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First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory 1854

First Press in the Kansas Territory 1854

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up 1854

Herald of Freedom Founded in Lawrence 1855

Vol. 1, No. 31. J. Speer & W. W. Ross, editors.: * 1855

Lincoln in Kansas! His first speech! 1859

From the State Capital....Sol Miller is a "brick." 1862

The Press of Kansas. We believe the following to b 1862

We have neglected to notice the Fort Scott Monitor 1863

*The fight between Ewing and Anthony is still wagi 1863

*Additional News from Lawrence! Terrible Scenes!.. 1863

*The Raid on Lawrence! Particulars and Incidents!. 1863

*It will be remembered that John Speer of the Lawr 1864

Vol. 1, No. 1. M. M. Murdock, editor and proprieto 1872

Modern Improved Methods of Printing 1900

Kansas Weekly Herald

Articles in database from Kansas Weekly Herald:    19

First Press in the Kansas Territory ...
September 15, 1854, Kansas Weekly Herald (ID 3055)

By Osborn & Adams, Vol. 1, No. 1. The Kansas Herald is published every Friday morning by Wm. J. Osborn and Wm. H. Adams. Publication office in Herald Building, on Levee, 2 doors below Corner Broadway.

Introductory. The establishment of the first press in a Territory is always an important and interesting event; and this we feel to be peculiarly so, in the establishment of one in the Territory of Kansas. We commence our efforts under a combination of circumstances, peculiarly interesting and exciting, and therefore great wisdom, prudence and moderation are indispensable in conducting a press at this time and in this place; more, indeed, of these qualities are needed than we profess to have. At the same time, the qualities of truth, honesty and firmness were never more requisite on the part of journalists than at this time....

We are Democrats, and will advocate and defend the well established and long tried principles of that democracy which has conducted our country to the elevated station she holds among the nations of the earth....We will also defend to the utmost of our abilities the constitution, the laws and the institutions of our country....We will, therefore, oppose all fanatical and factious movements, in every quarter -- of every name and every pretext, that opposes itself to that constitution, those laws and institutions.

Subscribing with all our hearts to the true and safe democratic doctrine, that the majority shall rule, that its will and decisions shall be the supreme law of the land -- we will oppose steadfastly all endeavors to counteract the same, and count those as enemies who will not submit thereto, when legally and constitutionally declared.... -- Osborn & Adams.

Our Paper and Ourselves. We have no apologies to make for the appearance of our paper, as we flatter ourselves that it needs none. We are certainly fortunate in that respect, commencing as we have done with new material, new press and without access to any other printing office. All the type of the present number of the Herald has been set under an elm tree in the city of Leavenworth. Ourselves and our compositors have been, like the Patriarchs of old, "dwellers in tents" for the last two weeks. During that time we have had almost every variety of weather, heat and cold, rain and dazzling sunshine, mists, fogs and thunderstorms. In addition to these duties and difficulties, we have packed wood, built fires, cooked for ourselves, fought mosquitoes, and slept on prairie hay on the ground. We have at the same time superintended the building of a substantial office, which is now nearly completed, and done our best to entertain and give information to the crowds of visitors who have thronged our young city. Our selections have been made, our editorials written, our proof read, sitting on the ground with a big shingle on our knee for a table. Think of this, ye editors, in your easy chairs and well furnished sanctums, and cease to grumble.

We had the pleasure...of a visit from our friends, Samuel J. Finch, editor of the Weston Reporter, and Ira F. Bird, Esq., in our sanctum sanctorum. They appeared very much astonished at our office...under an elm tree, but they seemed very much pleased with our "black bottle."

Town of Leavenworth....It was originally taken up, or claimed, by citizens of Missouri about the last of May 1854, immediately after the passage of the "Douglas Kansas and Nebraska Bill." The original claimants supposed that there would eventually be a town at Fort Leavenworth, and they desired to get as near said town as possible. Several other squatters immediately settled around and back of them. There was a variety of conflicting claims as to the time their separate claims were made. It was soon ascertained that Fort Leavenworth would probably not be abandoned as a military post for a number of years....

 

The Press in Kansas; Towns Springing Up ...
September 22, 1854, Kansas Weekly Herald (ID 3056)

The Press in Kansas. We have seen many paragraphs going the rounds of the press, concerning papers to be established in this Territory, some of which may be expected out during the coming winter, but most we apprehend will delay their enterprises until spring. Among those mentioned are the following:

Kansas Pioneer, to be published at Atchison, by Sexton & Hazzard, to advocate Southern interests.

Kansas Free Democrat, to be published at Leavenworth by George Brewster, and advocate Northern interests.

The Herald of Freedom, to be published at the seat of government by George W. Brown.

It has been reported that the office of the Liberty (Mo.) Platform is to be removed to this place and a paper started by Robt. Kelly, to advocate Southern interests.

We have seen a notice of the removal of a New Hampshire paper to Kansas, but have forgotten the name of the paper and that of its publisher. We are sorry to see that these presses come here for the purpose of promoting agitation and stirring up strife among the people. It is always painful to see that noble engine of power and intellectual culture, the press, perverted to evil ends. We hope that our brethren of the press will think better of their enterprises and come to assist us in suppressing fanaticism. If they come as messengers of peace and concord, we shall hail their advent with delight, for there will be room and good work for all, but as promoters of discord we have no wish to see them come.

Towns in Kansas. Towns are springing up in various parts of our young Territory. On the Missouri, besides Leavenworth, there are Atchison, near the mouth of Independence Creek, and Kickapoo city, at the lower end of Kickapoo Bluffs. Atchison has a very good site and will always have a good landing. Its situation is elevated and will afford many fine lots for building residences and business houses....Kickapoo city has an elevated situation with a good landing, which will be permanent....On Kansas are Douglass City, New Boston, Tecumseh City, and perhaps other places laid off. Douglass City is the first above the Shawnees' reservation, 40 miles from the Missouri line and about 30 from this place....New Boston is the focus of the New England emigration and is a fine location. It is known in the territory as "Yankee Town." They have already some 200 men in and about the town, and are preparing to build up a manufacturing city. It is about 50 miles from the mouth of the Kansas, and 35 from this place. Tecumseh City is further up the Kansas, on the north side....

Copies of the Herald, neatly enveloped, can at all times be had at this office at 5 cents per copy or 50 cents per dozen.

We are under obligations to the gentlemanly clerk of the fine steamer Australia for late St. Louis papers. We are indebted to the clerk of the fine steamer Admiral for late papers.

 

Our Publication This Week Unavoidably Delayed ...
October 6, 1854, Kansas Weekly Herald (ID 3057)

Our publication this week is unavoidably delayed until this (Saturday) evening. Workmen have been employed the past week in lathing our office, and our work has been carried on amid the din of their hammers. In addition to this, our office has been the common resort of the resident and transient population of Leavenworth. Our type and material has been handled during the last week by people enough to make a respectable town. We have had the misfortune to offend some persons by suggesting the inconvenience to which their handling our material subjects us. To their indignant interrogatory whether this is not a free country we have not one word to say. We hope that nobody will consider this in the light of a hint.

 

A State Without Agitation of the Slavery Question ...
October 13, 1854, Kansas Weekly Herald (ID 3058)

From the St. Louis Herald -- "Kansas Herald. This paper is a weekly publication issued at Leavenworth, the probable seat of government for Kansas Territory, and bids fair to be conducted in the spirit required to make a journal subserve the best interests of that Territory. The settlers in Kansas have the finest possible opportunity of making progress and establishing a State without agitation of the slavery question. If they will keep the question out of their newspapers and out of their public assemblages;...If therefore, when Kansas shall have ripened into fitness for State government, slavery shall be among its institutions, anti-slavery men have no right to object to its admission on that ground. Nor any more, if slavery be not among those institutions, have Southern men a right to object to it on that ground. In point of fact, the probabilities now are that Kansas will be a free State. The Kansas Herald, we are glad to see, seems to understand what is necessary to the peace and progress of the Territory...."

 

First and Only Paper in Flourishing Territory ...
October 20, 1854, Kansas Weekly Herald (ID 3059)

Dissolution. The co-partnership heretofore existing between Wm. J. Osborn and Wm. H. Adams has been this day dissolved by mutual consent. All debts contracted by said partners for carrying on said business will be paid by W. H. Adams and all debts to said firm must be paid to him....

Valedictory. With the present number of the Herald my connection as one of its editors and proprietors ceases. Its course hitherto has, I trust, met the approbation of the advocates of popular sovereignty, as asserted in the Nebraska-Kansas law, in every part of our country. Its neutrality on the exciting subject of slavery has not been questioned....I leave the Herald with the best wishes for its success....With this brief farewell I retire, glad to escape the hardships and vexations incident to conducting a press on an extreme frontier and under the critical circumstances attending this. -- Wm. J. Osborn.

To the Patrons of the Herald. We again appear before the public as the conductor of the press. Having purchased an interest in the Herald...we shall do our utmost to merit a liberal support. Having been connected with the press for a number of years, in other places, we enter upon the discharge of our duties with a full knowledge of the responsibility resting upon us....The Herald is the first and only paper now published in the young and flourishing Territory of Kansas. We shall aim to make it the Herald of glad tidings to all who are interested in the growth and prosperity of the far west....In the organization of the government, and in the formation of its institutions, we shall labor faithfully and earnestly for the great principles of the Nebraska-Kansas Bill, the right of the people to regulate their own affairs....We, in common with our fellow citizens, have our own views, but we shall not endeavor to force them upon others....The administration of President Pierce meets with our hearty approval....We shall labor for the maintenance and supremacy of the principles of the great National Democratic Party....To the breeze we freely unfurl our flag inscribed on its folds -- the Constitution -- a strict adherence to its charter, and against a latitudinous construction of it -- the Union as it is -- and the great fundamental principles of the Democratic party to sustain it.... -- Lucian J. Eastin.

 

Lucian J. Eastin, editor.: Our Sanctum. Here we ar ...
October 27, 1854, Kansas Weekly Herald (ID 3061)

Lucian J. Eastin, editor.

Our Sanctum. Here we are happily ensconced, not in the old armed chair with velvet cushion, but one of the old fashioned sort, a small table, a stool for our friends, sitting down amid the noise and bustle incident to a new and thriving town -- as independent as a wood sawyer -- culling from every flower, making notes of passing events, and taxing our brain to its utmost to indict editorials for the purpose of interesting and instructing our readers. We have passed from under the lone elm, where the type of our first number was set up, to a good substantial office in which our sanctum is now located....We labor under many disadvantages at present, which we hope soon to overcome, and as improvements is the order of the day among our go-ahead and enterprising citizens, we expect to keep pace with the times....

 

Those of our subscribers in the city will please c ...
November 3, 1854, Kansas Weekly Herald (ID 3062)

Those of our subscribers in the city will please call at the office and get their papers until we can make arrangements to have them delivered. In the absence of our Devil, we have to ask this small favor of our generous friends.

The Herald is in great demand, so much so that we are scarcely able to supply it. Each week our issue is exhausted before the next number is issued. Every mail brings us letters from all parts of the country, asking to see a number of the Herald, to know the terms of subscription....We expect to enlarge in the Spring, and make other improvements....

 

Every mail brings us more new subscribers, and let ...
November 10, 1854, Kansas Weekly Herald (ID 3063)

Every mail brings us more new subscribers, and letters asking to know our terms, and for a copy of the paper. It is impossible to answer the thousand and one enquiries made of us by letters. We hope our exchanges will state the terms of our paper, which is two dollars a year in advance. To a club of 20 subscribers, one dollar and fifty cents each. Direct to "Kansas Herald," Leavenworth, K.T. The Herald is truly the pioneer Press, and is the only paper now published in the Territory.

Frontier News. This is the title of a paper just published at Westport, in Jackson County, Mo., the first number of which is now before us. It is...edited with more than ordinary ability. C. C. Spalding and J. T. Brady, editors, and W. L. Halsey, publisher. The paper will be devoted to the interests of the frontier, and the South, and will advocate the cause of slavery as an institution sanctioned by Divine law.

The Herald of Freedom is the title of a paper purporting to be published at Wakarusa, Kansas Territory, but printed in New York, and endorsed by Eli Thayer, which is enough to condemn it with every right minded man. It is to be the organ of the abolition emigrating aid society and as a matter of course devoted to making Kansas a free state. The paper bears a falsehood upon its face in dating its publication at Wakarusa. We are sorry it has appropriated a portion of the name of our paper to its abolition incendiarism. The Kansas Herald is printed and published at Leavenworth, and has no affinities with the Herald of Freedom, printed in New York and dated in Kansas Territory.

Leavenworth Messenger. The title of a paper proposed to be published in this place by Clark & Few. They say they will "cheerfully forego their former predilections for party" as old-line national Whigs of the Clay and Webster school, and support the administration of President Pierce. They take the slavery side of the question....

 

Delay. Our paper has been delayed a day or two bey ...
November 17, 1854, Kansas Weekly Herald (ID 3064)

Delay. Our paper has been delayed a day or two beyond regular publication day in consequence of a great press of job work. Job work of every description neatly executed at this office on moderate terms.

Kansas Pioneer. This is the name of a paper which has just made its appearance. It is published by Messrs. Sexton & Hazzard at the town of Kickapoo in this Territory. The paper makes a very handsome appearance, is conducted with much ability and is pro-slavery in sentiment. It is the second paper started in the territory.

The Kansas Pioneer claims to be "the first and only paper in the Territory that has come out openly and fearlessly in favor of slavery and the institutions of the South." We shall not aim to pluck a feather from its cap, but let the editors revel in their glory of making such a grand discovery. While we do not profess to be the peculiar champion of the South, yet we hope we shall every contend for her rights, and the rights of "our whole country."...

 

Parkville Luminary. A labored article over the imp ...
December 8, 1854, Kansas Weekly Herald (ID 3065)

Parkville Luminary. A labored article over the imposing head of "Newspaper movements," appears in the Luminary...in which an account is pretended to be given how we left the St. Joseph Gazette and became connected with the Kansas Herald....Without enquiring as to how he obtained his information, we can simply inform him he has been deceived....We sold out our interest in the St. Joseph Gazette simply because we wanted to dissolve the co-partnership existing. We bought one-half of the Herald because we had the money and believed it to be a good investment....

 

Three months have now elapsed since the Herald was ...
December 15, 1854, Kansas Weekly Herald (ID 3066)

Three months have now elapsed since the Herald was first issued, and from that time to the present it has been constantly increasing in circulation....It was commenced under disadvantageous circumstances, without a house to print in or even a subscription list. The first number was set up under the shade of a large elm tree, the materials were then moved into the house we now occupy, which was the first building put up in Leavenworth....It was the first and only paper published in the Territory for about two months....But now we are comfortably situated in a good house, with plenty to live on, a respectable sanctum, where our friends may visit us....

 

Circulation 2,970. Lucian J. Eastin, editor.: ...
February 9, 1855, Kansas Weekly Herald (ID 3076)

Circulation 2,970. Lucian J. Eastin, editor.

 

(Lucian J. Eastin, editor) All Hail. Pro-slavery p ...
April 6, 1855, Kansas Weekly Herald (ID 3089)

(Lucian J. Eastin, editor) All Hail. Pro-slavery party victorious. The triumph of the pro-slavery party is complete and overwhelming. Come on Southern men -- bring your slaves and fill up the territory. Kansas is saved! Abolitionism is rebuked, her fortress stormed, her flag is dragling in the dust!...Leavenworth District, for council, two elected, R. R. Rees, pro-slavery, 896; Lucian J. Eastin, pro-slavery, 893;...B. H. Twombly, anti-slavery, 60; A. J. Whitney, anti-slavery, 59....The election passed off quietly without the slightest disturbance....

 

...H. Rives Pollard has become connected with the ...
April 13, 1855, Kansas Weekly Herald (ID 3092)

...H. Rives Pollard has become connected with the Herald as associate editor. He is a Virginian by birth and education, and a pro-slavery man all over....The paper will continue as heretofore, the advocate of the rights of the South, and the pro-slavery party....Having to be absent from our post as editor during the session of the Legislature some two months, and having much other business to call our attention away from our editorial duties. we have thought it best to procure the services of one who can add much to the...Herald. -- Lucian J. Eastin.

...We assume the "chair editorial" untrammeled with party obligations and under none but those which the constitution and interests of our country demand....To combat the wicked and expose their abominable schemes shall be our delight; to conquer them and defeat their ignoble purposes shall be our glory....Since slavery is made the paramount issue with all political parties of the present day, it behooves us to "define our position."...We are, and have ever been, a strong, thorough, inflexible pro-slavery man, and instead of regarding the existence of slavery in the United States as an evil to be restricted in its spread, we regard it as a blessing that deserves to be perpetuated....Let justice be done peaceably if possible, offensively if there is no other way of doing it....We expect our words to be analyzed with the nicest severity. We expect to receive all kinds of opprobrious epithets. We expect to be assailed with a torrent of expletives and philippics...for such is the reward an editor receives for the faithful and impartial discharge of his difficult duties.... -- H. Rives Pollard.

"The Pawnee Enquirer -- a weekly paper to be published by S. P. Higgins at the seat of government of Kansas, to be devoted to the interest of the Territory....Terms $2 per annum in advance. All letters addressed to the Argus office, Easton, will receive prompt attention." -- Easton (Pa.) Argus. The Pawnee Enquirer is doubtless to be the Governor's organ, and in the above notice which we find in a paper published by the Governor's nephew, it is said the paper is to be "at the seat of Government of Kansas."..."Straws show which say the wind blows" and no one can be deceived about the character of this paper. If it undertakes a defense of the Governor, it will have a hard road to travel. But the Enquirer is mistaken about the Capitol being located at Pawnee. The Governor has no power to locate the Capitol....The Governor may yet find the Legislature is not bound by all his edicts or notions of law....

 

From the last number of the Kansas Pioneer -- a ne ...
June 1, 1855, Kansas Weekly Herald (ID 3103)

From the last number of the Kansas Pioneer -- a neat, pungent, and spirited sheet published at Kickapoo -- we see that its Editor A. B. Hazzard is spoken of as a candidate for Delegate to Congress in the coming fall election. Mr. Hazzard is from Georgia, we believe, and is a firm, zealous and uncompromising pro-slavery man. The only objection we can raise against friend Hazzard is his Know Nothing principles.

 

We were pleased with a call from L. A. Wisely, the ...
June 8, 1855, Kansas Weekly Herald (ID 3105)

We were pleased with a call from L. A. Wisely, the gentlemanly and intelligent editor of the Platte Argus....We would here take occasion to recommend the Argus to the pro-slavery party of our Territory as the staunchest and most unflinching pro-slavery journal published in western Missouri. Its contents are invariably interesting and usually embrace much matter relating to the interests of our Territory....

 

Capt. Lucian J. Eastin is absent, and will be unti ...
July 7, 1855, Kansas Weekly Herald (ID 3114)

Capt. Lucian J. Eastin is absent, and will be until the final adjournment of the Legislature, being one of the members of that body. We are induced to again make this announcement from the large number of persons who have called at this office to see him....The session of the Legislature expires by limitation on the last day of August next, when the Captain may be expected back at the scene of his labors.

M. P. Berry, who tells us he has been "President of a Do Nothing Club for several years," has become associated in the editorial conduct of the Kansas Pioneer. Success to friend Berry.

The first number of the Kansas Territorial Register, published in this place by Archibald M. Sevier, Esq., and edited by Mark W. Delahay, Esq., is before us. It is a fine sized (24 x 37) sheet, and contains much interesting matter. We hope our citizens will extend a liberal patronage to the gentlemanly proprietors of the Register.

 

The Kansas Tribune informs us a Free State paper i ...
July 21, 1855, Kansas Weekly Herald (ID 3117)

The Kansas Tribune informs us a Free State paper is soon to be established at Council Grove under the name of the Council City Banner by one P. C. Conover, one of the leading fanatics of Lawrence. This will make the fifth! filthy incendiary abolition sheet published in our Territory. Pro-slavery men should look to this rapid propagation of abolitionism through our Territory. "An ounce of preventive is worth a pound of cure."

 

We desire to call the especial attention of our pa ...
August 25, 1855, Kansas Weekly Herald (ID 3123)

We desire to call the especial attention of our patrons to certain improvements which it is our purpose to make in this paper at the commencement of the next volume....

Enlargement. It is intended to enlarge this paper...by the elongation of its columns and the addition of a column to each page. The Herald will then contain 28 columns and will exceed in size any of its Territorial contemporaries. Besides this enlargement, we shall be enabled, on the completion of the publication of United States Laws, to give up our entire first page to poetry, humorous items, and a general variety of interesting articles....

Other Improvements. The new volume will be improved in many respects, and its publication will be greatly beautified. With fine clear type, a superior quality of paper, a new heading, and many minor features which, it is believed, will enhance the value and interest of the paper....

Editorial Department. ...We will adhere firmly to the course we have hitherto pursued. We will speak freely and openly on all topics of public interest; resist all unjust aggression upon the sentiments, rights and institutions of the South;...and in all things substitute Reason for Dogmatism. We shall continue to be the same fearless opponent of Fanaticism, Freesoilism, "National Democracy in Kansas," and the thousand and one disguises which Abolitionism, in the ever shifting game of politics, assumes to cover its deformity and nakedness from the public eye; but shall aim in all things to promote harmony of sentiment and unity of effort among the Pro-slavery men in this Territory, recognizing the importance of making Kansas a slave State paramount to all sectional interest and all nominal party-ism.

Pay Up! ...It may not be an unappropriate time to ask all our patrons who are indebted to this office for subscription, advertising or job work to call and make immediate settlement....We have postponed the matter up to this time as an accommodation to our friends, and hope they will not fail now to respond to this call....