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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Herald of Freedom

Articles in database from Herald of Freedom:    103

Delay in Printing This Number. When we issued the ...
January 6, 1855, Herald of Freedom (ID 3068)

Delay in Printing This Number. When we issued the first number of our paper from our old office in Pennsylvania, in October last, we expected to have been on the ground in Kansas and issued our second number as early as the first of November....We were delayed in the time of our departure, waiting for a rise in the Ohio River until the very last of October. We were then compelled to come by railroad, and was detained on the route in procuring material and other causes for some 20 days; then we had to wait until the first of December for the arrival of our stock and material, a portion of which arrived on the last boat of the season. In the meantime, we came to Lawrence and attempted to erect an office; but the scarcity of suitable timber prevented the erection of a log cabin, and as the steam sawmill had not got in full operation, we could not get lumber....We waited until we could get lumber, and have finally succeeded, by procuring a very large number of workmen, in the erection of a frame structure 18 by 30 feet on the ground, and a story and a half in height. This was not completed until the first of January; nevertheless we commenced distributing our type on Christmas evening, though there was no roof on the building. The building is made of green cottonwood boards, from 15 to 20 inches in width. Unless we err, it will be well ventilated by spring....We have near four tons of paper, and a sufficient quantity of ink to work it up, now on hand; hence the low state of the rivers, or other similar causes, will be inoperative in our case.

Jobbing. We have connected with the Herald of Freedom office a very extensive assortment of plain an fancy job type, embracing material for every variety of work, including handbills, cards, circulars, show bills, programmes, ball tickets, deeds, mortgages, justice and constable blanks, articles of agreement; also for books, pamphlets, &c. Work executed in gold, bronze, or colors of any description....

We have no mails yet in this Territory, save such as are gotten up at private expense. Here in Lawrence we have a post office, kept by Mr. Ladd....The mail matter directed to individuals residing here is stopped at Kansas City, or Westport, Mo., from which point it is brought, almost daily, by private individuals who chance to be traveling....

Our Terms. We cannot afford the Herald of Freedom a farthing less than $2.00 a year, either in clubs or otherwise. The exorbitant rates we are compelled to pay for freight, and the high prices of labor, demand high prices in return....

Our Material. The type for the Herald of Freedom are entirely new, and from the extensive Cincinnati Type Foundry....Our press also is new, from the establishment of A. B. Taylor & Co., N.Y. It is the most perfect machine for nice printing we ever worked with....

 

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence ...
January 13, 1855, Herald of Freedom (ID 3069)

Topeka. A new town site with the above name has been selected and is now rapidly filling up with Eastern people. It is located about 25 miles above this point on the Kansas river and will probably be a point of considerable importance....

Notices of the press....

The Herald of Freedom is the title of a new paper to be published in Kansas by G. W. Brown, formerly of the Conneautville Courier, the first number of which is now before us....His enterprise has built up a handsome business in our sister town, which he leaves to seek his fortune in the Far West.... -- Crawford (Pa.) Democrat.

We are pleased to know that the project has been committed to one possessing the talents, enterprise and industry of Mr. Brown. With him there is no such word as "fail" and now the friends of freedom in the states should extend to him a prompt and liberal support.... -- New Castle (Pa.) Promulgator.

It is the duty of the friends of freedom in the East and North to sustain this newspaper as an easy way to invest two dollars in this great enterprise of giving freedom and Christianity to Kansas, and keeping out slavery and heathenism. -- Boston Commonwealth.

Filled with interesting matter, mostly original, relative to the new Territory. Persons feeling an interest in the settlement of Kansas, and especially those who desire to make it a free state, should by all means patronize the Herald of Freedom. -- N. Y. Tribune.

The Herald of Freedom will be found to be a more potent weapon on the side of Liberty than tar and feathers, revolvers, and the loud-mouthed and insulting resolutions of the band of ruffians which usually precede the triumphal march of the "chivalry." -- Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette.

G. W. Brown, attorney at law. May be found at Herald of Freedom office, K.T.

 

Thanks. To the people of Lawrence and vicinity, wh ...
January 20, 1855, Herald of Freedom (ID 3070)

Thanks. To the people of Lawrence and vicinity, who have so generously extended to us their good will by subscribing,...paying for the same in advance, we...return our heartfelt thanks. Our reliance for a subscription list was in the Eastern states, among those who were interested in securing free institutions to Kansas. They have done nobly, and promise still better....We have frequently sold as high as 25, and in one instance 40, copies to one individual....

We hope every reader in the East, who favors our enterprise, will lend us his influence at once in extending the circulation of the Herald of Freedom. Our patronage from the Territory must necessarily be very limited until the population shall greatly increase....To publish a paper of the size of ours, and almost wholly made up of reading matter, without any aid from advertisements, requires a heavy weekly expenditure, which can only be made up by a very large subscription list. We contemplated a circulation of twenty thousand, and we think the cause requires that number of individuals to contribute their share towards making Kansas free. What say you, reader?....

Notice...

The first number...is marked by superior editorial ability and typographical excellency. The Herald establishment...is under the supervision of our esteemed friend D. Clinton Barrett, Esq., late proof reader of the Washington Daily Globe.... -- Easton (Pa.) Argus.

 

Persons visiting a printing office are expected to ...
January 27, 1855, Herald of Freedom (ID 3072)

Persons visiting a printing office are expected to do their business as expeditiously as possible, and not remain after it is consummated to hinder others from pursuing their avocations. A printing office is the last place in the world for whiling away leisure moments; as every remark made by a speaker diverts the attention of workmen from their pursuits....

Indisposition. The editor has been so seriously indisposed for the last week, with inflammatory rheumatism, that he has been confined to his room, and most of the time unable to stir himself in bed without assistance....In the meantime, he will receive the assistance of a couple of friends who are not unused to the use of the pen.

Complimentary....

It is devoted to the object of making Kansas a free state, and is edited with great ability and force. The editor says that he issued, this first number, 20,000....A large share of the edition is circulated in the states for the purpose of acquainting the people with the Territory, its inducements, &c.... -- Montrose (Pa.) Democrat.

 

Subscribe immediately....You have learned that our ...
February 3, 1855, Herald of Freedom (ID 3074)

Subscribe immediately....You have learned that our principal object in locating in Kansas was to aid in extending the free institutions of the North over our broad and beautiful plains. You are also aware that to publish a paper of the size of the Herald of Freedom in this remote region must be attended with a heavy draft on the purse of the publisher....You are also conscious...that we are entirely removed from the populous part of the nation, and that the people here can do comparatively little towards sustaining us....We propose then that each subscriber and reader, in fact, constitute himself a special agent and see what he can do in our behalf. The time to act is now....New England has led off well in getting up a list....New York, Pennsylvania, and Ohio must not be behind. Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin, and Michigan are each doing something....New Jersey, Delaware, and Maryland have each furnished clubs; the latter, though a slaveholding state, was the first to furnish us a package....

Apology. By being bolstered up in bed we have been enable to write most of our editorials this week; but, as our disease is now settling in our wrists and shoulders, we have little hope of being able to write for our next issue unless we get relief. Subscribers will excuse any shortcomings....

 

Indisposition. The editor is still confined to his ...
February 10, 1855, Herald of Freedom (ID 3078)

Indisposition. The editor is still confined to his room, almost entirely helpless. His disease is an acute form of inflammatory rheumatism, which has extended over his whole system, and having settled near his heart, doubt were entertained of his recovery. But, as the disease is now assuming a milder form, we hope soon to see him well....

 

At His Post. After four weeks confinement to his r ...
February 17, 1855, Herald of Freedom (ID 3080)

At His Post. After four weeks confinement to his room, and much of the time to his bed from severe indisposition, the editor is again enable to resume his duties with the pen and scissors. To those generous friends who have watched by his bedside during the long night vigils, ministering to every want, and the many who have sympathized with him in his illness, he returns his heart-gushing thanks....To Doct. Jas. F. Merriam, in particular, who stood by our bedside through the day and most of each night for nearly a week, applying successfully the soothing virtues of cold water to allay the most excruciating pains, he takes this public occasion to say his services has endeared him to us....

 

Printers wanted. Wanted immediately at this office ...
March 10, 1855, Herald of Freedom (ID 3084)

Printers wanted. Wanted immediately at this office two practical printers, one of whom is competent of doing press work, and one to fill the post of foreman....

Printers. We are in the immediate want of some printers, and cannot get along without some additional assistance. Unless we get a pressman immediately, it will be impossible for us to issue a paper next week. Our own health is such that we cannot labor either at the press or case, and can only at great risk of permanent injury sit at the table through the day and write or make selections. With the heavy Eastern migration now under way here, we hope to get relief soon.

 

No Paper. As we apprehended, we were unable to get ...
March 24, 1855, Herald of Freedom (ID 3086)

No Paper. As we apprehended, we were unable to get out a paper last week. We used every reasonable exertion to procure some person to do our press work, but could not find anyone who would undertake the task. This week we have called to our aid some gentlemen who have recently arrived who are wholly inexperienced in the business, and with our own services hope to succeed in getting out a paper....As soon as a suitable place can be erected in which to place our Power Press and engine, we shall have those valuable acquisitions in motion to lessen the fatigue....

 

*Destruction of the Press. It was only by the most ...
March 31, 1855, Herald of Freedom (ID 3088)

*Destruction of the Press. It was only by the most urgent and continued importunities of the leaders of the mob who visited us on Friday last that our office was saved from destruction. Various resolves were passed in regard to it, but the final conclusion was that the worst strike the pro-slavery party could make would be to destroy an opposition printing office, or do harm to the editor. Perhaps they remembered the removal of C. M. Clay's paper from Lexington, or the murdering of Lovejoy in Alton....

The Hirelings. Of the disgraceful proceedings in this place on Friday last, by which the ballot box was converted into an engine of oppression, we have hardly patience to write. To see hundreds of hired mercenaries on horseback, on foot, and in wagons and carriages, coming into Kansas in a body from an adjoining state, and expressing a determination to return so soon as they shall have polluted the freeman's safeguard with their touch....

 

We noticed several weeks ago the establishment of ...
April 7, 1855, Herald of Freedom (ID 3091)

We noticed several weeks ago the establishment of the Squatter Sovereign, an ultra pro-slavery paper, at Atchison, Kansas Territory. A friend favored us with a copy a few days ago, and we have no hesitancy in saying that it is the greatest fire-eating sheet we ever met with, out-Heroding the Frontier News, which we thought climaxed everything else in that direction....

 

To Our Friends. The regular issue of this paper is ...
April 14, 1855, Herald of Freedom (ID 3093)

To Our Friends. The regular issue of this paper is now 2,000 copies weekly, and it might be materially increased if those who approve of its principles and desire its success would take the trouble to present its claims to his neighbors....Each person who shall in future send us six new subscribers, accompanied by $12, shall be entitled to a seventh copy gratis.

The Pawnee Enquirer. The above is the title of a newspaper about to be published at Pawnee, in this Territory, by S. P. Higgins & Co., lately of Easton, Pa., at $2 a year in advance. The prospectus: "The Enquirer is designed...to advocate those principles of Democratic adoption which, in the opinion of the editors, are best calculated to advance the interests of the Territory...."

 

*Destruction of the Press. On the morning of Satur ...
April 21, 1855, Herald of Freedom (ID 3095)

*Destruction of the Press. On the morning of Saturday last, eight men called at the office of the Industrial Luminary, published at Parkville, Mo., by Messrs. Park & Patterson, and presented to the latter a series of resolutions to the effect that they had determined to throw the Luminary press into the river and expel the publishers from the state....A body of about 200 men surrounded the Park House, in which was the printing office, while others set themselves to work to remove the press....It was the design to have tarred and feathered the editors, but the absence of Mr. Park at Big Blue, in Kansas Territory, and the interference of Mrs. Patterson in behalf of her husband, saved them from this apparent degradation....The Industrial Luminary, for having dared to express itself as become an independent journal, was consigned to the watery element....Resolves were passed by the rioters that they would assemble in three weeks from that day, and if Park or Patterson were either found in the state, they would execute summary vengeance on them; and if they dared to settle in the Territory they would hang them....Our friends of the Luminary, whose light has been measurably obscured by the darkness which surrounded them, has suddenly emitted an effulgence which lights up the union, and attracts eyes in that direction.

It was said by the rioters in Parkville last Saturday that the destruction of the Luminary office was designed as an example to others, and it is very knowingly hinted that ours will meet with a similar fate. Very well, we have concluded to give any number of persons who wish to perpetrate such an act of folly a free pass to "kingdom come," and we pledge them every assistance in our power....We have prepared a duplicate copy of our subscription books, and that subscribers may not be losers by any contingency which may arise, we hereby authorize and depute our esteemed friend and general agent, H. A. Billings, Esq., to resume the publication of the Herald of Freedom should it be suspended by violence, at such point as he may designate....

 

All of our inking rollers melted down again this w ...
April 28, 1855, Herald of Freedom (ID 3097)

All of our inking rollers melted down again this week, and we are necessarily thrown behind with our work. We hope to "get the hang of the weather" after a while, so as not be annoyed to so great an extent, or suffer as much pecuniarily, as we have been compelled to for the last few weeks.

 

We presume our Eastern friends are not aware that ...
May 12, 1855, Herald of Freedom (ID 3099)

We presume our Eastern friends are not aware that the publishing business in Kansas is a losing affair, nevertheless they should be informed of the fact, and if they are disposed should lend a hand in making it otherwise. Since the first commencement of the Herald of Freedom, we have been sinking full forty dollars a week, and this without taking our own time or personal expenses into account. We...have given up a business in the east which paid richly for our labor to embark in a doubtful experiment....Our expenses for publishing a paper here are more than four times what they were for publishing a paper of the same size during the last season in Pennsylvania.

G. W. Brown, commissioner of deeds and other instruments of writing under seal and depositions for Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Vermont, Iowa, Illinois, and Ohio, will attend to the duties of his office on application at the Herald of Freedom office.

 

...E. C. K. Garvey & Co. will commence the publica ...
June 9, 1855, Herald of Freedom (ID 3106)

...E. C. K. Garvey & Co. will commence the publication of a weekly free state newspaper in Topeka on the first of July next, with the title of the Kansas Freeman....In a new country like this, where everything commands such exorbitant prices, the people must be liberal of they expect to sustain a free press....

 

This number completes the first half year of the e ...
June 30, 1855, Herald of Freedom (ID 3111)

This number completes the first half year of the existence of the Herald of Freedom, and with it will expire a large number of six months subscribers....To make our enterprise pay expenses...we must have several thousand new subscribers....For the last month, our entire receipts have hardly been sufficient to purchase the bread for our family, saying nothing about our expense of eighty dollars a week to get out the paper. If the East design to sustain a free state paper in Kansas, they must come immediately to the rescue.

 

The 2d volume of the Herald of Freedom will commen ...
January 12, 1856, Herald of Freedom (ID 3154)

The 2d volume of the Herald of Freedom will commence on the first of February next....We trust that an increased subscription list will enable us to greatly improve the appearance of our paper.

We have removed our office to the basement of our new stone building, fronting on Winthrop Street, a few rods east of our old office.

 

*Mrs. Brown arrived at home from her Eastern tour ...
January 24, 1856, Herald of Freedom (ID 3215)

*Mrs. Brown arrived at home from her Eastern tour on Monday evening last, coming by stage through Missouri....Mrs. B. left here on the 31st of October last to procure a stock of printing paper for the winter....She was successful on her mission. The paper arrived in due time, and is the stock we have been using for the last six weeks. Finding subscriptions pouring in upon us so rapidly,...we immediately sent forward for another bill of nearly $200. The usual delays attended it, consequently it is frozen up somewhere in the Missouri River....Mrs. B. visited Michigan and northern Illinois and procured near two hundred subscribers....Through her exertions we are saved from the necessity of a suspension until the opening of the river in the spring.

The crowded state of our columns compel us to lay aside the report of...the festival held in the Herald of Freedom building on the 17th inst., the 151st anniversary of Franklin's birthday....The evening passed off pleasantly....

We are now printing between five and six thousand papers weekly....Our list is still increasing at an unparalleled rate, and will equal 8,000 by the first of April....

 

The 150th birthday of Franklin was celebrated by t ...
January 26, 1856, Herald of Freedom (ID 3157)

The 150th birthday of Franklin was celebrated by the printers of Lawrence on the evening of the 17th inst. at the Cincinnati House. A select company, consisting of the editors and printers of Lawrence, invited guests and a goodly sprinkling of ladies assembled at 9 o'clock. The supper...was prepared by Ladies Hurd & Hall, proprietresses of the house. G. W. Brown of the Herald of Freedom was chosen chairman, and R. G. Elliott of the Free State and James Redpath, correspondent of the Missouri Democrat, appointed secretaries....

 

This number closes the first volume of the Herald ...
February 2, 1856, Herald of Freedom (ID 3158)

This number closes the first volume of the Herald of Freedom....The first number was issued from our Courier office in Pennsylvania and dated from Kansas on the 21st of October 1854. The 2d number was issued the first week in January 1855. In consequence of circumstances which we could not control, numbers have been missed, and instead of closing the volume in December...it has been prolonged to the first week in February....Here in Kansas we have found the publishing of a paper an entire different thing from what we found it there. Besides failing in punctuality, we have been compelled to cut down the number and length of our columns to fit a quantity of paper which fell in our way. We design to restore it to its original size as soon as we can get our paper up the Missouri, which we ordered on the 3d of October last from Cleveland....Some seem apprehensive that our office may be destroyed, and that they may not get their money's worth. To such we may say: The paper will go on!...We also appeal to the free press of the North to aid us.

The editors of the Kansas City Enterprise will accept our thanks for the following "first rate" notice. We are glad to learn that our paper "is approved by the whole Free State party." With its weekly circulation of 3,500 copies the Herald of Freedom appears to be a great annoyance to our contemporary. The Enterprise appears to be joining hands with the Leavenworth Herald, Kickapoo Pioneer, and Squatter Sovereign to fan another flame in Missouri with the view of getting up an attack on our office....But to the notice: "We cannot refrain from stating here that it is painful to see such an incendiary as the Herald of Freedom tolerated anywhere. No language is too gross -- no falsehood too monstrous for its purpose. It has done more to exasperate public feeling on both sides than all the men or presses in the Territory combined. It delights in blood, and is appealing to the worst passions of the human heart in its infernal work...."

 

G. W. Brown, editor; J. H. Greene, associate edito ...
March 22, 1856, Herald of Freedom (ID 3165)

G. W. Brown, editor; J. H. Greene, associate editor. Terms: $2.00 per annum in advance.

 

Mr. Brown, the senior editor,...has gone East on i ...
April 5, 1856, Herald of Freedom (ID 3166)

Mr. Brown, the senior editor,...has gone East on important business. He will remain absent for an indefinite period, during which our readers will be favored with frequent letters from him. In 18 months' hard fighting against the foes of Kansas, he has found scarcely a moment's respite....The associate, in taking exclusive control of the paper, expects to devote an undivided attention to the work....

Lecompton Union. This is the title of a pro-slavery paper soon to be published at Lecompton by W. L. Halsey & C. A. Faris. Mr. Halsey lives in Westport, Mo., is a New Yorker by birth, but has been in Missouri long enough to get thoroughly inoculated with slavery prejudices.

 

*Mrs. Brown left home again for the East of the 31 ...
November 8, 1856, Herald of Freedom (ID 3197)

*Mrs. Brown left home again for the East of the 31st of October to solicit subscribers for our paper....Until quiet is restored to Kansas, on her will devolve most of our duties in the states, as we have no desire to run the gauntlet of the Missouri River again....

 

Our entire jobbing material, with a small press ex ...
December 6, 1856, Herald of Freedom (ID 3200)

Our entire jobbing material, with a small press expressly for job work, has arrived and is now in constant operation....

The temporary illness of the editor prevented him from giving that attention which was desirable to the outside of the Herald of Freedom this week.

 

*Thanks. Subscribers are pouring in upon us at the ...
December 13, 1856, Herald of Freedom (ID 3203)

*Thanks. Subscribers are pouring in upon us at the rate of three or four hundred per week. We have doubled our forces for press work, and design to run our hand press night and day hereafter until we can get a power press in motion....

Poor Paper. Our new stock of paper, which we commence using this week, is an inferior article, and of smaller size than formerly, making a stinted margin....We shall have a better article as soon as the river opens in the spring....

 

*...We have not a single copy of any preceding num ...
December 20, 1856, Herald of Freedom (ID 3205)

*...We have not a single copy of any preceding number of the Herald of Freedom in our office, save files to the commencement of the volume....We have been increasing our edition 500 a week for the last few weeks...and yet they have not been sufficient to equal the increase of regular subscribers. We have doubled our force at the press, running it night and day through a greater portion of the week....Letters poured in upon us with such unexampled rapidity, we found it impossible to attend to them as they arrived, so we engaged the services of an additional clerk. The office work still dragging, we have engaged the third one. With our own personal supervision of the whole, by laboring 15 hours a day, we were enabled on Monday last to bring up and get the names of our new subscribers all entered on our books....A friend, who was in a post office on the borders of Missouri, a few days ago, when our last edition came to hand, says he never saw such a scrambling for a paper....

 

*...We have been favored with invitations -- compl ...
January 3, 1857, Herald of Freedom (ID 3208)

*...We have been favored with invitations -- complimentary of course -- to attend New Year's parties at Topeka, Kansas City, Camp Newby, and Leavenworth, yet we were tied down in our office and prevented from attending either....That at Kansas City had claims on us which we could hardly resist. Among the managers we observe several whose acquaintance we made at Westport last spring while detained there as a prisoner; among others that of Col. E. M. McGee, as floor manager, who played the part of a highwayman, stopping us on our route to Lawrence, making us a prisoner, and robbing us of a horse, saddle, bridle and a pair of revolvers, and then forcibly carrying us out of the state, and still detaining us as a prisoner while a contemptible charge was brought against us for treason!

 

...Mr. Speer has disposed of his interest in the K ...
January 10, 1857, Herald of Freedom (ID 3209)

...Mr. Speer has disposed of his interest in the Kansas Tribune to W. W. & E. G. Ross. Arrangements are being made by the new firm to place the Tribune on a permanent basis. With this view, E. G. Ross has gone East to purchase a new dress for the paper, as well as a large stock of paper....The new editor makes one error incidentally....He says he believes the Tribune was the first Free State paper printed in Kansas. Instead of it being the first, it was the third in fact. The first number of the Herald of Freedom printed in Kansas was dated Jan. 6, 1855....If our recollection is correct, the Free State made its appearance about the 12th of January, and the Tribune at a still later date, made up mostly from the columns of the Free State. Mr. Speer, the editor of the Tribune, visited Kansas in the summer or early in the fall previous, and returned to the states. On his arrival at Cleveland, or some other place in Ohio, he there printed a paper which he called the Kansas Pioneer....

 

*...G. W. Brown, who came with the Pennsylvania Co ...
March 14, 1857, Herald of Freedom (ID 3227)

*...G. W. Brown, who came with the Pennsylvania Company, brought with him an extensive printing office with a power press....The first number of the Herald of Freedom was printed in that office in Pennsylvania...and sent to Kansas for distribution. Twenty-one thousand copies were issued and sent gratuitously to all parts of the country....The second number was printed at Lawrence, and made its appearance on the 3d of January, 1855, thought dated on the 6th. It was continued up to May 1856, when it was destroyed by a pro-slavery mob. It was subsequently revived on the 1st of November, 1856; the editor having been held, in the interim, a prisoner, charged with high treason for having dared to oppose the introduction of slavery in Kansas....

We were again compelled to delay the publication of our paper last week for the want of paper. Our stock arrived at Leavenworth too late to get out on time that week....

 

*Four weeks ago, Thursday morning of this week, we ...
April 11, 1857, Herald of Freedom (ID 3232)

*Four weeks ago, Thursday morning of this week, we left home for the East to procure some machinery for our printing office....Before leaving, we visited the printer's department and received a promise from the workmen that on the happening of any contingency they would not leave the office until our return....On the river, we met with numerous delays. Instead of finding suitable machinery...in Alton, or St. Louis, we were compelled to visit Chicago....We were detained three weeks and one day. On arriving at home, we found all hands, save our clerk and faithful apprentice, had partaken of the claim speculating mania and had deserted the office, leaving it vacant, and no paper had been issued for two weeks....We are not a profane man, so we did not swear....Without delay, we commenced reorganizing our office. New hands were employed in every department, though printers were exceedingly scarce. After one week and two days effort, we have succeeded in getting this number of the Herald of Freedom before the public....We are not conscious of any circumstance which can delay us for the future. We are at our post and here shall remain....Subscribers have complained. They had cause. Our table is covered with complaints....Several numbers which have been issued here have never reached the East. This was probably caused by the floods, which prevented the mails from going through....

 

*Our present edition...is 7,200 copies weekly. It ...
April 18, 1857, Herald of Freedom (ID 3234)

*Our present edition...is 7,200 copies weekly. It will reach 10,000 in one month after the power press is set in motion, which will be as soon as we can complete rooms for it.

 

...Advertisers are crowding upon us rather hard be ...
April 25, 1857, Herald of Freedom (ID 3237)

...Advertisers are crowding upon us rather hard because of our very large circulation and the low terms of advertising. We purpose increasing our advertising rates to new patrons....Cash in advance will be required from advertisers from this time forth.

Jut published at the Herald of Freedom office, and for sale at one dime each, notes of "A Tour to the Neosho and Cotton" with valuable information for emigrants; also several miscellaneous articles, and the land office circular relating to pre-emptions.

 

*The Wyandott Register, Mark W. Delahay proprietor ...
May 9, 1857, Herald of Freedom (ID 3239)

*The Wyandott Register, Mark W. Delahay proprietor, has made its appearance and is to be published weekly after the 16th of May. It is a Free State paper....The editor was the former publisher of the Territorial Register, which is baiting catfish at Leavenworth City.

...Our jobbing department is perfect in all its arrangements....In short, those who wish good jobs, or ordinary ones, have only to make their way to the Herald of Freedom office and get their orders executed on our Wells Power Jobbing Press, similar to the one which the Kansas City Enterprise boasts of having in that office....Ours is propelled by steam....

 

*Basely False. It was stated by Chas. Robinson las ...
May 16, 1857, Herald of Freedom (ID 3243)

*Basely False. It was stated by Chas. Robinson last Friday night, in a public speech on the Levee, that we proposed last spring, while a prisoner at Lecompton, to sell out the Free State party, on condition of our liberation from prison; and that we told him subsequently that we induced Gov. Shannon to send to Leavenworth for him, that he -- Robinson -- would join in the sale and procure his liberation. A baser falsehood was never told by any man....If we had done as Robinson alleges, we should have been guilty of precisely the same act Robinson was guilty of the year previous when Shannon's militia was surrounding Lawrence....

 

The illness of Miss Gleason has induced her to res ...
May 16, 1857, Herald of Freedom (ID 3244)

The illness of Miss Gleason has induced her to resign her post as clerk of the Herald of Freedom office....We can only express regret at losing her services....Mr. Nixon, late editor of the Temperance Advocate, published at Norwich, N.Y., takes her place, assisted by Miss E. L. Smith, a graduate of the Cochran Commercial College of Detroit, Mich.

 

*We were honored...by a visit from Mr. Elliott, fo ...
May 23, 1857, Herald of Freedom (ID 3246)

*We were honored...by a visit from Mr. Elliott, formerly of the Free State, published in this city, and which was destroyed on the same day the Herald of Freedom office was "crushed out." Mr. E. has spent the last year in the States. He jocosely remarked that the difference in our cases was that he left the Territory immediately after the memorable 21st, while circumstances compelled us to remain....It affords us pleasure to state that Mr. Elliott has a new office at Delaware, and has determined to revive his Free State at that point....

Job Work. Our new jobbing office is now complete, and is one of the most perfect west of St. Louis. It embraces six presses, a foolscap Cincinnati press for fine work, a Franklin hand press for half sheet posters, and the smaller jobs of book work; a mammoth Washington press for the better class of book work and whole sheet posters; a Wells' power press, driven by steam, for cards, circulars, bill-heads, blanks, and every variety of work where rapid printing is desirable; and a Guernsey power press, propelled by steam, for newspapers. With an endless variety of the most fashionable type, including flourishes, border, cuts, rules, &c, with over a thousand dollars' worth of stock expressly for jobbing, we feel confident of our ability to execute any work....With three workmen who are devoting their entire services to jobbing, and room and material for a dozen more, if needed, we promise those in want of jobs but little delay in the execution of their orders.

 

A newspaper, The Kansas Leader, is soon to be issu ...
May 30, 1857, Herald of Freedom (ID 3248)

A newspaper, The Kansas Leader, is soon to be issued from Centropolis. The press has arrived...and the editors are there....It will be Free State in politics. This is the 14th Free State paper that is or will be printed in Kansas during the coming month.

Report states that the Doniphan Constitutionalist has "caved in" and hereafter will be silent on the slavery question, or free-soilish inclined. This would reduce the pro-slavery organs to four, and give us 15 which are battling for the right....

The Quindaro Chindowan is before us, neat in mechanical execution, well edited....It is published by J. K. Walden and Edmund Babb. It is a Free State journal....The name is rather uncouth, but will improve on acquaintance. It signifies in the Wyandott language leader....

 

We hail with pleasure the appearance of the first ...
June 13, 1857, Herald of Freedom (ID 3256)

We hail with pleasure the appearance of the first number of The Kansas News, published at Emporia, Kansas Territory, by P. B. Plumb, late foreman in the Herald of Freedom office....Less than three months ago, where Emporia is now situated, the hand of industry had done nothing. The country was wild and desolate....The rudiments of a city are there and there are stores, hotels and mills....

 

*The Kansas Free State. This journal, after a susp ...
June 20, 1857, Herald of Freedom (ID 3261)

*The Kansas Free State. This journal, after a suspension of nearly 13 months, caused by the destruction of its office on the memorable 21st of May, 1856, has again made its appearance, though now published at Delaware city, instead of Lawrence. R. G. Elliott has charge of the paper, as formerly....The editor states that his subscription books were destroyed, and desires those who have paid in advance...to write him stating the facts....

Geary City Era. The fourth number of this paper has reached us, and is a very handsome sheet. It is published at Geary City, a few miles above Doniphan on the Missouri River, by Jas. McCahon, and is designed to reflect Free State views.

 

The initial number of the Tecumseh Note Book is on ...
July 25, 1857, Herald of Freedom (ID 3277)

The initial number of the Tecumseh Note Book is on our table. It is a 24-column newspaper, published weekly by Samuel G. Reid, at our neighboring town of Tecumseh. It...will sustain the interests of the Democratic Party.

 

We welcome...the Ottumwa Journal, published at the ...
September 12, 1857, Herald of Freedom (ID 3299)

We welcome...the Ottumwa Journal, published at the new town of Ottumwa on the Neosho, 20 miles below Emporia....It is edited and published every Saturday by Jonathan Lyman at $2 a year, or 10 copies for $15....The editor is one of the old-school anti-slavery men -- long the publisher of a paper in the East....The editor has experienced the usual difficulties of border life,...found in the following extract: "We have the skeleton of an office, which awaits the hide to cover it. Our present office consists of a tenement 18 by 20, made of logs, which affords a shelter for an entire printing establishment, and the entire family of the printer, consisting of ten persons!"...

Young America is the name of a new independent paper just started at Leavenworth by Geo. W. McLane, editor and proprietor....The editor tells us his paper was designed for "Washington City, K.T.," but he could not commence there for want of an office, so he concluded to "pitch in," for the time being, at Leavenworth....

 

Henderson, of the Leavenworth Journal, has challen ...
October 10, 1857, Herald of Freedom (ID 3311)

Henderson, of the Leavenworth Journal, has challenged Mr. Grant of the Geary City Era to fight him, and the latter has declined. Grant showed himself a man of sense in declining the challenge, while Henderson, or any other man who challenges another to mortal combat, proves himself a coward in our estimation....

 

The Wyandott Register has, at last, closed its exi ...
November 7, 1857, Herald of Freedom (ID 3322)

The Wyandott Register has, at last, closed its existence, and the press and fixtures have been sold, to be removed from the place. The Citizen is the only paper now published at Wyandott. It professes to be in favor of making Kansas a free state, though it supports the National Democratic party. The Citizen and National Democrat, published at Lecompton, seem to be of the same stripe.

 

...Notwithstanding the fact that the Missouri has ...
November 28, 1857, Herald of Freedom (ID 3334)

...Notwithstanding the fact that the Missouri has closed this year, nearly a month in advance of the usual period, yet we have secured our stock of paper for the winter, enough to supply ten thousand subscribers...until after the opening of navigation in the spring....

 

Kansas Newspapers. The following is a corrected li ...
December 5, 1857, Herald of Freedom (ID 3341)

Kansas Newspapers. The following is a corrected list of the newspapers in the Territory, with their politics and, as near as we can determine, the order in which they were established:

Herald, Leavenworth, pro-slavery.

 

We notice on our table...the Southern Kansas Heral ...
December 19, 1857, Herald of Freedom (ID 3351)

We notice on our table...the Southern Kansas Herald, published weekly at Osawatomie by Chas. E. Griffith, editor and publisher. The second number is before us....The paper displays an unusual amount of editorial ability....

We are afraid that our editorials this week will give indications of the state of our health....We can truthfully write that we have not seen a well day in Kansas. Before coming here, we had on several occasions threatened to abandon business on account of the state of our health; and on one occasion offered our business and property for sale, while in Pennsylvania, with the view of engaging in some calling which would be less exhausting to the nervous system....The fatigue of body and mind incident to building up a home here exhausted our nervous system, and for long and weary weeks we were confined to our room, and most of the time to our bed, with inflammatory rheumatism....During the last few weeks this same nervous excitability has come upon us...and we are continually exhausted, and all vitality seems gone....We have the best office, and the largest variety of material, and the most commodious rooms for business west of St. Louis. This is all for sale, and possession will be given when desired....

 

*Dr. Grant has taken leave of the Geary City Era a ...
December 26, 1857, Herald of Freedom (ID 3356)

*Dr. Grant has taken leave of the Geary City Era and returned to his family in Iowa. The Dr. was a vigorous writer and has done good service in the cause. Among the reasons for closing his connection with the Kansas press, he gives the following:

"The office has, within the short space of three months, absorbed all of its receipts and the original outlay for materials in expenses, besides my own constant services, and I think that this is sacrifice enough for one man to make in the cause, however dear he may esteem it."

The Doctor's experience is probably that of every other publisher in Kansas. During our first year in Kansas we sunk full $6,000, and was only able to keep our paper alive by heavy sacrifices of property, and by contracting debts, some of which remain unliquidated to the present....Our expenditures the year through equal, if not exceed, $200 a week....We find ourself at the end of the year absolutely worse off than when we commenced it, and hardly able to keep our business open.

...The Kansas Free State was established contemporarily with the Herald of Freedom. Its editors made a losing business of it, and only kept it alive by means outside the paper.

The Kansas Tribune was established soon after. Mr. Speer sunk largely, as did Mr. Wood, who was connected with it for a time. Messrs. Ross, too, have only been able to sustain themselves by means outside the paper.

The Free State at Delaware went down, we suppose, because of the tight times. The Register at Wyandott did the same. This was also true of the Prairie City Champion, the State Journal and Freeman of Topeka, the Union at Lecompton and the Note Book of Tecumseh....The winter just opened upon us will be a severe one upon Kansas newspapers....

 

We were favored with a visit...from J. Thompson, t ...
January 2, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3357)

We were favored with a visit...from J. Thompson, the senior editor of the Geary City Era. Mr. T. is a practical printer...and has labored with his assistants, Dr. Grant and Mr. Marble, with hearty good will to...secure our emancipation from political thralldom....

 

*The Squatter Sovereign is now a Free State paper. ...
January 16, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3363)

*The Squatter Sovereign is now a Free State paper. It was bought out by Gen. Pomeroy, but is now conducted with considerable ability by O. F. Short. In his last issue he devoted a whole page, in handbill type, rejoicing over the result.

We were favored...with a visit from our friend J. Lyman of the Ottumwa Journal....The Journal is now published regularly, though it is greatly embarrassed for the want of better mail facilities with other localities. Mr. L. is a good writer, and a practical printer of 20 years experience....

Not Sold Out. During the last week we have had an offer for the purchase of the Herald of Freedom establishment, and the terms we had fixed were all complied with....We consulted our friends, and on no condition would they consent to the change....We were importuned to continue at the helm until Kansas was "out of the woods."...Though anxious to retire from the turmoil of politics and public life, we pledged ourself anew, refused the offer, and shall struggle to the end. Mr. Ross, who proposed to buy the establishment, we recognize as a warm personal friend....He takes a different view, however from what we do of Kansas matters. His hopes of making Kansas a Free State seem centered in the Topeka Constitution....

 

...The Kansas Leader, published at Centropolis, K. ...
January 23, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3364)

...The Kansas Leader, published at Centropolis, K.T., by Wm. Austin gives evidence of ability, and of practical value, second to no other newspaper published in the Territory....

 

The times are hard on newspapers. Not a mail comes ...
February 13, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3369)

The times are hard on newspapers. Not a mail comes in but some of our exchanges give notice that the tightness of the times has induced them to suspend. Several of our Territorial exchanges have done so temporarily for the want of paper. Among these...is the Geary City Era....The Chindowan and Prairie City Champion have been revived. Both these papers are more moderate than formerly in their positions....

We find upon our table Nos. 1 and 2 of The Kansas Settler, a new journal just established in the enterprising town of Tecumseh, 20 miles west of Lawrence on the Kansas River. It is published by Thomas R. Lord, late editor and publisher of Lord's Bank Note Detector of Cincinnati. The Settler is a distinctive Free State newspaper....

 

...A new paper, to be called the Western Metropoli ...
March 6, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3381)

...A new paper, to be called the Western Metropolis, will be started in Wyandott in a few weeks. The material, which is entirely new, is on the ground. The Register and Citizen have gone down....In politics they will be Independent Free State with Republican proclivities.

 

The editor has been absent two weeks...and has onl ...
March 13, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3385)

The editor has been absent two weeks...and has only returned in time to say that an account of his trip...must lay over until next week....He would also express his thanks to his worthy foreman, T. A. Osborn, for the very satisfactory way he has conducted its columns; also to Lowman, Heath, and others for valuable contributions....

 

Six hundred new subscriptions were received during ...
March 27, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3390)

Six hundred new subscriptions were received during our absence....These have all been obtained by the efforts of a single individual, except so far as persons in the various localities have been prompted...in sustaining the Herald....We are not at liberty to mention the name of the person who has handed in this new list....

 

We take pleasure this week in introducing Mr. Mart ...
April 10, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3396)

We take pleasure this week in introducing Mr. Martin...as associate editor, for the time being, of the Herald of Freedom....

The term of engagement of Miss E. L. Smith as clerk in the Herald of Freedom office having expired, we have secured the services of Miss L. G. Heath, formerly from New York, to take her post....During the last two and a half years we have employed lady clerks almost exclusively. Miss Gleason had general supervision of the books down to a year ago, since which they have been under the entire charge of Miss Smith. We cannot speak to complimentary of the business qualities of either of those ladies....

 

Freedom's Champion, the successor of the Squatter ...
May 3, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3400)

Freedom's Champion, the successor of the Squatter Sovereign, has suspended temporarily, and permanently unless the citizens of the town shall do something to sustain it.

 

G. W. Purkins, the able editor of the Leavenworth ...
May 15, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3405)

G. W. Purkins, the able editor of the Leavenworth Journal, has withdrawn from that paper. He has conducted the paper with marked ability since November last, and though a strong pro-slavery man, yet his sense of justice compelled him to oppose the Lecompton swindle with all the energy and talent of which he was master....

 

We copy the following from the last number of the ...
May 22, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3411)

We copy the following from the last number of the Kansas Leader. It pains us to see so able an advocate of Free Labor withdrawing his connection with the press of Kansas....(William) Austin, in his retirement, carries with him our best wishes....

 

Mr. Walden has retired from the Quindaro Chindowan ...
June 26, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3425)

Mr. Walden has retired from the Quindaro Chindowan, having an engagement to preach in Ohio during the coming year....The Chindowan is temporarily suspended, but it will be revived again in a few weeks.

Van Horn & Abeel of the Journal of Commerce, Kansas City, Mo., have commenced the publication of a daily....It is a model paper in mechanical appearance, containing 28 columns....

 

*...The last year has been one of great pecuniary ...
July 10, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3428)

*...The last year has been one of great pecuniary embarrassment to us....The very large subscription list which was unexpectedly thrown upon our hands compelled us to incur heavy expenses to enable us to supply that list. The cost of the additional building, type, power press, steam engine, &c., with the freight bills, equaled $8,000. The pressure of the times, and the hue and cry raised against us by designing demagogues for political purposes, have reduced our list, and cut off our receipts, leaving us large bills to pay, without the ability to do so....The time has passed when we have reason to expect a large Eastern circulation....

 

Some two or three months ago we noticed in our col ...
July 24, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3434)

Some two or three months ago we noticed in our columns that we wanted a couple of printers immediately, qualified for book work....We are happy to state that the places were promptly filled, and that we have a full complement of compositors, pressmen, jobbers, &c....

 

Complete files of Vol. 3 of the Herald of Freedom ...
August 14, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3443)

Complete files of Vol. 3 of the Herald of Freedom can be supplied,...tied up in bundles ready for binding, for $3; or they can be supplied ready bound for $4.50. Vol. 2 can also be supplied, minus a few numbers, for $3.50 in sheets, or $5 bound. The two volumes can be furnished, bound together, for $8.00. We have no perfect files of Vol. 1, save that preserved in the office for reference. The Herald of Freedom is believed to contain the fullest and most reliable history of Kansas which has been or can be written....

 

The first number of the Junction Sentinel, publish ...
August 28, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3448)

The first number of the Junction Sentinel, published at Junction City, is received....We regret that the editor has attached himself to the Democracy....The Sentinel is located at the most westerly point in Kansas which is favored with a newspaper....Benj. H. Keyser is editor.

 

Mr. Brown, instead of starting East soon after our ...
September 4, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3449)

Mr. Brown, instead of starting East soon after our last issue, found himself wholly prostrated by a fever which attacked him several days before the paper was worked off. He is still confined to his room and quite unable to give any attention to his business....

 

Unlike any other newspaper in Kansas, the Herald o ...
September 18, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3458)

Unlike any other newspaper in Kansas, the Herald of Freedom was established as the pioneer Free State paper at a time when it was deemed a hazardous enterprise. It was established, not to promote the interests of any one locality, but as a paper for the whole Territory....That which comes under our observation as worthy of note in Lawrence, we publish, but we do not recognize the position that we belong to Lawrence because we chose to live in the town....Most other papers have been established in the new towns, their object being to promote the interests of the specific towns in which they are located....Our purpose is not to run a tilt against newspapers thus established,...but to say to our readers that we are dependent upon no such source for our vitality, hence we can be just to all....It is for this reason, no doubt, that we are now receiving large accessions to our subscription list from all the leading towns in Kansas....As the interest in Kansas newspapers dies out in the East, we are glad to see this evidence of appreciation at home. With the disappearance of our Eastern list, of course we change to some extent the character of the paper to meet the wants of our new patrons; not, however, changing its political principles in the least....Instead of making a newspaper for Eastern readers,...henceforth we shall labor for our Kansas readers....We trust the friends of the Herald of Freedom will be active in extending its circulation....

After three weeks absence from our post, by indisposition, we are again able to resume the pen, though yet in too feeble health to write much for the paper. Last week we succeeded in writing some two or three columns of paragraphs, but with great exertion and to the injury of our health. Our readers must bear with us until we fully recover....During our illness, Miss Heath, our efficient clerk, though in feeble health herself, had general charge of the paper, and through her clippings, with the aid she received from the typos in the office, her brother E. Heath, Mr. Lowman and others, she succeeded in making a very interesting paper....

Our friend Griffith, of the Southern Kansas Herald, published at Osawatomie, has been confined to his room for three weeks with sickness, during a portion of which period the publication of his paper has been delayed....

 

...We have let our Jobbing Office to our former ef ...
October 2, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3461)

...We have let our Jobbing Office to our former efficient foreman in that department, Mr. Whitcomb, who has charge of it and is turning out work which defies competition west of St. Louis....

The editor of the Herald of Freedom will spend next week in Leavenworth, where he will be happy to see any of his old patrons, and would esteem it a favor to secure a large number of new ones. With the very large and increasing circulation of our paper in the southwest and western portions of the Territory, we are sure no paper furnishes so good a medium for Leavenworth business men to advertise in as does the Herald of Freedom....

 

The Star of Empire, published at Westport, Mo., ha ...
October 16, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3468)

The Star of Empire, published at Westport, Mo., has again changed hands and name. It now appears with the title of The Border Star. It formerly wore the name of Border Ruffian, and under the direction of its Border Ruffian editor it was a Border Ruffian sheet in earnest. Mr. McCarty, its new editor, is a gentleman of experience, and brings a large amount of talent to his aid....

The Kansas Weekly Press, published at Elwood, Doniphan county, has changed hands, being at present under the control of Jno. L. Merrick & Co....They are Free State men in sympathy, and will work for free labor and free principles....

 

*The editor of the Herald of Freedom has been repe ...
October 23, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3473)

*The editor of the Herald of Freedom has been repeatedly charged with having proved false to his principles, and turned traitor to freedom. Look over Kansas as it is today. Of all the Free State journalists in Kansas, prior to the commencement of 1857, none but Mr. Brown remains. He was present at the organization of the Free State party at Big Springs, and though the platform then adopted did not meet his approbation, yet as it was evident that it embodied the views of a large majority of those who would cooperate in making Kansas a Free State, he placed himself fairly on it, resolving to be silent on such features as did not meet his approbation until Kansas was a State in the Union. Though repeatedly expressing his dissent from some of the positions then taken,...yet in no instance has he advanced a single argument against a position therein taken. He has labored at all times, and in all places, to maintain the party on that platform, and has never abandoned it for a moment; while those who are so denunciatory of him...have always opposed it, and have labored to supersede it with another, which would have wrecked the last hope of those who determined at the outset to make Kansas truly free.

The Wyandott Argus has changed hands and is now conducted by Whittaker & McCauley....It is understood...that the new editors are Douglas Democrats....Though differing widely with the former editors of the Argus, yet their deportment towards us personally, as journalists, has always been of a friendly character....

 

*We find that some 25 newspapers, which have been ...
October 30, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3478)

*We find that some 25 newspapers, which have been started in Kansas since its settlement in the fall of 1854, have suspended or gone down entirely. In fact, save the Leavenworth Herald and the Herald of Freedom, the two oldest newspapers in the territory, we believe there is not a paper which has an editor who dates his connection with the Kansas press back of the spring of 1857. Some half a dozen presses have been brought to the Territory which were never used by their original proprietors, but changed hands before they were used. A press was taken to Fort Riley in the summer of 1855, and is now owned by Mr. Garvey of Topeka. Another was taken to Manhattan during that year, and is now in the Herald of Freedom office. The press on which the Osawatomie Herald was printed was taken to that place in the fall of 1855; was buried in a wood pile when that town was destroyed, and laid idle until last winter, when it was brought forth to print that journal. A strange fatality has attended the Kansas newspapers and presses, and their future history will be very interesting.

 

It is but just that we should say to the friends o ...
November 6, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3482)

It is but just that we should say to the friends of the Herald of Freedom...that we are pressed for money to an extent never before experienced....And this pressure is to defray the everyday expenses of the office, not to pay debts, nor for stock....We have managed in the past to pay our workmen each Saturday night until the last two or three weeks, but this we can do no longer. The alternative is before us, either to suspend or to appeal to the friends of the paper to bestir themselves...in its behalf. Experience has taught us better than to contract debts in the publication of a newspaper, particularly in Kansas. We know it is HARD times with others as well as us, but the trifling amount of two dollars with them, once a year, bears no comparison with the fifty dollars, which amount it costs us in money weekly, to defray in indispensable expenses of our office....If we supposed that the people withheld their patronage because the paper was not needed in the community, or they no longer desired our services as a journalist, we would suspend at once, and make arrangements with some other newspaper to fill out our unexpired subscription list, or get some other person to take charge of the Herald of Freedom establishment; but, whenever we have mentioned this to the friends of the policy we have advocated, there has been but one response, and that: "We cannot do without your paper. It has become a necessity, and as for changing editors, that would be the same as superceding the paper with another."...Our reply has been that nothing but the anxiety of our friends could retain us in the situation we occupy for a single week, as it has been and will continue a thankless task....Either our subscription list must be increased to paying rates, else we shall take measures to close up the business, and that very soon. The matter is with the friends of the paper....We have large amounts due us for advertising and job work, besides many have asked us to enter their names as subscribers with a promise to make payment "in a few days."...And yet months or years intervene and no payment. We respectfully but urgently ask all persons of this character to call on us immediately and liquidate their bills. We must have money, and that from those who owe us. We have no desire to continue the publication of the Herald of Freedom a single day longer unless the public desire it....

 

The receipts of the Herald of Freedom office have ...
November 20, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3487)

The receipts of the Herald of Freedom office have been greater the last week than during the entire four weeks directly preceding it. With these substantial evidences that our services are appreciated, we feel more hopeful, and feel more like laboring to keep alive and publish a good paper in Lawrence....

Thacher thinks it is none of our business if he does cut down the wages of his workmen, if they are satisfied. And we presume he thinks it is none of our business if he does insert a column of advertisements for five dollars, though the typesetting alone, at the rates we pay, would come to about two-thirds of that total amount....Thacher does well to divert the attention of the public from his RAT practices by assailing us....

This copy of our paper will fall into the hands of a large number of persons who are not subscribers....The "hard times" have reached us, and the paper is not paying expenses....Reader, please aid us in giving the paper a wider circulation....

Our neighbor, of the RAT OFFICE, gives us the benefit of a column notice, filled with falsehoods and false insinuations, which are too low and base to receive notice from us....

 

There are 24 papers published in Kansas at the pre ...
November 27, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3490)

There are 24 papers published in Kansas at the present time. There are also 10 printing presses lying idle. -- Leavenworth Herald.

We think the editor of the Herald is mistaken in his figures, as we can find but 20 newspapers in the Territory now in operation, located as follows: Lawrence 2, Lecompton 1, Topeka 1, Emporia 1, Junction City 1, Wyandott 2, Leavenworth 5, Atchison 2, Palermo 1, Elwood 1, Troy 1, White Cloud 1, Fort Scott 1. Of the presses lying idle, there is at Ottumwa 1, Osawatomie 1, Prairie City 1, Minneola 1, Tecumseh 1, Topeka 1, Quindaro 1, Delaware 1, Kickapoo 1, Iowa Point 1, Grasshopper Falls 1, Sumner 1, Palmetto 1, Oskaloosa 1, and how many more we don't know....

 

A new paper, the Jefferson Crescent, has been esta ...
December 11, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3495)

A new paper, the Jefferson Crescent, has been established at Grasshopper Falls on the ruins, we suppose, of the late Grasshopper. The new paper is edited by D. W. Guernsey, who gives evidence in his editorials of a good writer....

*The editor of the Osawatomie Herald, after a suspension of near three months, occasioned by sickness, has again resumed his paper....He has been prostrated with congestive chills and dysentery....

"The Lawrence Herald of Freedom. We learn that this paper has been purchased and will be issued soon at Baldwin City as the Kansas Messenger...." -- Western Metropolitan.

"It is reported in the street that the office and journal over the way is about to be bought out, in name as well as in fact, by the Democrats." -- Lawrence Republican.

Both statements are equally false,...with the exception that we did sell to Mr. Still a press and type to establish the Kansas Messenger at Baldwin City, but not the press on which the Herald of Freedom is printed....

 

The Kansas Messenger is the title of a newspaper.. ...
December 25, 1858, Herald of Freedom (ID 3503)

The Kansas Messenger is the title of a newspaper...just started at Baldwin City, in this county, by John W. Still....It is under the auspices of the Methodist denomination, we believe. Terms $1.50 a year in advance. The types, press, &c, were furnished from this office.

It gives us pleasure to note the favorable change in the receipts of the Herald of Freedom office, evidencing that times are getting easier....

 

This number of our paper will fall into the hands ...
January 1, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3505)

This number of our paper will fall into the hands of many persons who are not subscribers....The Herald of Freedom is the oldest Free State newspaper in Kansas....It is still content to labor for the making of Kansas a Free State without desiring to connect itself with any party organized outside of Kansas, though the sympathies of the editor are identified with the Republican party....

 

The Herald of Freedom delivered through the Lawren ...
January 15, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3511)

The Herald of Freedom delivered through the Lawrence post office last week to regular subscribers 125 copies. The Republican delivered 116 copies, and added a package of 75 for the periodical depot of Mr. Wilmarth....If papers delivered to Mr. Wilmarth for sale are to be taken into account, then we add to our list of papers within the range of delivery of the Lawrence office over 200 copies sold by Mr. Wilmarth the first week in January, and over 300 copies, as we are prepared to substantiate by affidavit, from the business rooms of the Herald of Freedom....

The initial number of The Weekly Highlander, published at Highland, Doniphan County, is on our table. The editor, G. E. Fouthner, in his salutatory, talks like a man of sense....

 

Last week we paid to our workmen, for labor in the ...
January 22, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3514)

Last week we paid to our workmen, for labor in the Herald of Freedom office for that week, 220 dollars. Every dollar of this amount enters into general circulation, to the benefit of all classes. The wages of several of the workmen ranged between 29 and 31 dollars each....

 

We have added over 200 new subscribers to our subs ...
January 29, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3518)

We have added over 200 new subscribers to our subscription list during the last two weeks....These evidences of the popularity of the Herald of Freedom with the masses are conclusive, that the People will sustain a plain, fearless advocacy of the Truth....

 

*"Old Brown" and a portion of his piratical band h ...
February 12, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3522)

*"Old Brown" and a portion of his piratical band have escaped into Nebraska, no doubt on their way East. On their arrival they will make a demand upon the charitable for contributions to pay for their expenses while engaged in robbing the people of Kansas. We do wish Gerritt Smith could know Brown as he is. If so, instead of lending him further pecuniary assistance, he would exert all his energies to send him to an Insane Asylum.

 

The Agitator is the name of a weekly newspaper, ed ...
March 19, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3533)

The Agitator is the name of a weekly newspaper, edited with marked ability by Hugh Young at Wellsboro, Tioga county, Penn....Mr. Young spent the spring and summer of 1856 in Kansas and was associated with the Herald of Freedom as corresponding editor from its revival in the fall of '56 until the close of the ensuing year....

 

Last week we received 62 new subscribers from Fort ...
March 26, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3538)

Last week we received 62 new subscribers from Fort Scott, and large numbers from other post offices in Kansas. We are indebted to W. Gallaher, postmaster at Fort Scott, for the first of these favors. During the last year, he has sent us nearly 100 subscribers from his immediate vicinity....

 

The first and second numbers of a new weekly journ ...
April 2, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3540)

The first and second numbers of a new weekly journal, with the name of Johnson County Standard, published at Olathe by Barker and Eddy, have found their way to our table....It is independent in politics....

 

Suspended. The Elwood Press, Grasshopper Falls Cre ...
April 16, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3547)

Suspended. The Elwood Press, Grasshopper Falls Crescent, Palmetto Kansan, Quindaro Chindowan, and Fort Scott Democrat have recently suspended. The Kansas Messenger has changed hands....Kansas is death on newspapers. From the way several other journals are howling at the Herald of Freedom, we should judge the vital spark with them had nearly fled.

 

The Herald of Freedom is the only Free state newsp ...
April 23, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3550)

The Herald of Freedom is the only Free state newspaper now in existence which was published in Kansas at the time the Free State party was organized at Big Springs in 1855. The Kansas Tribune has subsequently been removed to Topeka, and has twice changed hands, and is another affair from the Tribune of 1855. Is it to be wondered, then, that we sustain the party then organized?...

 

For Sale. It would give us pleasure to dispose of ...
May 14, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3556)

For Sale. It would give us pleasure to dispose of the Herald of Freedom office to some responsible party for its real value, with the condition that it shall remain Free State, and shall devote itself to the advancement of the interests of that organization until Kansas is a State in the Union....The office is now doing a first rate business with from $8,000 to $10,000 worth of job work annually, a large advertising list, and the largest subscription list in the Territory....

Our new printing press, for job work, has just arrived and is now in first rate working order. It is from the manufactory of W. T. & S. D. Day, Cincinnati, Ohio....

 

The Daily Leavenworth Herald, No. 1, Vol. 1, is be ...
May 21, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3558)

The Daily Leavenworth Herald, No. 1, Vol. 1, is before us. It is a first class, 28-column newspaper, printed in good style, and edited with marked ability by William H. Gill and S. J. Eastin. It is Democratic in politics....The Weekly Herald has always been one of the best papers for news in the Territory....

Horace Greeley of the N.Y. Tribune arrived in Leavenworth on...Monday last, in company with Gen. Pomeroy, and left the same day on a steamer for Wyandott, en route for the Osawatomie convention. Mr. Greeley appears in Kansas at this time, according to the Leavenworth Ledger, agreeably to the written request of a large number of straight-out Republicans, with the view of getting up some enthusiasm at the Osawatomie Convention....

 

The Kansas Express, edited and published by Chas. ...
May 28, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3560)

The Kansas Express, edited and published by Chas. De Vivaldi of Manhattan, commenced publication last week. Its editor is a good writer....He is a Republican but, we should judge, conservative in his sentiments. Mr. De Vivaldi is an Italian and of course well informed on the Italian question which furnishes the basis of the present war in Europe....

The Democratic Union of Atchison has issued a prospectus, and will soon commence publication. It will be edited and published by Mr. Chase, a conservative Democrat and veteran editor....

It is also rumored that a Democratic weekly is soon to be started in this place, and that a press and office have already been ordered from the East....

 

The Kansas Press. We welcome this new candidate fo ...
June 11, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3571)

The Kansas Press. We welcome this new candidate for public favor which hails from Cottonwood Falls, Chase county, S. N. Wood, editor and publisher. It is a racy and readable paper and will not fail to make its mark....

 

The Atchison Union came to hand just as we were go ...
June 18, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3573)

The Atchison Union came to hand just as we were going to press last week. It is a large and well conducted sheet, and evidences the editor's ability to defend the policy of the Democratic party....

 

Suspended. The Journal, after a successful run for ...
June 25, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3578)

Suspended. The Journal, after a successful run for the politicians, and an unsuccessful one for its late publisher, has suspended. They assign a number of reasons for suspending, but the most prominent one is that, out of the many promises made to them by the politicians, not one of them was redeemed.... -- Leavenworth Ledger.

 

Republican papers are taking especial pains to rea ...
July 2, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3581)

Republican papers are taking especial pains to read the Herald of Freedom out of the Republican ranks. Their efforts will prove futile. We came to Kansas to make it a free state, and have worked with this single object in view, and shall continue to, till that question is settled....

The fourth volume of the Herald of Freedom will soon close....It has always been our purpose to close our connection with the public press on the complete triumph of free principles on Kansas soil. This is the twelfth year since our connection with newspaperdom, two years longer than we purposed when we first became connected with the press....We have a first class printing office, with hand and power presses, and an almost endless variety of job type, for any amount of business; also a large list of paying subscribers and regular advertisers, with a good book bindery and blank-book manufactory attached. We would prefer to sell to a Republican who would labor to harmonize the anti-slavery element of Kansas. To make it an object for such a person to undertake the enterprise, we will make a donation to him of one thousand dollars in material, or sell the establishment one thousand dollars less than good judges will say the office is worth....If there are any parties who wish to buy on those terms, now is the time to make the strike, for there is no time to lose....

 

*The Radical Press. The Topeka Tribune has taken i ...
July 16, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3585)

*The Radical Press. The Topeka Tribune has taken its position with the Republican, Times, and News against the allowance of the claims of sufferers in the troubles of 1855-56. The principal objection on the part of these papers...arises from the fact that the claim for the destruction of the Herald of Freedom office in May 1856 was allowed by the commissioners. Although the claims, in the aggregate, exceed $400,000 and over 500 persons are interested, yet because of our claim these presses...tilt at the commissioners, the Legislature, and the people who elected them....

 

Fort Scott Democrat. This paper has been revived u ...
July 23, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3587)

Fort Scott Democrat. This paper has been revived under the auspices of E. A. Smith as editor....Although Democratic, we advise the Republicans of that section to patronize it liberally, as toleration of political differences is characteristic of true manliness.

 

*Our Side of the Story. On the 21st of May, 1856, ...
July 30, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3592)

*Our Side of the Story. On the 21st of May, 1856, the Herald of Freedom office was entered by an armed mob of Pro-slavery men, professing to be acting under process of law, who destroyed one small cylinder, mammoth size Taylor's Printing machine, the cost of which, in New York, was $2,250, and which was but slightly injured by previous service and which cost to get it to Kansas from $500 to $700; also one entirely new No. 6 Taylor's Washington press, with patent inking apparatus, costing in Kansas, as we can show by bills in our possession, $579; also one cap jobbing press; one imposing stone and frame; an unusually large amount of jobbing type, including expensive fonts of border, flourishes, numberless cuts, &c; some 1,400 pounds of news and advertising type, besides roller moulds, chases, column rules, and in short, the entire paraphernalia of an extensive printing office, the estimated cost of which, before leaving Pennsylvania in 1854, as may be seen in the New York Tribune of that season, and in Boston newspapers, was $8,000. The office was selected and made complete with an expectation of doing the Territorial printing, and was more expensive than the office we are now using, which cost upwards of $8,000. Besides the loss of the printing office proper, our entire stock of material for the season arrived on the steamer Lizzie the Friday previous to its destruction. This was all lost. Then we brought out with us a large stock of school and miscellaneous books, for sale, costing about $800. These were entirely lost or rendered valueless. Our library, embracing many choice and very valuable publications; also complete bound files of the Congressional Globe and Appendix for some 12 or 14 years were destroyed. To these losses were added a large number of other items, including a horse, saddle, bridle, a pair of revolvers, bowie knife, injury to building in setting it on fire, &c, making in the aggregate for the whole loss about $13,000. To this we added the item of damages, and before the commissioners claimed for the whole some $17,000. They allowed us in the vicinity of $12,500, that being the amount fully established by evidence. Instead of assessing the damages in the manner we claimed, they allowed six percent per annum on the value of the property proved to have been destroyed, from the date of its destruction to the rendition of the award. Without referring to the evidence,...we saw a statement of our loss going the rounds of the Republican papers...in which it was put down at $30,000. This statement did not originate with us, for up to that time, and long after, we were prohibited from holding communication with the outer world, being a prisoner at Lecompton, under the strictest surveillance....After making all the political capital possible, in 1856, representing our losses as so very great; representations, too, made by Republican correspondents, and circulated far and wide by Republican journals, sworn to by Republicans before Congressional Committees, and allowed by a Republican Congress, the Emporia News leads off in an attack upon us, and says our losses did not exceed $1,400. The Lawrence Republican, with its characteristic meanness, and the remnants of those three broken presses in full view from its office window, the cost of which in New York, as its specimen book would have shown, was $2,729, maliciously alleges the loss did not exceed $1,600. Mr. Cummings of the Topeka Tribune, who was a typo in the office in the spring of 1855, prior to the arrival of the power press, steam engine, &c, ignorant of the amount of stock destroyed, the value of the library, the stock of school and miscellaneous books, estimates it at $5,000. Wm. A. Phillips,...without knowing anything about the cost of the material, or the amount of it, only as he saw the remnants of the office after its destruction, swears before the commissioners on claims...that he thought the loss was about $1,600, though he admitted that he did not go to the bottom of the river to see what amount of type and material was thrown in there....The Republican claims that we have been paid for our losses by the charitable in the East, and that we had no legal claim for reimbursement from Congress or the Territory in consequence. The facts are these: Mrs. Brown, through the advisement of friends, traveled with an agent, who was employed at an expense of $3 a day, and presented the facts that we were then imprisoned for opinion's sake; that we had contracted a debt in Cincinnati of $800, which was secured by a mortgage on property in Pennsylvania, then overdue; that that property must be sacrificed unless the funds to redeem it were forthcoming; that the debt was contracted in the prosecution of our Kansas enterprise; that our means of obtaining money was thus cut off, and that as the debt was contracted to advance the cause of freedom, without any hope of personal profit, it was but just that the true friends of the cause should contribute of their means to liquidate that debt, and aid us, on our releasement from prison, to start our journal again, which all deemed so important to the cause. That call was generously responded to, and $2,780 were donated. A large amount of this fund was consumed in defraying traveling and incidental expenses for Mrs. Brown and Mr. St. Clair, and in efforts before Judge McLane, in Ohio, and Judge Curtis, in Massachusetts, for a writ of habeas corpus for all the treason prisoners -- seven in number -- who were alike joined in the petition asking for release. After defraying these expenses, and discharging the debt in Cincinnati, a little less than $800 was left us to commence business with. The $500 donation from Maj. C. W. Hunter of Alton, part of the $2,780, was used towards purchasing a press and type, and the balance was used for paper. Besides this, a new debt of $712 was contracted in Cincinnati for material, which we have but recently been able to liquidate. Several of those who made donations of $50 and $100 have been reimbursed by us, and when our means will justify, we expect to liquidate the last dollar....Had we prosecuted those who destroyed our property, and recovered a judgment therefore against the party doing the damage, then we would have no just claim upon government, as a principle prevails in law that one satisfaction liquidates the demand. Mr. Elliott, we understand, has prosecuted the parties who destroyed his office, but we have not, because we were satisfied of the impossibility of collecting the debt from them, as most of the parties were wholly irresponsible. We have no desire to engage in criminations or recriminations against any parties in this matter. If the Republican party or its leaders in Kansas expect to make anything by keeping up their crusade on us, they can "go in" to their heart's content, and the future will decide who is the injured party. We presented our claim in good faith to the commissioners of claims, a majority of whom are Republicans, appointed by a Republican Legislature, and under oath to discharge the duties of their office with fidelity. All of them are honest men, and above the low tricks which the Lawrence Republican, by innuendo, heaps upon them. The witnesses examined...were the best men of Lawrence, old citizens, and property holders. The award in our favor is based upon their testimony, and the Territorial attorney, also a Republican, appointed by the same Republican Legislature, after examining the facts and hearing the testimony, is satisfied with the award....

N. Thomas Doane, formerly of Ohio, has just published the initial number of the Free State Republican in Kansas City, Mo.

The Evening Dispatch is a new Leavenworth daily, edited by Josiah T. Hinton, not Inton "the representative of the great Neosho valley." Leavenworth has been the grave of daily papers; we wish the Dispatch a better fate than its predecessors.

The Leavenworth Ledger commenced republication...and is as excellent and vigorous a newspaper as ever. We are glad to see McLane at his post again.

 

Kansas State Register. The Leavenworth Ledger has ...
September 3, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3605)

Kansas State Register. The Leavenworth Ledger has finally give place to a new paper, which hoists the name of Mr. Parrott, and plants itself upon the Osawatomie platform. The State Register, under the editorial management of Jeff L. Dugger, will take rank as one of the first Republican papers in Kansas. The Times was too unstable in its radicalism to command the confidence of a large share of the Republicans of Leavenworth....

S. S. Prouty has commenced the publication of the Advertiser at Burlington, Coffey county, K.T.

 

The State Record. Ross Brothers commenced the publ ...
October 8, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3625)

The State Record. Ross Brothers commenced the publication of the Record on Saturday last. It is a large eight-page quarto in form. Its editors, Edwin G. and W. W. Ross, show a commendable degree of enterprise in starting a paper containing so large an amount of reading matter. We wish them success, but fear they will not realize their expectations. The Record is published at $2 per year.

The Neosho Valley Register is a well printed and well edited paper just started at Burlington, Coffey Co., by S. S. Prouty, formerly of Prairie City. Terms $2 per annum.

P. Sidney Post is now the editor and publisher of the Wyandott Argus.

 

Our entire edition last week was exhausted a few h ...
October 22, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3636)

Our entire edition last week was exhausted a few hours only after going to press. With an edition of over 3,000 this week, we hope to be able to supply the entire demand.

 

Old John Brown. "Of him, we might say with truth, ...
October 29, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3643)

Old John Brown. "Of him, we might say with truth, his wrongs have made him mad. There was a time when John Brown, the Pennsylvania farmer, and his sons, were as peaceable and peace-loving citizens as could be found in our country. He came to Kansas early, and loving the cause of freedom, was an earnest Free State man. For this he suffered. He saw his home invaded and destroyed; he mourned the death of a beloved son. And these great wrongs crazed the old man, and made him a fanatic, a monomaniac, with but one thought, one idea, one impulse -- vengeance on the slave power, which had destroyed his peace; revenge on the men who had murdered his kindred and friends. It is said that he took an awful oath that, while life remained, his hand should be raised against this power, and he would war against it to the death." -- Atchison Champion.

**The first thing the people of Kansas heard of Old John Brown was in the summer of 1855. A meeting of Ultra Abolitionists was held at Syracuse, N.Y., if we recollect rightly. While in session Brown, who is a resident of Essex county, N.Y., appeared in that convention and made a very fiery speech, during which he said he had four sons in Kansas, and he had three others who were desirous of going there to aid in fighting the battles of freedom. He could not consent to go unless he could go armed, and he would like to arm all his sons, but was not able to do so. Funds were contributed upon the spot, principally by Gerritt Smith. The four sons had located on Pottawatomie creek, in Lykins county, and in the fall of 1855 were joined by the father and other brothers. When the Wakarusa war was pending the old man and four sons arrived in Lawrence, the balance he reported sick. As they drove up in front of the Free State Hotel, they were all standing in a small lumber wagon. To each of their persons was strapped a short, heavy broadsword. Each was supplied with a goodly number of firearms, and navy revolvers, and poles were standing endwise around the wagon box with fixed bayonets pointing upwards. They looked really formidable and were received with great eclat. A small military company was organized at once, and the command was given to Old Brown. From that hour he commenced fomenting difficulties in camp, disregarding the commands of superior officers, and trying to induce the men to go down to Franklin and make an attack upon the Pro-slavery forces encamped there. The Committee of Public Safety were called upon several times to head off his wild projects, as the people of Lawrence had planted themselves on the law, claiming they had not been guilty of its infraction, and that no armed body of men should enter the town for any purpose whatever, and that they would not go out of town to attack any such body. Peace was established and "Old Brown" retired in disgust. When the news of the threatened siege of Lawrence reached John Brown, Jr., who was a member of the Topeka Legislature, he organized a company of about sixty men and marched towards Lawrence. Arriving at Palmyra he learned of the sacking of the town, and the position of the people. He reconnoitered for a time in the vicinity, but finally marched back towards Osawatomie. The night before reaching that place, when only a few miles away, they camped for the night. Old John Brown, who was with the party, singled out, with himself, seven men. These he marched to a point eight miles above the mouth of Pottawatomie creek, and called from their beds at their several residences, at the hour of midnight, on the 24th of May, Allen Wilkinson, Wm. Sherman, Wm. P. Doyle, Wm. Doyle, and Drury Doyle. All were found the next morning, by the roadside, or in the highway, some with a gash in their heads and sides, and their throats cut; others with their skulls split open..., with holes in their breasts, and hands cut off; and others had holes through their breasts with their fingers cut off. No man in Kansas has pretended to deny that Old John Brown led that murderous foray, which massacred those men. Up to that period not a hair of Old John Brown's head or that of any of his sons, had been injured by the Pro-slavery party. It was not until the 30th of August, three months after the Pottawatomie massacre, that the attack was made on Osawatomie by the Pro-slavery forces and Frederick Brown, son of Old John, was killed. The truth of history requires this statement. If Brown was a monomaniac, it dates back anterior to his first visit to Kansas.

 

Subscribe. We would suggest to the occasional read ...
November 19, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3652)

Subscribe. We would suggest to the occasional readers of the Herald of Freedom in Lawrence, many of whom are not subscribers, that they owe it to the prosperity of the place to subscribe for the paper. Though ours has been the best abused sheet in the world, yet what one has done a hundredth part for the town as has the Herald of Freedom? It was the bright particular star which advertised the town in the fall of 1854. Of the first number, printed about the middle of September, 1854, and bearing date the 21st of October, there was an edition of 21,000 copies, the expense of which to us was over $600. These were circulated throughout every part of the country, not one dollar of which was ever returned, but its effects were plainly visible in the fall of that year in stimulating emigration to Kansas. All winter of 1854-55, and the spring of that year, we labored under the most discouraging embarrassments, yet we believe the heavy emigration of that spring and summer was owing partly to the influence of our paper. And thus it continued to operate for the town, indirectly advancing its prosperity, until suspended in the spring of '56, when it was "crushed out" for a time, to be revived again in the fall of that year. Through the active operation of numerous personal friends and relatives scattered over the country, who took agencies for the paper, and many others who sympathized with the principles enunciated, our list was suddenly swelled to EIGHT THOUSAND. The effect of this large list was visible in the unprecedented emigration of the spring of 1857, nearly every emigrant of whom was bound for Lawrence. Our friends at Kansas City, Leavenworth, &c, were in the habit of remarking, as passengers left the steamboat and inquired the direction to this city, that "it seems as if eastern people are unconscious of any other place in Kansas than Lawrence." It was almost true, and we are vain enough to believe that our circulation of 8,000 copies throughout the States, and passed from hand to hand, each having at least six readers, and the long extracts from its columns in all the leading papers of the country, did much towards bringing Lawrence into still wider notoriety. Persons thus influenced came here, but in due time passed off to other portions of the Territory, but acquaintances made in Lawrence endeared them to the place, and the town has remained the center of business for the Territory in consequence. When our circulation and influence was cut down by the villainous falsehoods of interested letter writers, and their copyists in the States, Lawrence felt the blow, and she is still suffering and will suffer. The loss was not ours alone, but it was a blow upon every property holder and business man in the town. Years of assiduous labor cannot make up what was lost by that suicidal act, the laboring to crush out for a second time the Herald of Freedom. We appeal to every man's good sense, and inquire which would accomplish most for a town, two papers, with a circulation less in the aggregate than three thousand, five hundred, and these frequently in the hands of the same individuals, or a single paper with a circulation of 8,000? It is true it may be urged that we could not have sustained our large list. We believe we could, and we believe further that were we to make the effort, and would our business men and citizens generally join us in the movement, we could raise its circulation to that number again. We have little desire to do so, and certainly would not think of making the effort, did we desire, without our own citizens would join with us in the enterprise....We have sought, by making a good paper, and by fair and honorable dealing with all persons with whom we have come in contact, to merit a liberal patronage. If, laterally, we have failed to receive it, it is on account of the numberless falsehoods propagated from time to time at our expense. Time has shown that we were right in the past, and that unfailing arbiter will yet do us full justice on every charge, personal as well as political, which has been brought against us. We are conscious of a final triumph, for we are a firm believer in the principles of our motto: "Truth, crushed to earth, will rise again."...

 

The first article we wrote about Old John Brown wa ...
December 3, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3661)

The first article we wrote about Old John Brown was designed to caution Republicans against canonizing him. But they disregarded our urgent solicitations, and the result, our articles are copied by administration papers far and near. We regret that Republican journalists have made such consummate donkeys of themselves as to occupy the false position they do. When the Pottawatomie murder reached the public ear, the Free State party, as such, called a convention at Osawatomie and denounced it in unmeasured terms. Republicans should have done the same in respect to the Harper's Ferry tragedy, instead of apologizing for it through their leading journals, if they did not wish to be held responsible for it.

 

Our paper has been delayed on account of changing ...
December 10, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3664)

Our paper has been delayed on account of changing the location of our power press, and repairing it. It has thrown us back so far in this issue that we shall be compelled to forego the pleasure of issuing a number next week.

 

Retires. During the last eight months, we have bee ...
December 17, 1859, Herald of Freedom (ID 3668)

Retires. During the last eight months, we have been materially assisted in the editorial department of the Herald of Freedom by Doct. W. S. Bush. In fact, for many weeks during the summer, he had entire control of its columns....He closes his connection with the office this week and will return to the East. We take great pleasure in saying that his gentlemanly deportment at all times, and his valuable services, have endeared him to us....

*Temporary Suspension. Several weeks ago we wrote Balis & Hicks, dealers in printing paper at Kansas City, from whom we have purchased printing material the last few months, that we should rely upon them for our stock of paper this winter. They wrote in reply that they should keep a large supply on hand, and would be able at all times to fill our orders. About four weeks ago we sent them money in payment for a small stock. They forwarded a portion of it, and wrote that they were daily in expectation of receiving a large supply by river, when they would furnish the balance of our bill. Since then we have heard nothing direct from them, but have understood from others that their stock was frozen up in the river, and hence were unable to fill their orders. With this issue our entire stock of paper is exhausted. Unless we hear from Balis & Hicks soon, we shall seek a supply at St. Louis or Chicago, in the interim the Herald of Freedom must be temporarily suspended. We greatly regret this, but it is owing to circumstances over which we had no control.

It is possible that several weeks may intervene before another issue, as we have thought that should we visit Chicago to secure a stock of paper, we should probably continue our journey to Pennsylvania, to transact some very important business there which we have long neglected. Mr. Trask will remain in charge of the office to transact any business pertaining to the establishment, and will give particular attention to job work, orders for which are solicited.