democrat, pro-slavery, is published at Fort Scott.

Riley County -- Junction City supports the Sentinel, pro-slavery Democrat. A new Republican Free State journal will soon be started at Manhattan.

Marshall County -- The Kansan, pro-slavery, is published occasionally at Palmetto. It is the home organ of "Gov." Frank Marshall.

Jefferson County -- The Grasshopper, Republican Free State, hopped for some weeks at Grasshopper Falls, but has lately hopped out.

Of the above, three are daily papers. Of those which now appear, thirteen are published in towns along the Missouri, and seven in the interior.

*There is an instructive lesson in this which many of those who think there is no better place in the world for starting a paper than in Kansas might learn with profit. The struggles of those which still survive to maintain themselves have, at times, been almost desperate; indeed, many of them have only been upheld by a hope of something better in the future. The history of those which have gone down is a sad tale of misdirected enterprise and uncalculating impetuosity. Not a few, both of those dead and living, have been and are edited with an ability and judgment which merited a better lot than has fallen to them, and the whole, as a class, are far better conducted than the country journals of any other state or territory. There is more life, vigor and energy combined in the Kansas journalists than can be found in the editorial corps of any state. Many of them have made fatal mistakes in locating in towns where they never did and never could have received a sufficient support. Others have been ruined by adopting the credit system; and not a few through the mismanagement of their proprietors. Yet it is almost miraculous that so many yet remain. The Territory does not yet contain more than 93,000 inhabitants; hardly more than would entitle us to one representative in Congress.

The oldest paper in the Territory is the Leavenworth Herald. The first number of that paper was printed under a tree for want of better protection. The next, we believe, was the Herald of Freedom; and this paper, formerly the Squatter Sovereign, probably comes third on the list.

 

The Troy Democrat. We have received the first numb ...
December 11, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3494)

The Troy Democrat. We have received the first number of this paper, published at Troy, Doniphan County. It is the successor of the Geary City Era and is edited by Joseph Thompson, formerly one of the editors of the Era. We do not like Mr. Thompson's politics, but we wish him every success as an editor...

 

Defunct. "The Osawatomie Herald, Prairie City Cham ...
December 18, 1858, Freedom's Champion (ID 3499)

Defunct. "The Osawatomie Herald, Prairie City Champion, Delaware Free State, Geary City Era, Topeka Tribune, Doniphan Crusader, Elwood Advertiser, Ottumwa Journal, Palmetto Kansan, Doniphan Press, Sumner Gazette, Wyandott Gazette, Quindaro Chindowan, The Grasshopper, Junction Sentinel, Tecumseh Note Book, Iowa Point Inquirer and the Minneola Statesman are the names of Kansas newspapers recently defunct. They were 'too thick to thrive' and the hard times squelched them. The wonder, to us, is that more have not gone the same way. This should furnish an instructive lesson in regard to...establishing in new communities." Emporia News.

People will learn after while that Kansas isn't either the heaven of editors or the paradise of printers. But every little "dirt-eating city" must have a paper established in it, to drag out a miserable existence for a few weeks and die....There are now twenty newspapers published in Kansas, and twenty-one have suspended. When about ten of the others suspend, there will then be more than can be supported as they should be.

The Border Star. This paper, the successor of the Star of Empire, is one of the best and most ably edited papers on the Missouri border, if not the best. Since it passed into the hands of Col. McCarty, a marked and radical improvement has been visible....Terms are $2 per annum, $1 for six months.

 

T. Dwight Thacher of the Lawrence Republican has b ...
January 15, 1859, Freedom's Champion (ID 3510)

T. Dwight Thacher of the Lawrence Republican has been elected Territorial printer. His opponent was Mr. Plumb of the Emporia News. The vote stood 24 for Thacher and 11 for Plumb....

 

To meet the wishes of many of our citizens, we hav ...
February 19, 1859, Freedom's Champion (ID 3525)

To meet the wishes of many of our citizens, we have resolved upon issuing our Gold edition one week in advance of the time contemplated, and it will appear on Saturday next, 26th inst. It will be exclusively devoted to intelligence from the Gold Mines; information as to the best routes; the places of outfitting, &c., and the advertisement of dealers in outfitting goods....

 

Gold News. 2000 copies of this week's Champion are ...
February 26, 1859, Freedom's Champion (ID 3527)

Gold News. 2000 copies of this week's Champion are for sale at the office. It contains more news from the Gold Region than could be contained in a letter of 200 pages, and those having friends in the East could not send them a more acceptable present.

 

We have yet on hand several hundred copies of our ...
March 5, 1859, Freedom's Champion (ID 3530)

We have yet on hand several hundred copies of our Gold Edition of last week....Price 5 cents each or $3 per hundred.

 

New Job Type. We have lately received from the cel ...
March 19, 1859, Freedom's Champion (ID 3534)

New Job Type. We have lately received from the celebrated type foundry of L. Johnson & Co., Philadelphia, a splendid assortment of new plain and fancy job type, vignettes, borders, cuts, &c....Give us a call and see our specimens.

 

Linn County Herald. A new paper under the above ti ...
April 9, 1859, Freedom's Champion (ID 3545)

Linn County Herald. A new paper under the above title is on our table. It is published at Mound City, Linn County, and edited by Jonathan Lyman. Its typographical execution is creditable, and its editorials spirited and well written. In politics, it is Republican....

The Herald of Freedom, a few weeks since, counted up its newspaper followers. It enumerated them...as follows: Crescent, Grasshopper Falls; Gazette, Wyandotte; Tribune, Topeka; Leader, Palermo; Ledger, Leavenworth; and Chief, White Cloud. All of them it expected to sustain the Free State convention and oppose the Republican organization. Since then, one by one, these papers have declared in favor of the Republican movement, until every Free State paper now published in the Territory, with the exception of the Herald and the Wyandotte Gazette, has declared in favor of it....

 

The Sumner Gazette has been revived after a suspen ...
April 30, 1859, Freedom's Champion (ID 3553)

The Sumner Gazette has been revived after a suspension of about six months. Its editor informs us that it will be published regularly hereafter.

 

The absence of the editor (Jno. A. Martin), who st ...
May 21, 1859, Freedom's Champion (ID 3557)

The absence of the editor (Jno. A. Martin), who started to attend the Ossawatomie Convention on Monday last and has not yet returned, will account for the lack of editorial matter in this week's paper.

Horace Greeley arrived in this city by the Platte Valley on Sunday last, and left to attend the Ossawatomie Convention on Monday morning. He was cordially and heartily greeted by our citizens.

 

The Atchison Union. This new paper made its appear ...
June 11, 1859, Freedom's Champion (ID 3570)

The Atchison Union. This new paper made its appearance last Saturday. It is a very neat sheet...and is Democratic in politics....Although we differ widely in politics, we trust our business relations will always be friendly....

 

Owing to the large space which we are compelled to ...
June 25, 1859, Freedom's Champion (ID 3577)

Owing to the large space which we are compelled to devote to the favors of our advertising patrons, we have concluded to set the local news...in much smaller type than heretofore, and thus, although giving fully as much reading matter, condense it into a much smaller space....

We have received the second number of a new paper called The Western Spy, published at Sumner, and edited by Henry Barter and Samuel McBride....

 

In looking over our exchanges, we find several new ...
July 2, 1859, Freedom's Champion (ID 3582)

In looking over our exchanges, we find several new papers which we have neglected to notice heretofore.

The Kansas Express is the title of a handsome sheet recently started in Manhattan, K.T., by C. F. De Vivaldi....It is Republican in politics and will doubtless do good work for the cause in western Kansas....

The Elwood Free Press, published in Elwood, Doniphan County, by Lee & Wilder, is on our table. It is a neat sheet...and is Republican in politics. Its editors are both young men, full of vigor and determination....

The St. Joseph Free Democrat. It is glorious to see such a paper as the Free Democrat, honest, outspoken, earnest, established in a Slave State to advocate the cause of Free Labor and Free men. The Free Democrat...is published at St. Joseph, Mo., by E. H. Grant, formerly one of the editors of the Geary City Era....The Free Labor element is now a power in St. Joseph and throughout the whole of the northwest of the state....Of course, the ruffians who endeavored to stifle Free Speech and a Free Press in Kansas howl about the Democrat and threaten it with mobs....The West, one of the most unscrupulous and infamous supporters of the dark spirit of Slavery in Missouri, openly advises the destruction of the paper....

 

How Stands the Press. The press of Kansas does muc ...
September 10, 1859, Freedom's Champion (ID 3608)

How Stands the Press. The press of Kansas does much to form opinion and control events....We find, in examining our exchanges, that a large majority of the papers of Kansas are in favor of the (Wyandotte) Constitution. The following journals have expressed themselves strongly in favor of it: Lawrence Republican, Topeka Tribune, Leavenworth Times, Emporia News, White Cloud Chief, Palermo Leader, Leavenworth State Register, Leavenworth Zeitung, Elwood Free Press, Manhattan Express, Ossawatomie Herald, Linn County Herald, Cottonwood Falls Press, Wyandot Gazette, and Atchison Champion. Total 15.

The following papers, all of them belonging to the African Democracy, are opposing the Constitution: Leavenworth Herald, Leavenworth Dispatch, Lawrence Herald of Freedom, Lecompton Democrat, Doniphan Post, Atchison Union, Wyandot Argus, Iowa Point Dispatch, Junction Sentinel, and Fort Scott Democrat. Total 10.

Of the papers opposing the Constitution, however, two of them, the Fort Scott Democrat and Junction Sentinel, have suspended, probably permanently....

The Kansas Zeitung. This sterling German Republican paper has passed into the hands of L. Mader and William Kempf, who have considerably enlarged and otherwise improved it. It will be published regularly hereafter, at Leavenworth, at $3 per annum....Julius Holthaus of this city will act as agent, and forward all subscriptions to the proprietors.

 

...We now have been publishing the paper for over ...
September 24, 1859, Freedom's Champion (ID 3618)

...We now have been publishing the paper for over a year and a half; our books show a large amount due us for advertising, subscriptions, and job work; we have heavy weekly expenses which must be met, and we must have money to meet them....We are forced to ask those who owe us to come forward and pay up. We need the money now. Winter is fast approaching, and we must purchase a large stock of paper and materials to enable us to continue the paper regularly....We have thus far managed to keep The Champion going and out of debt -- whenever it ceases to do so, we stop. We are not going to publish a paper for fun....The small amounts so many owe us are small separately, and will not be felt by them, but in the aggregate they would very materially assist us....

 

Kansas State Record. We have received the first nu ...
October 8, 1859, Freedom's Champion (ID 3628)

Kansas State Record. We have received the first number of this sterling Republican journal, published at...Topeka by those old and tried friends of Kansas, Edmund G. & W. W. Ross. It is an eight page journal, arranged with good taste, and presenting a very neat typographical appearance. It contains a large amount of reading matter and is edited with ability....Terms $2 per year in advance.

A new paper called the Neosho Valley Register has just been started at Burlington, Coffey County, K.T., by S. S. Prouty, formerly publisher of the Champion at Prairie City. Its typographical appearance is creditable and it is edited with spirit and ability. It is Republican in politics....

 

Old John Brown. This madman has met a tragic end a ...
October 22, 1859, Freedom's Champion (ID 3638)

Old John Brown. This madman has met a tragic end at last. An insane effort to accomplish what none but a madman would attempt has resulted, as anyone but a madman would have foreseen, in death to all who were engaged in it. The account of the wild foray in which he was engaged, we publish in another column.

Knowing the character of the man, and familiar with his course for the past two years, as nearly all citizens of Kansas are, none here will be surprised at his attempted insurrection and its bloody termination. Of him, we might say with truth, his wrongs have made him mad. There was a time when John Brown, the Pennsylvania farmer, and his sons, were as peaceable and peace-loving citizens as could be found in our country. He came to Kansas early, and loving the cause of freedom, he was an earnest Free State man. For this he suffered. He saw his home invaded and destroyed; he mourned the death of a beloved son. And these great wrongs crazed the old man, and made him a fanatic, a mono-maniac, with but one thought, one idea, one impulse -- vengeance on the slave power which had destroyed his peace, revenge on the men who had murdered his kindred and friends. It is said that he took an awful oath that while life remained his hand should be raised against it to the death.

No sane man, however strong in his convictions against slavery, will pretend to justify the mad course he pursued. All will unite in condemning it, and no Northern men but would use every effort to put down such an expedition as he undertook. The termination of his foray will be the termination of every such insane and murderous attempt to create a servile insurrection, as it ought to be. None but madmen would ever attempt it, and they will meet with a madman's death.

Of the insurgents, fifteen have been killed. Brown and the others have been captured, and will be hung, as they deserve to be. And thus will terminate this insane attempt to incite a servile insurrection. Thus will it always be with the traitors who engage in such attempts. Those engaged in them will be hung like dogs, and their murderous designs will perish with them.

 

The ticket nominated by the Republican convention ...
December 3, 1859, Freedom's Champion (ID 3659)

The ticket nominated by the Republican convention at Kennekuk is universally to be one of the best and strongest that could have been put in the field. Let us refer more particularly to the candidates.

John A. Martin, editor of this paper, received the nomination for state senator from Atchison County....Now, as in the past, he will labor unceasingly for the advancement of what he conceives to be the true principles of the Republican party....

 

*Geo. W. Brown. We notice in a number of Pennsylva ...
February 19, 1860, Freedom's Champion (ID 3700)

*Geo. W. Brown. We notice in a number of Pennsylvania papers that the infamous editor of the Herald of Freedom has been visiting the section of the country from whence he came and, finding his presence quite refrigerating to his old neighbors, called a public meeting to purge himself of the charge of treason to the cause of Freedom, as well as to justify his cowardly and false attack upon John Brown. He made his speech but, in the course of it, was confronted by John Brown, Jr., and branded as a liar and defamer of the dead. This took the stiffening out of the renegade's spine....George Washington Brown is sinking lower and lower every day. Thus is it always with those who sell their principles for gain.

 

Our readers will have to overlook the scarcity of ...
April 14, 1860, Freedom's Champion (ID 3725)

Our readers will have to overlook the scarcity of editorial matter in this week's paper as the editor has been in attendance at the State Convention at Lawrence during the whole week, and has not had time to devote his attention to the editorial department.

 

"The Kansas delegation at Chicago will be a credit ...
April 28, 1860, Freedom's Champion (ID 3729)

"The Kansas delegation at Chicago will be a credit to the state. Col. Phillips is well known throughout the Union by his able and efficient defense of the Free-state cause through the columns of the New York Tribune....The press of Kansas is liberally represented in the delegation. John A. Martin is the editor of that sterling and ably conducted journal, the Freedom's Champion of Atchison. W. W. Ross, the accomplished editor of the State Record, is one of the old guard and a good and true man. John P. Hatterscheidt is now at the head of the German paper in Leavenworth....A. C. Wilder of Leavenworth is one of the working men of the party....A. G. Proctor is a representative of the Young American element...." Lawrence Republican.

 

Officers of the (Republican presidential) conventi ...
May 26, 1860, Freedom's Champion (ID 3736)

Officers of the (Republican presidential) convention....The Committee on Permanent Organization...appointed to recommend officers for the permanent organization of the convention...: President, Hon. George Ashmun of Massachusetts. Vice presidents...Kansas, W. W. Ross....Secretaries...Kansas, John A. Martin....

The Chicago Convention. We returned home from the National Convention at Chicago on Monday night last, and this week hoist at the head of our columns its nominees (For President, Abraham Lincoln of Illinois. For Vice President, Hannibal Hamlin of Maine) and surrender almost our whole space to the account of its deliberations.

While we shall give to him who has been selected as the standard bearer of the Republican party in the coming struggle our hearty and full support...it is needless for us to say that he was not our first choice...."Not that we love Lincoln less, but that we love Seward more." Not that we do not recognize Mr. Lincoln as a fit man for the nomination, but that we regard Mr. Seward as far, far above any other man of the age or time in gigantic intellect, towering statesmanship, unswerving patriotism, and unselfish devotion to the cause of liberty and progress....For Lincoln and Hamlin then, we work from this time until November with all the earnestness and power we possess; for them we battle, and with them we shall expect a glorious triumph of Republican principles.

 

The Grasshopper Falls Gazette is the title of a ti ...
June 2, 1860, Freedom's Champion (ID 3737)

The Grasshopper Falls Gazette is the title of a tiny sheet just issued at Grasshopper Falls, in Jefferson County. It is Republican in politics, and is published by Azel W. Spaulding.

 

The Grasshopper Falls Gazette comes to us enlarged ...
June 30, 1860, Freedom's Champion (ID 3750)

The Grasshopper Falls Gazette comes to us enlarged to twice its original size, and it now ranks among the mammoths of the Territory....We wish friend Spaulding every success.

The Auburn Docket is the name of a fresh and sparkling little sheet published in Auburn, Shawnee County, the first number of which is before us. It is Republican in politics....We wish its publisher and editor, Mr. Emmert, the greatest success.

 

During our absence in Leavenworth, our sanctum was ...
July 7, 1860, Freedom's Champion (ID 3755)

During our absence in Leavenworth, our sanctum was visited by Wm. H. Gill of the Leavenworth Herald and J. K. Bartlett of the Times....They came up with a large excursion party from Leavenworth on the steamer Des Moines.

 

We are much in need of money at present. The hard ...
July 14, 1860, Freedom's Champion (ID 3760)

We are much in need of money at present. The hard times, which effect others so stringently, reach us as well. We have a large amount due us from a number of subscribers and advertisers, and must have the money. We need it to carry on our business and pay our honest debts....The amount is generally small to them but in the aggregate is a large sum to us....

 

The Independent is the title of a new paper just i ...
July 28, 1860, Freedom's Champion (ID 3769)

The Independent is the title of a new paper just issued at the thriving town of Oscaloosa, the county seat of Jefferson county....J. W. Roberts and our old friend John W. Day are the editors and publishers....

 

G. O. Chase, who established the Union of this cit ...
August 4, 1860, Freedom's Champion (ID 3774)

G. O. Chase, who established the Union of this city over fourteen months ago, and has since that time been its sole editor and proprietor, retired from the paper with the last week's issue, and is succeeded by Wm. H. Adams and C. M. Stebbins. We part with Mr. Chase with regret. Our personal intercourse with him since he came to Atchison has been of the most pleasant character....

We have just received from the manufacturers S. P. Ruggles & Co. of Boston one of their patent rotary card and bill head presses, making three presses now in constant use in our office. The new press is as fine and excellent a piece of mechanism as can be seen....It will print 1000 to 1500 cards per hour, and in a style that cannot be excelled. We have also lately added to our job printing office a very fine assortment of card, circular, and bill type of the newest and most beautiful patterns, and altogether our office is now one of the best and most complete in the Territory....

 

Some time since we sent a letter to every one of o ...
August 25, 1860, Freedom's Champion (ID 3787)

Some time since we sent a letter to every one of our subscribers who was indebted to us for subscription, requesting them to forward the amount due as we were much in need of it. Some few have promptly responded to our call, but the large majority of them have paid not the least attention to it. Many who have taken The Champion for over two years have never paid a cent, while many others owe us for six and twelve months....While all branches of business in the Territory are prostrate, ours does not escape from the general dullness....We shall, therefore, in the next number of our paper, send bills to every subscriber, outside of the city, who is indebted to us, and then strike his name from our books until his indebtedness is paid. And if that is not done promptly some of them may have the satisfaction of seeing their names published in the black list. We trust, however, that all will cheerfully respond to so just and necessary a demand....

 

A chance for Democrats. Lincoln against the field! ...
September 15, 1860, Freedom's Champion (ID 3798)

A chance for Democrats. Lincoln against the field! Who will bet? $4,500 on Lincoln. The undersigned would like to test the faith of either the Douglas or Breckenridge Democrats in the success of either of these candidates for the Presidency. And having an amount of scrip and a number of lots in the city of Atchison that he would like to dispose of or win an equal amount, he will make the following bets: $500.00 in Scrip of the Township of Shannon that Abraham Lincoln will be elected President of the United States by the people at the Presidential elections of 1860. $1500 in Territorial Scrip that John C. Breckenridge will not be elected President of the United States by the people at the Presidential election of 1860. Twelve lots in the city of Atchison valued at $2,500 that Stephen A. Douglas will not be elected President of the United States by the people at the Presidential election of 1860. These bets can be taken together or separately as any one wishing to take them may desire. Any Democrat who believes that either one of the Democratic candidates has any chance of being elected can now have an opportunity of showing his faith. John A. Martin.

 

E. G. Ross, one of the able editors of the Topeka ...
September 22, 1860, Freedom's Champion (ID 3801)

E. G. Ross, one of the able editors of the Topeka State Record, has been in our city during the past week, canvassing for his paper and attending to other business of importance. Mr. Ross is one of the most fluent and vigorous writers in the Territory, as well as one of the most earnest and uncompromising Republicans. The State Record deserves the support of the people of Atchison....

 

We have neglected, heretofore, to notice that D. W ...
October 13, 1860, Freedom's Champion (ID 3811)

We have neglected, heretofore, to notice that D. W. Wilder, formerly of the Elwood Free Press, has removed to St. Joseph, Mo., and taken charge of the editorial department of the Free Democrat of that city. Mr. Wilder is a fluent, spicy and able writer, and an earnest, uncompromising Republican....

 

Atchison Directory. James Southerland, the enterpr ...
November 10, 1860, Freedom's Champion (ID 3821)

Atchison Directory. James Southerland, the enterprising and intelligent Western publisher, arrived in Atchison yesterday with his new Business Directory of our city for 1860-61. It is an elegant printed work of 100 pages, and contains the name and residence of every male citizen, a business mirror and sketch of the city, with information in regard to its various societies and institutions, and a full list of the city, county and other officers....

 

The Conservative. We have received the first numbe ...
February 2, 1861, Freedom's Champion (ID 3863)

The Conservative. We have received the first number of a new daily paper with above title, and published in Leavenworth by D. R. Anthony; D. W. Wilder, editor. It is handsome typographically, spicy editorially, interesting locally, and well filled newsically, as of course would be expected of it under the management of Web Wilder. Its name is a joke, an ironical misnomer, a nice piece of satire, or a lie, just as any one pleases. There ain't a drop of conservative blood, that is in the mean sense in which the word is used nowadays, in the veins of any one connected with the paper....

 

No paper will be issued from The Champion office n ...
March 16, 1861, Freedom's Champion (ID 3886)

No paper will be issued from The Champion office next week, as we shall be engaged in removing our office to the new building of Auld & Butcher, corner of Sixth and Commercial streets. In future we shall be found there.

The editor will start for Topeka to attend the State Legislature on Tuesday or Wednesday next. He will furnish full accounts of all proceedings of interest in regular letters to The Champion during the session.

 

During the absence of the editor at the Capital, b ...
March 30, 1861, Freedom's Champion (ID 3892)

During the absence of the editor at the Capital, business of the office will be under the charge of Frank A. Root.

 

Daily Union. The first number of the Daily Atchiso ...
April 20, 1861, Freedom's Champion (ID 3899)

Daily Union. The first number of the Daily Atchison Union made its appearance of Tuesday afternoon last. It is a five column paper, neatly printed, gotten up in good shape, and contains the latest telegraphic dispatches, local news, &c. The proprietors, Adams & Stebbins, propose running it so long as it will pay, and we hope they may succeed in their new enterprise. The paper is furnished to subscribers for 20 cents per week.

 

"The Union Banner is the name of a daily paper jus ...
May 18, 1861, Freedom's Champion (ID 3918)

"The Union Banner is the name of a daily paper just started in Atchison by John A. Martin. It is one of the most racy and entertaining sheets that has yet reached our table -- full of the right principles aptly stated. We fear that it is only intended for a campaign paper, but hope we are wrong in our conjecture. The Atchison Secessionists need such a raking down as Martin's caustic pen is now giving them." -- Lawrence Republican.

The Union Banner was started as a campaign paper, but it is the design of the editor to commence the publication of a Daily Champion some time during the coming summer. We return our thanks to our good friends of the Republican, as well as others of the profession in the State, who have greeted our little sheet with such kind and generous notices as the above....

 

From the Capital....The oldest member of either Ho ...
May 25, 1861, Freedom's Champion (ID 3922)

From the Capital....The oldest member of either House is Wm. H. Grimes of Atchison; the youngest Jno. A. Martin of Atchison. So that our county furnishes both the oldest and youngest member of the first Legislature of the State of Kansas....

The Olathe Mirror is the name of a new Republican paper just started in Olathe, Johnson County, on the ruins of the Quindaro Tribune....It is edited and published by John Francis.

 

Volunteers Wanted. The undersigned has been author ...
June 1, 1861, Freedom's Champion (ID 3928)

Volunteers Wanted. The undersigned has been authorized by the Commander-in-Chief to raise a Company of Infantry, consisting of 74 men, for the three years United States service. All able-bodied men between the ages of 18 and 45, who will pass the United States inspection, and none others, will be received. The company will be mustered into the service as soon as its ranks are full. All persons desiring to enlist will apply at the Champion office, or to Lieut. Col. Foster, who is appointed recruiting officer. Jno. A. Martin.

We have received the first number of The Brown County Union, a new paper just started in Hiawatha by P. Gould Parker. It is a large six-column sheet, got up in good style, neatly printed, takes strong Union ground, and openly avows itself to support the Administration of Abraham Lincoln. The Union is the only paper in Brown county.

 

The Bulletin. This sheet made its first appearance ...
June 22, 1861, Freedom's Champion (ID 3941)

The Bulletin. This sheet made its first appearance on Thursday last. It is a neatly printed paper and edited by Driggs, Faris and Moore....It is a quasi-secessionist sheet, the sympathies of its editors...being with the traitors who are making war against the government, but a small seasoning of discretion prevents them from saying so boldly....

 

Assault on the Editor. On Saturday last, an assaul ...
June 29, 1861, Freedom's Champion (ID 3948)

Assault on the Editor. On Saturday last, an assault was made on the editor of this paper by Geo. W. Glick. We were sitting in the drug store of John T. Grimes, with our back to the door, when Glick entered and, standing behind us, asked us what we were abusing him in the paper for. We replied that we didn't know we had been. He then retorted "D--n you, I'll show you that you can't abuse a private citizen with impunity," and immediately aimed a blow at us with an umbrella he held in his hand. We caught the lick on our left arm and jumped to our feet. He again struck at us with the umbrella, when we caught it in our left hand, wrenched it from him, and raised it to strike him, when Mr. Tucker, one of the city police, rushed between us. We then threw away the umbrella and attempted to grasp him with our left hand, but he retreated, and missing our grasp, we struck him with our right hand on the side of the head as he went out of the door, when Mr. Tucker again got between us, Glick taking refuge behind a sign post in front of the store. Mr. Tucker then arrested him, and he was taken before Recorder Price and fined $5 and costs. The assault grew out of an article in The Champion of last week reflecting on Glick's course as a politician. The article contained nothing of a personal nature, but every word of it was true as we can prove by the affidavits of fifty of the best men in Atchison. The assault, therefore, was wholly unprovoked, as we have a right, as an editor, to at all times refer to the public course of public men -- and Glick pretends to be one. And had it not been for the presence of the policeman he wouldn't have been able to write another card for the Topeka Record for two weeks, as we should have whipped him so bad that he would have been confined to his bed for that length of time. Further we have this to say. We endeavor at all times to speak the truth of the course of politicians. If we are ever misinformed, or in error, we are ready at all times to frankly correct any misstatement if convinced that it is such. But we cannot be deterred from publishing whatsoever we please in relation to the course of politicians who disgrace themselves and their manhood by a sympathy with secessionists; and threats of personal violence will but stimulate, rather than deter us, in exposing their vacillating course and despicable opinions. And we never have, and never will, use velvet words for disgraceful deeds....

 

The editor was absent at Fort Scott until Wednesda ...
September 7, 1861, Freedom's Champion (ID 3975)

The editor was absent at Fort Scott until Wednesday evening, and since his return has been so busy with military affairs that he has had but little time to devote to the paper. This is his excuse for the small amount of editorial.

 

The editor of this paper has been appointed lieute ...
September 14, 1861, Freedom's Champion (ID 3979)

The editor of this paper has been appointed lieutenant colonel of the 7th Kansas Regiment. He will leave for Fort Leavenworth early next week.

Home Guards. Recruits Wanted! The Company now forming in this county for the regiment of Home Guards in the U.S. service will be ready to start for Fort Leavenworth to be mustered in by Wednesday morning next....Wages $13 per month, clothing, and rations, with a bounty of $100 and a Land Warrant at the close of service. The regiment will be armed, equipped and paid by the U.S. Government, and stationed within the state for home protection. Term of enlistment three years, or during the war. Call at once. John A. Martin, Lieut. Col. 1st Reg't Kansas Home Guards.

 

To the Patrons of the Champion. I have been tender ...
September 21, 1861, Freedom's Champion (ID 3985)

To the Patrons of the Champion. I have been tendered by the Governor, and have concluded to accept, the appointment of lieutenant colonel of the Seventh Regiment of Kansas Volunteers. With the present number of The Champion, therefore, my connection with it as its active editor ceases and I shall henceforth fight for the cause of Liberty and Union in another way. It is now nearly four years since my connection with the paper commenced, and during that period I have faithfully and earnestly labored to make it worthy of your support and confidence....The business of the establishment during that period has not been a fortune, but it yielded a living and I am satisfied....I have a week or two to settle up my business. I owe some friends, and a great many owe me....I find on my books accounts amounting to over three thousand dollars. If I can get five hundred of that amount, I can pay my debts....The Champion will still continue to be published every week. I have engaged Geo. I. Stebbins, formerly of the Atchison Union, but whose strong Union sentiments and sympathies were too radical for that paper, to take charge of it as business manager and editor. I shall also furnish it with editorial letters, articles, and selections whenever opportunity offers. Mr. Stebbins is an able and talented writer, a correct business man, and a devoted and earnest friend of the Union....The dangers and perils of the battlefield I accept willingly and proudly, glad that I have an arm to strike, or if needs be, a life to give for my country.... -- John A. Martin.

To the Readers of the Champion. In taking position as one of the editors of the Champion, I have to say to its readers that in this time of our country's peril I consider it to be the duty of every patriot to place himself fully and unqualifiedly on her side...to throw aside all party predilections and stand shoulder to shoulder in this contest until the last vestige of rebellion is swept from the land....My best efforts shall be given to making the Champion what is has heretofore been -- a reliable and trustworthy newspaper.... -- George I. Stebbins.

 

The Eighth Kansas. The Eighth Kansas Regiment of K ...
December 14, 1861, Freedom's Champion (ID 4016)

The Eighth Kansas. The Eighth Kansas Regiment of Kansas Volunteers is now fully organized, and all of its companies but one mustered in. It musters nearly 800 men. The following are the field, staff and company officers of the regiment: Colonel H. W. Wessels, Lieut. Colonel John A. Martin....

 

From the Eighth Regiment. Camp Wilkes near Westpoi ...
January 11, 1862, Freedom's Champion (ID 4028)

From the Eighth Regiment. Camp Wilkes near Westpoint, Mo., Dec. 31, 1861. A happy New Year, with many happy returns, to all the patrons of The Champion....I have now been over two weeks at this place, or in the vicinity. With companies A and G, of the Eighth, I left Lawrence on Monday, the 16th, and reached Westpoint on Thursday, the 19th...having marched about 18 miles a day....It is designed, I understand, to station the 8th Regiment here for the winter to protect the state. A line of forces is stationed at intervals all along the border....The Eighth Regiment has been treated more shabbily than any from Kansas....It is composed of the very best of our citizens and the best fighting material of Kansas. But its companies are scattered over Kansas from one extremity to the other, and the commanding officers have been unable to get them together. Co. B is at Fort Leavenworth, where there is nothing to do;...Co. C is sent out to garrison Fort Riley, when a dozen men with a corporal could do just as well; Co. E is kept detached in Johnson Co., and Co. F is stationed in Doniphan county, where it stays serving the same purpose as a fifth wheel to a coach....The country about us exhibits all the horrors of a civil war in its most frightful aspect. Westpoint was formerly a thriving town with a large hotel, a number of fine store-rooms and a great many excellent private dwelling houses. Now everything in it is in ruins or rapidly going that way. Not a family resides in it. Soldiers are quartered in the houses, and the store-rooms are used as stables for the horses of the cavalry. The large hotel was used as quarters for two companies, but caught fire and was burned to the ground....Large farms unoccupied; the ripened harvest stands ungathered in the deserted fields; thrifty orchards are being trampled upon and broken down; houses and barns are burned or vacated by the fleeing and frightened inhabitants;...the stock running wild is killed by the soldiers....It is my first view of war's terrors and even my worst pictures of imagination are more than realized.... -- M.

 

The Leavenworth Inquirer. The Leavenworth Times sp ...
April 5, 1862, Freedom's Champion (ID 4068)

The Leavenworth Inquirer. The Leavenworth Times speaks as follows of a threat made by the traitor editor of that traitor sheet to have Col. Martin removed from his position as postmaster of this city. We hope Burrell will get up a good many petitions signed by traitors and forward them to Washington. Every loyal Union man is satisfied with the manner in which the Atchison Post Office is conducted....

 

Lieut. Col. John A. Martin takes leave of us today ...
May 31, 1862, Freedom's Champion (ID 4094)

Lieut. Col. John A. Martin takes leave of us today as provost marshal. He has been in the city some months and has done his duty with universal satisfaction and our citizens will learn of his departure to Corinth with sincere regret.... -- Leavenworth Conservative.

 

*The Inquirer. After a few days' suspension, this ...
June 28, 1862, Freedom's Champion (ID 4118)

*The Inquirer. After a few days' suspension, this traitorous sheet has again resumed its publication, all who were arrested for connection with it being released, except Taylor, the editor, who is yet held in "durance vile." We see some slight improvement in the first issue -- very slight, however, and we have but little hopes of it being permanent. Instead of asserting, as heretofore, that the Abolitionists were the cause of the war, in that issue it charges Southern fire-eaters, together with Northern Abolitionists, with recklessly plunging the nation into war. It is certainly something of an advance in the right direction for the Inquirer to acknowledge that the South were at all to blame....For the sake of the good of our State, we had hoped the miserable thing was effectually squelched, but suppose the process will have to be repeated again....

 

Lt. Col. Anthony has been placed under arrest and ...
July 12, 1862, Freedom's Champion (ID 4127)

Lt. Col. Anthony has been placed under arrest and charges have been proferred against him by Gen. Mitchell. The trouble seems to be that Anthony was not willing to guard the hen coops and onion patches of notorious and avowed rebels, nor to return fugitive slaves to their masters. This idea of protecting the property of men who are fighting us, and paying enormous prices for everything purchased of them, must be abandoned....

 

Col. Anthony has been unconditionally released fro ...
August 2, 1862, Freedom's Champion (ID 4138)

Col. Anthony has been unconditionally released from the arrest made by order of Gen. Halleck for refusing to expel negroes from his camp....

 

*Squelched. The Constitutional Gazetteer, publishe ...
August 23, 1862, Freedom's Champion (ID 4153)

*Squelched. The Constitutional Gazetteer, published at Marysville, Marshall county, was broken into and the office nearly destroyed by a mob a few days since. The last number contained a most bitter and abusive article on Gen. Lane, denouncing him as a murderer and thief, and its entire course has been in opposition to the Government and tending to give aid and comfort to the enemy. We regret that violence was used in closing up the concern, but treason sympathizing sheets can expect nothing else in Kansas if they persist in disseminating their doctrines. The Leavenworth Inquirer alone remains, and a strict censorship has thus far been required to save it. Better remove this, let it commit itself, and then close it up.

 

Letter from the Kansas Seventh...Near Rienzi, Miss ...
September 6, 1862, Freedom's Champion (ID 4159)

Letter from the Kansas Seventh...Near Rienzi, Miss, Army of the Mississippi, Aug. 21, 1862....The Kansas and Wisconsin brigade left Leavenworth on May 28th for St. Louis, where we arrived June 1st....We were ordered to Columbus, Ky., where we arrived June 2d. About 10 days after we arrived at Columbus, we were ordered to proceed down the Ohio & Mobile railroad to build up the bridges which were burned by retreating rebels, and clear the road of the guerrillas that infested the road from Columbus to Corinth....In June, while the 7th was marching through Kentucky, it was halted by Lieutenant Colonel Anthony at the house of one A. G. Sims near Clinton, Ky. Some officers and men took dinner, paying Mrs. Sims 25 cents apiece. Sixty-one bushels of corn were taken for which Col. Anthony gave a receipt at 40 cents per bushel, stating in the receipt that Sims was secesh. A few days after this and while the regiment was at Union City, Tenn., two old negro men, their wives and four children came into our camp. These were Sims' negroes. The night after we were at Sims', the 12th Wisconsin camped there and eight negroes with horses run into their camp. Old Sims pursued. The horses were returned to him, but the negroes fled to our camp for protection. (The camps were only one-half mile apart.) Sims went to General Mitchell for aid. General Mitchell sent his assistant adjutant general, Capt. W. H. H. Lawrence, with Sims to find the negroes and, if found, to turn them out of camp. No objection was made to Captain Lawrence searching the camp, but some of the boys told Sims that he would be minus a head if he did not leave camp at once, which he did in a hurry. General Mitchell reported to General Quinby, and General Quinby wrote to General Mitchell that "Sims' negroes must be put out of camp." General Mitchell being unwell, the command of the brigade devolved on Lieutenant Colonel D. R. Anthony on the march from Union City to Camp Etheridge, Tenn. At this place Anthony issued brigade general orders No. 26, saying that "the impertinence and impudence of open and avowed rebels in arrogantly demanding the right to search our camps for their fugitive slaves had become a nuisance and would no longer be tolerated." Lieutenant Colonel Anthony was placed in arrest. Well, we arrived at Corinth after many trials and tribulations in consequence of the colored "individual" and then Anthony was released by order of the War Department....

 

Kansas Boys in the South. From Mississippi through ...
October 4, 1862, Freedom's Champion (ID 4191)

Kansas Boys in the South. From Mississippi through Alabama and Tennessee to Kentucky at forced marches. Camp of 8th Ks. Vols., near Bowling Green, Ky., Sept 16, 1862. My last letter bore date of the 16th of August and at Eastport, Miss. That I have not written since has not been from a lack of disposition, but rather that I had no time to write and...no way to send the letter....On the 18th, we received orders from Gen. Mitchell to hold ourselves in readiness to march....At noon that day the 1st brigade came in and commenced crossing the Tennessee river....The next morning we crossed over on flatboats, and moved out three miles from the river....Did any of the readers of the Champion ever see an army cross a river on boats? It is a sight they would not soon forget. Day and night occupied; the shores crowded with busy men; officers angry and swearing, men angry and swearing; mules stubborn and braying, drivers whipping and cursing, wagons breaking down and overturning; soldiers drunk if there be any whisky in the neighborhood, and everything confusion and worse confounded. Such a scene we participated in during half a day, and witnessed during five. (hard marches for several days)....While at Nashville we saw the whole of Buell's splendid army, probably 50,000 men, file past us going northward, and they are now rendezvoused at this place. Here we first found out that it was a retreat and that our forced marches were for the purpose of reinforcing Buell. There has been miserable management, and a terrible responsibility rests somewhere....We left camp near Nashville at four o'clock on the 11th, marching until twelve o'clock at night through one of the most terrible storms of rain, wind and lightning I ever witnessed, and bivouacked on the wet ground in the woods near Edgefield Junction, ten miles from Nashville....We left Edgefield at four o'clock the next evening and then began the most exhausting march of our campaign. We passed up a spur of the Cumberland mountains at about ten o'clock at night, and at two o'clock in the morning bivouacked at Tyber Springs....At six the advance sounded. We pushed on, reached a point within three miles of Mitchellsville, Tenn., when we received orders to go back, and immediately faced about, marching a mile and a half on the return, and at about three o'clock in the afternoon halted. Here we were allowed to rest until ten o'clock at night, when we again started, our orders to return having, in the meantime, been countermanded. At daylight we passed through Franklin, Ky.; an hour afterwards halted on the roadside where we were allowed two hours' rest; then pushed on again, and at eleven o'clock halted at a fine spring about fourteen miles from Bowling Green. Here we rested until the next morning. I do not believe any other division in the army has made such marches as the one from Murfreesboro to Nashville and the one from Edgefield Junction to camp near Bowling Green, made by the 4th Division. I have suffered from cold, heat, loss of sleep, fatigue, and want of food before, since I have been in the service, but never the complete exhaustion and terrible prostration of all combined, as I did on these marches, and especially the latter....At two o'clock in the morning of the 15th we again started, and at one o'clock camped one mile and a half beyond Bowling Green....Here we yet remain....To say that I am disgusted with the manner affairs are conducted in this department would but poorly express my feelings, or those of every officer and man in the army. If any practical good had been accomplished by the marches we have made and the fatigues we have suffered; if we were marching to meet an enemy and give him battle; if we could be permitted to fight when within striking distance or our suffering and privations had done anything toward crushing this vile and infamous rebellion, no murmur of complaint or word of dissatisfaction would pass the lips of this brave and heroic army....It is true that Bragg is marching north, and is but about 15 or 20 miles east of us. But he has been during the whole march. But...we have not been allowed to attack him. They say we shall probably have a battle at Munfordsville or Elizabethtown, but I have little faith in it....But I have said enough. Future events may render plain what is now obscured, and I patiently bide the time.... -- J.A.M.

 

We have received the first number of The Crusader, ...
October 18, 1862, Freedom's Champion (ID 4205)

We have received the first number of The Crusader, a new paper just started at Paola. It is edited by B. F. Simpson, and earnestly advocates the Union State ticket....

 

Through Kentucky....Camp 8th Kansas Vols., near Cr ...
October 25, 1862, Freedom's Champion (ID 4220)

Through Kentucky....Camp 8th Kansas Vols., near Crab Orchard, Ky., Oct. 16, 1862. Long before this reaches you the telegraph will have brought to you the news of the battle and brilliant Union victory at Perryville, Ky., fought and won on the 7th, 8th and 9th. We have been constantly on the march since, in pursuit of the fleeing rebels, and I have had no opportunity until now to write the readers of the Champion an account....General Buell's army, consisting of the corps of Crittenden, McCook and Gilbert, left Louisville on the 1st in pursuit of the rebels under Bragg....We reached Newberg, nine miles out, at dark that day. Next day we marched ten miles, and the next day six, camping on a branch of Salt river. On the following day, we marched eight miles, passing through Mt. Washington, where our advance shelled out a party of rebels before occupying the town. The next day the advance had a series of skirmishes with the retreating rebels, and several were killed on each side. At dark we entered Bardstown and, passing through the town, camped a mile beyond it....At three o'clock next morning we were on the march again, and at dusk camped five miles beyond Springfield, Ky., having traveled 24 miles. Near the latter town the advance had a skirmish in which several were killed and a number of rebels captured....Next morning we started again and shortly after noon the booming cannon of the advance told us there was work ahead. General Gilbert's corps, of which General Mitchell's division is a part, had the center; General McCook being on the left and Gen. Crittenden on the right. Our division had the advance of the corps, and our brigade (the 32nd) the rear of the division. The heavy thunder of cannons on our left told us that McCook was doing heavy work and the dull boom of the guns in front gave us notice that there was service for us too. And shortly thereafter an order came for a rapid advance and we pushed briskly forward, anxious to meet the traitors face to face. Bragg's forces were posted to the north and west of the town of Perryville. They had an admirable position, being behind a series of hills that commanded every approach; and were well protected by a heavy timber, which concealed them entirely from view. They were also well supplied with water, while during the two days and a half succeeding our troops suffered greatly from its want. Here the rebels had gathered every available man, and proposed beating back the army of the Union. But a short time after having been ordered forward, the brigades of Colonel Carlin and Colonel Post, of our division, were ordered to file off in line of battle on each side of the road, and the 8th Wisconsin battery, 81st Indiana, and 25th Illinois, of our brigade, were halted in line with them, while the 8th Kansas and 35th Illinois were pushed forward about a mile in advance to support Birney's 5th Wisconsin battery, then engaging a rebel battery posted in the woods directly in front. The men moved into line in splendid order, the regiments taking a position in line of battle on the left of the battery. On the right our skirmishers were engaging detachments of rebel cavalry. The 5th Battery did splendid work, and was handsomely handled. Every shot told upon the rebels and they changed their position a number of times to avoid the fatal range of our battery. Their shots were poorly aimed, their shell mostly falling short of us. Two fell and burst within a short distance of our right wing, but did no damage; while one which burst directly in front of the battery inflicted a slight wound on one of its men. We remained in this position until an hour after dark, when we were ordered to fall back about half a mile and did so. Here we remained during the night, sleeping on our arms. At daybreak the next morning the firing commenced again. Two regiments of Gen. Sheridan's division had been ordered to the front as skirmishers and during the forenoon kept up a brisk running fight with the enemy....On the left McCook was having a hard fight, as the heavy firing on that side told, but up till noon there was little fighting except skirmishing in front. At one o'clock our division was ordered forward, and took a position on the right of the road, directly in front of the town. Here the enemy was in force. Colonel Carlin's brigade (the 31st) had the advance, while the 32d brigade, Colonel Caldwell commanding (our regiment forming part of it), was a reserve supporting it. Colonel Post's 30th Brigade (commanded by Colonel Goodin of the 22d Indiana, Colonel Post having been left at Bardstown, sick) occupied the left of the line, but was shortly afterwards ordered by General Gilbert to move over to support General McCook, who was hard pressed by overpowering numbers. Of its action I will speak hereafter. General Mitchell moved the two remaining brigades of his division steadily forward. On the brow of a hill in front of the town, the rebels had a heavy battery planted. In front were several large open fields. Along the ravines and fences of those, their infantry was posted. The 5th Minnesota battery was quickly in position in the edge of the woods and playing lively on the rebels. Our infantry in reserve were concealed. Two rebel regiments shortly after made a desperate charge on the battery, supposing it to be without support, but they were quickly undeceived. They were permitted to approach to within short rifle range, when our men rose with a loud shout and poured into them a deadly volley. They did not await a second, but fled in confusion, leaving the ground covered with their dead and wounded. The heavy artillery fire still continued, our forces steadily advancing while theirs fell back. At dark Colonel Carlin entered the town of Perryville, capturing about a hundred prisoners and a train of fifteen wagons loaded with ammunition. This ended the fighting on the second day. We camped on the battlefield, sleeping on our arms, and awaiting with feverish impatience for the morrow. The dead, who had gone to their last sleep, lay white and cold around us; the moans of the wounded, writhing in the agony of death, sounded in our ears; but we slept soundly on the bare ground, worn out with fatigue and the excitements of the day. The pale light of the new moon shone coldly on the calm faces of the dead and the living alike, and only the watchful sentinels and the sleepless wounded remembered that battle had been there, and its dire carnage was all around. Meantime our 30th Brigade had not been idle. It moved to the left about a mile, joined McCook, drove back a large force of rebels who were endeavoring to outflank him, and, just at dusk, were taking another position when they were suddenly surrounded by an overwhelming force of rebels, who opened a deadly fire on them at a distance of hardly thirty feet. Over one-fourth of the 22nd Indiana and 59th Illinois fell at the first fire, and so sudden and unexpected was the attack that the line was thrown into confusion for a moment. Col. Goodin, who was at the head of his column, rode quickly up to the rebel lines and called on them to "cease firing; that they were firing on their friends," and for several moments held their fire until deception could no longer be practiced. But his brave act had given his men time to rally, and they withdrew in good order from the ambuscade. Colonel Goodin surrendered his sword to Major General Polk and, after having done so, was struck over the head with a heavy saber, inflicting a severe wound, by the major of an Arkansas regiment, who probably boasts of his chivalry and honor. On the morning of the 9th, we moved forward again, our batteries shelling the rebels as we advanced. Their guns replied but seldom this morning, although at intervals the sullen boom of one would tell that they had not all gone. But it was evident that a retreat had been made, and as we advanced it became apparent that it was a hasty flight. They had left their dead unburied and their wounded lying uncared for, while the ground was covered with guns, blankets, knapsacks, &c, indicating the hurry in which they had fled. Our columns pressed on through the town of Perryville, to the left, crossing the ground still strewn with the awful carnage of the battle, where McCook fought so gallantly, and halted at Goodnight Springs, where the rebel position was the day before. Here we bivouacked, the enemy being in full retreat to Harrodsburg. And this closed the memorable battle at Perryville. Of what the other divisions did the newspapers will inform you better than I can tell. Only of our own can I speak knowingly, and never did soldiers behave with more gallantry or face danger with more firmness and resolve than the heroic men of the 9th Division. General Mitchell can well be proud of his brave command..... -- J.A.M.

 

Lt. Col. John A. Martin of the Eighth Kansas Regim ...
November 1, 1862, Freedom's Champion (ID 4230)

Lt. Col. John A. Martin of the Eighth Kansas Regiment has been promoted to the colonelcy of the Regiment. Col. Martin has been in active service in Kentucky and Tennessee since last spring, and by his intelligence, bravery, and unyielding devotion to the cause of liberty has most justly and deservedly won promotion, and if the war should continue...he will undoubtedly rise still higher in rank....

The Fight at Lancaster. Camp 8th K. Vol., near Crab Orchard, Ky., Oct. 18, '62....I will now, having a few moments spare time, give a hasty sketch of our further pursuit of Bragg and his rebel hordes. We left camp at Goodnight Springs at 10 o'clock on the night of the 10th, marching during a cold, chilly rain four miles to Nevada Station, on the road to Danville. Our regiment had the advance, and on the way we scared out a small force of rebel cavalry, who betook themselves to hasty flight. We reached camp at one o'clock at night and remained there until eight o'clock the next night, when we again started off, marching in the direction of Harredsburg until about two o'clock p.m. At 10 o'clock next morning we were on the march again, and camped that afternoon at Cole's farm near Harredsburg. Bragg and his rebel force was then reported at Camp Dick Robinson, about five miles northeast. But the next morning the information was that the rebel chief had made a rapid march southeast and was by this time far beyond Danville....We started going back 2.5 miles until we struck the Danville pike, and camping that evening within four miles of the place. At 6 next day we started again, passing through the town,...and marching to near Lancaster, about 12 miles southeast. Here our advance discovered a force of rebels and our Division, having the advance that day, was rapidly formed in line of battle, the 21st Brigade having the right of the line, the 30th the center, and ours the extreme left. Our batteries soon opened a brisk fire on the rebel force, and they replied by sending shell and shot towards us as fast as possible....We could see them hurrying to and fro as if terribly frightened, and their batteries commenced barking as our shell got the range of them. Meantime our brigades were moving forward in excellent order, and behind the batteries, which poured in upon the rebels a brisk fire, as they advanced, and we had got within about a half mile of the town, and close upon the rebel position, when Gen. Mitchell received a preemptory order to withdraw his forces and "not bring on a general engagement." So our division was compelled to fall back to camp, half a mile distant, and the rebels were given a good long night in which to escape, for fear of "bringing on a general engagement." At daylight next morning we again advanced toward town, and this day the Eighth had the advance of the brigade and the brigade the advance of the division. We were ordered to move carefully, feeling our way as we went, and Company B was deployed out as skirmishers in advance. The company moved rapidly forward, and the brigade kept within near supporting distance. Just before reaching the edge of town, we heard loud cheering and could plainly see the rebel cavalry moving as fast as their horses could carry them out of the town. Our skirmishers were then close to the place and, asking permission of Gen. Woodruff,...I received his consent to ride forward into the town in advance. As soon as I reached the streets I found the people half frantic with joy; men were cheering, women and children waving Union flags and handkerchiefs, and it seemed as if the whole people were half crazy. I was seized by the hand by dozens and received with the wildest demonstrations of joy. Company B moved up the street just at the moment, having captured two rebel soldiers as they came in. The main body of the rebels were moving away without any mercy on horseflesh, and our brigade a short time afterwards entered the place. Discovering that the rebels had a force posted about a mile east of town, we filed rapidly through and drew up in line of battle. Companies E and K of the Eighth were then ordered forward as skirmishers and Carpenter's battery opened a brisk fire on the rebel position. Capts. Greelish and Hurd advanced their companies about a mile and a half beyond the reserve, getting within close shot of the rebel battery, when the recall was ordered to be sounded, and they were drawn in. The battery continued to play on the rebels, and just afterwards they beat a rapid retreat. We were then ordered to move on to Crab Orchard and keep two companies, one on each side of the road, deployed as skirmishers....The skirmishers captured five rebel prisoners that day, but beyond this the march was marked by no incident of importance. We reached camp at this place at about three o'clock on the 15th and here we yet remain, idle and inactive. In the fight at Lancaster we killed and wounded over 70 of the enemy; probably more, as that number were found on the field afterwards, and the rebels may have carried away some of their wounded. Our side lost not a man. If we had been permitted to take the town the evening before, I have not the slightest doubt that we would have captured a few hundred prisoners, some of their batteries, and a large supply train....We were halted when an important capture and a brilliant victory were just within our grasp, and the rebels permitted to escape....Out of the 427 men who left Kansas with us, only 237 are present now. Death has made sad havoc in our ranks, and sickness confines in the hospitals the absent he has not claimed as his own.... -- J.A.M.

 

*Democratic Standard. This is the title of a newsp ...
December 6, 1862, Freedom's Champion (ID 4256)

*Democratic Standard. This is the title of a newspaper issued by W. J. Marion from the office of the Union, which has become extinct. It is no improvement upon its predecessor, but rather worse, as it hoists the name of George B. McClellan for president and Sam Medary for vice-president -- the first a do-nothing, the second a treason sympathizer.

 

News from Tennessee. Gen. Rosecrans' army is prepa ...
December 27, 1862, Freedom's Champion (ID 4268)

News from Tennessee. Gen. Rosecrans' army is preparing for a move and we can look for a brilliant victory when it strikes....Col. John A. Martin of the 8th Kansas is now in command of the 32nd Brigade, 9th Division, Gen. Woodruff having been ordered to another command. The brigade is composed of the 8th Kansas, 25th and 35th Illinois, 81st Indiana, 8th Wisconsin Battery, and one company of the 2d Kentucky cavalry, in all about 3,500 men. They are all veteran troops and have already won a brilliant reputation in the Army of the Cumberland. Brig. Gen. Robt. B. Mitchell is in command of the city of Nashville, and the troops and fortifications in and around it....The 8th Kansas is camped about five miles from the city, on the Franklin road,...being under command of Major Schneider. It has been in two skirmishes, one of them a pretty hot one, during the past two weeks....

 

Kansas Weekly Tribune. We have received the two fi ...
January 17, 1863, Freedom's Champion (ID 4287)

Kansas Weekly Tribune. We have received the two first numbers of this large and well gotten up paper. It is published at Lawrence by John Speer, one of the pioneers of the newspaper business in this State.

 

Eighth Kansas Regiment. Four companies of this reg ...
February 7, 1863, Freedom's Champion (ID 4297)

Eighth Kansas Regiment. Four companies of this regiment, which have for some time been stationed at Fort Leavenworth, left on Tuesday last for Nashville to join their comrades in Tennessee under command of Col. John A. Martin....

The Eighth Kansas. The Leavenworth Conservation of the 5th speaks of this gallant regiment: The 8th was recruited under a special order from Gen. Fremont as a Home Guard regiment to be retained in Kansas....After the regiment was mustered into service, the special order was disapproved...and the regiment was numbered as the 8th Kansas. Although composed in large part of men of families who did not at the time...expect to leave the state, the revocation of the special order was generally acceptable to both officers and men....A portion of the regiment has been, for nearly a year past, in Tennessee and Mississippi under command of Col. John A. Martin, and on many a hard-fought field has upheld the old flag....

 

Last week commenced the sixth volume of the Champi ...
February 21, 1863, Freedom's Champion (ID 4313)

Last week commenced the sixth volume of the Champion and, in view of the enormous advance in the price of paper and the largely increased cost of ink, &c, we ask all who know themselves to be indebted for subscription, advertising, or job work to pay us without delay, as it will require the closest economy, and the collection of all that is due, to enable us to meet the expenses of publishing a newspaper....

 

*Annulled. We see it reported that Col. Martin's o ...
March 28, 1863, Freedom's Champion (ID 4324)

*Annulled. We see it reported that Col. Martin's order prohibiting the circulation of secesh sympathizing papers of the Chicago Times and Columbus Crisis stamp in Nashville has been annulled by Gen. Mitchell....

D. R. Anthony has received the Republican nomination for mayor of Leavenworth city. Anthony is a man of decision and ability, although of a very ultra stamp of politics, and believes in showing no leniency to rebels. He periled his life in the cause of freedom in the Border Ruffian times, and never hesitated to think, talk and act as a freeman should in the darkest hour which Kansas saw....

 

*Mayor Anthony of Leavenworth, who is also postmas ...
June 27, 1863, Freedom's Champion (ID 4357)

*Mayor Anthony of Leavenworth, who is also postmaster of that city, recently burned an immense bundle of contraband papers in the public street. Thus the Copperhead doctrines go up in smoke in Kansas.

*The Kansas Jeffersonian. We have received No. 1 of a good-sized, well-printed paper bearing the above title and published at Grasshopper Falls. R. H. Crosby is editor and proprietor, and P. H. Peters publisher. It is radical Republican....

 

To the great surprise and gratification of hosts o ...
August 15, 1863, Freedom's Champion (ID 4391)

To the great surprise and gratification of hosts of friends, Col. Martin very unexpectedly arrived at home last Saturday on a short furlough, in the best of health and spirits. He has been for some weeks in the advance in the Army of the Cumberland with his gallant regiment, and has seen very active and arduous service, but seems to thrive wonderfully under dangers and difficulties. It is now nearly a year and a half since Col. Martin left our city, and during this time he has been in constant service, a portion of the time in the difficult and responsible position of provost marshal of Nashville, and since then in the rapid marches recently made by Rosecrans upon the rebels, which resulted in their defeat and utter rout. The Colonel has only a furlough of 20 days....

 

Our young friend S. H. Dodge, recently connected w ...
August 22, 1863, Freedom's Champion (ID 4397)

Our young friend S. H. Dodge, recently connected with the Troy Patriot, has purchased the Grasshopper Falls Jeffersonian.

 

With this number, I close my connection with the C ...
August 29, 1863, Freedom's Champion (ID 4407)

With this number, I close my connection with the Champion and...desire to return my sincere thanks to its readers for the many words of cheer which I have received...during the past two years -- years fraught with peril to our country....The Champion will be conducted by gentlemen of talent and experience.... -- G. I. Stebbins.

*Latest news from Quantrill's band states that over 80 have thus far been killed and the pursuit is still kept up. Most of the horses and a large amount of money and goods taken at Lawrence have been recaptured. All houses belonging to guerrillas, and all where Lawrence goods are found, are destroyed.

*Clothing, Etc., for Lawrence. Four wagons, mostly loaded with clothing, bedding, and boots and shoes, were forwarded from our city as soon as possible after the news of the terrible disaster reached our city.

 

I have leased the office and its good will to John ...
September 3, 1863, Freedom's Champion (ID 4414)

I have leased the office and its good will to John J. Ingalls and Judge Albert H. Horton. In future they will conduct it....I need not say that the paper will continue to advocate the principles of Union and Freedom.... -- John A. Martin.

Col. John A. Martin. But few officers in the army of the Union are more deserving of promotion than the colonel of the 8th Kansas....Whether acting as the commander of one of the best regiments in the service, in the responsible and delicate position of provost marshal of Nashville, or as brevet brigadier, he has always shown himself active, efficient and competent....On more than one occasion, Maj. Gen. Rosecrans has complimented his regiment for their efficiency in drill, their obedience to orders and their cleanliness of dress. Further, this exacting general has frequently publicly thanked Col. Martin for his prompt discharge of duties,...and recommended his name for promotion. Still he is overlooked and others less worthy are "starred."...

 

From the 8th Kansas....On top of Sand Mountain, Al ...
September 10, 1863, Freedom's Champion (ID 4421)

From the 8th Kansas....On top of Sand Mountain, Ala., Aug. 30, 1863. We received orders at noon on the 20th to "change camp."...Everyone said it was a fraud and we were going on a march to the Tennessee River, as we did. We started at 5 p.m. and marched until 10 at night, where we camped on the banks of the Tennessee, just one year and two days since we left it at Florence, Ala., going north. Our brigade, the Pioneers with the pontoon trains, were the only troops forming the advance....The Pioneers were steadily and silently at work all night behind the bushes that fringed the banks, preparing the pontoons for a launch in the morning. Our pickets, and those of the rebels, held frequent talks during the night, and we could hear them relieving the guards regularly. At daylight next morning we had breakfast and were ready. The 8th Kansas and 15th Missouri were ordered to cross first. Each pontoon was manned by one officer and 25 men. Gen. McCook and staff were on the ground, superintending the work. On the bluffs, two batteries were placed to protect the boats. The enterprise was one of difficulty and everyone knew that if the rebels had a single cannon, or any considerable force, on the other side, the loss of life would be fearful. To cross a river in the face of the enemy has always been considered the most hazardous enterprise in warfare -- but not a man quailed. Indeed, the contest was a wild one, as to who should be first. The boats were manned, and at the word lifted down the bank and into the river. In an instant they were filled by their crew; the oarsmen seized the oars, the sharpshooters were in position, and the boats pushed out. The silence was deathlike. Not a man was there but was listening intently for the crack of the guns that would send many a gallant soul to his Maker. But none came. We reached the shore. In a moment we were up the bank, through a corn field to the road, and formed in line of battle. Skirmishers were thrown forward. The advance began. The campfires of the rebels were yet burning. Their horses had been eating corn not half an hour before, as we saw by the half-eaten ears strewing the ground....Our skirmish line caught sight of them once or twice, and passed some shots, but that was all. We reached the foot of the mountain, two miles from the river, and halted for a half hour, then went on. We toiled laboriously up its almost perpendicular sides, over fallen trees, and rocks, and brushwood and bramble, and at 10 o'clock, totally exhausted, reached the top....We marched two miles, camping in an orchard, where we are at present....General Rosecrans highly complimented the regiments that had first crossed for their energy, skill, coolness and bravery....The pontoon bridge was put down as soon as we had possession of the opposite side....The army is now crossing on it....Our regiment has heard with the deepest pain of the destruction of Lawrence by Quantrill....What a lesson does this raid teach....

*On Monday last, Leavenworth city was thrown into great excitement by the arrest of Mayor Anthony by one of Gen. Ewing's detectives. While performing his official routine of business in his office about three o'clock, the officer entered the Mayor's office, seized Anthony rudely by the arms, and said: "I want you, sir." Mayor Anthony replied: "What do you want?" The officer replied: "I arrest you; go with me." Anthony asked: "By what authority do you arrest me?" He replied: "By G--d, I am authority," at the same time dragging him from the door and ordering his men to "throw" him into the buggy, some of whom were disguised with coverings over their faces. The order was obeyed and he was violently seized and thrown into the carriage, his feet hanging over the side. The officer mounted his horse and, ordering the driver to drive on, threatening to blow Anthony's brains out if he offered the least resistance. Mayor Anthony was driven rapidly to Kansas City, and on his arrival there was immediately released by Gen. Ewing, who disowned the arrest, and stated that the same was wholly unauthorized by him....Meetings were held in different parts of Leavenworth city expressing indignation....

 

The following complimentary notice...we clip from ...
September 24, 1863, Freedom's Champion (ID 4431)

The following complimentary notice...we clip from The Daily Commonwealth of Sept. 12th, published at Denver City, C.T.: "We observe the able and gentlemanly messenger of the Overland Stage Line, Frank A. Root, has become the publisher of Freedom's Champion, Atchison. Frank was, and is, well known in this community as an efficient and upright business man....The Champion was always a good paper...but we observe a decided improvement, both in quantity, quality and arrangement of the matter, and also in general makeup and typographical appearance."

 

The Gallant Eighth. James Martin of this city, fat ...
October 1, 1863, Freedom's Champion (ID 4438)

The Gallant Eighth. James Martin of this city, father of Colonel Martin, received the following dispatch on Friday, announcing the safety of his two sons who were engaged in the late battle of Chickamauga: "Chattanooga, Sept. 24. Myself and brother are safe. The Eighth lost 14 commissioned officers and 196 men killed and wounded. It fought gallantly....John A. Martin, Col. commd'g brigade."...It appears that at least one-third of the gallant Eighth have been killed or wounded in the recent fight. The loss is a terrible one and will affect many homes in Kansas.

 

Letter from Col. Martin. Chattanooga, Tenn., Sept. ...
October 8, 1863, Freedom's Champion (ID 4445)

Letter from Col. Martin. Chattanooga, Tenn., Sept. 23, 1863. I have only time to write a few words, detailing the main incidents of the great battle of Chickamauga River....Even as I write our batteries are shelling the rebels in the distant woods, and occasionally an ugly whiz in the air tells that a rebel shell has sped on its way. I wrote to you from camp at the foot of Stevins Gap, Ga., on the 18th. Little did I then think that we were next day to be engaged in one of the bloodiest battles of the war. At 6 p.m. on the 18th, we left our camp and marched five miles north. At 8 o'clock the next morning, we again started and at noon reached Gen. Rosecrans' headquarters. Heavy cannonading continued all day, but it had been so frequent of late that we paid but little attention to it. We moved on about two miles beyond the general's headquarters, when we were moved to the right through the woods, and a mile further ordered into line of battle. Our brigade formed rapidly and then moved forward through the woods. By this time, the discharges of musketry on our left became frequent and rapid. Van Clevis' Division was there contesting with the enemy. But in our front the silence was deathlike. We still moved on and had just reached the top of a small rise of ground when suddenly a volley was poured into our ranks, rapidly succeeded by another, and another. Our men replied with promptness and effect and for a quarter of an hour the war was terrible. The rebels then advanced with a shout, pouring into our ranks the most deadly volleys. They came up in column four lines deep, passing their front line, which had been concealed behind a stone barricade. Our flank was exposed and another fire was opened in our rear and left by a body who had moved rapidly around our left and to the rear. The ground was piled with the dead and wounded. Six captains and two lieutenants, and over a hundred men of the Eighth, lay dead or wounded, and the loss in the other regiments of the brigade was equally as great. My own horse had been shot under me. Col. Heg, commanding brigade, gave the order to fall back and the men retreated, stubbornly contesting every inch of the ground. Thirty yards in the rear we met the second brigade coming to our assistance, and the men were rallied and again advanced. Again the fire opened, more severe than before. The rebels were massed in overpowering numbers before us. They advanced steadily, our men mowing them down by their destructive fire, but being themselves decimated again. We were beaten back, and again rallied, again advanced. The ground was now one heap of mangled bodies. Men fell like the leaves of autumn, but the Eighth fought with a fury and courage unsurpassed. Again the enemy opened, this time accompanied with artillery. Our little force, by this time reduced below half our numbers, stood firm, taking shelter behind trees and firing rapidly and with effect. But no courage, however devoted, could stand such an attack, and we were again forced to fall back to the road, about fifty yards in the rear, where we again formed behind a fence. By this time Sheridan's Division came up and relieved us, holding the position we held, and allowing our brigades to fall back across an open field behind a hastily constructed barricade, and reform. Sheridan's Division held their position for half an hour, once attempting to advance to the position we had originally occupied, but were beaten back. By this time it had become dark and the fight ceased. Next morning about 2 a.m. we moved about two miles to the left and, taking a position on a high hill, remained until 12 o'clock. Our division was then ordered to support Sheridan's Division and advanced about a mile, taking position on his left, behind a barricade, fronting an open field. We had hardly got into position, lying down, when a volley saluted us and the firing commenced. The rebels rose up from the field and came pouring out of the woods in overwhelming numbers, moving steadily across the field in column five lines deep. If the firing of the day before was intense, certainly this was worse. I had heard of hail storms of balls before, but never realized what a storm of balls was like. Our men stood steady, firing coolly, taking deliberate aim, and mowing down the rebels like chaff before the wind. Their line broke and wavered. But just at this moment lines of rebel infantry, which had moved unseen through the woods, had gained the right flank of Gen. Carlin's brigade and the left flank of ours, and the men were ordered to fall back as rapidly as possible. Rebel batteries opened on us right and left. Sheridan's Division and Van Cleve's were in full retreat, and our exhausted columns joined the line. We moved over the hill to the position we had formerly occupied, and reformed our broken columns. But the rebels had suffered enough and did not pursue. Halting long enough to rest our exhausted men, Gen. Sheridan, the ranking officer present, moved them to the left about three miles, and halted. An hour later we were ordered out to support Gen. Granger's column, hard pushed by the rebels, and moved back on the road; we had come about two miles, taking a position on a high hill. But fortunately night came on, and our services were not needed. That night the whole army moved to the left, up the Chattanooga road to Rossville. Next day, we worked hard until evening, throwing up barricades for defense, but the enemy did not attack. And at 11 o'clock at night we moved to this place. We have been ever since throwing up fortifications. Bragg's army was strengthened by Longstreet's corps, and several divisions from Charleston. His strength was far greater than ours, and in every attack by the rebels they massed their forces at one point. Col. Heg, commanding one brigade, was killed during the first day's fight and I assumed command....Our officers behaved with courage and coolness. Three captains were killed and three wounded, and four lieutenants wounded. My horse was shot in the first day's fight, and I received two bullet holes through my blouse, but escaped unhurt. Lt. Col. Abernathy and Maj. Schneider escaped without a scratch. The regiment went into the fight with 407 men....

Report of Col. John A. Martin. Headquarters, 3d Brigade, 1st Division, 20th Army Corps, Chattanooga, Sept. 28, 1863....I have the honor to report the following account of the actions of this brigade from the time of crossing the Tennessee River up to the present date, including its participation in the engagements on the 19th and 20th. As I did not assume command of the brigade until the 19th, when the brave and gallant Col. Heg was mortally wounded, and as Capt. Henry Hauff, A.A.A.G. of the brigade, was taken prisoner, and none of the official records of headquarters are in my possession, the report of our movements prior to the 19th may contain inaccuracies of memory, which the general commanding will readily correct....I enclose...a list of the killed, wounded and missing of the brigade during the two days' engagement. By far the larger number were lost the first day; our loss on the 20th being light. On the 2d day we had hardly 600 men left in the brigade when we were thrown into the fight. These were opposed by at least two full divisions of the enemy's army. The list accompanying shows the loss to be fully 60 percent of those engaged, and amply attests the courage, stubbornness and determination with which the troops fought....The effective fighting force of the brigade when it went into the engagement of the 19th was as follows, viz.: 25th Ill. Vol. Infty. 337, 15th Wis. Vol. Infty. 172, 8th Kansas Vol. Infty. 406, 35th Ill. Vol. Infty. 299, aggregate 1218. The loss of the brigade during the two days engagement was as follows, viz: 25th Ill. 205, 15th Wis. 111, 8th Kan. 220, 35th Ill. 160, aggregate 686. Since the battles on the 19th and 20th the brigade has been largely recruited by returned convalescents and by two full companies of the 15th Wis. Vols....Many of the slightly wounded have bravely returned to duty considerably augmenting our force. I am, Captain, very respectfully, your most ob't ser'vt, John A. Martin, Col. Commd'g 3d Brigade....

 

The Battle of Chickamauga. Chattanooga, Tenn., Oct ...
October 22, 1863, Freedom's Champion (ID 4456)

The Battle of Chickamauga. Chattanooga, Tenn., Oct. 2, 1863....The feverish excitement of the battle has cooled into a healthy heartbeat....Coolly we can look back upon the past now, though the heart shivers at the recollection and the eye moistens as it views the vacant ranks....I had intended to write a description of the battle, but I cannot. No pen can portray, no tongue describe, the excitements, fury, passion, terror, energy, desperation, courage, horror, that was crowded into those two days. It passeth all remembrance and understanding. A few incidents take shape and form,...but all else is confusion confounded....Let me tell something of the personal history....Our division, on the first day, was a forlorn hope, fighting to save the centre. We had...reached Gen. Rosecrans' headquarters, when we were ordered to the east of the road to keep the enemy from breaking through. Only two brigades of our division were with us; the 1st, Col. Post, being back with the baggage train. If the enemy had pierced our lines there, almost the whole train of the army would have been captured. It was then passing along the road. Gen. Rosecrans ordered Gen. Davis to hold the position at all hazards, and so our little division was thrown in. We held the front until dark; held it at the cost of half of both brigades, but our train went through. That night Gen. Rosecrans told Gen. Davis that his division had done hard fighting before, but never fought so nobly and so well as on that day. It had saved his headquarters, saved his train, saved the center from being pierced and his army cut in two, and he thanked him for it....We fought that day Longstreet's Virginians, as we ascertained from officers and soldiers we captured. They said that Gettysburg, Antietam, and other battles were hard places, but they had never known what an enemy was until they met the Western troops. They acknowledged that they outnumbered us three to one, and expressed the greatest astonishment that we should have thought of contending against them, or could have held our ground a single moment against their attacks....Individual heroism. The instances that passed under my notice are too many to relate, and of course there were thousands of instances that I could not have seen....Men who were wounded would not leave the field; sick men, wracked with disease, came onto the field and fought through both days' fight. Over 50 men now on duty with the regiment are slightly wounded but refuse to go to the hospital....

From Chattanooga. Camp at Chattanooga, Oct. 8, 1863....Affairs here have generally been quiet and exceedingly monotonous. The only variation...is an occasional shelling of our works by the rebels, or of them by our batteries. Meantime our entrenchments are being daily strengthened...and Chattanooga is today almost impregnable....We are yet on half rations....Chattanooga cannot be retaken by them unless they cut off our supplies and force us to evacuate by starving us out....A great many of the wounded of the Eighth have been forwarded to Stevenson and Nashville....Our brigade is now on outpost picket duty, each brigade going on every eight days, and remaining four. Our pickets are very close together, being only separated by Chattanooga creek. They converse with one another and exchange papers daily. No firing is allowed between the pickets unless they are pressed. The men get water in the same creek....Longstreet's Virginians are particularly surprised. They say they never fought such men or devils as Rosecrans'.... -- J.A.M.

 

J. F. Cummings, mayor of Topeka and one of the edi ...
November 12, 1863, Freedom's Champion (ID 4470)

J. F. Cummings, mayor of Topeka and one of the editors of the Topeka Tribune, has been elected to the Legislature....His majority over W. T. Douthit is 83....

 

From the Eighth Kansas. The following list of kill ...
December 10, 1863, Freedom's Champion (ID 4491)

From the Eighth Kansas. The following list of killed and wounded in this gallant regiment during the late battles near Chattanooga vindicates their valor and increases their claim to the love and admiration of the people of Kansas. The accompanying extract from private letters from Col. Martin...will be read with the greatest interest. "Chattanooga, Nov. 26, '63. I have not time to write anything. Have not slept for three nights. We have won the most brilliant victory of the war. The Eighth Kansas on the 23d charged the rebel rifle pits, driving the rebels two miles to the foot of Missionary Ridge. On the 24th, Hooker's force stormed Lookout Mountain and took it. On the 25th, our division, with the forces of Sherman and Howard, stormed Missionary Ridge and took it, routing the whole rebel army. We captured 25 pieces of artillery, 2,000 stand of small arms and 2,500 prisoners. The men never faltered. We start tomorrow for Knoxville to relieve Burnside. Truly yours, John A. Martin."...

We failed to receive the last number of the White Cloud Chief. It makes excellent addition to the compost heap and is highly prized by agriculturists as a fertilizer. By some it is considered equal to night soil. One copy is sufficient to manure a ten acre lot, according to President Lincoln's theory.

 

The Storming of Mission Ridge. Strawberry Plains, ...
January 21, 1864, Freedom's Champion (ID 4514)

The Storming of Mission Ridge. Strawberry Plains, Tenn., Dec 23d, 1863. We were ordered on a long and tedious march, without transportation or conveniences for writing, so soon after the great victory at Chattanooga that I could not write any account of it there, and since our arrival here I have not felt like attempting it here, for fear what I have to say might be stale ere it reached your readers. But there are so many incidents of interest always crowded into the shifting scenes of a battlefield; so many that one sees and another cannot; so many that are so grand with the glory of individual heroism that must be forgotten or overlooked in a general description that I believe I ought not to trust to others to tell the heroism of my own brave boys, or of the dauntless courage that has again shed immortal glory on the soldiers of Kansas. And therefore, although nearly a month has elapsed since that time of victory, I sit down this morning...to tell the scenes that should not be forgotten and pay my humble tribute of praise to the gallant spirits who so noble bore the bullet-torn banner of the Eighth to the top of Mission Ridge, looking death in the face at every step they took. Monday -- our regiment went on outpost picket duty at daylight. There had been rumors of a contemplated advance for many days past but it had been so often postponed that our boys had begun to regard it as a joke. A little after noon, however, an order for a general advance was brought to me, with instructions that the division would form in front of the works around the town and the Eighth would be deployed as skirmishers in front of our line, and at a given signal move forward. The instruction was that this advance should be simply a reconnaissance in force to discover the strength of the enemy. At about two o'clock the bugle sounded the advance, and picket reserves were promptly doubled on the sentinel line which moved forward. The rebel pickets were only about fifty or a hundred yards distant. The embankment of the railroad separated the two lines. Our boys moved forward in splendid order and with the greatest impetuosity. The rebels opened a brisk fire on them but could not stand the assault and fell back, gathering strength as they reached their own reserves. Our boys dashed after them with hearty cheers and with such impetuosity that they never recovered from their disorder and we drove them at leas a mile, taking their first line of rifle pits and occupying Orchard Knob (afterwards the headquarters of Gen's Grant, Thomas and Granger during the fight). Our skirmish line drove on some hundred yards beyond this, nearly to the reserved line, where we were ordered to halt, the brigade forming behind the first line of rifle pits. Our regiment lost three wounded in this advance. That night the whole division was engaged in strengthening the line of works, and the position of Orchard Knob was so important that it was determined to hold it, and accordingly a strong earthwork was thrown up on its top, and Bridge's battery was moved to it from Fort Wood. Tuesday passed in comparative inactivity, although the rebels were constantly sending us their compliments in the shape of shell and solid shot. During the day, Osterhaus' Division of Sherman's Corps; Stanley's Division of our corps, and Geary's division of Slocomb's Corps stormed and took Lookout mountain. The action was plainly visible from Orchard Knob until the combatants were lost in the mist and fog that covered the top of the mountain, receding constantly, and telling us that our men were victorious. During this day Sherman crossed the rest of his corps, with Davis' Division of the 14th Corps, across the river at the mouth of Chickamauga crook, on our extreme left, and occupied the detached hills near Mission Ridge. The day was dark, rainy and chilly, and the troops shivered with the cold, inadequately supplied with clothing as they were. Wednesday came and the morning passed without any action for us. Directly on the right of our regiment was the small knoll called Orchard Knob, and on its summit were gathered the leading spirits of this great contest. I met there, during the day, Genl's Grant, Thomas, Howard, Palmer, Granger, Hunter, Meigs, Wood, Sheridan, Baird, Willich, Hazen and Asst. Secretary of War Dana, all viewing the scenes that were passing around them, and anxiously speculating on the result. Before us towered Mission Ridge, bristling with artillery, and strong in the numbers of traitors behind the rugged barricades that crowned its summit. Mission Ridge is a long range of hills, so nearly connected as to be almost one, from 600 to 1,000 feet high, and running from Chickamauga on the North, in a semi-circle around Chattanooga; separated on the west only by a small valley, on the opposite side of which is Lookout Mountain. Hooker, having taken the latter place, moved south along its summit until he had reached a point near the old Chickamauga battleground, and was now ready to cross the valley to Mission Ridge on the south. Sherman was on the north, and during the forenoon of Wednesday made two desperate assaults on the enemy's line, both times driven back with a terrible loss. And on the center we had the work to do! I had felt it since the first day's advance, and the stronger grew the conviction that the attempt would be made, the stronger grew the conviction of its utter madness and folly. I could not believe that any courage, however desperate, could carry the height bristling with a hundred pieces of artillery, and defended by a force nearly, if not quite, as large as ours. But I felt that however fearful the risk of utter defeat, the attempt would be made, and I shuddered as I looked down the lines of brave men, and thought how many of them would that day sleep their last sleep. Yet still the conviction grew more and more positive as the morning hours dragged heavily on, and I waited nervously for the order "Storm the hill!" that I knew would come. Beyond those hills was Burnside, besieged by a superior force, and the only way over them. Sherman beaten back, only the old Army of the Cumberland -- "Old Rosey's" pride -- was left to do the work. I knew they would not falter, hesitate or doubt; I knew if it was possible for human courage to do this thing, here were the men that could do it; but calmly weighing all the circumstances, the odds, the immense advantage of the position, I hardly dared hope that human courage, or impetuosity, or desperation, could find a firm lodgment for the banner of the Stars on those frowning hills. In front here was a wide bottom covered with trees and tangled vines; then an open space for probably a hundred yards; then a slight rise of ground; and on the top of this the first line of rebel rifle pits. Beyond this line stretched another open space of probably fifty yards, and then the hill commenced rising broken, ragged, steep, in some places almost perpendicular for 300 yards and crowned on the top by a strong barricade of the trunks of trees, filled with earth. From the time we left our own works until we reached the top of these hills we would be subjected to the converging fire of over one hundred pieces of artillery, and the worse and more destructive fire of small arms the moment we emerged from the skirting of forest in front. Could it be done? I would not doubt, and yet I hardly dared to believe. At two o'clock it came, the order I had anticipated, "Advance!" They said afterward the order was a misunderstanding -- that the first order was only to take the first line of rifle pits at the foot of the hill. We did not get it so it was simply "Advance" at the signal -- six guns fired in quick succession from Orchard Knob. It would have made no difference, anyhow -- a skirmish line could not have taken the first line of works, but no army in the world could have held them without first dislodging the enemy from the summit of the hills, for they were raked from every side. The troops were in the following order: Hazen's brigade on the right, Willich's to which we belong in the center, and Beatty's on the left. On the right of our division was Sheridan's, on the left Baird's. The troops moved out in front of the rifle pits and formed in line, the men resting lazily on their guns, but anxiously awaiting the signal. One--two--three--four--five--then a long pause for the sixth gun hung fire -- six; and with a loud huzzah along the whole line it advances, steadily, firmly. A moment and crash -- bang, bang, bang -- the ball has opened. The summit of Mission Ridge is enveloped in smoke; above us crack the bursting shell, and around us fly the hurling showers of broken fragments. Without an order the line breaks into a double-quick; brave fellows, they know the sooner the ground is passed over the greater the safety. They emerge from the woods and the quick rattle of musketry commences. Not a shot from our side yet. On we go, as fast as the burdened men can travel. We reach the first line of works and the gray coats crouched behind them throw down their arms and leap to our side, for their comrades on the hill will not heed their lives while we are there. A halt for a moment behind the works for the men to recover breath -- then "Forward!" We had lines before; now they are lost and the fight becomes a struggle as to who shall be first on top. The crash of artillery is deafening; the air is alive with bursting shell and musket balls and solid shot seem to plow up every foot of ground beneath our feet. But forward all go. Not a man hesitates or falters. Here and there a regimental color leads ahead, surrounded by half a dozen impetuous spirits whose desperate courage has carried them along. Lines become shaped like wedges, the points far up the hill, generally headed by the regimental flags, and widening to the deep columns behind. Up go these wedge-shaped masses, irresistible in their impetuous force. Now has reached the summit and the

 

Glorious Reception! Eighth Kansas Home. The Brave ...
March 3, 1864, Freedom's Champion (ID 4530)

Glorious Reception! Eighth Kansas Home. The Brave Men Welcomed! On Thursday last, the Eighth Kansas Regiment of Veterans, Col. John A. Martin commanding, reached our city at 2 o'clock p.m....As soon as the Eighth had been announced on the levee, hundreds of our citizens hurried to greet, with words of joy and shouts of welcome, the gallant men who on the battlefields of Perryville, Chickamauga and Mission Ridge won imperishable honors....Mayor Crowell...introduced the speaker....Col. J. A. Martin responded feelingly, earnestly, briefly, in the manner of a soldier. The regiment was then marched to Price's Hall, where a sumptuous dinner was awaiting them. In the evening, a military ball was given at the Massasoit....The dancing was continued to the small hours of morn....

 

Flag Presentation. Gen. Robt. B. Mitchell recently ...
March 31, 1864, Freedom's Champion (ID 4543)

Flag Presentation. Gen. Robt. B. Mitchell recently presented the 8th Kansas Regiment with a magnificent flag, accompanying its presentation with the following letter to Colonel Martin: "...By the valor of your regiment "Chickamauga" and "Mission Ridge" can be inscribed on your banners and those names will be an earnest that, borne by the men who won such undying fame upon those bloody fields, the flag will ever be found at the head of a victorious column, and the names of new scenes of victory will be added to your glorious list...."

 

F. G. Adams of Topeka has been in town several day ...
April 7, 1864, Freedom's Champion (ID 4547)

F. G. Adams of Topeka has been in town several days attending to the duties of the office of United States District Clerk, for which he is paid by the government about two thousand dollars a year. Having a little leisure, he undertook to perform the Atchison County printing at the Conservative office in Leavenworth....

 

Frank A. Root, formerly foreman of this office, bu ...
June 23, 1864, Freedom's Champion (ID 4583)

Frank A. Root, formerly foreman of this office, but at present acting in the responsible position of mail agent at Latham, Colo., is in the city on a visit.

 

*Marysville Enterprise. We have received the first ...
July 21, 1864, Freedom's Champion (ID 4603)

*Marysville Enterprise. We have received the first number of the Marysville Enterprise, published at Marysville, Marshall county, by P. H. Peters. It is edited by an editorial association. The mechanical work...is of the finest character and the editorials are spicy and readable. The selections exhibit judgment and taste....We make the following extract: "We know of but two parties, one a Union, the other a Disunion...."

 

The lease existing between the present publishers ...
September 1, 1864, Freedom's Champion (ID 4628)

The lease existing between the present publishers of the Champion and Col. J. A. Martin expires this date, and with this issue of the paper my connection with it ceases. The paper will remain under the charge and control of J. J. Ingalls. I bespeak for the Champion a continuation of the patronage heretofore bestowed. -- Albert H. Horton.

Valedictory. The surviving editor desires to pay a parting tribute to the ability and worth of his associate, who withdraws from the control of the Champion with the current issue. To the capacity and resources of Judge Horton, the success of the last volume is mainly due, and the public, no less than the writer, will regret the necessity which terminates his connection with the enterprise to whose thrift he has so largely contributed....As the year is closing, and the financial problem is increasing in difficulty, the editor would respectfully, but urgently, solicit all who know themselves to be indebted to the Champion...to pay their dues without further notice. The enormous expenses of labor and material render this course essential to the continuance of the enterprise....

The friends of Col. John A. Martin will regret to learn that he is ill in the officers' hospital at Lookout Mountain with intermittent fever and scurvy. At the last account, he was recovering and hoped to rejoin his regiment at Atlanta in a few days.

 

The Leavenworth Bulletin has been sold to Col. Ant ...
September 22, 1864, Freedom's Champion (ID 4642)

The Leavenworth Bulletin has been sold to Col. Anthony. It is said that the proprietor is a candidate for the U.S. Senate.

The Conservative has consecutively lost the services of Wilder and Bloss and appears to be running itself. It has contained no editorial matter for several days and is exceedingly stupid and tame....

Col. Vaughn has retired from the Times to fulfill appointments on the stump. He is succeeded by W. W. Bloss, formerly of the Conservative, whose experience and brilliant capacity are already so favorably known in Kansas....

 

Letter from Col. Martin:: Headquarters, 1st Brig., ...
September 29, 1864, Freedom's Champion (ID 4652)

Letter from Col. Martin:

Headquarters, 1st Brig., 3d Div, 4th A.C., Atlanta, Ga., Sept. 18, 1864. Dear Ingalls: I send you accompanying a full and complete list of casualties in the 8th Kansas Vet. Vol. Infantry in the campaign terminated by the capture of Atlanta....We are camped about four miles southeast of the city in a beautiful location and here we rest. When the army will move, or where it will go, only Sherman knows. We hope for a long rest, and certainly after 123 days continuous fighting, driving the enemy inch by inch from Ringold to Lovejoy, not a moment of the time out of danger or from under fire, the army needs it. But it is in good spirits and confident of success where Sherman leads. Atlanta is terribly cut up by shot and shell. There is hardly a house in the city but that was struck. Gen. Sherman designs to make it a purely military post, and has ordered all citizens out....

 

Apology. Owing to the absence of the editor to the ...
October 20, 1864, Freedom's Champion (ID 4661)

Apology. Owing to the absence of the editor to the "field," our readers will excuse the lack of the accustomed amount of editorial matter. Until the state is free from the danger of invasion, our senior will be absent from his editorial post and...we believe will do his duty as a soldier and a Kansan. -- J. A. Glass, foreman.

 

Col. John A. Martin is now in command of the 1st B ...
October 27, 1864, Freedom's Champion (ID 4665)

Col. John A. Martin is now in command of the 1st Brigade, 3d Division, 4th Army Corps, near Atlanta. He has resigned his position and will be at home as soon as his resignation is accepted by the War Department.

 

Col. J. C. Vaughn assumes the editorial chair of t ...
December 1, 1864, Freedom's Champion (ID 4669)

Col. J. C. Vaughn assumes the editorial chair of the Leavenworth Times, left vacant by the retirement of Mr. Bloss.

The Troy Investigator is succeeded by the Doniphan County Soldier, a radical Union newspaper, published by the Troy Printing Company.

Col. Martin's resignation has been accepted and on the 17th he was mustered out after more than three years active service in the field. He is now at his old home in Brownsville, Pa., and will be in Atchison next week.

 

A large supply of paper ordered several weeks ago ...
December 15, 1864, Freedom's Champion (ID 4672)

A large supply of paper ordered several weeks ago has failed to reach us on account of the shipment of government goods over the H. & St. Jo. R.R. to the exclusion of all other freight....The stock at both Leavenworth and St. Jo. is exhausted.

Col. Martin reached home on Tuesday last. He designs making an effort to have his regiment filled by a consolidation with the veteran detachments of the 1st and 10th Kansas, and such recruits as can be obtained in the state. If this can be done,...Col. Martin will go into the service again. The 8th has now only 171 men present, and an aggregate of 380 men present and absent, out of the 1,250 that originally composed it....If Col. Martin cannot succeed in his efforts to fill up the regiment, he will at once resume editorial control of the Champion....

 

From Sherman's Army. Pulaski, Tenn., Nov. 4, 1864. ...
December 17, 1864, Freedom's Champion (ID 4674)

From Sherman's Army. Pulaski, Tenn., Nov. 4, 1864. Dear Champion: I have been on the move and so busy for the past month that I could not find time to write a letter to your readers....The quiet and monotony that followed the brilliant capture of Atlanta was rudely broken on the night of the 2d of October by an order to march at daylight....Although we had heard rumors of contemplated movements of the enemy to our rear, we had not heeded them. But we were off at the time and, passing into the city, passed out of it towards the Chattahoochee....The whole army with the exception of the 20th Corps was in motion -- the latter being left to occupy...Atlanta....At 4 p.m. we camped behind the old rebel works at Smyrna campground, 21 miles from our camp of the morning previous....Next morning at daybreak we were off again and at 3 p.m. camped behind the old rebel line at Little Kennesaw -- arriving just in time to see, from the top of the mountain, the rebel army...tearing up our railroad from Big Shanty to Ackworth and towards Alatoona Pass. Gen. Sherman arrived here simultaneously with our corps, and the armies of the Tennessee and Ohio, with the 14th Corps, were also close upon us. Next morning at 7:45 a.m. we marched to Pine Top, going into camp at 2 p.m. The rebels this afternoon made a furious assault on Alatoona Pass, the battle lasting four hours, but they were repulsed with great slaughter, and our signal corps reported them...retreating rapidly towards Dallas and New Hope Church. That night it rained in torrents and continued almost without interruption for the two succeeding days....We therefore remained at Pine Top until 2 p.m. the 8th, when we marched to Ackworth, 9 miles. Here the 89th Illinois, of my brigade, was detailed to assist in repairing the railroad. The balance of the brigade remained in camp until 2 p.m. of the 10th, when we marched...camping near Cartersville, 16 miles distant....The next morning at daylight we marched again and at 3 p.m. camped three miles southwest of Kingston....Being election day in Ohio, the Ohio regiments voted on the road. The 15th and 49th veteran infantry of my brigade polled 585 Union Republican votes to 6 Democratic or copperhead. Next morning at daylight we were off again and camped near Rome at about 11 at night, having marched 23 miles....We remained here until 2 p.m. next day, when reports were received that the enemy had attacked Resaca....We marched at once, our corps in advance, and going 13 miles....Next morning we were off again and, passing through Resaca, camped...4 miles north of the place, having marched 24 miles. The rebel attack on Resaca was a feint to mask their movements and, under cover of it, they had totally destroyed the railroad to near Tunnel Hill....The next day, the 15th, we started again, marching northwest. Leaving Dalton to our right, we faced directly towards Rocky Face Ridge, a high chain of hills...only passable through several gaps. These gaps the enemy held in strong force....At 12 M., Gen. Sherman directed...one of those masterly moves, to force the hills, for which he is so famous. The 14th Corps was suddenly withdrawn, and joined our corps, and the two corps, without a wagon or piece of artillery, marched directly over the ridge, taking the rebels by surprise, and causing them to hastily evacuate Snake Creek Gap, giving passage to the Army of the Tennessee....I received orders from Maj. Gen. Stanly at the same time to take command of all the artillery, trains, &c, and send them back to Resaca, covering the movement with my brigade, and on arriving there take the strongest position...and hold the place against all odds....The success of the movement, and the hasty withdrawal of the rebels, however, gave us nothing to do...and the next morning we followed the route of the army through Snake Creek Gap, joining the corps...at Villanow....We remained at Villanow until the morning of the 18th, when we marched through Frick's Gap and southward 23 miles....That day we commenced living by foraging on the country and kept it up until the 30th, Gen. Sherman having determined to make it impossible for a rebel army to again pass through the country and live on it. On the 19th we...camped at Summerville. On the 20th we marched...to Gaylesville, Ala....Here we remained until the 27th....At daylight on the 30th we marched into Chattanooga, where our division was shipped on the cars...and reached Athens, Ala.,...on the 31st,...when we marched 13 miles. Next morning...we were off again and at 4 p.m. reached this place. The 1st Division of our corps arrived here on the 3d, the 2d Division today, so that the corps is now all concentrated here. The 23d Corps is said to be coming north, also -- the balance of the army, with Sherman at its head, is going -- where it would be contraband to tell just now, but where it will be heard from, and the success of its movements...will almost be the death blow of treason. Thus for the present (and future, for all I know to the contrary) ends our connection with the great rebel raid to our rear. In all the important elements of military movements it was a failure....Intended to force us to evacuate Atlanta, it failed to accomplish its purpose, while at the same time it left all the country south open and at our mercy....Our future movements I cannot speak of now. Those who know Sherman know that he cannot rest....We have had no fighting since leaving Atlanta and consequently our regiment has sustained no loss....I am still commanding the 1st Brigade, 3d Division.... -- J.A.M.

 

Brig. Gen. Th. J. Wood...addressed the following l ...
December 22, 1864, Freedom's Champion (ID 4678)

Brig. Gen. Th. J. Wood...addressed the following letter to Col. Martin: Col. Jno. A. Martin, 8th Kansas Vols., was assigned to my division in...Oct. 1863 and has, with his regiment, participated in all of the more important actions of the division and Army of the Cumberland...since that time. Col. Martin and his regiment took a leading part in the brilliant affair of Orchard Knob on 23d Nov. 1863, and participated in the fierce assault and glorious victory of Mission Ridge on the 25th of the same month. Immediately after these decisive successes, Col. Martin and his regiment marched with the division to East Tennessee and manfully bore their share in the untold privations and hardships of that awful winter campaign....Returning from its veteran furlough, the regiment joined the division during the Atlanta campaign and...to the end of the campaign performed well its duties....At the close of the Atlanta campaign, Col. Martin came into command of the brigade to which his regiment is attached, and...joined in the pursuit of Hood when he attempted to destroy our communications. Col. Martin has performed every duty since he has been under my command faithfully, manfully, intelligently, patriotically; and on retiring to civil life he carries with him my highest respects and warmest wishes....

 

Valedictory. My editorial connexion with the Champ ...
December 29, 1864, Freedom's Champion (ID 4680)

Valedictory. My editorial connexion with the Champion ceases from this date. Col. Martin having accomplished his arduous and brilliant career in the field, resumes the position which he abandoned three years ago at the call of his country.... -- John J. Ingalls.

First Words. After an absence of over three years I again assume editorial control of The Champion. To Geo. I. Stebbins and Frank A. Root, who during the first two years of my absence took charge of the paper, and to John J. Ingalls and Judge Albert H. Horton, who during the past year have controlled and edited it, I am under very many obligations.... -- Jno. A. Martin.

 

When, in the winter of 1857, we bought the old Bor ...
January 19, 1865, Freedom's Champion (ID 486)

When, in the winter of 1857, we bought the old Border Ruffian organ, the Squatter Sovereign, and established with the same type and press The Champion, we adopted as the motto of the journal the truthful and eloquent declaration of Henry Clay, It is better to the right than President. These earnest words were kept at the head of the paper until it was leased to Ingalls and Horton, who adopted a new motto. We this week again nail to our masthead the glorious declaration of the great Kentuckian....The old motto is that under which we launched our bark in the early years of darkness, danger and almost despair. The friends in Atchison who supported the cause it pleaded were few, and the enemies many. The times were troublous and the threats against it bitter and numerous. We were a boy in years and experience, but we tried to sustain our motto and defend the right with our whole strength....

Our old friend, Jacob Stotler, formerly editor of the Emporia News, is speaker of the House of Representatives. He was complimented by a unanimous vote....

A. D. Richardson, special correspondent of the N.Y. Tribune, who has been confined in the Southern prisons for over 18 months, has at last been released. Mr. Richardson resided in Sumner, in this county, prior to the outbreak of the war.

 

We present to the public this morning the first nu ...
March 23, 1865, Freedom's Champion (ID 494)

We present to the public this morning the first number of The Daily Champion....We hope to keep pace with the growth and prosperity of the city.... -- John A. Martin.

 

Joseph Speer, a young son of John Speer of the Law ...
August 17, 1865, Freedom's Champion (ID 535)

Joseph Speer, a young son of John Speer of the Lawrence Tribune, was shot in the head last Thursday by the discharge of a pistol in the hands of a boy named Shoales. The lads were playing with the pistol, not thinking it was loaded. He died of the wound next day. The loss, says the Journal, is doubly heart-rending from the fact that Mr. Speer lost two sons at the Quantrell massacre, and is now absent from home.

 

No. 1 of a paper called the New Era, published at ...
September 28, 1865, Freedom's Champion (ID 548)

No. 1 of a paper called the New Era, published at Lecompton, has been received....S. Weaver is the editor and proprietor. He announces that it will not be a political paper, but will be devoted to morality and literature.

Major Edmund G. Ross of the gallant 11th Kansas Cavalry arrived in the city last evening. He has just been mustered out after a long and honorable service in the army....He is one of the oldest of our Kansas editors....

 

D. W. Wilder and family are in the city en route E ...
October 12, 1865, Freedom's Champion (ID 553)

D. W. Wilder and family are in the city en route East. Mr. Wilder is the old editor of the Leavenworth Conservative....He has purchased the Rochester Democrat and with his brother, A. C. Wilder, will hereafter conduct it.

Garvey of the Topeka Tribune has had his establishment closed for some time past, owing to one of his interminable lawsuits. He issued a paper last Friday, however, and announces that it will "again go forth." We will "go five" to one that Garvey has another lawsuit in a few weeks, and the Tribune will again stop going forth. Garvey is a queer genius....

 

The Topeka Tribune has again changed hands, the ir ...
October 19, 1865, Freedom's Champion (ID 555)

The Topeka Tribune has again changed hands, the irrepressible Garvey retiring and J. P. Greer and Bronston taking charge.

Ward Burlingame is about starting a new paper, to be called the Weekly Leader, in Topeka. He is one of the best writers in the state.

 

Geo. T. Isbell, for a long time connected with the ...
November 9, 1865, Freedom's Champion (ID 564)

Geo. T. Isbell, for a long time connected with the Leavenworth Conservative as local editor, has taken charge of the Grasshopper Falls Jeffersonian as publisher and editor. He is an able and vigorous writer.

 

The Kansas Tribune. Maj. Ed. G. Ross has associate ...
November 23, 1865, Freedom's Champion (ID 567)

The Kansas Tribune. Maj. Ed. G. Ross has associated himself with John Speer as one of the editors and proprietors of this able Republican journal. Maj. Ross is one of the oldest of Kansas editors, and is a vigorous, polished writer, and a staunch, earnest Republican. He has been in the army four years, first as captain and then as major of the 11th Kansas. The Tribune has been enlarged and much improved in appearance.

 

Mr. F. G. Adams, who during the whole war never st ...
November 30, 1865, Freedom's Champion (ID 571)

Mr. F. G. Adams, who during the whole war never struck a single blow for his country; who was never within a hundred miles of a battlefield in his life; who never heard the crack of the enemy's rifle nor the whistle of an angry bullet during the whole period of his worthless and torpid existence, talks glibly of the "cowardice" of the Champion. In the army it was notorious that the greatest braggarts as well as the most inveterate cowards were fellows who, like him, were always in the rear with the baggage.

 

P. A. J. Russell, a compositor in the Leavenworth ...
December 21, 1865, Freedom's Champion (ID 581)

P. A. J. Russell, a compositor in the Leavenworth Times office, challenges any compositor in Leavenworth for the sum of $100, or 250, that in one hour, one day or one week he can set more type, and a cleaner proof, than any compositor in that city. His challenge is in answer to a statement made by the Conservative that it employed "four compositors who could set more type, cleaner proof, and justify their matter better than any four compositors employed on any other paper in the state -- the Times and Bulletin of this city included." Mr. Russell states as terms of the match that "the matter to be set by both parties is to be of the same letter, and a forfeit of $50, if for the first named sum, or $100 if the latter sum, to be placed in the hands of a third party agreed upon....He also announces that "in the event of this challenge not being accepted by any compositor in the city, then the challenge is open to any compositor in the state."...

We have received the first number of the Topeka Leader, a new weekly journal published by J. F. Cummings & Co. and edited by Ward Burlingame....Ward is an old journalist and one of the best writers in the state....

 

We have received several numbers of a paper just s ...
December 28, 1865, Freedom's Champion (ID 584)

We have received several numbers of a paper just started at Paola, Miami County, by Smythe & Higgins and called the Free Press.

 

Newspaper Changes. The Burlington Patriot has rece ...
January 11, 1866, Freedom's Champion (ID 587)

Newspaper Changes. The Burlington Patriot has recently been enlarged and otherwise mechanically improved....We greet you, friend Prouty....The Leavenworth Times has recently been enlarged to a nine column daily....The Lawrence Tribune comes to us much enlarged and otherwise typographically improved. The Tribune is a live daily....S. S. Ludlum has sold his interest in the Leavenworth Bulletin and it is now published by C. D. Roys & Co.

 

The editorial convention concluded its sessions ye ...
January 25, 1866, Freedom's Champion (ID 592)

The editorial convention concluded its sessions yesterday. A constitution and bylaws for the association were adopted. A large number of the editorial fraternity were present. The association elected the following officers for the ensuing year: President, R. B. Taylor of the Wyandott Gazette; vice presidents, M. W. Reynolds of the Lawrence Journal, John A. Martin of the Atchison Champion, M. M. Murdoch of the Osage Chronicle and J. F. Cummings of the Topeka Leader; secretary, Mr. McDonald of the Topeka Record; treasurer, P. H. Peters of the Marysville Enterprise.

Just before the final adjournment of the late publishers' convention at Topeka a resolution passed that body that an annual address be delivered at every session of the association by some selected member of the Kansas press. Col. Vaughan was solicited by a unanimous vote of the convention to report himself on the 17th of next January.

We have received Vol. 1, No. 6, of the Western Home Journal published at Ottawa by the Home Journal Company.

The Free Press of the 16th has the following concerning the lecture of Monday evening: "We attended the lecture delivered by John A. Martin before the Mercantile Library Association in the Presbyterian Hall last night. The subject, 'The Siege of Chattanooga and the Battle Above the Clouds,' was an interesting one and was handled by the speaker in an able and eloquent style. The description of the assault of Lookout Mountain and Mission Ridge was graphic and thrilling, and was received with much applause."...

 

Mr. Reynolds, editor of the Lawrence State Journal ...
February 1, 1866, Freedom's Champion (ID 595)

Mr. Reynolds, editor of the Lawrence State Journal, in his Topeka correspondence says that "Col. Martin of the Atchison Champion last evening addressed the Topeka Library Association in Representative Hall. Subject: 'The Siege of Chattanooga and the Battles Above the Clouds.' The audience was large and highly entertained by the agreeable description of the reminiscences and heroic services of the gallant Kansas Eighth....In descriptive writing and word painting Col. Martin is peculiarly happy."

 

The number for the present week commences Vol. 9 o ...
February 8, 1866, Freedom's Champion (ID 598)

The number for the present week commences Vol. 9 of The Weekly Champion. Eight years ago the present editor and proprietor purchased the old Squatter Sovereign and established in its stead Freedom's Champion. Since then he has been its proprietor at all times and its editor for all of that period except three years and three months. He took charge of it when Atchison was a village containing a few straggling houses, and when Kansas was a territory weak in numbers, poor in substance, and oppressed by unjust laws, interpreted and enforced by despotic and corrupt officials. It was a hard, desperate struggle during those early years to secure for the paper a patronage sufficient to pay its ordinary expenses, and had we not been a practical printer, able to take charge of the typographical department and do most of the work connected therewith, the journal must have failed. But we were young, enthusiastic and resolute; had come to Kansas determined to succeed if industry and energy could triumph; and through the dark days of trial and precarious existence we struggled on with confident hope. The little village grew; its business increased; its commerce stretched abroad to far-away Western lands, bringing to the people prosperity and plenty, and giving the young town expansion and permanency....The recollections of the years past, filled though they oftentimes were with the hardest labors, are yet pleasant to revive. But a boy in years when we first assumed the place of editor, we were but illy fitted, by experience, for the discharge of its arduous duties....The Champion fought slavery in Kansas, and did its part towards saving our fair prairies from that blighting curse. It raised its earnest voice of protest against that infamous outrage on the people's rights, the Lecompton Constitution. It spurned with contempt the English Bill, that vile creation with which a corrupt administration sought to bribe an incensed people into acquiescence. It opposed with unswerving fidelity those degrading and unjust enactments called "Black Laws," with which doughface conservatism and low prejudice sought to disgrace our statue books. It gave its warm support to the Wyandotte Constitution and to the movement by which Kansas was made a state. It advocated the early organization of the Republican Party in the territory, and gave to the platform and principles of that organization its cordial advocacy. And when the alarm gun of the Great Rebellion called a people to arms, it espoused the cause of Union and Freedom with all its heart and soul and strength, and through the long years of our nation's trial and agony its inspiration was her cause; its duty, her will; its delight, her advocacy; and its reward, her triumph....It has lived to see the perfect triumph of the principles which it has steadfastly defended and advocated....The imperious Slaveholder's Rebellion has ended, and with it American slavery has perished....

 

...We learn that Col. John A. Martin has been brev ...
March 1, 1866, Freedom's Champion (ID 602)

...We learn that Col. John A. Martin has been brevetted by the President as brigadier general of volunteers "for gallant and meritorious services during the war." In the absence of Col. Martin from the editorial post, we think it not improper to add that we believe that this honorary distinction and titular reward for gallantry and good conduct has been, in this instance, most fittingly bestowed....

 

During the past year the foreman of The Champion o ...
March 29, 1866, Freedom's Champion (ID 607)

During the past year the foreman of The Champion office, John J. Glass, has been constantly on duty and has never lost a day either by sickness or any other cause. When it is remembered that this position is one of the severest labor; that he remains in the office until the forms for the morning paper are on the press, rarely before one o'clock, and oftentimes not until two or three; and that he is again at his post at eight or nine in the morning, our readers will appreciate the fact that in the discharge of his duty he has won the warmest commendation of the publisher, and deserves that of the public....

 

During the past year the Free Press has had nine d ...
April 26, 1866, Freedom's Champion (ID 613)

During the past year the Free Press has had nine different editors or editorial writers. Each one has strutted his brief hour before the public, and ducked away out of sight and out of mind. Each one, on his first appearance, seemed to imagine that he had a special call to wipe out The Champion. He tried it and, like the old fellow who was going to wipe out the bear, he went in gay and came out -- immediately, greatly surprised at the result! During the same period the Free Press has had about nine correspondents who have also felt called upon to wipe out the Champion. They retired after trying the experiment....

 

Jos. H. Hunt, editor of the Reporter published at ...
May 10, 1866, Freedom's Champion (ID 617)

Jos. H. Hunt, editor of the Reporter published at Troy, died yesterday at his residence. He was 27 years of age.

A new paper called the Union has just been started at Humboldt, Allen County, W. T. McElroy editor and publisher.

The Miami County Free Press, published at Paola, has changed hands, Wm. Higgins retiring and G. A. Colton and F. R. Smythe assuming editorial control.

 

We are now permanently located in our new office, ...
May 17, 1866, Freedom's Champion (ID 619)

We are now permanently located in our new office, one door east of our old place of business. The new Champion office is arranged expressly for the printing business and is one of the most convenient in the Western country.

The Troy Reporter announces that paper is being published by Mrs. Elizabeth H. Hunt, widow of the late Joseph H. Hunt, deceased. She is a practical printer and will continue the publication until she can sell the office for a reasonable price....

 

A. C. Wilder, formerly representative in Congress ...
June 7, 1866, Freedom's Champion (ID 631)

A. C. Wilder, formerly representative in Congress from Kansas, and D. W. Wilder, his brother, for a long time editor of the Conservative at Leavenworth, have taken charge of the Express at Rochester, N.Y....We regret their abandonment of Kansas, with whose interests they were so long and so early identified....

Hollister Dodge of Lawrence, formerly an employee in The Champion office, has been elected a delegate to the National Typographical Convention which meets at Chicago.

 

We take pleasure in noticing the change which has ...
June 28, 1866, Freedom's Champion (ID 637)

We take pleasure in noticing the change which has been made in the Troy Reporter. The last issue comes to us enlarged and in an entirely new dress....It is now published by Robert Tracy.

 

U.S. Senator. Gov. Crawford has appointed Maj. Ed. ...
July 26, 1866, Freedom's Champion (ID 647)

U.S. Senator. Gov. Crawford has appointed Maj. Ed. G. Ross, one of the editors of the Lawrence Tribune, as United States Senator to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Senator Lane....This appointment will excite considerable surprise throughout the state, though we believe it will be very generally well received. Maj. Ross is one of the oldest settlers of our state, and has been connected with the press for a number of years. He is a writer of fine abilities and an honest, sincere gentleman, and an ardent, uncompromising Republican....

 

John Speer's paper, the Lawrence Tribune, contains ...
August 2, 1866, Freedom's Champion (ID 653)

John Speer's paper, the Lawrence Tribune, contains a most violent article denouncing Gov. Crawford for the appointment of Maj. Ross, who until his selection was junior editor of that paper, as U.S. senator.

 

The Fort Scott Monitor says that the first imposin ...
August 23, 1866, Freedom's Champion (ID 662)

The Fort Scott Monitor says that the first imposing stones ever manufactured from Kansas marble are now in their frames in the Monitor office. They are two feet and a half by three and a half, manufactured by Smith Brothers. The surface is smoother than can be obtained from the white marble, and being a harder material will prove more durable. The tables and frames were manufactured by...Wetherwax & Peterman.

The Hiawatha Sentinel has changed hands and is now edited and published by Ira J. Lacock and J. W. Oberholtzer....

 

The Grasshopper Falls Jeffersonian comes to us enl ...
August 30, 1866, Freedom's Champion (ID 663)

The Grasshopper Falls Jeffersonian comes to us enlarged as a seven column paper and in a new dress....Mr. Isbell, its editor and proprietor, is a spicy and vigorous writer, and since the Jeffersonian passed into his hands it has been wonderfully improved.

 

The Border Sentinel has changed hands. Col. Snoddy ...
September 6, 1866, Freedom's Champion (ID 666)

The Border Sentinel has changed hands. Col. Snoddy, the Ishmael of the Kansas press, retires and Joel Moody assumes control. We are sorry to lose Snoddy. Although "his hand was against everyone, and everyone's hand was against him," he was nevertheless a vigorous writer and, although erratic, was honest and sincere.

 

We have received a new paper called the Kansas Val ...
September 20, 1866, Freedom's Champion (ID 672)

We have received a new paper called the Kansas Valley Courier, published at North Lawrence. It is a small but well printed and well edited sheet.

 

The Garnett Plaindealer comes to us in mourning fo ...
October 4, 1866, Freedom's Champion (ID 677)

The Garnett Plaindealer comes to us in mourning for the death of its editor, J. E. Olney. The paper will be published hereafter by the wife of the deceased.

 

Geo. I. Stebbins, one of our oldest citizens and w ...
October 11, 1866, Freedom's Champion (ID 679)

Geo. I. Stebbins, one of our oldest citizens and who had charge of the Champion for two ears during our absence, reached here yesterday from Montana....

 

W. H. Johnson is about to commence...a newspaper a ...
January 10, 1867, Freedom's Champion (ID 701)

W. H. Johnson is about to commence...a newspaper at Iola, Allen county. It is to be called the Allen County Journal....Newspapers are getting plentiful in the Neosho Valley.

 

The Leroy Pioneer has changed hands, W. J. Kent re ...
February 7, 1867, Freedom's Champion (ID 708)

The Leroy Pioneer has changed hands, W. J. Kent retiring to give place to Mr. Everett, who in conjunction with Higgins will give a good paper.

The Osage Chronicle has suspended publication. Mr. Murdock thinks of removing his office to some other point, probably Wamego.

 

The Lawrence Tribune says that all the material, f ...
February 21, 1867, Freedom's Champion (ID 713)

The Lawrence Tribune says that all the material, fixtures, etc., for publishing a newspaper have been accumulated at Salina and that the Salina Herald will make its advent in a few days....

 

C. C. Hutchinson has associated himself with Rev. ...
February 28, 1867, Freedom's Champion (ID 716)

C. C. Hutchinson has associated himself with Rev. I. S. Kalloch in the management of the Home Journal at Ottawa. He is a fine writer.

 

Press Association....The publishers of the several ...
March 28, 1867, Freedom's Champion (ID 722)

Press Association....The publishers of the several daily papers in the Missouri Valley met at the Times' counting room in Leavenworth on Wednesday last,...for the formation of an association through which the readers of the daily journals may obtain later and fuller intelligence by telegraph. A temporary organization was effected by the election of Louis Weil of the Kansas Zeitung to the chair, and John W. Wright of the Conservative as secretary....Sixteen daily papers were represented either by the proprietor or by proxy, as follows:

Leavenworth: Times, Willis Emery; Bulletin, Col. D. R. Anthony; Commercial, George F. Prescott; Conservative, Jno. W. Wright; Zeitung, Louis Weil.

Kansas City: Journal of Commerce, A. H. Hallowell; Advertiser, A. W. Simpson.

Lawrence: Tribune, John Speer; proxy for Reynolds of the State Journal.

Atchison: Champion, Jno. A. Martin.

St. Joseph: Herald, Jno. L. Bittinger.

Junction City: Not represented but understood to abide by the action of the meetings.

...The permanent organization of the association was effected by the election of Col. D. R. Anthony as president, John W. Wright as secretary, John Speer as treasurer; executive committee, G. F. Prescott, Jno. A. Martin, M. W. Reynolds, A. W. Simpson and Jno. L. Bittinger....The executive committee were directed to complete arrangements and report within two weeks.

 

We understand that Geo. T. Isbell of the Grasshopp ...
April 18, 1867, Freedom's Champion (ID 728)

We understand that Geo. T. Isbell of the Grasshopper Falls Jeffersonian contemplates removing his paper to Holton, Jackson County. Holton is quite a flourishing place, and there is no paper now published in Jackson County.

 

...It is understood that Col. Anthony is the...pow ...
April 19, 1867, Freedom's Champion (ID 729)

...It is understood that Col. Anthony is the...power that controls the Bulletin. That paper says he was removed as postmaster because he would not support Johnson's policy. This is simply false. Col. Anthony did support the administration, or at least pretended to....

 

Mr. Porter retires from the Junction City Union, w ...
May 16, 1867, Freedom's Champion (ID 736)

Mr. Porter retires from the Junction City Union, which will hereafter be conducted by G. W. Martin alone. Mr. P. was business manager of the paper....Mr. Martin will continue in charge of its editorial department.

The publication of the Paola Argus has been suspended, and the Republican of that town says that Mr. Russell, the publisher, will remove the material to Salamanca, Cherokee County.

 

M. H. Insley and John W. Wright announce in the Co ...
May 30, 1867, Freedom's Champion (ID 740)

M. H. Insley and John W. Wright announce in the Conservative of the 22d that they assume its management as publishers and proprietors. We believe that the Conservative has heretofore been owned by a company, Capt. Insley being one of the principal proprietors and John W. Wright business manager.

 

The Fort Scott Monitor comes to us printed in octa ...
June 27, 1867, Freedom's Champion (ID 748)

The Fort Scott Monitor comes to us printed in octavo form, upon new type, and much enlarged and improved....A. Danford is now its editor.

 

The Leavenworth Commercial says that Col. Hoyt is ...
July 11, 1867, Freedom's Champion (ID 751)

The Leavenworth Commercial says that Col. Hoyt is now editor of the Conservative. Hoyt is a brilliant writer, an earnest Radical, and one of the most talented young men in the state.

The Leavenworth Bulletin has changed hands, Col. D. R. Anthony retiring as publisher and Capt. Geo. T. Anthony as editor. They are succeeded by a company of practical printers as publishers, and by F. S. Pinckney as editor. Capt. Anthony is a graceful and vigorous writer and we part with him with regret.

 

We have received the first number of the Jackson C ...
July 18, 1867, Freedom's Champion (ID 756)

We have received the first number of the Jackson County News, published and edited by our friend and late fellow townsman, A. W. Moore, at Holton....

 

We have received the first number of the Chase Cou ...
August 15, 1867, Freedom's Champion (ID 764)

We have received the first number of the Chase County Banner, published at Cottonwood Falls by Theo. Alvord & Co....Theo. Alvord is a graduate of The Champion office, an excellent printer, and a good fellow.

 

C. C. Wall, a printer of Leavenworth, recently set ...
August 29, 1867, Freedom's Champion (ID 767)

C. C. Wall, a printer of Leavenworth, recently set 2050 "ems" in one hour, the matter half solid and half leaded (bourgeois type). This is pretty fast work.

 

Kansas Farmer. This excellent monthly...has passed ...
September 12, 1867, Freedom's Champion (ID 771)

Kansas Farmer. This excellent monthly...has passed into the hands of Capt. Geo. Anthony, former editor of the Conservative, and Geo. A. Crawford of Fort Scott. They have infused new vigor into its columns....

 

The Burlingame Chronicle has been revived, and com ...
September 26, 1867, Freedom's Champion (ID 774)

The Burlingame Chronicle has been revived, and comes to us in an entire new dress and greatly enlarged....Here's our hand, friend Murdoch.

 

The Kaw Valley Courier has been merged into the Cl ...
October 3, 1867, Freedom's Champion (ID 778)

The Kaw Valley Courier has been merged into the Clarion, a new weekly started at Lawrence. Whitney & Boughton are publishers, and Maj. Whitney its editor.

Every Saturday, published by Ticknor & Fields, is regularly received.

 

We have received the first number of the Kansas Ce ...
October 24, 1867, Freedom's Champion (ID 783)

We have received the first number of the Kansas Central, a paper just started at Olathe, Johnson county. W. F. Gobbe is editor and proprietor.

 

M. M. Murdock, editor of the Burlingame Chronicle, ...
November 21, 1867, Freedom's Champion (ID 789)

M. M. Murdock, editor of the Burlingame Chronicle, has been elected clerk of Osage county.

 

We have neglected to notice the change of propriet ...
November 28, 1867, Freedom's Champion (ID 791)

We have neglected to notice the change of proprietors in the Hiawatha Sentinel. Lacock & Oberholtzer have retired and Daniel Downer has assumed editorial control. Mr. D. has had a long experience in the newspaper business.

 

Capt. Geo. T. Anthony has assumed editorial charge ...
December 19, 1867, Freedom's Champion (ID 797)

Capt. Geo. T. Anthony has assumed editorial charge of the Leavenworth Conservative....Col. Hoyt...has conducted the Conservative with conspicuous ability....

We have neglected to notice the re-appearance of the Topeka Daily Tribune under the editorial management of Judge Greer and A. L. Williams.

 

The first number of a new German paper, Die Fackel ...
January 9, 1868, Freedom's Champion (ID 803)

The first number of a new German paper, Die Fackel, will appear in this city some time next week. This paper was published for some time in Wyandotte, but the proprietor...decided to remove his establishment. Die Fackel will be Republican in politics. The editor, H. W. Kastor, is an able and vigorous writer and a newspaper man of long experience.

 

The State Editorial Convention assembled this even ...
January 23, 1868, Freedom's Champion (ID 809)

The State Editorial Convention assembled this evening in the hall of the House of Representatives. Some 30 journals...were represented, and a large number of the members of the legislature with many of the citizens of Topeka were present. R. B. Taylor, president of the association, presided. Several new members were added....The old officers were all re-elected, as follows: President, R. B. Taylor of the Wyandotte Gazette. Vice presidents, M. W. Reynolds, Lawrence State Journal; Jno. A. Martin, Atchison Champion; M. M. Murdock, Osage Chronicle, and Geo. W. Martin, Junction City Union. Secretary, S. D. McDonald, Topeka State Record. Treasurer, P. H. Peters, Marysville Enterprise. The association selected Jno. A. Martin to deliver the annual address at the next meeting with R. B. Taylor as alternate. M. W. Reynolds then delivered his address....The meeting then adjourned to meet on Franklin's birthday, Jan. 17th of next year.

 

Col. Snoddy of Linn County has introduced in the H ...
January 30, 1868, Freedom's Champion (ID 812)

Col. Snoddy of Linn County has introduced in the House of Representatives a resolution to amend the constitution of the state so as to elect a public printer, instead of having the state printing done as at present....The State Editorial Association has twice passed a resolution recommending...the proposed change.

 

A new paper called the Kansas Family Visitor has b ...
February 6, 1868, Freedom's Champion (ID 815)

A new paper called the Kansas Family Visitor has been started at Baldwin City. It is published by Bryan & Carey.