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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Junction City Union

Articles in database from Junction City Union:    88

*We learn that the Marysville Gazetteer has been d ...
August 23, 1862, Junction City Union (ID 4152)

*We learn that the Marysville Gazetteer has been demolished by a company of soldiers which they had just recruited in that county. It had at its masthead "The Union as it was, and the Constitution as it is," which means more than good loyalty can back up. It was destroyed for its strictures on General Lane, which equaled anything in scurrility that a Richmond paper could get off. It exhibited very plainly the rebel sympathies of its editors. It was continually snarling at Congress, and any measures which they might adopt to put down rebels. Altogether it was a miserable thing, and we doubt not got its deserts. This illustrates one thing; that men of undoubted loyalty can criticize the actions of the government as much as they please, but when men who have sympathized with rebels do it, it is palpable what prompts it.

Book, Job and Newspaper Printing. The following statistics we find in the preliminary chapters of the report of the Superintendent of the Census of 1860:

In New England, the Middle and the Western states, the value of book, job and newspaper printing is returned as $38,428,043, of which 11 millions worth consisted of books, the value of the latter being nearly equal to the whole product of the same branch in 1850....The manufacture of paper, especially of printing paper, has increased in an equal ratio, the state of Massachusetts alone producing paper of the value of $5,968,469....New York returned paper of the value of $3,516,276, Connecticut $2,528,058, and Pennsylvania $1,785,900.

Of 4,051 papers and periodicals published in the U.S. at the...census of 1860, 3,242, or 80.02 percent, were political in their character; 298...devoted to literature. Religion and theology composed 277, while 234...are classed as miscellaneous....

The total white population of the U.S. was stated at...the census of 1850 to be 19,533,114. In 1860 the census report it at 27,008,081....

 

*A Change. One year ago, good and loyal citizens w ...
February 28, 1863, Junction City Union (ID 4316)

*A Change. One year ago, good and loyal citizens were found who expressed sympathy for the Frontier when it paid the penalty of its unpatriotic course. Today we fail to hear one single word of sympathy for the rebel Inquirer. True, there are some who keep their mouths shut, which is indicative enough. Let us thank God for this improvement. Keep them quiet, and the war will soon come to a successful close.

 

Geo. W. Martin, editor. Vol. IV, No. 2.: Volume Fo ...
April 15, 1865, Junction City Union (ID 500)

Geo. W. Martin, editor. Vol. IV, No. 2.

Volume Four. We today commence the re-publication of The Union. Our patrons are all familiar with the circumstances of its suspension, of which we need not speak. We had hoped for a longer respite from editorial labors, but the growing necessities of the country, and our will to advance those necessities, have induced us to return to the editorial ranks....New settlers are among us....The preliminary surveys of the Union Pacific Railroad, destined ere long to be the most extensive work of public improvement on the continent, are being run through our section....Further, the progress of Right and Loyalty justifies the prediction that speedily the Nation will return to the ways and arts of peace; and consequent thereto an immense immigration must follow the footsteps of the great railway which is to bind the hemispheres....

 

"The Junction City Union, after a suspension of se ...
April 29, 1865, Junction City Union (ID 502)

"The Junction City Union, after a suspension of several months, appears again, as fresh and spicy as ever. The former publishers, when they stopped its publication, had determined to enter into other business; but the people of that section, after having a paper published in their midst for three years, could not do without the Union, and G. W. Martin has again entered the ranks...." -- Lawrence Daily Tribune.

 

"...The Junction City Union, after a little nap, h ...
May 6, 1865, Junction City Union (ID 503)

"...The Junction City Union, after a little nap, has arisen refreshed and is as good looking and sprightly as before. Mr. Martin's name still flies at the masthead as editor. The Hon. S. M. Strickler determined that the Union should be preserved, and to his efforts are the people indebted for its continued existence...." -- Topeka Record.

 

Married. In this city, on the 4th of June, 1865,.. ...
June 10, 1865, Junction City Union (ID 515)

Married. In this city, on the 4th of June, 1865,...William S. Blakely and Miss Josephine Morgan, both of this place....Our association with Blakely renders inadequate words to express the joy and felicity we pray may be in store for them....

 

The Lawrence Daily Tribune comes to us handsomely ...
June 17, 1865, Junction City Union (ID 517)

The Lawrence Daily Tribune comes to us handsomely enlarged. We are glad to note this evidence of a success which it has always merited....The State Journal is passing through a change. James Christian and a gentleman from Detroit are to take hold of the establishment....The Kansas Farmer has again reached us, filled with valuable reading for its class of people....

 

Acquitted. Col. Anthony of the Leavenworth Bulleti ...
July 1, 1865, Junction City Union (ID 522)

Acquitted. Col. Anthony of the Leavenworth Bulletin has been acquitted of the charge of assault with intent to kill upon Col. Jennison. The indications, to our mind, are that the Times faction of that city, aided by a lot of cowardly, sneaking copperhead rebels, are intently bent upon getting Anthony into quarrels. First, that sheet howled itself hoarse over Anthony's conduct in shooting at Jennison, and did all it could to forestall public opinion, notwithstanding which, a jury have acquitted him. Next, some kind of a thing spits in Anthony's face, which is quietly submitted to, whereupon the Times blows furiously of his cowardice and exhibits plainly a meddlesome, doubtful purpose....To state that Anthony is a coward is to say what is well known to be false; while his quiet submission to such an infernal outrage will go far to refute the charge that he has no control over his passions. Anthony has his faults, but his good qualities will exceed any possessed by those who are so determined to war with him.

No Paper. The elements were against us last week and, however annoying it is the miss an issue, we had to yield. We had a supply of paper aboard some ox train between here and Leavenworth, which was exceedingly tardy. To avoid all danger of accident, we ordered a bundle by Express. In the meantime, the rains coming, the streams rising, and the bridges leaving. The ox train and Express were alike powerless to relieve us. We will not be caught again, however, as we have now received a six months' supply.

 

S. M. Strickler & W. K. Bartlett, proprietors. Geo ...
August 5, 1865, Junction City Union (ID 532)

S. M. Strickler & W. K. Bartlett, proprietors. Geo. W. Martin, editor. Published every Saturday at Junction, Davis Co., Kansas.

Kansas State Journal. This paper comes to us in daily form and is decidedly the neatest looking in the state....Since it changed hands it has exhibited a fairness towards all sections positively refreshing for Lawrence. It is sound in judgment and in conviction positive.

 

We have had Meader, the blacksmith, at work on our ...
August 19, 1865, Junction City Union (ID 538)

We have had Meader, the blacksmith, at work on our ancient press, and its transformation to a modern apparatus, working smooth and good, compels us in justice to say that Meader can do things in first class style.

 

In an excellent article on the improved tone of ou ...
September 30, 1865, Junction City Union (ID 552)

In an excellent article on the improved tone of our newspaper press, the Conservative says: "Many of the Kansas papers compare favorably with newspaper publications either in the Middle or Eastern states. They are generally characterized by vigor and enterprise, and many of their editorials would adorn the columns of metropolitan journals of high pretensions. We believe this to be true of much of the original matter published in the papers of our city, Atchison and Lawrence; also in the columns of the State Record, Kansas Chief, Oskaloosa Independent, Junction City Union, and some others...."

 

A convention of the newspaper men of the state is ...
November 25, 1865, Junction City Union (ID 568)

A convention of the newspaper men of the state is to be held at Topeka during the session of the Legislature. All thus far favor the proposition, in which we heartily join. Numerous questions affecting the material interests of the business may be suggested for consideration. But particularly an interchange of thought and opinion could not but result in elevation of the press and an increase of its usefulness. All must agree that the course of the Kansas press has improved wonderfully the past season, and that as a result the material interests of the state have been advanced far more than during all time previous. It is within the power of the press to shape the character of all political contests and for God's sake don't let us have any more such as we have had....

The Lawrence Tribune comes to hand somewhat enlarged and announcing the addition to its editorial corps of Major E. G. Ross....Major Ross is an old newspaper man of long experience and good ability.

 

A new paper, to be called The Kansas Independent, ...
December 2, 1865, Junction City Union (ID 573)

A new paper, to be called The Kansas Independent, is about to be started at Leavenworth under the supervision of Rev. J. G. Reaser and Rev. John Ekin. In their prospectus the editors say: "While candor requires us to state that in its control and doctrinal preference our paper will be Presbyterian, we nevertheless disclaim all denominational antagonism....We seek for, and offer cordial cooperation with, all of every name whose chart is 'Glory be to God in the highest and on earth peace, good will toward men'." Price $2.50 per annum; in clubs of 10 or more $2.00 per annum.

 

...We are in receipt of the Topeka Weekly Leader, ...
December 16, 1865, Junction City Union (ID 579)

...We are in receipt of the Topeka Weekly Leader, Ottawa Home Journal, and Miami County Free Press, all new candidates for public favor. The Leader proposes to be an independent political state paper....The Home Journal is a religious paper in the interest of the Baptists and is under the management of the Rev. I. S. Kalloch. The Free Press is conservative in tendency....The press of the state, outside of Junction City, seem to be enjoying remarkable prosperity.

 

The Topeka Leader has an excellent article on the ...
December 30, 1865, Junction City Union (ID 585)

The Topeka Leader has an excellent article on the false economy of the city dailies in refusing to exchange with the country weeklies. The Conservative has recently cut the Union from its list. We are sorry the "leading paper" is becoming so reduced in circumstances, and so blinded in consequence, as to refuse those common courtesies of life, but which, however, lack the cash. It is a "penny wise and pound foolish" system of economy. During the past summer and fall the Conservative has copied from the Union to the extent of from four and five items to a half column of them each week -- items of interest to their readers, which they now propose to throw away for the sake of a few cents on their paper, and, more than that, the city dailies are quoted from each week and constantly advertised to the people of the state by the country weeklies. The Conservative has always been a favorite with us, but a St. Louis daily will answer just as well. We would like to see what kind of looking things our "metropolitan" papers would be should the entire country press of the state shut down on them....In this connection we would take occasion to thank the publishers of the Lawrence Tribune and Journal, Leavenworth Bulletin and Atchison Free Press for their dailies.

 

The following is supposed to be the number of news ...
February 3, 1866, Junction City Union (ID 596)

The following is supposed to be the number of newspapers in the world. Ten in Austria, 14 in Africa, 14 in Spain, 26 in Portugal, 30 in Asia, 65 in Belgium, 85 in Denmark, 60 in Russia and Poland, 120 in the Germanic States, 500 in Great Britain and Ireland, and 1,800 in the United States, or nearly twice as many in this country as in all the other nations together.

 

To Advertising Agents. This is to request you to s ...
February 24, 1866, Junction City Union (ID 601)

To Advertising Agents. This is to request you to stop boring us with your stuff....We have no use for the brazen face who asks us to work for half price. Our paper is too full of respectable advertisements, at good payment rates, to give any attention to such trash. We see some papers filled up almost by them -- and if they accept the pay generally offered in circulars we get, we don't wonder that poverty is the lot of printers.

 

Be Patient. Advertisements are crowding upon us an ...
March 17, 1866, Junction City Union (ID 604)

Be Patient. Advertisements are crowding upon us and our reading matter is reduced in consequence. We beg our readers to bear with us until the end of the volume, which is four more numbers. We have purchased a first class printing office at the foundry of L. Johnson & Co., Philadelphia, with which we propose to give you the Union in a large seven column form. We...hope to have our new material here in time to commence anew about the first of May.

 

With this number of the Junction City Union, we cl ...
April 14, 1866, Junction City Union (ID 612)

With this number of the Junction City Union, we close our connection with it. After this date the proprietorship will vest in Porter & Martin. The institution is now a fixed success. Consequently we desire to turn it over to those whose occupation it is. In assuming the expense of the concern thus far, we have labored only for the good of the country, and our consciousness that it has been useful to our local interests is sufficient satisfaction to us. Ample assurance for the future is given when we announce that it will be controlled editorially by Geo. W. Martin, who has so ably presided over this department during the past four years....The Union has the reputation of being the best local paper in the state and, with Mr. Martin's experience in conducting it thus far, assisted by the mechanical skill and newspaper experience of M. H. Porter, with the increased facilities at the command of the new proprietors, we are satisfied the Union under its new auspices will be still more useful and acceptable to the public. -- S. M. Strickler, W. K. Bartlett.

In assuming the connection with this paper above announced, we would not fail to give a parting word to those who have generously supplied from their own private means the funds with which it has thus far been run. The necessities of the country, in the publication of the Junction City Union, have been most generously met by W. K. Bartlett and S. M. Strickler, and although we have labored our utmost, it is due exclusively to their generosity that western Kansas possesses an established organ....We have no promises to make for the future. The character of the paper is fully established. As has been announced, however, after a brief suspension the paper will appear in an enlarged form with a complete new dress. -- M. H. Porter, Geo. W. Martin.

This number of our paper closes Volume Four. As we have a new printing office ready to open, and contemplate enlarging our paper, we will be compelled to suspend for one week, and possibly two. In the meantime we want our friends to bring in the names (and the money). We must have a circulation of 1,200 in western Kansas.

Good Bye, Old Press. Reader, this is the last impression you will ever receive from the oldest printing press in America -- old Ben's, now in the Patent office, notwithstanding. Last Sunday a new Washington press, together with a good miscellaneous assortment of printing material, was unloaded at our door, with which we propose replacing the old press and type of the Union office, which have served as advance guard from the locality of Pocahontas westward to the spot where a conscientious regard for its venerableness compels us to stop it, and ship it back to its starting point -- the foundry. We have no means of arriving at the exact age of the press we today cast among the scraps of old iron....Among the type that we propose casting into the "hell box" is a font of long primer which first did service in Ebensburgh, Pennsylvania, on a Whig paper, distant 12 or 15 miles from where we began setting type. It was brought west by Dr. A. Rodrique, who founded Lecompton in this state. It was in store at Kansas City for a while, and during the early trouble of Kansas, a party of ruffians, supposing it belonged to Senator Pomeroy, took it from the building and threw it into the Missouri River. It lay there several months, when it was fished up and sold by the Rodrique estate to the Democrat establishment at Lecompton. In that office we served a portion of our apprenticeship on it. Subsequently it was sold to Sam Medary, who brought it to Junction City. Two years afterwards we followed it to this point, and for four years we've made those same old types howl. After 15 years service, in the cause of Whiggery, and some violent distortions in the interest of ruffian democracy, winding up their days in the redeeming virtues of Radical Republicanism, we give them a decent burial, with feelings akin to sadness.

 

We greet our readers this morning with a brightnes ...
April 28, 1866, Junction City Union (ID 614)

We greet our readers this morning with a brightness of face, gratifying to us, and which we are confident will be pleasing and acceptable to you all. We confidently submit the fact that The Union now stands on an equal footing, as regards appearances, with the older and more profitable establishments of the state.

Albert Griffin, formerly of Manhattan, and well known throughout this county, is editor of the Nationalist, a radical loyal paper published at Mobile, Alabama.

 

Judge Sears, we regret to say, has retired from th ...
May 19, 1866, Junction City Union (ID 623)

Judge Sears, we regret to say, has retired from the Conservative and his place is to be filled by Ward Burlingame. Judge Sears gave a tone to the Conservative which placed it foremost among the papers of the West. It was refreshing to read his spirited, able and sound editorials....The Conservative, in the hands of Sears, was an ardent supporter of Congress and struck heavy blows at "my policy." Before another week the Conservative will be in full fellowship with all the Copperheads and bushwhackers, and just that moment will its claim to the "leading paper" cease....

 

The Ebensburgh (Pa.) Alleghanian is...publishing a ...
June 23, 1866, Junction City Union (ID 636)

The Ebensburgh (Pa.) Alleghanian is...publishing a history of the newspaper business of that place and...it quotes the notice we gave in the last number of our old issue, of certain type which we afterwards threw away....Only the primer and a font to small wood type were brought to this place. The rest of it remained in the Democrat establishment at Lecompton. The removal of the capital, in consequence of the admission of the territory as a state, dried that thing up, and from thence the material of the office was removed to Atchison. There the vilest kind of a Copperhead sheet was issued from it, called the Bulletin, which public sentiment, however, soon squelched. From thence it was removed to Leavenworth, where it formed a portion of the Leavenworth Daily Inquirer establishment. Its course there was such that in a few short months a righteous mob tossed it out the second story windows and made a bonfire of the office furniture. For a year or two thereafter, a suit for damages, brought by the proprietors against the City of Leavenworth, was pending in the district court of that county. The suit was finally settled by the city paying a certain amount of damages. The wood type brought to this place is still in this office. We could write a volume of reminiscences in connection with that old printing office. Their close alliance with all the ruffianism that inaugurated the first grand skirmish upon these prairies for liberty, their persistent career in the interests of slavery and treason, and their violent demise, furnish us food for reflection. Furthermore those same types exercised some tremendous brains. Robert J. Walker, Fred P. Stanton, James W. Denver, Samuel Medary and William Brindle drove the quill at various times during its stay at Lecompton -- all but Brindle being national characters. Brindle has been in Pennsylvania for some years past and, we learn, has been connected with the Philadelphia Age and the Harrisburg Patriot and Union.

 

The Kansas Radical is the title of Manning's Manha ...
July 21, 1866, Junction City Union (ID 644)

The Kansas Radical is the title of Manning's Manhattan paper. We have received the first copy of it. It is a spirited paper and, with deference to the Independent, a decided improvement on Manhattan typography. We wish it success, and we wish the Independent success also, but the fact is...the newspaper business is sadly overdone in this state, and particularly in Manhattan. One or the other of them must die, unless they live on faith, which is almighty mean grub for the stomach. Of the two, Pillsbury will come nearer doing this than Manning. In the innocence of his heart, Pillsbury believes, we honestly think, that purity, piety, virtue and all the graces center in Manhattan....Money, which is as essential as brains in running newspapers, is not in the business, and we would advise one or the other of them to accept the first situation of stage driver or bull whacker that is offered.

 

We publish in another column a sketch of Senator E ...
July 28, 1866, Junction City Union (ID 651)

We publish in another column a sketch of Senator E. G. Ross, appointed by the Governor to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of Senator Lane. We like the appointment. Senator Ross is an intelligent, honest, good, radical man, to whom a particle of objection could not be urged. The only fault found with the appointment is by the Lawrence Tribune, which occurs under such circumstances,...as to relieve the appointed from unfavorable criticism. Senator Ross was a business partner in the paper at the time of his appointment, and previous to which it was a strong supporter of Governor Crawford. His appointment, however, gives occasion for the severest assault upon the Governor by the remaining editor that we have read in a long time. When the fact is generally known that John Speer was the most prominent borer for the appointment, it will be readily understood. If Governor Crawford hasn't given John Speer as good a thing as he might have done, John has a perfect right to "go for him."...

The New Senator. Edmund G. Ross was appointed U.S. Senator by Gov. Crawford on the 19th. He was born in Ashland, Ohio, in 1825. At the age of ten years he commenced learning the printers' trade in the Advertiser office in Huron, Ohio. He continued in that office, and the office of an elder brother at Sandusky, Ohio, until 1850. That year he went to Wisconsin and worked a while at his trade in Waukesha, and afterwards at Milwaukie in the Sentinel office for Gen. Rufus King. In 1863 (?) he came to Topeka. His brother, Wm. Ross, late mayor of Topeka, was then, in conjunction with John Speer, publishing the Topeka Tribune. E. G. Ross purchased Mr. Speer's interest and the two brothers continued its publication until 1857, when they sold it. The same year they started the State Record. In 1861, E. G. purchased the interest of his brother in this paper and was sole publisher and editor until Aug. 1862, when he sold out an enlisted as a private in Co. E, 11th Kansas Reg. Through his exertions mainly, the company was raised, and when the time for election of officers came, he was elected captain. When the regiment was transferred to a cavalry regiment, he was appointed major by Gov. Carney. During the last year and a half of the war he was inspector of this department, and in that capacity visited all the soldiers in the state monthly. His headquarters being in Lawrence, he moved his family to that place....After his discharge at the close of the war, he formed a business connection with John Speer and became one of the editors of the Lawrence Tribune. Prior to the organization of the Republican party, Mr. Ross was a Whig and belonged to the radical wing of the Whig party....When the Republican party was organized, his natural tendencies took him into it and made him side with the Radical wing of that party. Prior to his entering the army he used his influence for the most stringent measures for the prosecution of the war. He endorsed Fremont's Missouri proclamation, Gen. Lane's views of arming the negro, and every other measure that tended to destroy slavery, the cause of the war. While in the army he advocated the same principles. As an editor he made a reputation second to no other in the state. As a soldier and officer he did his duty, and whole duty, in every position that he was called upon to fill....In Kansas politics he has always been among the most radical, but he has never descended into the personal wrangles that have disgraced so many of our politicians....He entered the army a poor man and came out of it as poor. Not a whisper has ever been heard against E. G. Ross, as to his being connected with contracts or dishonest practices. There is no taint of corruption upon him....

 

The unprecedented prosperity of this portion of th ...
September 29, 1866, Junction City Union (ID 675)

The unprecedented prosperity of this portion of the state, its progress in all the facilities of an older and well settled country, and its consequent unceasing demands upon the activity of its public enterprises, induce us to the publication of the Junction City Union Daily....Therefore, on or about the 15th day of October, 1866, we will commence the issue of the Junction City Daily Union. It will be 24 columns in size (just that of our weekly one year ago), and will be delivered to subscribers by mail and by carrier in the city at $9 per annum....Porter & Martin, publishers and proprietors.

 

The first issue of our daily paper will be deferre ...
October 13, 1866, Junction City Union (ID 680)

The first issue of our daily paper will be deferred from the 15th to the 22d. Our partner, Mr. Porter, has been detained in St. Louis longer than he anticipated, and certain material, necessary in its publication, that we ordered from Philadelphia, lies among express goods some place between here and Leavenworth.

 

Kansas has a population of 250,000 and 41 newspape ...
February 2, 1867, Junction City Union (ID 706)

Kansas has a population of 250,000 and 41 newspapers....

 

The late Editorial and Publishers Convention unani ...
February 9, 1867, Junction City Union (ID 710)

The late Editorial and Publishers Convention unanimously voted in favor of a proposition that the people of the state should elect a state printer to rank with the rest of the state officers. They appointed a committee to draw up a memorial to the Legislature asking that steps the taken to have the constitution so amended....

 

The co-partnership heretofore existing in the publ ...
May 11, 1867, Junction City Union (ID 735)

The co-partnership heretofore existing in the publication of the Junction City Daily and Weekly Union, in the firm name of Porter & Martin, has been dissolved, Morris H. Porter retiring. The business...will be conducted by and in the name of George W. Martin. John W. Delaney, who has been an employee of the office for the past six months, will have charge of our books and business....

 

*Whereabouts or fate of the leading Border Ruffian ...
May 18, 1867, Junction City Union (ID 738)

*Whereabouts or fate of the leading Border Ruffians and Free State men of Kansas:...Mr. Delahay, first territorial delegate from Kansas, is a judge of the U.S. District Court;...G. W. Brown of the Herald of Freedom is boring for oil down at Peoria;...P. B. Plumb is a lawyer at Emporia and was speaker of the House of Representatives last winter;...Mr. Holliday is still at Topeka, engaged in the real estate business;...Sam Wood is now judge of one of the state courts;..."Old Colonel Vaughan" is still a leading journalist at Leavenworth; T. Dwight Thacher is now on the staff of the Philadelphia Telegraph;..."General" Stringfellow, B. F., the notorious champion of the border ruffians with the pen, became a free state man and settled at Atchison....

 

The press gang accompanying the (railroad) excursi ...
June 8, 1867, Junction City Union (ID 744)

The press gang accompanying the (railroad) excursionists was large and embraced the first newspaper talent of the country. Our border sanctum was honored by a call from most of them. The party consisted of Major A. R. Calhoun, Philadelphia Press; Frank B. Wells and Homes James Budd, Philadelphia Evening Bulletin; J. R. Young, New York Tribune; J. R. Fitch, New York World; J. H. Riley, Alta Californian; A. K. Pedrick, Philadelphia Enquirer; C. C. Fulton, Baltimore American; Dr. Samuel S. Wood, Chicago Journal of Commerce; H. F. Zeider and W. Fayell, St. Louis Republican; D. M. Grisson, St. Louis Evening Dispatch; J. W. Miller, Cincinnati Commercial; W. Stenngle, Westliche Post, St. Louis; S. C. Burch, Missouri Democrat....This side of the state line, the party was reinforced by G. T. Anthony, Leavenworth Bulletin; John Speer, Lawrence Tribune; M. W. Reynolds, State Journal; McDonald, Cummings and Dunlap of Topeka; J. S. Brown of the Kansas Farmer, and Weil of the Zeitung....

 

...Some few months ago we alluded to the appearanc ...
July 13, 1867, Junction City Union (ID 754)

...Some few months ago we alluded to the appearance of the Manhattan Independent, filled with advertisements of Madame Remington, Madame Perigo, Crisper Coma, Journvilles Elixir, Hair Exterminator, &c. We see by a New York paper that the firm which sent the stuff out has suspended because the senior had been operating extensively in gold, and the printers are all to be swindled....The White Cloud Chief estimates that by this humbug the press of the country have been swindled, in the aggregate, out of $200,000.

 

Our new building is ready, except plastering, and ...
August 31, 1867, Junction City Union (ID 768)

Our new building is ready, except plastering, and inasmuch as the county requires our present room for court purposes, we are compelled to vacate this day. It being an utter impossibility to print and plaster in the same room, we shall suspend for one week, after which we shall wake up in a new, bright office.

 

We are now right side up in our new office, thanks ...
September 21, 1867, Junction City Union (ID 773)

We are now right side up in our new office, thanks to the generosity and public spirit of Streeter & Strickler, who furnished the money to pay for it. It is a substantial two-story stone building, with brick front, 23 feet by 50, and cost we judge about $3,000. The second story occupied by us is as neat and commodious a room as there is in the state....The building is located on Washington Street, north of Eighth, in a convenient business locality....

 

The Hays City Railway Advance is the name of a tri ...
November 16, 1867, Junction City Union (ID 788)

The Hays City Railway Advance is the name of a tri-weekly paper which has made its appearance at the terminus of the road, and published by Joseph Clark, W. H. Bisbee and Willis Emery, all of Leavenworth. The thing looks like a huge joke, considering all things....

 

The Ellsworth Advocate is the name of a new weekly ...
March 14, 1868, Junction City Union (ID 830)

The Ellsworth Advocate is the name of a new weekly paper just started at Ellsworth with P. H. Hubbell as publisher. The Advocate...is in every respect a "live journal." It is neutral in politics....

 

We rejoice at the return of D. W. Wilder to the ed ...
May 9, 1868, Junction City Union (ID 841)

We rejoice at the return of D. W. Wilder to the editorial control of the Leavenworth Conservative....The people of Kansas well remember that during his connection with the Conservative it was emphatically in all respects the "Leading Paper."...We are confident he will speedily restore the prestige of the Conservative, which has been somewhat demoralized during the past year by a monthly change of editors....

 

The Lawrence Tribune says: "We have received the f ...
July 25, 1868, Junction City Union (ID 855)

The Lawrence Tribune says: "We have received the first copy of the Junction City Avalanche, published by Huling & Co., in the interest of the Democracy. It appears to be fully as good a paper as the Leavenworth Commercial."

 

*We notice elsewhere...the demise of the Junction ...
November 14, 1868, Junction City Union (ID 865)

*We notice elsewhere...the demise of the Junction City Avalanche. Its brief but "brilliant" career -- we mean "red hot" -- demands a matter-of-fact sketch, as well as a beautifully written obituary....We regard it as the same old snake warmed into life, with a fearfully apparent decline of vitality, and a softening of the brain. It was born with the town of Junction City, when ruffians ruled, and was called the Junction City Sentinel. The Sentinel was edited by a variety of chaps, principally by Ben H. Keyser, and was strong and vigorous, but mechanically was a daub. It gave way to the Junction City Statesman, which was edited by one Herbert, during whose reign it was in its prime, who cut and slashed with vigor and sharpness. It was then changed to the Kansas Statesman by young Sam Medary, who was about as little like the old man as hotel coffee is like coffee. It didn't amount to anything under his management, and the very first frost it crawled into its hole. The material passed into Republican hands and for three years was used in publishing The Union. The Democracy secured other material in 1861 and resumed publication under the name of the Frontier, which was under charge of H. T. Geery, another weak sister. It passed into the hands of George E. Dummer, who was a brick, slightly crazy, never believed what he said, but could write like thunder. He made it "red hot," so much so that in March 1862 Company F, 6th Kansas, and Company C, 8th Kansas, came over from Riley and demolished it. Old Sturges was in command of the district and an inquisition was appointed similar to the one we are now enjoying, but not a "damned Radical" could be caught, and the thing fizzled. In the fall of 1861, The Union was started by George W. Kingsbury, who had a finger, in some way or other, in all the rest of them except the Frontier, but it (The Union) in a few months passed into its present hands. A "great reaction" came along and the prospects of "Seymou' and Bla' " seemed to justify the Democracy in bringing it out again. After a terrible time, it appeared as the Junction City Avalanche. A threatening title but, considering the weakness of the slide it made, exceedingly ludicrous. It lived about three months....It had no brains, no merit as a newspaper, no life, no snap, but was a fair sample of the double distilled essence of stupidity....We understand its proprietors are out about $35 per week during its short career....In conclusion, dear dying Democrats and sinners, The Union will be continued at the rate of $2.50 per annum.

 

*...We have been prevented from noticing two impor ...
March 13, 1869, Junction City Union (ID 880)

*...We have been prevented from noticing two important events in newspaper circles. The consolidation of the Lawrence Journal, the Lawrence Republican, and the Ottawa Home Journal into one grand daily called the Lawrence Republican Daily Journal, and as a weekly under the name of the Western Home Journal, was effected about the 4th of March. The trio in charge consists of Reynolds, Thacher and Kalloch, which certainly forms a monster of brains, newspaper ability and influence....Both the Journal and Republican for some time past have had the appearance of being on their last pegs financially -- this consolidation gives one well fed, healthy, vigorous looking newspaper.

 

The telegraph announces that on Tuesday, the 6th, ...
April 10, 1869, Junction City Union (ID 884)

The telegraph announces that on Tuesday, the 6th, the President (Grant) sent into the Senate the name of George W. Martin, editor of this paper, as register of the land office at this place....

 

Our appointment as register of the land office was ...
April 24, 1869, Junction City Union (ID 885)

Our appointment as register of the land office was confirmed by the Senate on Friday of last week....

 

The first number of the Kansas Daily Commonwealth ...
May 8, 1869, Junction City Union (ID 889)

The first number of the Kansas Daily Commonwealth has been received. It is published at Topeka by Prouty & Davis. It is a splendid specimen of typography, filled with interesting reading matter....

 

We notice some of the papers of the eastern portio ...
May 15, 1869, Junction City Union (ID 890)

We notice some of the papers of the eastern portion of the state have given Senator Ross personal notices upon his return home, but in all cases they started out by apologizing for his course on impeachment....We are not afraid to say that we have always found Ed Ross to be a gentleman, without prefacing the remark with an apology for some political difference....

 

Senator Ross visited Junction City last Tuesday an ...
May 22, 1869, Junction City Union (ID 892)

Senator Ross visited Junction City last Tuesday and received calls from a number of our citizens. Since his election to the Senate, Mr. Ross has been especially active to advance the interests of this section of the state....In early days, the Senator represented this neighborhood in the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention which framed our present constitution, having beaten his Democratic competitor, Captain McClure, very handsomely. He was then a resident of Wabaunsee county....

The Topeka Daily Record has arisen from the ashes, appearing as bright as a new dollar....While at Topeka a few days ago, we were pleased to meet the new proprietors who have become associated with Mr. Baker in its publication. Captain Henry King, formerly of the Quincy (Ill.) Whig, assumes the position of political or managing editor, and Maj. A. W. Edwards, late of the Carlinville (Ill.) Democrat, takes charge of the local and commercial departments, while Mr. Baker retains control of the business affairs....We would mention that new men have now a monopoly of the Topeka press. Mr. Prouty has associated with him in the publication of the Commonwealth J. B. Davis, late of New York, whom we also met for the first time....The Commonwealth and Record offices are each supplied with new material throughout....

 

The Topeka Commonwealth inaugurates a new era in e ...
May 29, 1869, Junction City Union (ID 893)

The Topeka Commonwealth inaugurates a new era in eastern Kansas journalism. It actually devotes almost a column to the singular subject of "Western Kansas."...Lawrence and Topeka runners for southern Kansas lie so infernally concerning the western portion of the state that the Commonwealth, in attempting to counteract them, has assumed quite a task....

...One day last week the entire contents of the Champion & Press office (at Atchison), including the presses, type, a large stock of printing paper, &c., were destroyed. Not a thing in the office, except the inside pages of the daily and three pair of cases, were saved. The editor's private library, including quite a large collection of books, was burned. The smoke, in 10 minutes after the alarm was given, was so dense and stifling that any ingress into the upper story was impossible....The building occupied by the post office and Champion & Press office was owned by John A. Martin and valued at $7,000. It was insured for $5,500....The Champion & Press office with its stock of paper was inventoried at over $9,000, and was insured for $5,500....Colonel Martin started east the next morning for a new stock.

 

The "Times and Conservative" corrects the list of ...
June 19, 1869, Junction City Union (ID 896)

The "Times and Conservative" corrects the list of Kansas papers as given in the "American Newspaper Directory," and adds some sensible comments: "But those who have given their attention to the business and who deserve success have invariably succeeded. Men who have attended to their papers and knew what a newspaper was -- men like Speer, Thacher, the two Martins, Miller, Baker, Taylor, Stotler, Prouty, Murdock, Elliott, Roberts and others, including several in this city -- have not whined about want of support, although our state is newly and sparsely settled and the rivalry has at times been very great and unnecessarily bitter and personal. We have all worked more for politicians, made more for them than we have for ourselves. If we read our exchanges right, that day is over. So far as mere making money is concerned, there is not one of the men we have mentioned who would not have been richer had he gone to farming, opened almost any kind of a store, or worked at a trade and invested his money in Kansas lands or city lots. And what has been true of the last 12 years will be true of the next 12. Still we scribble."

 

Fire Among the Printers. The devouring element see ...
July 3, 1869, Junction City Union (ID 898)

Fire Among the Printers. The devouring element seems to have an especial spite against printing offices. No less than $30,000 worth of type and printing material have been burned within the past two months, not far from us. First, the Topeka Record was totally destroyed, then the Atchison Champion office, and the last destruction is that of the Kansas City Bulletin, which was destroyed Monday night last. About 10 o'clock Monday night a fire broke out in a grocery store in Kansas City, occasioned by the explosion of a coal oil lamp....The interior of this house was soon on fire....The roof was immediately blown off by some explosive material in the house, supposed to be a barrel of coal oil, and the flames spread with great rapidity to Ham's saloon,...from thence to John Kelley's picture gallery; thence to Mrs. Fredenburg's millinery establishment;...the flames then caught in the cornice and windows of Dr. Taylor's building, the third story of which was occupied by the office of the Evening Bulletin, and soon this story was on fire in every part. Type, presses, paper, ink and material of all kinds were consumed before the fire could be arrested. The Bulletin's loss is from $7,000 to $11,000....

 

The partnership heretofore existing between George ...
December 18, 1869, Junction City Union (ID 915)

The partnership heretofore existing between George W. Martin and John W. Delaney, as connected with the printing and publishing The Junction City Union, is this day dissolved by mutual consent. The paper will hereafter be printed under the sole direction of George W. Martin.

We dislike to miss an issue, but the condition of our office suggests that we take advantage of the holidays to clean up. For two years past we have occupied a portion of an unfinished block, and the exposure has destroyed about half the plastering. The entire building now being closed in and completed, we will have plasterers occupy the room next week in order that we may begin the New Year bright and clean.

 

...We have very little interest now in the result ...
January 15, 1870, Junction City Union (ID 920)

...We have very little interest now in the result of impeachment. At the time, we honestly thought Johnson deserved something and that those Republicans who saved him were engaged in very dirty business, and hence we are not surprised that today they are hunting certificates about the matter....Dispatches announce that Senator Ross has commenced libel suits against the New York Tribune, the Ohio State Journal and the Lawrence Tribune for asserting that money influenced his vote....

We have received the Emporia News enlarged to nine columns. W. W. Williams has become a partner in its publication. It is a splendid looking sheet but, comparing its dimensions with the size of the town, it looks very much like running a newspaper for glory. However, we find that those men who find glory in the business succeed. Had we the "scads" to indulge in a Taylor press, we would be tempted to follow suit....

 

Topeka, Jan. 17 -- The Editor's and Publisher's As ...
January 22, 1870, Junction City Union (ID 921)

Topeka, Jan. 17 -- The Editor's and Publisher's Association of Kansas convened at Union Hall at 7 p.m. Jacob Stotler, president, called the association to order....S. S. Prouty, treasurer, reported that there were $18 in the treasury....On motion, the officers of the preceding year were re-elected for the ensuing year. The officers are: President, Jacob Stotler; vice-presidents, M. M. Murdock, John A. Martin, Geo. W. Martin and G. A. Prescott; secretary, S. D. McDonald; treasurer, S. S. Prouty. On motion, Ward Burlingame was elected to deliver the next annual address, and Henry King was selected as the alternate. R. B. Taylor then read a portion of an annual address, which was a history of the press of Kansas. It was found to be too lengthy to admit of the reading of the whole....Second Day. At an adjourned meeting...at the Governor's room in the state capitol, Jan. 18, 1870, at 9 a.m. the meeting organized, in the absence of the president, by calling Senator Murdock to the chair. After considerable discussion the following resolution, offered by D. W. Wilder, of the Times and Conservative, was unanimously adopted: "Resolved, that Jacob Stotler, M. M. Murdock and Geo. C. Crowther be requested to ask the Legislature to obtain from the widow of Thomas H. Webb of Boston the newspaper files and scrapbooks containing the most complete record now in existence of the early history of Kansas." Mr. Taylor offered the following resolution: "Resolved, that the editors of the Kansas press be requested to publish newspaper histories of the counties in which they are published in order to aid in the work of completing a history of the press of state." The resolution was adopted....After the business meeting of Monday night, the association adjourned to Germania Hall where a banquet was given by the printers, binders, publishers and editors of Topeka....The following toasts were read and responded to: 1. Benjamin Franklin; response by D. W. Wilder. 2. The state of Kansas; response by Gov. J. M. Harvey. 3. The press of the state; response by I. S. Kalloch. 4. Exemplars of the art preservative; response by F. B. Colver. 5. The newspapers of the capital; response by Maj. J. B. Davis. 6. The Legislature; response by Lieut. Gov. Eskridge. 7. The ladies; response by S. A. Kingman. 8. The tramping jour; response by W. C. Webb....After supper came the ball at Union Hall....

 

Patience. For a month past our office has been cro ...
May 7, 1870, Junction City Union (ID 928)

Patience. For a month past our office has been crowded with work to such an extent as to be as annoying to us as the delay is to our patrons. We respectfully ask all to "grin and bear" it for a few weeks longer, about which time we will be able to accommodate....Last Monday we ordered a Taylor power press, and an additional Gordon jobber. As this machinery will cost $2,000, it would be exceedingly pleasant to us if the five or six hundred subscribers who owe us one, two or three years subscription each would come and see us....We have engaged the lower room of the building we occupy, and in a few weeks...we will be able to do more work and break fewer promises.

 

We have received the first number of Buckingham's ...
June 11, 1870, Junction City Union (ID 934)

We have received the first number of Buckingham's new paper at Clyde. It is a handsome six column paper called The Empire....

The Union office has increased some in dimensions. We have taken possession of the first floor of the building, where the job portion of our establishment can be found. After writing able editorials for years on other people's sidewalks, we suddenly took a notion during the past week to embellish our own front with one, so that now that mud puddle is spanned with an elegant walk....We have cut a stairway leading to the second floor. We have received our new jobber, and we are expecting our Taylor every day....Now that our sidewalk is done, come and see us.

 

We have before us a copy of the Southern Kansas Ad ...
June 25, 1870, Junction City Union (ID 936)

We have before us a copy of the Southern Kansas Advocate, published at Leroy, Coffey county, by C. L. Goodrich & Co....Along the line of the MK&T Railway, built within the past year, we find eight newspapers already established.

 

The Leavenworth Times comes to us again bearing th ...
July 9, 1870, Junction City Union (ID 939)

The Leavenworth Times comes to us again bearing the title which it was first known in the early days of our history. It has put on a new dress but resumed its old name by striking out the word "conservative." In the days that tried men's souls, when Kansas, then a territory, through a fierce revolution was making her way to the stars, that word conservative was a mere mockery. In those dark hours, the Times was bold, fearless, outspoken, sacrificing everything in defense of those grand principles which it triumphantly vindicates today. In time, the Conservative was born. Its policy was not, however, conservative, but uncompromisingly radical. It was under the management of D. W. Wilder, who steered its course during the long years when the life of the nation trembled in the balance. It promulgated doctrines of truth and right, freedom and emancipation....When the great struggle was over these journals consolidated....On the first of July it was issued, and will hereafter be known, as the Times. It retains its position among the leading papers in the state and under the management of Wilder & Sleeper shows all its ancient vigor and life.

 

"The Junction City Union has added to its establis ...
September 10, 1870, Junction City Union (ID 948)

"The Junction City Union has added to its establishment a new Taylor power press, and the last number also comes to us in a new typographical dress. With these improvements, the Union ranks with the best of its contemporaries in appearance, while in point of ability and influence it has always occupied a place in the front rank...." -- Topeka Commonwealth.

 

We have received the first number of the Council G ...
October 29, 1870, Junction City Union (ID 964)

We have received the first number of the Council Grove Democrat, published by S. M. Hays and edited by E. S. Bertram and Isaac Sharp....We have received two or three numbers of the Democratic Standard, a weekly published at Lawrence....We like to note this increase of decent Democratic papers, because they add variety to our reading matter, and afford us some relief from the dirty scandals which make up the literature of the majority of the Republican papers of the state....

 

Our friend Stotler of the Emporia News has run aga ...
December 10, 1870, Junction City Union (ID 972)

Our friend Stotler of the Emporia News has run against a serious snag in his daily enterprise. He paid the usual heavy bonus to become a member of the Missouri and Kansas Press Association in order to obtain the dispatches. As a member of that monopoly, his tax for telegraph would be $16.50 per week but, just as he was ready to commence operations as a morning paper, the telegraph company notified him that he could have the dispatches for $25 per week. Jake is going to see what virtue there is in a contract....

 

The Manhattan Standard has given way to The Nation ...
December 24, 1870, Junction City Union (ID 977)

The Manhattan Standard has given way to The Nationalist, which is the result of a sale by Elliott to Albert Griffen....The Leavenworth Times has changed its managers somewhat. D. W. Wilder has left the Times and assumed charge of the Fort Scott Monitor, while Mr. Lowman has secured assistance in the person of the Rev. Mr. Sharman of Lawrence.....

 

At a meeting of the Editors and Publishers' Associ ...
January 21, 1871, Junction City Union (ID 987)

At a meeting of the Editors and Publishers' Association at Topeka last Wednesday, M. W. Reynolds of the Lawrence Journal was elected president for the ensuing term. The annual address was delivered by Ward Burlingame of the Commonwealth. Capt. King of the Record was chosen to deliver the next annual address, with Geo. A. Crawford as alternate.

 

Captain Henry King has retired from the Topeka Rec ...
February 18, 1871, Junction City Union (ID 998)

Captain Henry King has retired from the Topeka Record....During Captain King's management of the Record it was one of the very best papers in the West.

The Topeka Commonwealth contains the well-written val of our friend Ward Burlingame. Mr. Burlingame...accepts the position of private secretary to Senator Caldwell.

We have received the first and second numbers of the Minneapolis (Ottawa county) Independent, published by J. E. Wharton. The material is all new and, after the vexations of gathering a printing office together so far out upon the border, the paper appears as fresh as springtime.

 

The Ottawa Journal, noticing the desire of the pro ...
February 25, 1871, Junction City Union (ID 1002)

The Ottawa Journal, noticing the desire of the proprietor of the Neosho Falls Advertiser to sell his paper, makes some very sensible...remarks upon the conduct of the newspaper business generally...."So it goes. Every now and then one of the laity...beget an inordinate itching to run a newspaper; and not only that, but believes it is easy to do it. A few struggles, and all the ardor and ambition thrown into the enterprise vanishes in thin air. When will the people learn that it takes more energy, persistence, hard work and brain to run a newspaper than it does to run a saw mill? And when will they learn that none but the men who have the business bred in their bones can publish a newspaper successfully, and at the same time enjoy their calling? Nobody but an artist can paint; anybody can daub. So it is in the newspaper world....With the fast-approaching end of the wild, chaotic and speculative era here in the West, we can see a better day dawning and a higher state of excellence for the newspaper press. And let it come."

Lawrence Journal: "It is singular that in this business, of all others, there are so many 'fools to rush in where angels fear to tread.' There is no business that requires so much tact, judgment, skill and business capacity as this profession. And yet there is none which the outside world thinks can be so easily conducted."

Atchison Champion: "It is gratifying to our state pride, and we like to boast of the fact that about 90 papers are published in Kansas, or one for almost every 4,000 of our entire population. But the truth is that the newspaper business in Kansas is overdone to an extent unparalleled in any other country on earth. Of the 90 papers published in our state, at least half of them are printed at a dead loss to their publishers. They are kept alive only by pecuniary aid extended to them by the embryo city or ambitious town from which they hail, and to whose building up, if well edited, they contribute more than all other means or forces combined. If they are not well edited, they speedily die out or change proprietors and take a fresh start....Too many men are disposed to try their luck as editors, when there is not, never was, and never will be any luck in it. All the success that any journalist in this country has every won has been attained by the hardest, most constant, and untiring work, added to a natural fitness and capacity for editorial life and duties....There are too many papers in Kansas for the good of the proprietors, and it is not wonderful, therefore, that during the hard winter now drawing to a close we should have heard of numerous journals dying....By and by we shall get 'down to hard pan,' and then there will be an awful mortality among the journalistic consumptives. The whole brood of them will die out. Consolidation will absorb some; the dealers in old type metal and iron will take in the rest. And then the newspaper business, as all other business enterprises in Kansas, will be conducted upon the legitimate basis of supply and demand...."

 

On the 1st of April, the Times and Bulletin of Lea ...
April 8, 1871, Junction City Union (ID 1018)

On the 1st of April, the Times and Bulletin of Leavenworth consolidated and are now known as the Times & Bulletin, and Mr. Burke of the Bulletin is editor of the consolidated concern. This is sense. We never heard of a place where rival interests contributed so much toward weakening newspapers as in Leavenworth....Champion Vaughn, one of Kansas' early heroes, is prominently connected editorially with the new paper....

The Lawrence Journal has also undergone a change. T. Dwight Thacher has assumed entire charge of the paper and Kalloch retires. It seems that M. W. Reynolds retired from the institution some time ago but Mr. Thacher hopes to retain him. Thacher is equal to any emergency, consequently the Journal will continue to thrive.

It is some satisfaction to know that Kalloch proposes to return to the ranks at an early day, having in view the establishment of a "broad-gauge, broad-brained, independent, non-political, elegantly printed paper for the home, the farm, and the fireside." Kalloch can do it. His Ottawa Home Journal was a gem.

 

G. W. Brown, who published the Herald of Freedom a ...
July 5, 1879, Junction City Union (ID 1834)

G. W. Brown, who published the Herald of Freedom at Lawrence from 1854 to 1858, is now practicing medicine at Rockford, Ill.

 

The Wa-Keeney Kansas Leader is the name of a paper ...
August 16, 1879, Junction City Union (ID 1847)

The Wa-Keeney Kansas Leader is the name of a paper just started at the wonderful town of Wa-Keeney, Trego County, by H. P. Stultz....This new town now has two good papers, all printed at home.

Ex-Senator Ross was in Junction City...soliciting subscribers for his paper, the Lawrence Standard. The Standard is the best simon-pure democratic paper published in the West. The weekly is distinctly a political sheet. It is devoted exclusively to politics and the expounding of democratic principles. Major Ross is the oldest editor in Kansas and has had a checkered experience, politically and personally. He is now in the best of spirits and sees daylight ahead. While here, in company with Captain McClure, Judge Humphrey and a reporter of The Union, he visited Fort Riley, a post which he commanded at one time, and paid his respects to General Pennypacker.

 

The Wa-Keeney World office has purchased a Prouty ...
August 23, 1879, Junction City Union (ID 1850)

The Wa-Keeney World office has purchased a Prouty power printing press.

F. B. McGill, editor of the Oswego Independent, died last Tuesday of consumption.

 

The Republican Citizen of Paola has adopted the qu ...
August 30, 1879, Junction City Union (ID 1852)

The Republican Citizen of Paola has adopted the quarto form and now has eight pages, seven columns to the page. Leslie J. Perry, founder of the Paola Spirit and one of the very best journalists in the West, has assumed the proprietorship and editorial and business control....

F. B. McGill, editor of the Oswego Independent, died on the 18th, aged a little over 43 years....A few months ago, he went to Colorado in search of health, the seeds of consumption having been planted in his constitution, but was doomed to disappointment....

 

We are in receipt of a copy of the first issue of ...
September 6, 1879, Junction City Union (ID 1855)

We are in receipt of a copy of the first issue of the Wichita Beacon, dated September 1st....It will publish the afternoon dispatches of the Associated Press. Wichita will doubtless support a daily paper....

The Ottawa Gazette is now edited by Joel R. Goodin,...well and favorably known in Kansas during its territorial days....The Gazette is democratic and so is Joel, but that does not prevent us from liking the paper for its venerable witty, able and companionable editor. He slings ink as vigorously now as he did 22 years ago when, in the old Kansas Leader at Centropolis, he occasionally paid his respects to 'Inton and S'prouty....

Frank Prouty, son of Col. S. S. Prouty, founder of the Commonwealth and formerly editor of the Patriot, attended the big camp meeting at Humboldt....Frank...is at present devil on The Union office at Junction, a first-rate printer and a No. 1 good boy. -- Burlington Patriot.

A number of editors met at Humboldt on the 28th and affected an organization to be known as the Southeastern Kansas Editorial Association. The district comprises 15 counties. W. T. McElroy, editor of the Humboldt Union, was elected president; Leroy Armstrong, secretary; J. R. Lamb, treasurer. Burlington was selected for the place of the next meeting to be held the 19th of November.

 

The publication of the Daily Beacon of Wichita has ...
September 13, 1879, Junction City Union (ID 1859)

The publication of the Daily Beacon of Wichita has been suspended for the present, owning to the fact that it is not able to get dispatches early enough in the afternoon.

 

The power press and printing material of the Salin ...
September 27, 1879, Junction City Union (ID 1865)

The power press and printing material of the Salina Democrat have been sold at constable's sale. The press was purchased by the proprietors of the Abilene Gazette and the type and other material were sold to the Sampsons of the Salina Journal.

 

The editor of the Belleville Telescope has been ar ...
October 4, 1879, Junction City Union (ID 1872)

The editor of the Belleville Telescope has been arrested on a charge of libel, sued out by A. B. Wilder of the Scandia Journal....

 

The Beloit Gazette is now published by Brewster Ca ...
October 11, 1879, Junction City Union (ID 1876)

The Beloit Gazette is now published by Brewster Cameron and edited by John Coulter....Coulter is a "natural-born" journalist, having inherited his excellent newspaper talents from his deceased father....Many years ago, the senior Coulter edited and published the Bellville (Ill.) Advocate, one of the leading journals of southern Illinois....

W. B. Taylor has sold the Wyandotte Gazette to Armstrong and Meyer. They will continue it as a Republican paper. Mr. Taylor goes into the practice of law.

 

Leslie J. Perry, editor of the Paola Citizen, was ...
October 25, 1879, Junction City Union (ID 1884)

Leslie J. Perry, editor of the Paola Citizen, was held as a prisoner of war 20 months during the rebellion and during that time was an occupant of nearly every military prison in the Confederacy -- at Richmond, Charleston, Salisbury, Tuscaloosa, Ala., Florence, S.C., and Andersonville, Ga. He had a wide experience in these hells upon earth and was lucky to escape with his life. Over 60,000 Union soldiers died in these Southern prison pens.

 

The Lantern is the name of a greenback paper of th ...
November 15, 1879, Junction City Union (ID 1889)

The Lantern is the name of a greenback paper of the unalloyed stamp, published weekly at Lawrence by Judge L. D. Bailey. It is small but pungent and aggressive.

 

F. G. Prouty represented The Union at a meeting of ...
November 22, 1879, Junction City Union (ID 1893)

F. G. Prouty represented The Union at a meeting of the Neosho Valley Press Association held at Burlington Tuesday and Wednesday of this week....

 

We are in receipt of No. 1, Vol. 1, of the Brookvi ...
December 6, 1879, Junction City Union (ID 1902)

We are in receipt of No. 1, Vol. 1, of the Brookville Independent, a paper just started at Brookville by Albin & Tupper.

 

Wirt W. Walton, assistant state superintendent of ...
December 13, 1879, Junction City Union (ID 1907)

Wirt W. Walton, assistant state superintendent of public instruction, has purchased a half interest in the Clay Center Dispatch and will assume editorial and business control...the first of next month. Mr. Campbell, the present proprietor and editor, and who will still retain a half interest, will hereafter devote himself to the banking business, he having made enough money out of the Dispatch to enable him to establish a first-class banking house....

 

Emile Gerber, editor of the Staats-Anzeiger at Top ...
December 27, 1879, Junction City Union (ID 1917)

Emile Gerber, editor of the Staats-Anzeiger at Topeka, committed suicide by blowing out his brains at the Fifth Hotel....Disappointed in love.

 

The Wichita Republican is the name of a paper just ...
January 3, 1880, Junction City Union (ID 1923)

The Wichita Republican is the name of a paper just started at Wichita by Kickpatrick & Kirk.

 

W. W. Embry was shot and instantly killed by his p ...
January 10, 1880, Junction City Union (ID 1927)

W. W. Embry was shot and instantly killed by his partner, Thomas C. Thurston, in a Leavenworth saloon on New Year's Day. Embry was the man who shot D. R. Anthony nearly five years ago. Embry and Thurston were partners in the publication of the Leavenworth Sunday Herald, and they quarreled about a woman.

 

The large stone building at Cherryvale, occupied b ...
January 31, 1880, Junction City Union (ID 1941)

The large stone building at Cherryvale, occupied below by D. Frank as a furniture store, and above by the Globe printing office and sleeping apartments, was destroyed by fire on Wednesday night of last week. Six men were sleeping upstairs, three of whom escaped by jumping from the windows a distance of 18 feet, sustaining severe bruises and cuts, but not being dangerously wounded. O. Henderson, foreman of the Globe office, and Wm. McClain, printer, were burned to death.

 

Hudson & Ewing of Topeka, publishers of the Kansas ...
February 7, 1880, Junction City Union (ID 1943)

Hudson & Ewing of Topeka, publishers of the Kansas Farmer, American Young Folks and Daily Capital, have dissolved partnership. The Farmer will hereafter be published by Mr. Ewing, and the other publications will be continued by Mr. Hudson.

 

Hon. E. G. Ross has purchased the Leavenworth Pres ...
February 14, 1880, Junction City Union (ID 1947)

Hon. E. G. Ross has purchased the Leavenworth Press and with that paper will unite the Lawrence Standard. The new paper will be published in Leavenworth. We believe that this will be a good move for Mr. Ross. Leavenworth is a doubtful county, politically, and at times goes democratic. A good democratic paper there, such as Mr. Ross will publish, will receive a good local support, which is essential for the success of any paper in Kansas. Mr. Ross is a vigorous writer and he expounds democratic principles and advocates the cause with ability and dignity. He is favored with a rare stock of hope and his grit is admirable. We hope he will be a success in his new location.

 

The Golden Belt Editors. What they say of their vi ...
April 24, 1880, Junction City Union (ID 1970)

The Golden Belt Editors. What they say of their visit to Junction City --

Solomon Valley Mirror -- ...We found several "weeklies" abroad, and when we arrived found Col. Prouty waiting to welcome us in behalf of Junction City....George W. Martin of Topeka was there and, of course, knew everybody and had a word and a joke for all. Charley Davis was -- everywhere. His pockets were full of bus tickets, hotel tickets, and "reserved seats," livery rigs. etc....

Ottawa County (Minneapolis) Index -- ...The Mirror and the Index were represented from this place. We were met at the depot by Col. Prouty of the Union and Chas. S. Davis of the Tribune....

Woodson County (Neosho Falls) Post -- ...Nearly 30 pencil pushers were present representing all the leading papers along the line of the Kansas Pacific from Topeka to Wa-Keeney, and a few from along the Concordia branch....

 

Greeley Tribune is the name of a paper just starte ...
May 1, 1880, Junction City Union (ID 1973)

Greeley Tribune is the name of a paper just started at Greeley, Anderson County, by George Higgins, formerly of the Olathe Progress....

 

On the main street of Leavenworth last Wednesday a ...
May 29, 1880, Junction City Union (ID 1986)

On the main street of Leavenworth last Wednesday afternoon, T. C. Thurston, who slew his partner Embry on the first of January last, fired two shots from a revolver at Col. D. R. Anthony. Neither hit Anthony, but one struck Lucien Baker, who was standing on the street a distance of 600 feet from the assassin, and the other hit J. C. Douglas on his head, inflicting a painful though not dangerous scalp wound. Baker was shot through the body...and his life is in a critical condition. Thurston was threatened with lynching and probably would have been summarily disposed of had he not been rushed out of the city by the sheriff and placed in jail at Atchison. The singular feature of the tragedy is that Baker was a friend of Thurston and was his attorney when he was on trial for the killing of Embry....

 

The suit for libel brought by F. P. Baker, editor ...
June 5, 1880, Junction City Union (ID 1990)

The suit for libel brought by F. P. Baker, editor of the Topeka Commonwealth, against Dr. M. Munford, editor of the Kansas City Times, which has been in court for about three years, was settled in the Shawnee County court last Monday evening. Col. Wofford, Dr. Munford's attorney, appeared and entered the plea of guilty to the charge and a fine of $50 and costs was assessed, the costs amounting to about $25.

 

By Geo. W. Martin: Rip Van Winkle -- On the 20th o ...
March 22, 1887, Junction City Union (ID 2421)

By Geo. W. Martin

Rip Van Winkle -- On the 20th of October, 1866, The Union appeared as a daily. It expired on the 29th of July 1867. We then paid $20 per week for telegraph dispatches, and $18 and $20 each to three men for putting it in type. There were 1,500 people in the town then, and the last issue of that daily contained 19 column inches of advertising. It had 300 subscribers. We now wake up after 209 years, and find our electrical and typographical appliances combined laid down for a cent an inch, bases thrown in....

We were offered the editorship of the Leavenworth Conservative, and on condition that we would not accept it was agreed by a number of friends that The Union office should have a power press and other conveniences befitting the boss daily of that day, but it was a flash in the pan, and so on the 29th of July, 1867, we got too tired to live -- we had no plates then to fall back on -- and so the Daily Union expired....

Here we are again. And they say there is no fool like an old fool. But with our able and widespread corps of assistants, whose intellects ready to slap on the press in a jiffy we can command at a cent an inch, we may not have to work so hard, and so we may last longer.

The last number of the issue was 232. So we resume where we left off, and commence with No. 233. The old heading we resurrected from the hell-box and blow new life into it.

But times have changed. We can give the people of Junction City every evening the same dispatches contained in the papers received on the afternoon trains....

Shall we say that we have come to stay? It need not break the back of a town now to maintain a daily. If 1,500 people 20 years ago provided 19 columns of advertising, 4,000 today ought to do as well as we start with in this issue.