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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Kansas Pioneer

Articles in database from Kansas Pioneer:    73

Vol. 1, No. 16. A. B. Hazzard, editor and propriet ...
February 28, 1855, Kansas Pioneer (ID 3082)

Vol. 1, No. 16. A. B. Hazzard, editor and proprietor.

Prospectus of the Kansas Pioneer. ...The undersigned...proposes to publish a weekly newspaper at Kickapoo City, Kansas Territory, to be called the Kansas Pioneer, devoted to agriculture, science, the mechanic arts, commercial interests, and the great principles of the Democracy of the Union....We tender...our heartfelt acknowledgments for the liberal support we have heretofore received...from the merchants, artisans and mechanics of St. Louis, Mo., and Jacksonville, Fla....We shall advocate the construction of the Great Central Railroad to the Pacific,...and shall strenuously oppose the principles of Abolitionism in Kansas....Kickapoo City is situated on a high and beautiful elevation on the Missouri, in Kansas Territory, nine miles above Fort Leavenworth by water,...being three miles above the city of Weston, Mo....The Pioneer is published on a medium sheet of fine paper, neatly printed with new type, for Two Dollars per annum, invariably in advance....Feb. 21, 1855, A. B. Hazzard, editor and proprietor.

Clubs. We are under obligations to the kind friends who have interested themselves in getting up a Club of subscribers for the Pioneer at Round Prairie, on Stranger Creek....We shall be pleased to have other friends work for us in other settlements. A Club might, with a little effort, be made up in every settlement in the Territory. Post offices will soon be established at different points, and the people will easily get their papers....Our circulation is daily increasing, and we want to keep it on the increase until we shall scatter five thousand copies weekly among the squatter sovereigns of this territory....There is now a post office at Kickapoo City, and the Pioneer can be forwarded to Clubs by persons coming in to get their letters.

We are authorized to announce A. B. Hazzard, Esq., of Kickapoo City as a candidate for the House of Delegates in Kansas Territory at the ensuing election.

 

Vol. 1, No. 48: Great Triumph! Kickapoo City the C ...
October 10, 1855, Kansas Pioneer (ID 3128)

Vol. 1, No. 48

Great Triumph! Kickapoo City the County Seat of Leavenworth. On Monday last, the friends of Kickapoo turned out in their strength and polled the largest vote ever before cast at an election in the old Fifteenth. Too much praise cannot be bestowed upon our citizens, who voted and worked like men....Kickapoo with her EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY-TWO VOTERS were at work, and nobly have they acquitted themselves....The roaring of cannons and the sweet sounds of the Weston Brass Band could only be heard at intervals when the shouts of "Hurrah for Kickapoo" would gradually cease....Even while writing this article (Tuesday night) cannons are being fired....At 2 o'clock the immense crowd was invited to "pitch in" and they did ample justice to the bountiful spread before them....The ball came off at 7 o'clock at Wm. H. Elliott's large store room, which was attended by hundreds....The following is the correct vote for Kickapoo, and as near as we can ascertain for the other places: Kickapoo City 892, Delaware 860, Leavenworth City 752, Centerville 60.

Southern Emigration to Kansas. At a public meeting recently held in Griffin, Ga., resolutions were passed calling upon the people of Slaveholding States to adopt such measures as would encourage Southern emigration to Kansas, and, in the words of the resolution, counteract, by the formation of Southern Aid Societies, "the aggressive measures of Northern Abolitionism." The Griffin Empire State says that Colonel Augustus Cargile of Kansas is working vigorously in the cause, it is this gentleman's desire to make up, if possible, a company of one thousand emigrants to go with him this fall to Kansas. It may be all right, but we would like to know who Colonel Augustus Cargile of Kansas is. Who knows?

Excitement About Kansas. There is, at this time, and there has been almost ever since this Territory was annexed to the Union, a great deal of unnecessary excitement abroad in regard to its settlement....that the elections are carried "at the point of the Bowie knife and the revolver;" when, in fact, our elections are conducted as peaceably and amicably as in any section of the Union. Pro-slavery men have been called ruffians, cut-throats, and by every other name that could be thought of except gentlemen, for the sole and only purpose of getting up as much sympathy as possible in the free-soil and abolition ranks of the North and East, for the purpose of having this Territory flooded with migration from those latitudes, and the uninitiated are thus deceived by their corrupt, falsifying and fanatical leaders....But it is to be hoped that the people have too much intelligence to be duped by these loud-sounding, gassy, and lying tricksters. If you are doing well (Free State men) at home, remain there, and be satisfied that you cannot do better here....

 

This week we present the Pioneer to its many patro ...
July 27, 1878, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1725)

This week we present the Pioneer to its many patrons in a complete new dress and enlarged form. This has cost us considerable money, but we feel that our efforts and endeavors will be appreciated. We propose to devote the Pioneer, in the future, as we have in the past, to the best interests of Smith County in particular, Kansas in general, its patrons always, and the financial interests of its publisher between times. It will still be a faithful exponent of the vast resources and agricultural advantages of Smith, the banner county of the state. The Pioneer will make a specialty of immigration matters, and especially recommends itself to eastern emigrants who desire reliable information concerning Kansas....No "chromos" are offered with the Pioneer to secure your patronage. We want you to take the Pioneer because it deserves patronage, and shall expect you to pay for it....

A. C. Estill and W. Scott Elliott, with the aid of ye editor, constitute the mechanical force of the Pioneer. Mr. Estill, our foreman, is conceded to be the best job and newspaper printer in Kansas....Mr. Elliott has been with the Pioneer for three consecutive years, and a better boy, and more faithful, diligent and careful workman than Scott never "sot a type."

 

F. E. Jerome is now employed on the Pioneer force. ...
August 3, 1878, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1727)

F. E. Jerome is now employed on the Pioneer force. Mr. Jerome is a first-class job and newspaper printer, and is conceded to be the most rapid compositor in the West.

Frank M. Jenkins of Fairbury, Neb., brother of ye editor, is out on a visit. Frank has traveled over the Western states from Kansas to California and Mexico.

E. F. Robinson of the Kirwin Progress said his "farewell" last week....John J. McClimont will take charge of the machine and swing a Democratic sheet to the breeze next week.

Prof. F. E. Jerome of the Pioneer force has the best collection of rare minerals, fossils, petrifications, &c, of any man in the West....

 

An individual in Pawnee Township, who is a candida ...
August 10, 1878, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1729)

An individual in Pawnee Township, who is a candidate for probate judge, and whose first name is Ora Jones, very industriously circulated the report in that township that W. W. Guthrie furnished the money that bought the new material for the Pioneer....Mr. Guthrie never furnished one cent towards the Pioneer. It is true that we borrowed some money to make out the $1,250 necessary to put in the new material, but not one cent of the amount was borrowed from Mr. Guthrie or any other political aspirant. Mortgages on file in the register of deeds' office in this place, in favor of Smith Bros. & Thompson, bankers, at Red Cloud, and Schneidenwand & Lee of Chicago will explain more fully who and how and on what conditions we secured loans....We propose to run the Pioneer for the next 25 years and not make one cent rather than "sell out" to professional politicians and accumulate a fortune by publishing misrepresentations....

 

The Pioneer ward is one ahead....F. E. Jerome of t ...
August 31, 1878, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1732)

The Pioneer ward is one ahead....F. E. Jerome of the Pioneer force is the happy daddy of a ten-pound girl.

 

The Pioneer has a telephone, running from the offi ...
September 14, 1878, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1736)

The Pioneer has a telephone, running from the office to the Kansas Central Hotel.

 

Alex McDonald, recent foreman of the Monitor-Diamo ...
October 4, 1878, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1740)

Alex McDonald, recent foreman of the Monitor-Diamond, spent a couple of days in town. He was on his way to Kirwin to take charge of the mechanical department of the Democrat.

 

The Phillips County Herald has passed into the han ...
October 25, 1878, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1741)

The Phillips County Herald has passed into the hands of Geo. W. Stinson.

 

The Pioneer is negotiating for a steam-power cylin ...
November 1, 1878, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1744)

The Pioneer is negotiating for a steam-power cylinder press. Fifty quires per week is too much for the old hand press.

 

E. V. Durfee,...who has worked for some time in th ...
November 8, 1878, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1745)

E. V. Durfee,...who has worked for some time in this office, has accepted a position on the Smith County Pioneer. -- Beloit Record.

 

W. H. Nelson, our esteemed young friend...,has bee ...
November 15, 1878, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1746)

W. H. Nelson, our esteemed young friend...,has been commissioned by Gov. Anthony to fill the unexpired term of the probate judge office, made vacant by the death of Judge J. C. Harlan.

 

Geo. A. Jenkins of Fairbury, Neb., a brother of Bi ...
November 29, 1878, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1749)

Geo. A. Jenkins of Fairbury, Neb., a brother of Billy's, is now a lightning compositor on the Pioneer.

 

Mark J. Kelley of the Beloit Record offended the d ...
December 13, 1878, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1754)

Mark J. Kelley of the Beloit Record offended the dignity of Geo. W. Anderson of the Gazette and now Anderson proposes to charge Kelley several thousand dollars for it. In other words, he had Kelley arrested for libel.

There will be a hard fight made against Geo. W. Martin for state printer this winter....Mr. Martin is now serving his third term, has done good work for the state, and has done it well.

The Riverton Eagle -- E. V. Durfee and Scott W. Elliott bid farewell to the Pioneer this week and have gone to Riverton, Neb., to establish a paper...to be called the Riverton Eagle....W. Scott Elliott has been foreman of the Pioneer office for the past three years and has proven himself worthy of our confidence....E. V. Durfee has been with us since last October and we can vouch for him as a thorough, practical printer, a man of good judgment, a careful business manager, a good writer....

 

The Riverton Eagle flew across the divide and alig ...
January 10, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1767)

The Riverton Eagle flew across the divide and alighted on our exchange table. Vol. 1, No. 1, bearing the date of January 3rd is a six-column, four-page, all home print, neat in appearance....Durfee & Elliott, the young enterprising publishers.

 

We have no apologies to make for this half sheet p ...
January 17, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1768)

We have no apologies to make for this half sheet publication this week....Our paper failed to arrive....We can hear nothing of the order sent out from this office on the 3rd last to Omaha for a half ton of paper. We are experiencing the inconveniences consequent on being isolated away from railroad and telegraphic communication....

 

James A. Scarbrough of Jewell City, the veteran Fa ...
January 31, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1772)

James A. Scarbrough of Jewell City, the veteran Faber shover of the West, has been secured to assist in the editorial management of the Pioneer. For five years, we have remained faithfully at the helm, doing all the editorial, local, scissoring, managing, and assisting on the composition and press work....In the meantime,...we have built up a lucrative loan and real estate business and, realizing the fact that we are not able, either physically or mentally, to do justice to, or make a success of, both branches of business, we are compelled through a sense of duty to ourselves and patrons to "call in help."...

...Our esteemed and talented young friend, Tom Stivers, for eight years the brilliant local of the Atchison Champion, has at last gone into business for himself. He has bought out Vandegrift and Beal of the Atchison Patriot, and is now a full partner with H. Clay Park in the publication of that sterling Democratic paper....

-----

 

State Printer -- ...As we predicted, Geo. W. Marti ...
February 7, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1774)

State Printer -- ...As we predicted, Geo. W. Martin was re-elected by a handsome majority on the first ballot. His principal opponents were Sam Dodsworth of Leavenworth and F. P. Baker of the Commonwealth.

We have repeated offers from foreign nurseries to advertise for them and take our pay in nursery stock....It takes money to buy material and to pay "help" and, until we can induce them to take their pay in fruit trees, we don't want any of that kind of pay for advertising.

 

The Marysville News publishes the figures to show ...
February 14, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1777)

The Marysville News publishes the figures to show that it has a circulation of 1,092 in Marshall County. -- Champion. The Pioneer has an actual circulation of 840 in Smith County, and 240 outside, making 1,080 in all, and yet we never thought of making any fuss about it.

 

Our "big brother," O. M. Jenkins, came over from O ...
February 28, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1781)

Our "big brother," O. M. Jenkins, came over from Osborne City last Tuesday.... "Cella" is now engaged with H. D. Pratt of Osborne City, who is putting in a water mill at that point....

 

We are in receipt of a new paper just started at F ...
March 7, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1783)

We are in receipt of a new paper just started at Fort Scott called the Republican Record, S. A. Day, editor and proprietor....In its editor we think we recognize an old friend, Judge S. A. Day, formerly an able member of the Legislature from old Bourbon....

The Chronoscope is the rather peculiar name of an ably edited and handsomely printed paper at Larned. Col. Henry Inman, formerly of the regular army but more recently of the Ellsworth Reporter, is the gifted editor and enterprising proprietor. The Chronoscope is an eight-column paper, all printed at home.

The Beloit Courier...is the latest venture in the newspaper line that has come under our notice....Wm. H. Caldwell is editor and proprietor....If anybody can make a third paper pay in Beloit, "Billy" Caldwell can. He is a sound and earnest Republican.

The Clifton Review is the name of a new and spicy six-column paper just started at Clifton by Wellman & Blake. Mr. Wellman will be remembered by our readers as the Rev. W. M. Wellman, formerly of this place, and Mr. Blake will be recognized by many of our patrons as the Rev. Geo. O. Blake, formerly of the Kirwin Progress.

 

The Troy Chief, in noting the demise of the Highla ...
March 14, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1785)

The Troy Chief, in noting the demise of the Highland Sentinel, refers to it as "Number Twenty-Five." Sol says it's a mistaken idea that he has preached the funerals of all the defunct newspapers of Doniphan County; he has only preached the funeral of those that set out to preach his. As far as the Sentinel is concerned, he says there was not much of it to preach over, and if he did wish to preach one, he would have to do as the Sentinel did with its wit -- borrow for the occasion -- and make it brief and to the point. He would simply quote the well known epitaph on a very small baby: "Since I am so quickly done for, I wonder what I was begun for."

Another newspaper baby has been born. Its name is the Wa-Keeney World. Its birthplace is the new town of Wa-Keeney in Trego County, and is the frontier newspaper of Kansas. Its editor and proprietor is W. S. Tilton. It is a neat, newsy little six-column paper and bears the "imprint" of marked ability. It is Republican in politics.

The Atchison Champion was born on the 20th day of February, 1858....Col. John A. Martin and Capt. William S. Moorhouse landed in Atchison on the 18th day of October, 1857, from Brownsville, Penn....Atchison was a fast place in those days and by spring their money was nearly all gone. When Col. Martin took charge of the paper, it was called the Squatter Sovereign. He immediately changed the name, and the first number under his management was called Freedom's Champion. Col. Martin was only 18 years of age but, for a boy, he was a plucky and energetic one. His entire force in the office consisted of himself, Capt. Moorhouse, then a young man only 22 years of age, a jour printer, and a boy, commonly known in printing offices as "the devil." The entire wealth of the outfit was 50 cents, not the property of the proprietor, but of his able assistant, Captain Moorhouse....At the end of the first week, John. A. owed his jour $20. Where the money was to come from he was at a loss to know. He had taken in no money on subscription, and the young Pennsylvania firm was "busted." A bright idea struck him. He had an aunt in Atchison who had a $20 gold piece. John A. went and borrowed it and paid off his jour and discharged him. After that, for several weeks, John, William and "the devil" ran the paper alone. The subsequent success and present popularity of the Champion and its energetic proprietor is too well known to need repetition in the Pioneer. Martin was colonel of the 8th Kansas Infantry during the late "unpleasantness," and Moorhouse was captain of Company B, 7th Kansas Cavalry. On March 3, 1869, Capt. Moorhouse was appointed adjutant general by Gov. James M. Harvey, which position he held until January 11, 1870. He is now traveling for the hardware house of W. W. Marbourg of Atchison. The Champion is the best paper in the state of Kansas and Col. John A. Martin stands at the head and front of the editorial fraternity....

 

The Clifton Review is troubled with typographical ...
March 28, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1789)

The Clifton Review is troubled with typographical tramps. Bro. Wellman says they stick him for grub and then "skip the town."

Our esteemed and talented old friend, Noble L. Prentis, whom the readers of the Pioneer will remember as having visited Smith Center with Col. Anderson last summer, takes charge of the local department of the Atchison Champion the first of April next...."Print" is the best local editor in the state....In cases of emergency, Prentis also makes a good second page editor....

 

The Smith County Pioneer was established at Cedarv ...
April 4, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1807)

The Smith County Pioneer was established at Cedarville in November 1872 by Dr. W. D. Jenkins, now of Kirwin. It was sold to the Cedarville Town Company in 1873, and was edited successively by Dr. W. D. Jenkins, Lew Plummer, and Mark J. Kelley. In the fall of the same year, the office was sold to Levi Morrill, who removed it to Smith Centre and continued to published the Pioneer until Oct. 20, 1874, when it was sold to Will D. Jenkins, Jr., who has since continued to publish the same regularly. In July 1878, the paper received an entire new dress and was enlarged to a seven column folio. When the present proprietor took possession of the office, the entire circulation, including exchanges and dead-head subscribers, was 140 copies. Since then the circulation has steadily increased until now it has a bonafide subscription list of over 1,300 cash paying subscribers, and one half of this number has been added to the list during the past eight months....

 

Major Mark J. Kelley of the late Beloit Record is ...
May 21, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1803)

Major Mark J. Kelley of the late Beloit Record is making arrangements to start a paper in Decatur County. As a newspaper starter, Mark is a decided success. He has started more papers in Kansas than any other man in the state.

The Western Homesteader is one of our most valued and interesting exchanges. It is published by W. S. Burke of the Leavenworth Times.

Alexander MacDonald, one of the best "prints" in the state,...is now a regular member of the Pioneer force.

Fred J. Hulaniski, formerly of the Pioneer force, has returned to his home at Cawker City. Fred is a good, honest, industrious boy....

 

A. B. Wilbur, formerly of the Scandia Journal, is ...
May 23, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1814)

A. B. Wilbur, formerly of the Scandia Journal, is about to start a new paper at Omio in Jewell County.

The Norton County Advance came out last week in a brand new dress and enlarged to six columns to the page.... "Mose" Pettigrew takes hold remarkably well.

 

Our new Gordon job press was shipped to us from Ch ...
May 30, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1816)

Our new Gordon job press was shipped to us from Chicago on the 3rd inst. At the same time, our new job type was shipped to us from Cincinnati. We have had the type in the cases for over two weeks, but the jobber has not come yet. We have twice sent to Beloit for it, but each time the team came back without it. Last Tuesday...Will D. Jenkins started for it in person....

 

The Ness County Pioneer is the youngest member of ...
June 6, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1820)

The Ness County Pioneer is the youngest member of the Kansas newspaper family. It is published at Clarinda by F. Sheldon....

 

The first number of the Jewell County Journal, pub ...
June 13, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1822)

The first number of the Jewell County Journal, published at Omio by Wilbur & Dunfee, has been handed to us....Asa B. Wilbur is an old and highly esteemed friend.

George W. Stinson has retired from the Phillipsburg Herald and has resumed the practice of law....He is succeeded in the publication...by Korns & Stewart.

The Kansas Editorial Association convened in Topeka yesterday, and last night the members were the happy recipients of a grand complimentary banquet and military dress ball. This afternoon they leave Topeka for Chicago, and tomorrow evening they leave Chicago for the Straits of Mackinaw, away up among the lakes. Our best wishes and...Will D. Jenkins accompany them.

The County Paper -- The county newspaper has become one of the institutions of these United States. It is found everywhere from Maine to California, and whether it has "patent innards" or is "home print," it is a joy to millions of people. The farmer and his family welcome it as an old friend; the politician sneers at it, but cringes to its power; the business man uses it to aid him in extending his business, and is proud of its help and usefulness in this direction; the professional man gazes upon it with pride when it tells of his success in the world; the mother's eye glistens with a tear when she reads in the county paper of the birth of her first born, and mayhap in old age trembles with pride at mention of the success of her boy in the battle of life. In a thousand ways each week, the live county paper can endear its readers to its familiar pages, and it is the ambition and pride of the humble toiling editor to bring joy, not sorrow, to all his readers. It is a thankless office, many think, to publish a local newspaper, but to us it has a charm that can never be broken. No one can publish a newspaper for several years without making many mistakes, and often abusing public confidence in his position as a newsgatherer, but each error rectified is a point won, and the old veterans of the profession are brave, warmhearted, farseeing men. They have seen every side of life, and sifted the trash away, standing firm for truth, liberty and humanity. Such men as John Speer, Webb Wilder, John A. Martin, Sol Miller and many others of the old craftsmen in Kansas represent the most advanced ideas in politics, religion and finance. To these men, Kansas owes much of her advanced prosperity. Many of them are growing old and were never rich except in thought, yet the state is prouder of them than they suppose. The people are prompt in sustaining good county papers. They are few and far between who object to payment of the printer's bill on presentation. The negligence of the printer to attend to his business more often leads to his failure than lack of appreciation on the part of the people. -- Marysville News.

Truer words than the above were never uttered. But other names may be added to the list of those to whom Kansas is indebted for much of her unparalleled success. Among them we would mention the names of Col. Thacher of the Lawrence Journal, Major Inman of the Larned Chronoscope, Murdock of the Wichita Eagle, Tom Hughes, the writer of the above article, and scores of others....

 

...June 12th, 11:00 o'clock p.m. -- Still in Topek ...
June 20, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1826)

...June 12th, 11:00 o'clock p.m. -- Still in Topeka. The Kansas Editorial Association met today at four p.m. Two hundred members are present, and it was the finest body of men we ever saw assembled together....The officers of the association, elected for the ensuing term: For president, Capt. Henry King, re-elected; vice-presidents, H. Clay Park of Atchison Patriot, Jno. S. Gilmore of Fredonia Citizen, M. M. Murdock of Wichita Eagle, and H. E. Smith of Concordia Empire; for treasurer, Judge W. A. Peffer of Coffeyville Journal; for secretary, Col. S. S. Prouty of Junction City Union. Hon. T. Dwight Thacher of the Lawrence Journal then delivered one of the most able, eloquent and sound addresses that we have ever listened to....Geo. W. Reed of Topeka Blade, the poet of the occasion, then delivered an interesting poem. At this writing, nearly every editor present with his wife or sweetheart is now whirling in the mazy waltz in the Legislative Hall of the State Capitol....A sumptuous banquet is spread in the Senate Hall....Tomorrow, we start for Mackinaw, via Chicago, over the Chicago & Alton....

That Gordon Jobber has arrived. Bring on your job work.

 

The first number of the Oberlin Herald, published ...
July 4, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1833)

The first number of the Oberlin Herald, published by Humphrey & Counter, is on our table. It is a neat little six-column "patent outside" paper....

The Clifton Review has changed hands, Blake and Wellman retiring and Rick & Co. taking charge.

 

J. W. Stewart,...for the past eight months foreman ...
July 11, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1835)

J. W. Stewart,...for the past eight months foreman of the Pioneer office, was married on Sunday last...to Miss Augusta Crawford....

Curley Burris, an old typo, and one of the most rapid compositors in the West, was in the Pioneer office this week. Curley is a good one and never has any difficulty in securing a "sit." He is now on his way to Clay Centre.

W. Scott Elliot of the Riverton Eagle...has now taken entire charge of the Eagle.

 

The Phillipsburg Herald has just received a brand ...
July 18, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1838)

The Phillipsburg Herald has just received a brand new eight-column Washington press and some new type and other material.

 

The Jewell County Review is the name of a new Gree ...
July 25, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1840)

The Jewell County Review is the name of a new Greenback paper just started at Jewell Centre by L. D. Reynolds.

The Blade is a new Independent paper recently started at Concordia by J. M. Hagaman & Son....Three other papers in the county.

One year ago this week, the Pioneer was enlarged to a seven-column paper, and has increased from a circulation of 600 to 1,300 copies....

 

We have received a new six-foot imposing stone fro ...
August 1, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1843)

We have received a new six-foot imposing stone from the Brantford Marble Works, which is a perfect beauty. It is of fine quality and excellent finish.

The irrepressible Nat. L. Baker...has again been heard from. This time he hails from Culbertson, Hitchcock County, Neb,...the Culbertson Globe....It is on a par with the Leota Locomotive, Norton County Bee, and the Steele City Times, being in fact one and the same paper, the only difference being in the change of locality.

The Norton County Advance comes to us this week printed on a half sheet of brown wrapping paper. Cause -- the failure of the usual supply of "news" to arrive in time....The Pioneer saw the light more than once from the murky background of half a sheet of wrapping paper when the three or four quires of white "news"...had failed to put in an appearance.

Ward Burlingame, the versatile and spicy Washington correspondent of the Atchison Champion, is now on a layoff at his home in Topeka.

 

The campaign Pioneer -- For the small sum of 25 ce ...
August 8, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1845)

The campaign Pioneer -- For the small sum of 25 cents, we will mail the Pioneer to any address from the 15th of August to the 7th of November, inclusive. Thus you will get all of the campaign news and the result of the election.

The periodical howl for another paper, an organ, is now rending the air in and about Smith Centre....We wish they had one.

 

The Western Star, published at Hill City, Graham C ...
August 22, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1849)

The Western Star, published at Hill City, Graham County, by T. H. McGill, and edited...by Thomas Beaumont, formerly of Norton County, and T. J. Garnet...is a handsome 5-column quarto.

 

Star jobber for sale. Size of chase 7x11, treadle ...
August 29, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1851)

Star jobber for sale. Size of chase 7x11, treadle motion....Price $25 cash or $30 on three months time. Address Will D. Jenkins.

The rapidly increasing circulation of the Pioneer demands greater facilities for press work....Arrangements are now being made to put in the Pioneer office a cylinder power press with a capacity of at least 1,000 per hour....This change will necessitate an outlay of at least $2,000 cash....

Leslie J. Perry, formerly of the Paola Spirit, but more recently of a "patent outside" outfit at Kansas City, has returned to Paola and bought out the Citizen.

The new paper at Gaylord will be called the Gaylord Herald. Its proprietor, publisher and editor will be J. W. McBride, late of the Kirwin Chief, and brother of the stalwart A. G....

The Independent is the name of a new paper just started at White Rock, on the county line between Republic and Jewell counties.

Just before going to press, a column of type was pied, hence the non-appearance of several locals and special notices.

 

Change of base -- Gale E. Frazier has moved his fu ...
September 5, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1854)

Change of base -- Gale E. Frazier has moved his furniture store into the new building immediately south of his residence, and the new Pioneer sanctum and job rooms are to be found in the building vacated by Mr. Frazier.

As an additional evidence of prosperity on the part of...W. P. Meadows,...he is putting up a new building immediately opposite the post office, 14 x 20 feet....It will be occupied jointly by Mr. Meadows and our "big boss," Will D. Jenkins, as a real estate, loan and collection office; headquarters Howe Sewing Machine Agency, and office of the clerk of the district court.

Fast press work -- Last Friday, in working off the 1,300 edition of the Pioneer, our foreman, Jack Stewart, assisted by Geo. A. Jenkins,...performed the Herculean task of working off 16 quires of paper in one hour....Three hundred and eighty impressions an hour we consider fast press work....

 

We are in receipt of the first number of the Gaylo ...
September 13, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1858)

We are in receipt of the first number of the Gaylord Herald, a bright, clean-faced, sprightly little six-column paper just started at Gaylord by J. W. McBride.

Married at the office of the Pioneer...on Monday evening, Sept. 8, 1879, by L. C. Axton, father-in-law of the Pioneer, A. N. Brenneman of the Pioneer force to Miss Belle Jenkins, sister of the Pioneer. Among the invited guests were the editor, local editor, foreman, and compositors of the Pioneer.

By letter...we have the sad intelligence of the death of Alexander McDonald, formerly of the Pioneer force, but at the time of his death a compositor on the Lincoln State Journal. Mr. McDonald will be remembered...as the "crippled printer," he having lost both of his feet and three fingers of his left hand during a terrific snow storm in western Nebraska five years ago last winter, in the heroic attempt to save a brother hunter from freezing to death who was more thinly clothed than himself. He was an excellent printer, a rapid, easy and fluent writer, and with proper surroundings would have made a first-class newspaper man. For a while, he was the publisher and local editor of the Solomon Valley Democrat...at Kirwin....

 

Brewster Cameron, late special agent of the Post O ...
September 19, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1863)

Brewster Cameron, late special agent of the Post Office Department, and an old and experienced newspaper man, has bought out the Beloit Gazette....John Coulter, later of the Leavenworth Times, will be associated...in the editorial management.

Dr. Thompson, late of Caddo, Indian Territory, has the press and material for a seven-column paper at Gaylord, which he wishes to...utilize at some thriving town in the Great Northwest.

...A dark cloud has passed across the bright and sparkling sunshine of our domestic happiness....Last Thursday night week, James Clayton Scarbrough, the youngest child of the local editor of the Pioneer, was taken violently ill with scarlet fever,...and after lingering in the most intense agony until last Wednesday morning, his angel spirit took its flight to God....His age was one year, nine months and 14 days....

The absence of the editor and the severe bereavement of the local editor must plead our only excuse for the dearth of local and editorial news in this week's issue.

 

Dr. Neely Thompson, editor and proprietor of the n ...
October 3, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1870)

Dr. Neely Thompson, editor and proprietor of the new...Kansas Free Press, is building a new printing office, immediately north of the post office, 18x24.

 

The Beloit Gazette comes to us...with the name of ...
October 10, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1875)

The Beloit Gazette comes to us...with the name of Brewster Cameron as proprietor and publisher, and that of John Coulter, late of the Leavenworth Times, as editor....Its old proprietor, Geo. W. Anderson, has gone to Lincoln Centre and will publish the Saline Valley Register.

M. Winsor, late of the Jewell County Monitor-Diamond, has stepped down and out and left Byron J. Thompson sole editor and publisher. Mr. Thompson has changed the name...back to the Jewell County Monitor.

The Kirwin Chief has put in a power press and has enlarged to a seven-column paper.

We have bought a new Campbell power press and the first of next January the Pioneer will be enlarged to a nine-column paper.

We are in receipt of the first number of The Rag Baby, a new and exceedingly small Greenback paper, recently started at Kirwin by F. I. Snodgrass, at 25 cents a year. It is just 7.5 by 11.5 inches in size.

The first number of the Kansas Free Press is on our table....Dr. J. Thompson, the editor and proprietor, and J. H. Sells, the business manager, are both clever, genteel appearing gentlemen.

 

The old and well known Topeka Blade is no more. Al ...
October 17, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1878)

The old and well known Topeka Blade is no more. Alfred L. Sewell, late of the Little Corporal, Chicago, has bought a half interest in the establishment and, in partnership with Geo. W. Reed, will publish the Kansas State Journal.

The Truth Teller is the somewhat cheeky name of a new eight page "patent" inside and outside paper recently started at Osborne City by C. Borin....Six pages of the paper are printed abroad, and only the two inside pages are printed at home.

...Both of the opposition papers of Smith Center, the Free Press and The Toiler, are "patent insides."

The first number of The Toiler, the new Greenback organ, is before us, and...is a very creditable production. It is clean faced, well printed and ably edited.

 

Married -- At the residence of the bride's parents ...
October 24, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1883)

Married -- At the residence of the bride's parents in Muscotah, Oct. 16, 1879, John H. Sells, manager of the Free Press, Smith Centre, to Miss Lotta Spangler.

 

The first number of the Atwood Pioneer is on our t ...
October 31, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1886)

The first number of the Atwood Pioneer is on our table, published at Atwood, Rawlins County, away out on the very outskirts of civilization in northwestern Kansas by Thorpe & Sons....The Pioneer is a neat, newsy, well printed, all at home, six-column paper.

 

The Toiler, published at this place, has been temp ...
November 14, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1887)

The Toiler, published at this place, has been temporarily suspended. However, we are informed that the publication will be resumed next month. C. H. Topliff, a good printer and an experienced newspaper man, has been engaged as publisher.

James a. Scarbrough, who has so ably conducted the local department and assisted on the editorial staff of the Pioneer, severed his connection with this journal on the 7th.

 

James A. Scarbrough, until recently local editor o ...
November 21, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1892)

James A. Scarbrough, until recently local editor of this paper, is now assistant editor of the Free Press.

 

F. L. Henshaw, a first-class printer from Independ ...
November 28, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1897)

F. L. Henshaw, a first-class printer from Independence, Iowa, has taken a permanent "sit" on the Pioneer.

 

Jack Stewart, formerly foreman in the Pioneer offi ...
December 5, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1900)

Jack Stewart, formerly foreman in the Pioneer office, is now holding cases on the Free Press.

 

Vol. 1, No. 2, of the Jewell County Republican cam ...
December 12, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1906)

Vol. 1, No. 2, of the Jewell County Republican came to our sanctum this week. It is a well-printed, five-column, eight-page paper with four pages patent. Its general makeup indicates that the editor, W. W. Brown, is a man of far more than ordinary ability. Whether or not the patronage of Jewell City will justify the publication of such a journal remains to be seen....That city already has starved out a very creditable local paper.

The Atwood Pioneer...has suspended, or rather taken a rest for a few weeks.

 

The Stockton Record, Vol. 1, No. 1, came to this o ...
December 19, 1879, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1911)

The Stockton Record, Vol. 1, No. 1, came to this office last week....Chambers & McBreen are publishers. It is Republican in politics.

Phil W. Fouke, one of the editors and proprietors of the Logan enterprise, was in town....He purchased our Washington hand press....The Enterprise will soon be enlarged.

 

We had intended this week to issue a holiday editi ...
January 2, 1880, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1921)

We had intended this week to issue a holiday edition...but the amount of work consequent upon the change from a seven to an eight column paper has occupied so much of our time that we could not possible prepare the copy....

Our new press is a Campbell Country Cylinder No. 3, and is one of the best presses ever placed in an office. F. L. Hasbrook of Kansas City...came with it and placed it in due position for work....The Campbell press is acknowledged by all practical printers to be superior...to any other manufactured....While it is especially adapted to steam power, it can be readily and easily run by hand. The publisher of this paper now has over $4,000 invested in office material....

 

The Atwood Pioneer has resumed publication.: The R ...
January 16, 1880, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1929)

The Atwood Pioneer has resumed publication.

The Reveille is the name of a new paper started last week at Burr Oak, Jewell County, with H. E. Taylor as publisher, and W. H. Crouch, editor. It is a six-column, four-page patent....Jewell County now has five newspapers.

A. N. Brenneman, foreman of the Pioneer news and job rooms, had the misfortune to lose the first joint of the second finger of his right hand...by getting the same crushed in the Gordon jobber....The injury will probably keep him off duty for a month or so.

 

Several newspapers...have got "off wrong" in regar ...
January 30, 1880, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1937)

Several newspapers...have got "off wrong" in regard to the suit instituted by T. M. Helm against the editor of this paper. The suit is not for libel, as many of the papers have represented, but simply for damages -- $10,000, only....

Vol. 1, No. 1, of the Bull City Post arrived....It is a six-column, four-page paper, patent outsides....Osborne County now has three papers.

We neglected...to note the enlargement of the Norton County Advance. That journal is now a seven-column folio, all home print....It is customary...,when a publisher bends every nerve, and expends every cent of money that he earns in order to give his patrons a good paper, for some hot-headed politician to raise the cry of "another paper needed," and then some blacksmith printer, with a few pounds of type, and a thimble-full of brains, starts an "opposition paper" to fill the "long felt want," thereby dividing up the revenue that so justly belongs to the one who has, by years of hard work, earned the same....

 

...The editor of the Atwood Pioneer,...on the extr ...
February 6, 1880, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1942)

...The editor of the Atwood Pioneer,...on the extreme outskirts of the frontier,...holds religious services regularly in his printing office every Sabbath.

 

Printing type -- In a font of type, such as is use ...
April 16, 1880, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1962)

Printing type -- In a font of type, such as is used in printing a book or newspapers, the different characters used are as follows: 29 capitals, 29 small capitals, 33 small letters, 8 points, 11 references, 10 figures, 9 fractions, 5 braces, 4 dashes, 8 spaces and quads, 20 italic capitals, 33 italic small capitals, and 5 italic points. Total 213 different characters. The place of each one of these must be so familiar to a compositor that he can instantly put his hand upon it when wanted....

 

The meeting of the Editorial and Press Association ...
April 30, 1880, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1972)

The meeting of the Editorial and Press Association at Kirwin on the 6th was a success. The attendance was not very large....On motion,...Dr. Jenkins, W. H. Caldwell and Dr. Thompson were appointed to draft a memorial to our representatives in Congress, praying for a reduction of the tariff on newsprint, and the abolition of the duty on pulp and other chemicals and materials used in the preparation and manufacture of print paper, asking that the same be placed upon the free list....

 

On Wednesday, the 5th,...T. M. Helm of Kirwin file ...
May 14, 1880, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1977)

On Wednesday, the 5th,...T. M. Helm of Kirwin filed an information before the county attorney charging Will D. Jenkins, the editor of this paper, with libel....The court...placed the bond for a reappearance at the next term of the District Court at the enormous sum of One Hundred Dollars....

 

The Roscoe (Graham County) Tribune, Vol. 1, No. 1, ...
May 21, 1880, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1981)

The Roscoe (Graham County) Tribune, Vol. 1, No. 1, is at hand. It is published by our young friends, Worcester & Kellogg.

E. V. Durfee, formerly an attache of the Pioneer office, and subsequently one of the publishers of the Riverton (Neb.) Eagle, has assumed control of the Bull City Post.

The Pioneer is now the frontier steam printing office of Kansas -- there being no other office run by steam west of Wichita....

 

Henry King, in his recent address before the Misso ...
June 4, 1880, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1988)

Henry King, in his recent address before the Missouri editors, among other things said: "There are some kinds of news, so called, that better be cast out entirely, too, whether the papers diminish in space or not; the nasty scum of the divorce courts, for instance; the petty scandals that stab family peace and break hearts and provoke rancor and violence; the shocking details of executions, murders and suicides; and the very other unsavory, shameful and wretched things which we name as 'sensational.' It is not enough to say that the public likes to read such stuff. The editor has a responsibility which he cannot shift with such a plea. Does he not know that the same public makes his printing of these things an excuse for reading them?...The world is full of clear-thinking, right-living men and women who do not relish or approve scandal and horror in their newspapers; and these are the people who hold society together and make progress possible -- these are the people who sustain the press, and whose tastes are the editor's true and safe guide. I hold to be a good, and infallible, and a profitable rule which excludes from a newspaper every line that cannot be read aloud in a family parlor."

Our steam engine is a beauty and it works like a charm. It was manufactured expressly for the Pioneer office by the Geiser Manufacturing Company at Waynesboro, Penn. It does not require to exceed 15 cents worth of fuel to produce sufficient steam to run off an edition of 1,700 copies of the Pioneer....Two bushels of corn cobs is all the fuel required for a two hours' run....

 

The Bull City Post has suspended. The publishers, ...
July 2, 1880, Kansas Pioneer (ID 1997)

The Bull City Post has suspended. The publishers, in their valedictory, state that there are in Bull City 34 business houses and only 11 of the number patronized the paper with advertisements.

 

To the Republican voters and citizens of Smith Cou ...
July 23, 1880, Kansas Pioneer (ID 2000)

To the Republican voters and citizens of Smith County -- Acting upon the advice of friends and my own inclinations, I have concluded to become a candidate for state senator from this, the 34th District....The columns of the Pioneer will not be used, either for the purpose of urging my own claims, or detracting from the claims of my opponents in the senatorial canvas. -- Will D. Jenkins.

 

Capt. I. W. Stone, late of Caddo, I.T., has assume ...
August 6, 1880, Kansas Pioneer (ID 2005)

Capt. I. W. Stone, late of Caddo, I.T., has assumed a half interest in the Free Press.

The meeting of the Pioneer correspondents last Monday was a grand success. Thirteen were present. The meeting was held in Uhl's hall. A speech of welcome was delivered by R. M. Pickler and responded to by each and every one present....The club then adjourned to the Kansas Central Hotel, where a sumptuous banquet was served....A permanent organization was perfected with Junius as president and Nemo as secretary....

 

H. E. Smith, for the past 10 years editor and prop ...
August 13, 1880, Kansas Pioneer (ID 2007)

H. E. Smith, for the past 10 years editor and proprietor of the Concordia Empire, has disposed of his interests in that journal and gone into other business....He is an old veteran in...Kansas journalism....Honey & Davis are his successors.

 

We accept the situation -- The editor of the Pione ...
September 10, 1880, Kansas Pioneer (ID 2012)

We accept the situation -- The editor of the Pioneer failed to get the endorsement of the Republican Party of this county for the state senatorship. Out of the 68 delegates, he lacked 7 of a majority, but he has the happy satisfaction of knowing that he did not canvass the county in person....He has not taken one day from his usual avocation, that of furnishing to the people of Smith County the best newspaper in northwest Kansas....

Billy Jenkins attributes his defeat in the convention to the lack of votes.

 

Another victim. C. Borin, editor of the Osborne Co ...
October 8, 1880, Kansas Pioneer (ID 2018)

Another victim. C. Borin, editor of the Osborne County Truth Teller, was arrested last week for libel and held under $1,000 bonds....Therefore we laugh. When the editor of this paper was sued for $10,000 damages to the immaculate character of little Tom Helm of Kirwin, then the editor of the T.T. immediately proclaimed the startling intelligence that the Pioneer editor had committed a gross outrage upon humanity, and thanked God that we were about to be punished for it. He...said something about "personal journalism" and hinted that a ten years' term in state's prison would be mild punishment....We shall not be so harsh with him in this, his hour of dire calamity. We shall sincerely hope...that his punishment may not exceed a five years' term in the penitentiary....

J. N. Fuller of Cawker City...is now holding cases on the Pioneer.

 

The Troy Chief carried away the premium offered by ...
October 15, 1880, Kansas Pioneer (ID 2020)

The Troy Chief carried away the premium offered by the managers of the state fair at Bismarck (park near Lawrence) for the best printed paper in Kansas....The Chief is not only the oldest paper in the state, but is one of the ablest, and in point of typographical appearance and mechanical makeup it is several lengths ahead of any other paper west of the Missouri River....His paper is a power in the political affairs of northeast Kansas. His fearless, plain and outspoken manner and way of handling public matters make him a terror to wrong doers....

 

We are glad to note that our old friend of early d ...
November 26, 1880, Kansas Pioneer (ID 2034)

We are glad to note that our old friend of early days, Mark J. Kelley of Mitchell County, has obtained a situation as traveling correspondent for the Topeka Commonwealth.

 

Ad astra per aspera -- In assuming editorial manag ...
April 10, 1885, Kansas Pioneer (ID 2327)

Ad astra per aspera -- In assuming editorial management of The Pioneer, I do not feel that I shall be speaking through a strange newspaper to strangers. Very many of the people of northwest Kansas have been readers of newspapers which were conducted by, or upon which, your humble servant has been employed.

For over 13 years, The Smith County Kansas Pioneer has been talking to the people of many states, telling them of the many good things to be found here. It has recorded the incoming and outgoing of emigrants, the births, marriages and deaths, the accidents and crimes, writing a complete history of this portion of Kansas....Only for a little while has it been anything but Republican in politics, and Republicans would like to look upon that part of its history as buried and forgotten.

We believe its financial troubles are at an end. It is now backed by a number of business men, who have abundant means to carry through to success any enterprise they may undertake. If the present editor proves to be deficient in brains and ability, he will have to step down and out, and give place to some one who possesses the necessary qualifications to make the paper what it should be. However, we shall do our "level best" to make a newspaper which will be an honor to the county, and a benefit to the community. But in order to do this we must have the support of the people. We may not reach "the stars through difficulties," but we will "shoot our wad" in that direction. It is now in order for everybody to subscribe for The Pioneer. Come and See us. -- I. S. Drummond.

Editor Pioneer: It may not be either necessary, prudent or pleasant for me to occupy any space in your paper, yet I have a desire to say a polite "thank you" to each of my patrons for their courtesy to myself and patronage to the Pioneer, and also to wish the paper a brilliant and successful future under your management.... - Geo. W. Anderson.

 

Our new dress -- The Pioneer this week looks at ou ...
May 8, 1885, Kansas Pioneer (ID 2330)

Our new dress -- The Pioneer this week looks at our readers with a new face. The old type used for local had become old, and being small faced the print was a little hard on old eyes. Our new type is the same sized body as the old, but has a broader and better face....

No excuse -- We have been in the harness as editor of the Pioneer for only five weeks and during that time we have been very busy getting the office in running order....We have made no boasts in regard to it;...therefore we have no excuses to make for our course.

But there seems to be one matter which calls for a little more explanation from us, in order to place the Pioneer before the people in its true light. It is this: When we took charge of this paper, after having leased the office from the balance of the stockholders, it was charged against us that this was a combination to "bu'st the Bulletin" or "smash the Bazoo." This charge was made not only by individuals, but by most of the papers in the county, and also by some in adjoining counties. It was also charged that the editor of the Pioneer would be "run" by some of all of the stockholders; and that it was a "political scheme" to boost somebody into office; and that the paper would be run by capital, and without brains; that the capital invested in and pledged to its success was immense; and last of all that the stock would very soon be for sale at 50 cents on the dollar.

In answer to all these charges, we have to say:

First -- That this editor had no tho't nor desire to "bu'st" anything or anybody.

Second -- The editor of the Pioneer is not run by anybody, or any combination. More than that, there is not one of the stockholders who has ever shown the slightest inclination to even give us any advice as to how the paper should be conducted.

Third -- That the Pioneer will be a political paper there can be no doubt; and in this it will probably be different from the other papers which made the charge and which, of course, are not political. But that it was a "political scheme to boost somebody into office," or a "ring" concern, we most emphatically deny. At the same time, we just as emphatically claim our right to give our support to the men we may think best qualified for the offices to be filled....

Fourth -- That it will be in favor of prohibition and the enforcement of the laws, the people have probably discovered. It could not be Republican and do otherwise....

Fifth -- In regard to the capital back of the enterprise, we are glad to assure our readers that there is plenty of it; and if the present editor proves to not have enough brains to make the Pioneer what it should be, there is capital enough to hire more brains. However, the editors of the Gaylord Herald, Cawker Journal, Bulletin, or Reamsville Dispatch need not look for a bid for brains for some time yet.

To sum all up, the editor of the Pioneer leased the shares in the office which he did not own, and is running the business to furnish bread and butter for a large family. No other man is financially benefited or receives a cent of the income of the office, and all tales to the contrary are "made out of whole cloth" and circulated to injure us financially, and all such statements are made with malice aforethought.

We are not publishing a paper for the purpose of ventilating our personal grievances, and are sorry that we are compelled to take up so much space to give this explanation....

 

Reduced rates. After giving the matter careful stu ...
May 15, 1885, Kansas Pioneer (ID 2332)

Reduced rates. After giving the matter careful study, we have come to the conclusion that it will be best for all parties -- the publisher as well as the advertiser -- to give better rates on advertising, and to treat all parties alike. As newspapers are generally run in this western country, home advertisers are charged a very high price, while foreign advertisements are inserted for almost nothing to "fill up with."...The rates of advertising in the Pioneer have heretofore been $100 a column per annum. We have concluded to make the following rates: One column, 1 year, $75; half column, 1 year, $40; quarter column, 1 year, $22; eighth column, 1 year, $12; professional cards, per year, $6. Local notices will be charged at the rate of 5 cents a line for each insertion. Land proof notices, $2.50 each....We shall...wrong no man by charging legal rates for legal work....Special rates will be charged for special position in the paper.... -- I. S. Drummond.

 

The Smith Center Pioneer, under Drummond's care, i ...
May 22, 1885, Kansas Pioneer (ID 2335)

The Smith Center Pioneer, under Drummond's care, is rapidly getting back to the pretty and good paper that it was under Billy Jenkins, and we think that's a big complement, Ike. -- Beloit Courier.

Well, we don't often copy compliments, but we do value such a notice from the editor of the Courier, who is one of the oldest and ablest editors in Kansas, as well as one of the best printers. In fact, Caldwell is more apt to "jab" a fellow for shortcomings in newspaper work than he is to compliment one when he does right, because, he thinks, a fellow ought to do right anyhow. Thanks.